Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Fri, 05 Feb 2021 21:14:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Citadel alum calls in Chick-fil-A manager to help a drive-thru Covid-19 vaccination clinic https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-alum-calls-in-chick-fil-a-manager-to-help-a-drive-thru-covid-19-vaccination-clinic/ Sat, 13 Feb 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21836 When a drive-thru COVID vaccine clinic left people waiting for hours, the town mayor called in a professional for help: a Chick-fil-A manager.]]>

Note: Mayor Will Haynie (photo left), a member of The Citadel Class of 1983 who earned a Business Administration degree, was elected mayor of Mount Pleasant in 2017.

As seen on CNN, by Alaa Elassar

When a South Carolina drive-thru coronavirus vaccine clinic got backed up, leaving people waiting for hours, the town mayor decided to call in a professional for help: a Chick-fil-A manager.

Local hospitals in Mount Pleasant opened the clinic on January 22 for residents eligible to receive the first shots of Covid-19 vaccine. But shortly after the drive-thru opened, the computer system handling registrations went down, causing hundreds of people to wait in heavy traffic.

That’s when Jerry Walkowiak, the manager of a nearby Chick-fil-A, stepped in to save the day.

“When I heard about it, I called Jerry and asked if he would come help us out,” Mount Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie told CNN. “After he looked it over, he said, ‘There’s your problem right there. It’s backed up because you have one person checking people in.’ Then he showed us how to do it right.”

With the help of a few additional volunteers, Walkowiak transformed the messy traffic jam into a smooth operation, reducing the hours-long wait to just 15 minutes.

More than 1,000 people received the vaccine that day, Haynie said. When everyone returns for their second dose on February 12, Walkowiak will be back to help manage the drive-thru.

“At Chick-fil-A, we’re about being the most caring company in the world, and when Mayor Haynie asked us to come over, we took a look at what was their drive-thru system,” Walkowiak told news station WCBD.

“We saw a little hiccup in their drive-thru system, and we needed some more people, so we gathered some of the wonderful Rotary volunteers and went down there and just was able to expedite the registration part.”

More than 29 million doses of Covid-19 vaccines have been administered in the United States, according to data published Saturday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

While the US still has a long way to go before the pandemic is over, Haynie hopes his town’s experience will encourage others to get vaccinated and help with vaccine efforts.

“Jerry got a phone call and dropped everything because he knows getting this vaccine out is a game changer,” Haynie said. “This is what the light at the end of the long Covid tunnel looks like.”

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An inside look at The Citadel’s soon-to-be-completed new business school, Bastin Hall https://today.citadel.edu/an-inside-look-at-the-citadels-soon-to-be-completed-new-business-school-bastin-hall/ Sat, 30 Jan 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21717 The new Bastin Hall provides a glimpse into what a contemporary, 21st-century learning environment can look like.]]>

As seen in The Post and Courier

After more than two years of construction, a new home for The Citadel’s business school is ready to welcome students and professors.

Bastin Hall, which houses the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business, is the first new academic building constructed on the public military school’s campus in 30 years.

The 44,000-square-foot building was built with students in mind, said Michael Weeks, dean of the business school.

Everything from the fluid architectural design to the type of furniture used in classrooms was specially designed to build creative and collaborative spaces for students to work and study.

“It’s really, we think, going to be transformative for the educational experience for the students,” Weeks said.

Bastin Hall now hosts some of the college’s most popular degree programs. Of the 2,400 members in the Corps of Cadets, close to 600 are majoring in business. Another 375 Citadel students are pursuing a Master of Business Administration degree or are enrolled in a business administration degree completion program within the school.

While the finishing touches are still being put in place, the first round of classes was held inside the building Monday. It is expected to be completed in two weeks, with an opening ceremony to come in April.

The $25 million building sits near the intersection of Hagood Avenue and Congress Street, across the road from the school’s football stadium and alumni center.

It stands as one of the college’s most welcoming features on campus.

Once inside the main entrance, visitors are greeted with a large common area/collaborative workspace, complete with floor-to-ceiling windows and an abundance of natural light. A circular stock ticker hangs from the tall ceiling, a colorful array of numbers flashing across its surface.

The new Bastin Hall building is a modern upgrade from the previous business school home. Originally constructed in 1922, Bond Hall has housed business school classrooms since the 1970s. “There’s a lot of state-of-the-art space here that we just didn’t have in our old building,” Weeks said.

21st-century classrooms

The new Bastin Hall provides a glimpse into what a contemporary, 21st-century learning environment can look like.

Most of the new classrooms are equipped with dual laser projectors which have a much faster startup/shutoff time than their traditional counterparts, said Conyers Bull, the school’s multimedia services manager.

The rooms also include dual touch-screen computer monitors, Bull said, meaning that faculty don’t have to turn their back on students while teaching. If they want to write something on the board, they can use a stylus to write on the touch screen.

But one of the most highly anticipated pieces of technology is the building’s professional selling lab.

At first glance, this space might look like a traditional Bastin Hall classroom, with dozens of desks and corresponding portable whiteboards. Before the onset of the global coronavirus pandemic, these whiteboards would be stored beside students’ chairs but have since been converted into makeshift virus-blocking partitions.

