Swain School of Science and Mathematics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Mon, 19 Apr 2021 15:15:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.5 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Swain School of Science and Mathematics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Earth Day Resiliency in the 21st Century: a panel with scientists from College of Charleston, MUSC, and The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/earth-day-resiliency-in-the-21st-century-a-panel-with-scientists-from-college-of-charleston-musc-and-the-citadel/ Mon, 19 Apr 2021 15:15:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=23568 Aerial view of popular cove on Lake Keowee in South CarolinaAerial view of popular cove on Lake Keowee in South CarolinaDiscussing the need for resilience and sustainability due to rapid human-induced climate change.]]> Aerial view of popular cove on Lake Keowee in South CarolinaAerial view of popular cove on Lake Keowee in South Carolina

Register for this public event via Zoom

Photo above: Aerial view of a popular cove on Lake Keowee in South Carolina, by Brennon Williamson.

This panel and discussion focuses on the need for and understanding of resilience across the triple bottom line (social, economic, environmental systems) of sustainability within the context of rapid human-induced climate change. 

REGISTER HERE 

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Mapping America’s extreme urban heat https://today.citadel.edu/mapping-americas-extreme-urban-heat/ Wed, 14 Apr 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=23253 chris-barbalis-IdGjFFoNWaI-unsplashchris-barbalis-IdGjFFoNWaI-unsplash"...nationally heat causes more deaths than flooding. People are not ordered to “evacuate” from a heat wave."]]> chris-barbalis-IdGjFFoNWaI-unsplashchris-barbalis-IdGjFFoNWaI-unsplash

Citadel’s Near Center for Climate Studies part of NOAA Heat Watch project

During one of the hottest days of the year this summer, scientists and volunteers in Charleston will participate in a type of crowd-sourced study intended to map and teach about urban heat islands. The goal is to help the participating cities identify where to make improvements to help protect people from heat stress, which can be deadly.

“Many people may not know this, but nationally heat causes more deaths than flooding. People are not ordered to “evacuate” from a heat wave,” says Scott Curtis, Ph.D., director of The Citadel’s Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr. Center for Climate Studies. “In Charleston we must be vigilant over all climate threats, and this study will give us more information about where heat is most extreme, which is important information when it comes to the city educating and protecting its citizens.”

This will be the first time the City of Charleston will be included, but it will be the third summer for the Heat Watch initiative. It is a collaborative project being carried out by the National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS), a system jointly developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

“It is important to study heat because it is oftentimes overlooked where people are accustomed to a hot, urban climate, such as in the southeastern U.S.,” Curtis continued. “Extreme heat adversely effects people working outside, those with health conditions and especially those with no way to stay cool.”

Curtis will lead several participants from the Center to participate in the one-day Charleston mapping effort effort, which will also include other intuitions and organizations.

“Here at The Citadel heat is already regularly monitored to make sure cadets and cadet-athletes, are safe when training and performing military drills during hot times of the year,” Curtis added.

Cadets participate in Bond Volunteer Aspirant (BVA) physical training on Summerall Field on Friday, November 20, 2020.

The Near Center for Climate Studies will also be analyzing the heat data with NOAA with the goal of producing reports that can be applied to solutions for withstanding extreme heat by the city’s decision makers.

The cities being mapped this summer include:

  • Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Atlanta, Georgia
  • Charleston, South Carolina
  • Kansas City, Missouri
  • New York City, New York
  • Raleigh/Durham, North Carolina
  • San Diego, California
  • San Francisco, California

“All of the Charleston participants will be notified about the selected day to go out with our equipment to take measurements by NOAA based on the forecast ,” Curtis said.

Related Citadel undergraduate research

An example of a solution to help with extreme urban heat could be to increase the tree canopy within a city, a subject of an ongoing research project by Citadel Cadets and students.

Cadet Anthony Sands checking a tree sensor in Hampton Park in August 2020.