Inside the sales lab there are several cameras mounted from the ceiling. Professors can use a special software to connect to cameras and microphones in nearby breakout rooms, where they can observe in real time mock sales pitches and role-playing exercises.

They can even provide feedback or advice over the speakers remotely from their position in the main lab.

This type of technology is a game changer in more ways than one, said Dr. Bob Riggle, who heads the marketing, supply chain management and economics department.

In addition to sales training, the lab can be used to teach interview skills or conflict-resolution training.

“It’s really state of the art,” Riggle said. “This is the best that you can get that’s on the market right now.”

Riggle taught his first course inside the new building on Monday.

“The feedback from the students was phenomenal. They were really excited,” he said. “This is the kind of thing that they need to kind of break through to the next level.”

A lasting legacy

Rick Bastin, a 1965 graduate of The Citadel, remembers what his business classes were like in Bond Hall.

“While I was there, we didn’t have air conditioning I don’t think. We had open windows,” he said.

While he reflects on his time there and his professors fondly, Bastin has been impressed to see how much the college has transformed in the time since he was on campus.

When he was a cadet, calculators were just in their infancy.

“We used to have to go to tables and books and figure all those things out and now it’s all at your fingertips,” he said.

Today, more than 50 years after Bastin was a student himself, the Florida resident is looking forward to eventually seeing the new business school building named in his honor.

The state-of-the-art facility was made possible because of a more than $6 million gift provided by Bastin and his wife, Mary Lee, through The Citadel Foundation.

Their family has supported the college for years, previously supplying funds to create the Bastin Financial Lab. The space has since been renamed the Mary Lee and Rick Bastin, ’65, Financial Trading Lab, and serves as one of the main focal points of the new business school building.

In addition to the Bastins, more than 50 other individuals, families, businesses and Citadel classes provided donations to help fund the new business school building. 

Bastin said he hopes the creation of a new building will help The Citadel attract highly skilled professors who might not have otherwise joined the faculty.

“I want to see them stay on the cutting edge of technology and bring in faculty that’s very attuned to that,” he said.

In addition to the sales and finance labs, the new building features an advising center and an entrepreneurship-innovation lab. The new building also includes a rooftop balcony that can be used for large gatherings and events.

“All of these labs and all of this technology ties together, and so they can take their ideas and put them into practice,” Weeks said.

Cadet Taurus Brown, who attends The Citadel on an Air Force contract and is the head drillmaster for the Corps, said he’s been blown away not just by the new building but how far the business school has come since he first enrolled as a freshman.

“I just think it’s going to be a great place to be in the next couple years,” Brown said. “I’m glad to see the building up, and I will be so happy to come back and really see how much it’s changed.”

Bastin Hall’s design and construction was overseen by Liollio Architecture. THS Constructors served as the general contractor for the project. 

The Post and Courier: A tour of The Citadel’s new Baker School of Business building

Please visit The Post and Courier at this link to view the newspaper’s photo gallery of Bastin Hall.

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The Citadel unveils Bastin Hall, a new way to do business https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-unveils-bastin-hall-a-new-way-to-do-business/ Wed, 27 Jan 2021 14:30:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21640 Exterior of Citadel's Bastin HallExterior of Citadel's Bastin HallBastin Hall, with its fluid architectural design, high-tech classrooms and fresh approach to conveying the college’s iconic architecture is a learning complex that now reflects the exemplary quality of the business education The Citadel provides.]]> Exterior of Citadel's Bastin HallExterior of Citadel's Bastin Hall

Bastin Hall is open for business.

That statement is even truer than it sounds. Bastin Hall, The Citadel’s first academic building to be constructed in three decades – is the gleaming new home for the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business (BSB).

With the finishing touches being put in place as the spring 2021 semester gets underway, Bastin Hall now houses some of the college’s most popular programs. Close to 600 cadets are majoring in business and approximately 375 Citadel Graduate College students are pursuing a Master of Business Administration or completing undergraduate degrees with the BSB.

Scenes from the first day of classes in Bastin Hall, the first new academic building on campus in three decades, at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, January 25, 2021.

“Bastin Hall, with its fluid architectural design, collaborative spaces, high-tech classrooms and fresh approach to conveying the college’s iconic architecture is a learning complex that now reflects the exemplary quality of the business education The Citadel provides,” said The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.). “Bastin Hall, thanks to the remarkable generosity of Rick and Mary Lee Bastin, will for generations serve the needs of future entrepreneurs and business leaders who specifically seek out The Citadel as the place to attain a business education.”

Located on Hagood Avenue and linking the main campus to the football stadium, Bastin Hall now stands as one of the college’s most welcoming features. The BSB faculty moved into Bastin Hall in January from Bond Hall, where The Citadel’s business school was located for many years.

Bastin Hall, at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, January 25, 2021

The building blocks of Bastin Hall

The state-of-the-art facility was made possible because of a more than $6 million gift provided by Rick Bastin, The Citadel Class of 1965, and his wife Mary Lee, through The Citadel Foundation (TCF). The Bastins have long supported The Citadel, previously supplying funds to create the Bastin Financial Lab in the BSB’s old location. Re-named The Mary Lee and Rick Bastin, ’65, Financial Trading Lab, the facility is now a focal point of the new building.

Mary Lee and Rick Bastin addressing guests at the groundbreaking for Bastin
Mary Lee and Rick Bastin addressing guests at the groundbreaking for Bastin Hall in 2017

“After several years in the works, it is exciting to see Bastin Hall become a reality this semester as the new home of the Baker School of Business,” said Rick Bastin, ’65, in a statement sent from his home in Florida. “State-of-the-art spaces such as the Financial Trading Lab and the Entrepreneur Lab will help the college recruit and retain a faculty of leading scholars and business professionals. It is my hope that future generations of Citadel cadets, evening undergraduates, and MBA students will benefit from this innovative space as they learn to become principled business leaders who achieve success in their field and give back to their communities.”

In addition to the Bastins, more than 50 other individuals, families, businesses and Citadel classes provided the substantial donations needed to fully realize the vision for the building through TCF. Plaques located throughout Bastin Hall will recognize the areas funded by their individual gifts, such as the Darby Family Lobby, in recognition of the Georgia and John Darby Family, ’85; the Jimmy Kerr, ’65, and Bunny Kerr Family Rooftop Terrace; and the Class of 1977 Great Lawn.

Scenes from the first day of classes in Bastin Hall, at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, January 25, 2021.

Special features

Bastin Hall is approximately 44,000-square-feet. In addition to top-of-the-line technology-equipped classrooms, gathering spaces, breakout rooms, and academic offices, some of the building’s other notable features include the following:

  • Advising Center
  • Financial Services Center
  • Entrepreneurship-Innovation Lab
  • Professional Selling Lab
  • Large commons area
  • Balcony commons area
Cadet Taurus Brown, a senior majoring in Accounting, and the head Drillmaster for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, attending class for the first time in Bastin Hall, January 25, 2021.

“It’s amazing how much a new building can affect the feel of an entire academic program,” said Cadet Taurus Brown, an Accounting major, who attends The Citadel on a U.S. Air Force contract and is the head Drillmaster for the Corps. “We are all energized by being in Bastin Hall for our classes and labs, and to socialize and meet with like-minded students – which, despite the pandemic, we are able to do there. The new building’s large spaces enable us to get together safely, with social distancing to collaborate on class projects.”

Additionally, the building features a Student Success Suite with significant resources for all students including those pursing degrees through The Citadel Graduate College.

Dr. Michael Weeks, dean of the Baker School of Business, walks Bastin Hall checking on final touches being put into place on Monday, January 25, 2021.

“We are excited about the possibilities in this new building,” said Michael R. Weeks, Ph.D., USAF (Ret.), dean of the BSB. “In addition to a state-of-the-art finance lab, we also have a remarkable sales training lab in the building for our new Marketing and Business Development majors. Moreover, we are confident that the collaborative spaces in this building will transform the educational experience for our students.”

Liollio Architecture partnered with The Citadel to design and construct Bastin Hall. THS Constructors served as the general contractor for the project. Through a coincidence benefitting this bold new enterprise, the company connects The Citadel’s long-standing engineering and business legacies – the THS chairman and founder, Howard Suitt, graduated from The Citadel with a Civil Engineering degree in 1948, and company’s the senior vice president, Tom Suitt, earned a Business Administration degree from The Citadel in 1974.

About the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

The Tommy & Victoria Baker School of Business develops innovative leaders of principle to serve a global community. The school is accredited by AACSB International and is a recognized leader in business education. 

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Six generations of Workmans and a wakeup https://today.citadel.edu/six-generations-of-workmans-and-a-wakeup/ Sat, 26 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20940 Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)When Billy Workman matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina.]]> Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)

By Cadet Merritt Reeves, The Citadel Class of 2022
Historic photos provided by The Citadel Archives and Museum

Photo above: Cadet-recruit William Douglas Workman V, The Citadel Class of 2024, a sixth generation Citadel cadet, poses for a portrait on campus on November 20, 2020.

When Billy Workman of Orangeburg matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina, a father-son tradition that dates all the way back to the late 19th century and his great-great-great-grandfather.

Billy’s full name: William Douglas Workman V.

In 1882, The Citadel resumed operations after closing its gates for 17 years after the Civil War. In that year, William Douglas Workman enrolled along with over a 100 other cadets. An 1886 graduate, he was the first of Billy’s ancestors to attend the college.

The second William Douglas Workman in the family line was William Douglas Workman Sr. who graduated from The Citadel in 1909 and was valedictorian of his class.

1909

William Workman Sr. was also the second, and the last, Workman to attend The Citadel before it moved from Marion Square campus to its current location on the Ashley River. Billy’s great-aunt, Dee Benedict, talked about her grandfather’s service during World War I.

 “If you look at my grandfather, he really was an absolute hero of the bunch,” said Benedict. “Back when South Carolina was in its own brigade, he led the charge and broke the back of the Germans.”

Dee Benedict, Billy Workman’s great aunt discussing William Douglas Workman Sr.

In 1935, William Douglas Workman Jr., Billy’s great-grandfather, graduated from The Citadel after holding the rank of battalion commander.