They are collecting data from remote sensors placed on trees in locations close to campus to measure the breadth of the cooling effect of trees, beyond the relief simply standing in the shade.

Cadet Anthony Sands checking sensor on a tree in Hampton Park in August of 2020.

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The Citadel faces West Point, Annapolis and other military schools in NSA cyber challenge https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-faces-west-point-annapolis-and-other-military-schools-in-nsa-cyber-challenge/ Fri, 09 Apr 2021 13:43:23 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=23289 The Citadel began a three-day competition on April 8 hosted by the National Security Agency which pits the country’s military colleges and service academies against each other in intense cyber security simulations. Cadets began the first day with several virtual challenges. The Citadel/ProvidedThe Citadel began a three-day competition on April 8 hosted by the National Security Agency which pits the country’s military colleges and service academies against each other in intense cyber security simulations. Cadets began the first day with several virtual challenges. The Citadel/Provided“NSA has an incentive to ensure the nation has a competent cyber-smart workforce,” she added.]]> The Citadel began a three-day competition on April 8 hosted by the National Security Agency which pits the country’s military colleges and service academies against each other in intense cyber security simulations. Cadets began the first day with several virtual challenges. The Citadel/ProvidedThe Citadel began a three-day competition on April 8 hosted by the National Security Agency which pits the country’s military colleges and service academies against each other in intense cyber security simulations. Cadets began the first day with several virtual challenges. The Citadel/Provided

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Thomas Novelly

Photo above: The Citadel began a three-day competition on April 8 hosted by the National Security Agency which pits the country’s military colleges and service academies against each other in intense cyber security simulations. Cadets began the first day with several virtual challenges. The Citadel/Provided

The Citadel began a three-day competition on April 8 hosted by the National Security Agency that pits the country’s military colleges and service academies against each other in intense cyber security simulations. 

The NSA’s National Cyber Exercise allows future service members and cadets to experience real-life examples of digital problems the military faces. This marks the first year The Citadel has been invited to compete for the title and trophy. 

At least 36 cadets are participating in the event. It involves exercises on forensics, cyber policy, cryptography and reverse engineering, and ends with a real-world defense challenge where they have to detect and protect a network system from hackers. 

The events take place over the course of three days and range anywhere from eight to 12 hours in length. 

“Through NCX, NSA helps to educate, train and test the cyber skills of U.S. service academy cadets and midshipmen, as well as teams from the senior military colleges and select NSA employees,” Diane Janosek, commandant of NSA’s National Cryptologic School, said in a statement. 

“NSA has an incentive to ensure the nation has a competent cyber-smart workforce,” she added.

In recent years, the U.S. military and the federal government have put more emphasis on training young service members to combat increasing cyber threats from terrorists and other countries. 

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Editorial: Celebrate our success on Mars. Another giant leap may be near. https://today.citadel.edu/editorial-celebrate-our-success-on-mars-another-giant-leap-may-be-near/ Thu, 25 Feb 2021 16:46:32 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22369 This image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechThis image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechWhat they’re doing on site with the X-rays, UV and Raman spectroscopy, they can get that information directly uplinked. ]]> This image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechThis image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Photo above: NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. NASA/JPL-Caltech.

As seen in The Post and Courier
By the Editorial Staff

After a year of grappling with a deadly pandemic, racial injustice and disturbing political turmoil, the landing of NASA’s most advanced rover on Mars sends an important and timely message of how the United States can still do great things.

Last week’s stunning, near-touchdown picture of Perseverance — NASA’s particularly fitting name for the rover — should instill in us a sense of wonder of our ever-expanding ability to explore new worlds.

The image already is being compared with NASA’s most iconic photos, including Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the moon and Saturn as seen by Voyager 1.

The spacecraft has 25 cameras and two microphones, many of which were turned on during Thursday’s descent, and still more pictures and even audio recordings were released this week. But its most tantalizing potential goes far beyond photos.