1935

In that year, the Corps numbered 89 cadets who were split into two battalions. William Workman Jr. was Benedict’s grandfather and, according to her, he served in North Africa during World War II. “After the war, he stayed in the reserves,” said Benedict, “He ran for the United States Senate against a newspaper man in Columbia and had 46% of the vote, which was amazing. There were a bunch of people who would get fired because they supported him which made it almost like a revival thing. Although he lost the race, that was the start of the Republican Party in South Carolina.”

Billy’s grandfather, William Douglas Workman III, graduated from The Citadel after serving as first sergeant in Tango Company. A 1961 graduate, he attended the college before it was integrated in 1966.

William Douglas Workman III, The Citadel Class of 1961

Billy’s father, Will (William Douglas Workman IV), who has a cotton ginning business in Orangeburg, was the last of the Workmans to attend The Citadel before the college turned co-ed. 

William Douglas Workman IV, '89
William Douglas Workman IV, ’89

He graduated in 1989 with the self-proclaimed title “centurion.” Known for his sense of humor, Will paid for this comedic streak throughout his years as a cadet with hundreds of tours. These punishments, however, hardly dimmed Will’s mischievous spirit.  According to Billy, he is still a jokester.  “He’s a pretty laid back guy,” said Billy, “but my going to The Citadel has loosened him up even more, and I can relate to him better.”

Doing what only felt natural, Billy is expected to graduate in 2024 with a Business Administration degree. After decades of forefathers who roamed the grounds of The Citadel, Billy finally joined the long line of Cadet Workmans. “Billy always had a choice on whether or not he would go to The Citadel,” said Will, “but when he decided he wanted to go for himself, it made me really proud. I was happy that the tradition wasn’t ending with me.”

William Douglas Workman V,
a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, who goes by Billy, posting for a portrait
at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on November 20, 2020.

The Workman family has seen the college through time and progress. Like Billy’s Citadel COVID-19 on campus freshman year, each generation has had difference experiences, but one thing remains constant—the lasting bond between alumni and college. With five generations before him, Billy feels a familial expectation, but he waits in earnest to fulfill this role and dreams even of continuing the legacy one day with a seventh William Douglas Workman.

Cadet Merritt Reeves is an intern in the Office of Communications and Marketing. A junior majoring in English with a Spanish minor, she has earned Gold Stars for academic excellence. After graduation, she plans to return to her home town of Columbia, South Carolina and attend law school.

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Upcoming News from The Citadel – October 2020 https://today.citadel.edu/upcoming-news-from-the-citadel-october-2020/ Thu, 24 Sep 2020 14:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18743 A look at some of the events happening in and around The Citadel’s campus, including a virtual town hall for parents and more.]]>

President’s Virtual Engagement with Parents

Thursday, October 1
7 – 8 p.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

In order to make campus operations as close to normal as possible, the President of The Citadel, Gen. Glenn Walters, USMC (Ret.), will hold a virtual town hall for parents on October 1 at 7 p.m. EST.

He will be joined by the Provost and Dean of the College, Sally Selden, Ph.D, SPHR and the Commandant of Cadets, Capt. Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.).

Parents can connect with Walters, Selden and Paluso by submitting questions via the Facebook Live link while watching the event.

This event is intended to replace the annual engagement that the president holds for cadets’ family members during Parents Weekend; all of those events had to be cancelled due to concerns surrounding COVID-19.

Emerging Topics Lecture Series about national security issues

Thursday, October 1 at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, October 20 at 4 p.m.
Thursday, October 29 at 8 a.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

Dr. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Homeland Security
Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, Ph.D., moderator for the series

The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, one of the fastest-growing programs on campus, is launching a new, virtual lecture series to cover a wide range of topics related to national security.

The Emerging Topics Lecture Series is open to the public, and is especially designed for Citadel cadets and students, and others interested in hearing national security issues by Citadel faculty members, alongside other international experts.

Due to the COVID-19 environment, the Emerging Topics Lecture Series will be held virtually, via Zoom.

The first three forums will be held on different days — and at different times — in October.

The lecture names, panelists and Zoom links can all be found here.

Thinking of pursuing a Master’s degree? Join a virtual information session for prospective graduate students interested in an MBA, Project Management or Leadership Studies degree

Wednesday, October 7 at 6 p.m.
Monday, October 28 at 11 a.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

With the pandemic changing how prospective students find the right degree program, The Citadel Graduate College is hoping to make things easier. The college will be hosting multiple virtual information sessions for prospective students. The sessions on Wednesday, October 7, and Monday, October 28, will be focused on The Citadel’s MBA, M.S. in Project Management and M.S. in Leadership programs.

The information sessions are program-specific, with representatives from the three departments, to better address questions from anyone attending.

The presentation will focus on the flexible course options available through the graduate college, as well as information on the application and admissions process. There will be an interactive Q&A session at the end of the session.

To register for the October 7 session, click here.
To register for the October 28 session, click here.

Citadel team helping with Soldiers’ Angels Food Drive

Friday, October 9
8 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Elks Lodge; 1113 Sam Rittenberg Blvd, Charleston, S.C.
Free, open to the public

The Citadel community always looks for opportunities to give back to those who served and sacrificed for their country. That’s why The Citadel Health Careers Society will be volunteering with Soldiers’ Angels, working to supply low-income veteran families with food assistance.