The $3 billion craft was guided to a site only a mile away from an ancient river delta, where it soon will look for signs of ancient life; if Mars ever harbored life, scientists’ best guess is that it occurred about 3 billion to 4 billion years ago, when water flowed on its surface.

The rover ultimately will be able to take rock and soil samples and jettison them back into space for retrieval to Earth by yet another spacecraft within the next decade. (NASA is working with the European Space Agency on that.)

“They’re not just looking at the surface but the subsurface. That turns out to be important too when you think about what was the history of this place,” he said. “What they’re doing on site with the X-rays, UV and Raman spectroscopy, they can get that information directly uplinked. Even if they can’t bring back soil samples, they can do a lot.”

The craft also has a miniature automated helicopter that can fly through the planet’s thin air to capture images the rover can’t. And it will try to convert a small amount of carbon dioxide into oxygen, which, if it works, would be crucial to providing breathable oxygen and fuel for future manned missions.

All signs show Perseverance stuck its landing, and it could start roving around by early March.

Admittedly, NASA has sent rovers to Mars before — this is our ninth spacecraft and fifth NASA rover to land on the planet — and China and the United Arab Emirates also have spacecraft in orbit there.

And of course, we shouldn’t put all our bets on Mars. Venus also deserves more exploration, particularly after last year’s controversial discovery in which powerful telescopes detected faint amounts of the molecule phosphine, which might exist only because something living emitted it.

But our six-wheeled, car-size rover is the most advanced ever and ultimately could provide the first proof of the existence of life outside our own planet. If it does, that would be yet another giant leap for mankind indeed.

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Citadel professor finds not all plastic is equal in study on decomposition https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-professor-finds-not-all-plastic-is-equal-in-study-on-decomposition/ Sat, 13 Feb 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22120 Weinstein said there are only about 100 of these composters, begging the question of whether someone who chooses a PLA product as a green option would actually be able to dispose of it properly.]]>

As seen in The Post and Courier
By Chloe Johnson

Photo above: Former Cadet John Deckle collecting samples for PLA research spring 2018

A new study by a Citadel professor shows that some plant-derived plastics, meant to replace traditional fossil fuel products, may present their own problems for the environment.

The research, led by Biology Department Chair John Weinstein, was conducted on the banks of the Ashley River. It’s one of the few field studies documenting how plastics break down. While there are many estimates of the time it takes for plastic bottles, bags or cups to fully disintegrate, there is relatively little real-world observation of this debris disintegrating. 

A citadel research project placed a board with small strips of various plastics in salt marsh along the Ashley River to observe how the products disintegrated.

But in testing several conventional and plant-derived plastics, Weinstein observed something surprising: the slowest decomposer was a material made from corn. 

The compound, called polylactic acid, or PLA, is one of the most common bio-plastics used today. But it’s also the most resistant to breaking down, “with almost no change observed between the control and 32-week sample,” according to Weinstein’s study.

The experiment, conducted in 2017, involved attaching small strips of the various plastics to a wooden board, and placing the device in salt marsh along the Ashley. Samples were examined and compared with unexposed pieces of the same plastics after four, eight, 16 and 32 weeks outside. The resulting paper was published in November in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin.

Professor John Weinstein at microscope
Professor John Weinstein at microscope

The intent, Weinstein said, was to simulate a likely scenario — what would happen to plastic trash that ends up entangled in a marsh?

“It really was meant to be like a backyard study and really, the Ashley River was like the backyard of The Citadel,” Weinstein said.

The study included seven materials, all chosen because Weinstein said they were “readily available” to consumers. Two were classified as biodegradable, and two were bio-based, like PLA. Researchers compared these bio-plastics with three more conventional materials, like the HDPE used in jugs of laundry detergent, or foamed polystyrene commonly known as Styrofoam.

Sangwon Suh, an industrial ecologist at the University of California at Santa Barbara, said Weinstein’s study “confirms our understanding” of PLA’s persistence in the environment.

Part of the issue is the material is designed for industrial composters, facilities that use temperatures in excess of 120 degrees to break down waste. Weinstein said there are only about 100 of these composters in the United States, begging the question of whether someone who chooses a PLA product as a green option would actually be able to dispose of it properly.

Oil-based plastics, by contrast, are degraded by the sun’s UV rays. 

Plastic decomposition rates also vary widely depending on the environment. Suh recently helped conduct a review of existing scientific work on plastic decomposition. A PET bottle, like the kind that might be filled with soda, takes an estimated 2,500 years to decompose halfway if buried in a landfill, but just 2.3 years if exposed to sun and water while floating in the ocean, Suh said.

Still, Suh acknowledged that there’s a dearth of studies actually observing these breakdowns in the real world, something Weinstein’s work addresses.

Mark Hahn, a toxicologistat Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, said Weinstein’s study was soundly designed.

The question, however, is whether it’s a good thing at all to find plastics that break down quickly. While larger debris can entangle sea creatures, decomposing plastics shed tiny particles that spread throughout the water and air.

“People have found (microplastics) wherever they’ve looked,” Hahn said. “Deep sea sediments, arctic sea ice … they find microplastics.”

Weinstein’s own past work has found that shrimp will readily eat these microplastic pieces, introducing them into the food chain.

“It’s a real challenge to know what the right balance is between degradability and persistence,” Hahn said.

It’s still unclear what the health effects are of these invisible-to-the-eye plastics, which sometimes attach to other pollutants in the environment.

Hahn said he’s at the beginning of work now to suss out how these particles are taken up by the animals that consume them, and whether some are tiny enough to infiltrate the circulatory system. Some animals have been observed expelling the plastics that they eat

As for Weinstein, he said his next focus is to estimate how much extra litter has been released in the area from protective equipment like gloves and masks used and discarded during the coronavirus pandemic. 

Previously, Weinstein has estimated that 7½ tons of plastic trash was floating in Charleston Harbor. 

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Astronomer Saul J. Adelman, Ph.D., presented with the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award by Marquis Who’s Who https://today.citadel.edu/astronomer-saul-j-adelman-ph-d-presented-with-the-albert-nelson-marquis-lifetime-achievement-award-by-marquis-whos-who/ Tue, 09 Jun 2020 23:00:02 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16783 The world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to present Saul J. Adelman, PhD, with the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award.]]>

Dr. Adelman has been endorsed by Marquis Who’s Who as a leader in the astronomy field

Marquis Who’s Who, the world’s premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to present Saul J. Adelman, PhD, with the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award. An accomplished listee, Dr. Adelman celebrates many years’ experience in his professional networks, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes he has accrued in his field. As in all Marquis Who’s Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.

With more than five decades of excellence in his specialties, Dr. Adelman has garnered a laudable reputation as an exemplary astronomer and educator. His interest in astronomy began as a child, when he would take both early-morning bird watching trips and late-night stargazing excursions with his father. Somewhat exhausted by this schedule, his mother told the future Dr. Adelman to decide which activity to continue. He chose stargazing, and his interest in astronomy continued to grow. He attended the University of Maryland in College Park, graduating in 1966 with a Bachelor of Science in Physics with high honors and high honors in Physics and earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology in 1972. His thesis advisor was Dr. George W. Preston III from whom he learned much about the conduct of research. His thesis topic was “A Study of Twenty-One Sharp-lined Non-Variable Cool Peculiar A Stars” which derived their elemental abundances from spectra in the photographic region mainly taken at the 100-inch telescope of Mt. Wilson Observatory.