The event will be held outside, regardless of weather.

Cadets and students can sign up to volunteer on GivePulse. Credit will be given for travel time along with the time given for service and will be considered healthcare community service hours.

Soldiers’ Angles has a global network of volunteers — representing all 50 states and 12 countries abroad — who work tirelessly to ensure that those who serve or have served are supported, uplifted and remembered through a variety of support programs.

Contact Dr. Sarah A. Imam at imams1@citadel.edu or Dr. Kimbo Yee at kyee@citadel.edu for further information. 

From the football field to restaurant franchise ownership, Bulldogs talk entrepreneurship

Tuesday, October 13
8 – 9 a.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, pre-registration required, open to the public

They started as Bulldog football players, and now they’re co-owners of a Zaxby’s franchise.

Through the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Speakers Series, The Citadel community and the public can hear from former quarterback Duran Lawson. He is a member of the Class of 2008 who graduated with a degree in Business Administration. His business partner, Andre Roberts, Class of 2009, currently plays for the Buffalo Bills.

In the virtual webinar, Lawson will discuss franchises as a business opportunity, how to build partnerships and more. Additionally, he will discuss how The Citadel experience, both on and off the field, prepared him for this opportunity.

“It was not foreign to me to have long days, and this is very important when you launch your business,” said Duran. “Second — what was the secret sauce between the both of us and the basis of our partnership — we were both military brats, came through sports together, we have similar values and share similar desired outcomes. We knew what we wanted in a business.”

To register for the webinar, click here.

Thinking of pursing a Master’s degree? Join a virtual information session about graduate degrees in Intelligence and Security Studies, International Politics, Military History or Social Science degrees

Wednesday, October 21
11 a.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

With the pandemic changing how prospective students find the right degree program, The Citadel Graduate College is hoping to make things easier. The college will be hosting multiple virtual information sessions for prospective students. The session on Wednesday, October 21 will be focused on The Citadel’s Intelligence and Security Studies, M.A. in International Politics, M.A. in Military History and Social Science programs.

The information sessions are program-specific, with representatives from the all of the departments, to better address questions from anyone attending.

For more information about this information session, please contact The Citadel Graduate College at cgc@citadel.edu.

New Citadel physics and leader to speak at Exchange Club luncheon

Wednesday, October 28
12:30 p.m.
Halls Chop House; 434 King St, Charleston, SC
Open to members of the Exchange Club and their guests

One of the newest professors in the Physics Department, Scott Curtis, Ph.D., will speak to the Exchange Club of Charleston about the climate of water in the city — specifically, how trends in flooding and extreme precipitation affect the city, and how those issues can be addressed.

Scott Curtis, Ph.D., on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel

Curtis, who will serve as the John Lining Professor of Physics, joins The Citadel as the director for the new Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., ’77, Center for Climate Studies. The center is under development, and was recently named for Near, who passed away in March of 2020, an alumnus, veteran and physics professor.

Curtis has authored more than 150 books, book chapters, peer-reviewed journal articles and scientific white papers for presentations. He is engaged frequently to speak around the nation on issues including climate change, coastal water hazards and flooding. Curtis has participated as an editor for five scientific journals.

The Exchange Club is an all volunteer, national service organization for men and women who want to serve their community, develop leadership skills and enjoy new friendships. Exchange is made up of nearly 1,000 clubs and 33,000 members throughout the United States and Puerto Rico.

Biloxi Blues

Friday, October 30 at 7 p.m.
Saturday, October 31 at 7 p.m.
Sunday, November 1 at 3 p.m.
South of Broadway Theatre Company; 1080 East Montague, North Charleston
$30 for general admission and $20 for students, open to the public

Delayed by COVID-19, the Biloxi Blues performance is on its way back to the state. Though it was originally going to be held on campus, it’s been moved to a theater in Park Circle; however, it’s still supported by The Citadel Fine Arts program and has multiple Citadel cast members, as well as a Citadel alumnus as the director.

Biloxi Blues tells the story of young Army recruit Eugene Morris Jerome as he travels from Brooklyn to Biloxi, Mississippi for boot camp during World War II. On his quest to find love, achieve fame, and attain his manhood,

Last performed at the military college in 1988, the new production is directed by Citadel alumnus Bob Luke ‘76. Luke runs a successful acting studio in New York City and has enjoyed an illustrious career as an on-set acting coach for Hollywood movies including RansomRacing Stripes, and Enchanted.

Due to social distancing requirements within the theater, please contact mary@southofbroadway.com to reserve tickets.

A Night in the Archives: Cadet Rebellions from Citadel History

Saturday, October 31
6 – 8 p.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

It started with five seniors sneaking out at night to go to a party, and ended with a riot that brought police to campus and resulted in the expulsion of 60 cadets. The biggest rebellion in Citadel history, The Cantey Rebellion in 1898, is just one of the events that will be discussed during a virtual version of A Night in the Archives.

On October 31, The Citadel Archivist, Tessa Updike, and the Archives Assistant, Alex Adler, will present stories of cadet rebellions dating back to the 1850s. In addition to rebellions, the event will focus on hunger strikes, food fights and more that have occurred over the years.

The Zoom discussion will be held on Halloween night, from 6 – 8 p.m. A link to the Zoom meeting will be posted here closer to the event.

Faculty expert spotlight

Lee Westberry, Ph.D., is a professor in the Zucker Family School of Education and the program coordinator for Educational Leadership.

She arrived at The Citadel with extensive educational experience, having served the last 21 years in Berkeley County Schools as a high school assistant principal, middle school principal, high school principal, Executive Director of Secondary Programs and Executive Director of Accountability and Assessment. 

Westberry’s recent scholarship activities include presenting at the National CTE Best Practices Conference, which highlighted her work with career academies. She recently published Putting the Pieces Together: A Systems Approach to School Leadership, which helps school leaders understand how to develop the systems to support the critical work of schools, in order to prevent the “putting out fires” mode of operation. Westberry will release a second title, focused on student support systems and the culture system, in December.

In addition to coordinating the program that helps train more educators in South Carolina, Westberry continues to work with schools across the state to assist with school improvement efforts — including curriculum and assessment alignment, principal mentoring, the learning process and more.

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International business leader to discuss profit and purpose with the Baker School of Business https://today.citadel.edu/international-business-leader-to-discuss-profit-and-purpose-with-the-baker-school-of-business/ Tue, 15 Sep 2020 14:25:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18574 The Baker School of Business is hosting a presentation by Stuart Williams, an international businessperson and founder of In Place Impact.]]>

By Maria Aselage, Director of Communications and Marketing for the Baker School of Business

Business is focused on making a profit – but sometimes there’s more to it. That’s why the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business is hosting a special presentation by Stuart Williams, an international businessperson and the founder of In Place Impact. This comes as the school launches its new partnership, the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Speaker Series. The virtual event will be held on Sept. 17 at 8 a.m. and is open to the public with pre-registration.

Williams is a visionary leader who co-created the global platform, “Profit and Purpose.” He has spent the past 12 years designing a new form of inclusive capitalism and economics emphasizing making a profit while making a difference. During his presentation, he will discuss Impact Economics, its role in entrepreneurship, how it empowers businesses to become catalysts for social change and how young leaders can help build a sustainable future for all.

“Impact Economics, in part, encourages business leaders to deliver the highest and most viable corporate profits while creating increased positive impacts for their communities and environment. This idea mirrors The Citadel’s model of servant leadership, so we are excited to have Stuart Williams as the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Speaker Series inaugural guest this academic year,” said Michael R. Weeks, Ph.D., dean of the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business.

The Innovation and Entrepreneurship Speaker Series introduces students to business professionals working in entrepreneurial endeavors across various mediums of society. It is organized by James Bezjian, Ph.D. and David Desplaces, Ph.D.

This event is free; those interested in attending the webinar must register ahead of time here.

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Baker School of Business welcomes new faculty in all three departments https://today.citadel.edu/baker-school-of-business-welcomes-new-faculty-in-all-three-departments/ Tue, 18 Aug 2020 21:15:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17821 The Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business is welcoming five new faculty members joining The Citadel community for the 2020-2021 academic year.]]>

Photo: Iordanis Karagiannidis, Ph.D., teaching cadets in the Rick and Mary Lee Bastin Financial Leadership Lab in 2018

The Citadel’s Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business is comprised of three departments: Accounting and Finance, Management and Entrepreneurship, and Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Economics.

Under the leadership of Dean Michael Weeks, Ph.D., the school has more than 20 tenured/tenure-track faculty and about 620 cadet majors. The school also offers an undergraduate degree completion program for non-cadet, evening students as well as an online or in-person Master of Business Administration program, both through The Citadel Graduate College.

The Baker School of Business welcomes five new faculty members for the 2020-2021 academic year.

Accounting and Finance

Michael Chitavi, DBA

Chitavi specializes in asset pricing and contemporary theories of finance. His areas of research interest include commodity derivatives, microstructure and Fintech (Financial Technology).

Prior to arriving at The Citadel, Chitavi taught finance and accounting courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level at multiple universities in the Midwest.

 Before teaching, Chitavi worked in the financial services group of KPMG in Canada, and South Africa.  He also worked in the alternative finance sector at the boutique firm Chicago Ventures (Formerly I2A Venture Capital Firm) and Hughes and Co.

Chitavi earned his Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) from the University of Wisconsin – Whitewater. He also earned his Master of Business Administration from Northwestern University.

Management and Entrepreneurship

David Desplaces, Ph.D.

For nearly two decades, Desplaces has dedicated himself to educating entrepreneurs, executives and future leaders with one goal in mind — unlocking the potential in each of them. He has distinguished himself by applying his expertise in the areas of international management, global commerce and trade, cultural management, leadership, change management, and entrepreneurial venturing.

Desplaces’ experience includes supporting various domestic and international entrepreneurial ventures, being a part owner in various businesses, helping launch a professional certification program, leading international cultural and professional development initiatives, and empowering his community through various leadership and coaching initiatives.

Desplaces earned his Ph.D. from the University of Rhode Island; he also holds a Master of Science in Education from Syracuse University and a Master of Business Administration from Bentley University. In addition to The Citadel, he teaches business classes at the College of Charleston.

Read more about Desplaces here.