From the summer of 1972 until the summer of 1974, Dr. Adelman was a National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Postdoctoral Resident Research Associate at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. His advisor was Dr. Anne B/ Underhill who had an excellent sense of the science behind the problems she investigated. He began some research projects with other astronomers and diversified his interests by studying the ultraviolet, optical ultraviolet, and visible spectral regions, each of which for a given star has some lines of different atomic species. With grating scanners he performed spectrophotometric observations and also studied the atomic physics of species of astronomical interest. Sometimes he could investigate a topic using more than one technique which enabled him to understand details in the data which otherwise would have been missed.

Between 1974 and 1978 he was an Assistant Professor of Astronomy at Boston University. There he began to involve some of his undergraduate students with his research. The work that they did had to be appropriate to their scientific skills. Their studies showed them that they could act as scientists and opened new directions for their careers. His first spectrophotometric studies of the mCP (magnetic Chemically Peculiar) stars revealed that three broad continuum features in their optical region spectrum which had been recently been discovered by others were class characteristics.

He found further success as an Assistant Professor of physics at The Citadel in 1978, and rose to become an Associate Professor in 1983, and a Professor in 1989. Dr. Adelman returned to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a Senior Research Associate from the summer of 1984 to the summer of 1986. During this and the subsequent period he concentrated on the Mercury-Manganese stars which were intermediate in properties between the mCP and solar composition stars. He would continue to teach at The Citadel until 2019, when he retired and was granted Professor Emeritus status.

In the early 1980s the spectrophotometric instruments at Palomar and Kitt Peak were retired. He used previously obtained observations of normal stars to help determine their effective temperatures. After he increased the number of band passes in his later observations, he found those of the mCP stars showed considerably greater complexity.

Dr. Adelman has been the author or coauthor of 363 articles most of which have appeared in refereed professional journals, co-editor of the Proceedings of 9 scientific meetings, and seven popular articles. Forty-two of his undergraduate students were coauthors of at least one of his articles. He was the co-thesis advisor of six PhD students in Turkey and the advisor of a master’s student at Boston University.

Another major line of work was over 40 trend setting elemental abundance analyses papers made with spectrograms obtained with the coude spectrograph of the 1.22-m telescope of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory and electronic detectors. Many were done with scientific collaborators. There were in addition auxiliary papers. They used the technique known as fine analyses. Most of the data had a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 200. An attempt was made to have a good degree of consistency among the different stellar studies. The choices of model atmospheres made use of optical region spectrophotometry. Normal stars with elemental abundances similar to the Sun of spectral types B and A with effective temperatures of 2 to 4 times that of the Sun were studied. With Drs. Aaron S. Adelman and Olga I. Pintado he showed that non-magnetic Mercury-Manganese and the cooler metallic-lined stars formed a temperature sequence.

With Dr. Austin F. Gulliver and other collaborators, he participated in a series of papers on the very bright Spectral Type A0 Va star Vega. Some of the weak lines had peculiar flat-bottomed profiles which they attributed to a fast-rotating star observed nearly pole on. Another of their studies of the bright Mercury-Manganese Star Alpha And showed that the behavior of the mercury lines in its atmosphere was due clouds.

He was initiated into the Honor Societies Phi Beta Kappa. Sigma Pi Sigma, and Phi Kappa Phi at the University of Maryland and Sigma Xi at Boston University. Later at The Citadel he helped revive its chapter of Sigma Pi Sigma. He served at the first Treasurer and later President of its Phi Kappa Phi Chapter. Further he was the Vice-President and the President of the Charleston, SC Chapter of Sigma Xi. In 2011 he was the first recipient of the Governor’s Award for Excellence in Scientific Research at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution.

He had many PhD level collaborators in his research. The most productive in terms of the increasing numbers of papers are Drs. Zulema Lopez-Garcia, Cetin Bolcal, Barry Smalley, Glenn Wahlgren, Tanya Ryabchikova, Charles R. Cowley, Robert J. Dukes, Jr., Steven N. Shore, Kutluay Yuce, Olga I. Pintado, Hulya Caliskan, Dursun Kocer, David S. Leckrone, Graham Hill, A. G. Davis Philip, Diane Pyper Smith, and Austin F. Gulliver.