Gayla Todd, DBA
Alvah H. Chapman, Jr. Chair in Management and Ethics

Todd recently earned her Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) after 29 years of business experience, working globally for multiple software solution and technology companies. Her doctoral research was about the retention of women in STEM occupations.

Todd’s career has included various positions in business development and strategy, sales, product management, product marketing, customer and data analytics, solution architecture and implementation consultation. Todd has experience working in many countries throughout Europe and Asia Pacific. 

Todd earned her DBA – as well as her BA in Marketing and Management – from Saint Leo University. She earned a Master of Business Administration from the University of Tampa.

Eric Villafranca, MBA, MS

Villafranca comes to The Citadel after teaching data visualization and management information systems at Baylor University, where he also earned his Ph.D in Information Systems.

He earned a Bachelor of Business Administration from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, a Master of Business Administration from Sam Houston State University, and a Master of Science in Information Systems from Baylor University, before beginning his Ph.D. program.

Before beginning his education, Villafranca served in the U.S. Air Force for eight years, first as a Communications and Navigations Missions Systems Technician stationed at Yokota Air Base in Japan and, later a weather forecaster in the Texas Air National Guard, providing weather support during natural disasters for the U.S. Army North and their Defense Support of Civil Authorities mission. He left the Air Force as a senior airman.

Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Economics

Hee Yoon Kwon, Ph.D.

Kwons has varied teaching and research interests. He is an expert in post-disaster humanitarian supply chains, gamified and game-based learning, and immersive technologies – like virtual and augmented reality – as well as their behavioral impacts in learning, operations, and supply chain management.

According to Kwon, he works to challenge and support his students to engage in real-world and hands-on projects, such as national public service announcement contests and op-ed writing projects.

Kwon joined The Citadel after working as a consultant and assistant manager for multiple institutions in Korea.

He holds a Ph.D. in Supply Chain Management from the University of Rhode Island, a Master’s degree in International Studies from Seoul National University and a B.A. in Spanish Language and Literature from Korea University.

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The Citadel to use new technology to enhance virtual learning https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-to-use-new-technology-to-enhance-virtual-learning/ Wed, 05 Aug 2020 13:28:45 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17533 Classrooms at The Citadel are now equipped with new technology called Swivl that helps brings the in-class experience to virtual learning via Zoom.]]>

As seen on WCBD – Count on 2 by Katie Augustine

Classrooms at The Citadel are now equipped with new technology to bring the in-class experience to virtual learning.

It’s called swivl. It adds a little something extra to a traditional zoom call.

“What is does is allows us to have face-to-face classes while still practicing social distance,” said Maria Aselage, an adjunct professor in the Baker School of Business at The Citadel. “And in addition to that, it’s going to give students the experience of being a cadet on campus which is so very important to The Citadel mission.”

The technology is in a small tool called a marker. It contains a microphone. The professor carries the marker around with them and that allows the swivl to rotate and follow them wherever they walk in a classroom.

“I think that’s what makes it real special is that we can walk anywhere. To the back of the class, the front of the class. Either side of the class and the swivl’s going to follow us,” said Aselage.

One cadet at The Citadel has the opportunity to test out the new technology today with Aselage. Typically, Amanda Teague prefers face-to-face instruction, but after testing out the swivl she feels more optimistic about learning virtually.

“It’s more like an actual lecture. Whereas, during spring break, it was just the teacher’s face and it wasn’t very interactive, but just with this tool it’s going to help a lot. It’s going to keep us more engaged as well,” said Teague.

The Citadel is taking more steps to ensure a safe semester for everyone on campus. For more about Operation Fall Return 2020, click here.

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USA Today: Soldier sneaks up on Citadel football player son https://today.citadel.edu/usa-today-soldier-sneaks-up-on-citadel-football-player-son/ Mon, 27 Jul 2020 00:23:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17363 Tereis Drayton, a rising junior majoring in Finance, received a Homecoming surprise that was arranged by The Citadel Athletics in 2019.]]>

As seen in USA Today Militarykind

USA Today’s positive news brand, Militarykind, recently reached out after seeing the 2019 Homecoming surprise for Citadel Cadet Tereis Drayton. His father, Staff Sgt. Demond Drayton, sneaked up behind his son for a homecoming surprise, arranged by The Citadel Athletics.

Drayton, a rising junior majoring in Finance, plays on the offensive line for The Citadel Football team.

Watch Drayton’s new interview with USA today about that special moment below.

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Baker School of Business professor published in National Review https://today.citadel.edu/baker-school-of-business-professor-published-in-national-review/ Mon, 13 Jul 2020 13:51:15 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17217 Richard M. Ebeling, Ph.D., is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership in the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business.]]>

Photo: Richard M. Ebeling, Ph.D., is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership in the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

As seen in the National Review by Steve H. Hanke and Richard M. Ebeling on July 1, 2020

Thomas Sowell at 90 Is More Relevant Than Ever

Thomas Sowell in a Hoover Institution interview in 2018. (Hoover Institution/via YouTube)

Yesterday, Thomas Sowell turned 90. And he is more relevant than ever. Sowell, a frequent contributor to National Review and prodigious scholar, has delivered yet another insightful and accessible book, Charter Schools and Their Enemies. It was released on his birthday — a gift from Sowell to the rest of us.

In his new book, Sowell puts primary sources and facts under the powerful microscope of his analysis. His findings are, as is often the case, inconvenient, not to say explosive, truths. Indeed, Charter Schools and Their Enemies documents how non-white students thrive in charter schools and close the performance gap with their white peers. It’s no surprise, then, that there are long waiting lists to enter charter schools. So why aren’t there more of them? Well, public schools and their teachers’ unions don’t like the competition. This, of course, traps non-white students in inferior public schools.

Just who is Thomas Sowell and why is he a larger-than-life figure in today’s world? Sowell was born on June 30, 1930, in North Carolina. He grew up in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood and served in the Marine Corps during the Korean War. He earned three economics degrees, one from Harvard (1958), one from Columbia (1959), and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago (1968). After holding down faculty positions at prestigious universities, Sowell settled at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, where he has been for the past 40 years.

As Sowell recounts in his autobiography, A Personal Odyssey (2000), he considered himself a Marxist during most of his student years. Chicago put an end to that infatuation. But Sowell’s study of classical economists included the works of Marx, and in 1985 he published Marxism: Philosophy and Economics. As anyone steeped in Marx knows, all symbols of the capitalist, exploitive past must be uprooted and destroyed before a workers’ paradise can be constructed. It turns out that Marxism is of the moment: Yes, the removal of statues and the changing of street and building names is straight out of Marx’s playbook.

But for those who find Marxism too general and abstract to be relevant for the events of today, we direct you to a treasure trove of books in which Sowell has focused his attention on the problems surrounding race and discrimination both in the United States and around the world. To name just a few of his many works specifically on this theme: Race and Economics (1975), Markets and Minorities (1981), Ethnic America: A History (1981), The Economics and Politics of Race (1983), Preferential Policies (1990), Race and Culture (1995), Migrations and Cultures (1996), Conquests and Cultures (1998), Affirmative Action Around the World (2004), Black Rednecks and White Liberals (2005), Intellectuals and Race (2013), Wealth, Poverty and Politics (2016), and Discrimination and Disparities (2018; rev. ed., 2019).

When analyzing race and discrimination, Sowell relishes going after one of his favorite targets: the intellectual elites, or as he refers to them, “the anointed.” The heart of his message is that men are not born with equal abilities. Contrary to the assertions of the anointed, Sowell argues that “empirically observable skills have always been grossly unequal.” Sowell also argues that not all cultures are equal contributors to world civilization. Indeed, he observes that “differences among racial, national and other groups range from the momentous to the mundane, whether in the United States or in other countries around the world and down through the centuries.” Sowell concludes that the world is culturally complex and filled with variety. We still have little understanding of the causes and consequences of that complexity. But markets tend to harmonize the interests of, or at least minimize the friction between, various peoples and cultures, while politics creates conflict, with advantages for some at the expense of others.

Much of what Sowell has to say about race is contained in his undeniably controversial Black Rednecks and White Liberals, a collection of essays. In the course of a lengthy examination of identity, culture, and its socioeconomic effects, he looks, among other issues, at what he refers to as “black ghetto culture” (something, he stresses more than once, of which “most black Americans” are not a part) and its particular language, customs, behavioral characteristics, and attitudes toward work and leisure. Sowell argues that it has been heavily influenced by earlier white southern “redneck” culture, although, as he is careful to note, this is not a matter of “simple linear extrapolation.” And indeed it is not.

Sowell traces this culture to several generations of Americans mostly descended from immigrants from “the northern borderlands of England . . . as well as from the Scottish highlands and Ulster” who arrived in the southern American colonies in the 18th century. The outstanding features of this redneck or “cracker” culture — as it was called in Great Britain before and during the emigration years — included, Sowell writes, “an aversion to work, proneness to violence, neglect of education, sexual promiscuity, improvidence, drunkenness, lack of entrepreneurship, reckless searches for excitement, lively music and dance, and a style of religious oratory marked by rhetoric, unbridled emotions, and flamboyant imagery.” It also included “touchy pride, vanity, and boastful self-dramatization.” The point to be drawn, he writes, “is that cultural differences led to striking socioeconomic differences among blacks, as they did among whites. In both races, those who lived within the redneck culture lagged far behind those who did not.”

Most of the commercial industriousness and innovation in the South in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Sowell demonstrates, were introduced by businessmen, merchants, and educators who moved there from the North, and especially New England. The culture of work, savings, personal responsibility, and forethought that flourished in the North left the southern United States lagging far behind — a contrast often remarked on by 19th-century European visitors.

Sowell’s tracing of these past differences brings us back to today. On June 5, the American Economic Association (AEA), the premier professional association for economists since its founding in 1885, issued a statement saying that it was time for officers and governance committees within the association to look into racism and racist practices and presumptions within the profession. To that end, the AEA compiled a recommended reading list on race and discrimination. Sowell is nowhere to be found on it. Neither is the late Gary Becker, former president of the AEA, who won a Nobel prize in 1992 for, among other achievements, his pathbreaking work on the economics of discrimination. This is the blinkered world we live in today.

Steve H. Hanke is a professor of applied economics at the Johns Hopkins University and a senior fellow and director of the Troubled Currencies Project at the Cato Institute. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.

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