Dr. Adelman’s observing experience was as a Guest Investigator at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory in Canada and, at the Hubble Space Telescope, and as a participant in the Smarts Consortium which uses the Chiron Echelle Spectrograph on the 1.5-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory in Chile. Further he has been a Visiting Astronomer at Kitt Peak National Observatory and at Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito in Argentina. He was a Guest Investigator with the Hale Observatories, the Copernicus Satellite, the Hipparcos Satellite, and the Turkish National Observatory. He participated in the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope Project with Drs. Robert J. Dukes, Jr., Principal Investigator, Diane Pyper Smith, George McCook, and Edward Guinan. This telescope operated in the mountains of Southern Arizona during 1990-2012 and obtained intermediate four band Stromgren uvby photometry of bright stars. Dr. Adelman used his share of time to observe the variable mCP Stars, A-type supergiants, and cool chemically peculiar S-type stars. Primarily with Smith he better defined the rotational properties of the class of mCP Stars. He was the Associate Producer of the 1-hour television program “The Perfect Stargazer” on the South Carolina Educational Television Network in January 1990. It won a Bronze Award at the 1991 Houston International Film and Video Festival.

Dr. Adelman has been grantee of NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Space Telescope Science Institute besides The Citadel Foundation. He was an active member of the International Astronomical Union which culminated in his being a past president of the International Astronomical Union Commission B6 Astronomical Photometry and Polarimetry. He remains a member of the International Astronomical Union, the American Astronomical Society and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. In retirement he is continuing to work with his collaborators on Chemically Peculiar and normal main sequence band, B, A, and early F stars, coudé spectroscopy, CCD spectrophotometry, abundance analyses, line identification techniques, space astronomy, horizontal-branch stars, photoelectric photometry, automatic telescopes, S stars, and A type supergiants. He hopes to complete a new CCD based spectrophotometric telescope in the near future. He plans to make considerable progress on his family history and continue to document cemeteries in Lithuania where his ancestors are buried beyond the three he has already done with the aid of his guide Regina Kopelvitch,. Besides spending time with his family especially his two grandchildren he wants to continue improving his photographic skills of nature and architectural subjects and travel to see the sights of the world.

About Marquis Who’s Who®

Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who’s Who in America®, Marquis Who’s Who® has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who’s Who in America® remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis® now publishes many Who’s Who titles, including Who’s Who in America®, Who’s Who in the World®, Who’s Who in American Law®, Who’s Who in Medicine and Healthcare®, Who’s Who in Science and Engineering®, and Who’s Who in Asia®. Marquis® publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who’s Who® website at www.marquiswhoswho.com.

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Faculty heading into retirement with finesse after decades of leadership https://today.citadel.edu/faculty-heading-into-retirement-with-finesse-after-decades-of-leadership/ Tue, 09 Jun 2020 20:22:12 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16766 In all, 13 members of The Citadel faculty retired after the 2019-2020 academic year, but their contributions will continue to be felt on campus.]]>

In her almost three decades as a leader at The Citadel, it is unlikely that Dr. Conway Saylor ever envisioned herself dancing with her husband, Dr. Bart Saylor, on the front lawn of the college’s Krause Center building.

Conway Saylor, Ph.D., and her husband, Bart, at socially-distanced parade in honor of her retirement

But that is what they did — along with waving, laughing, cheering, and crying — as members of the campus community drove by the Saylors in decorated automobiles for a socially distanced retirement parade complete with music.

“We just had to find a way to make Dr. Saylor feel special after all she has done for The Citadel. COVID-19 didn’t stop us,” said Christina Soyden Arnold, one of Saylor’s co-workers in the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics.

Saylor joined The Citadel in 1991 as professor of Psychology. She eventually became director of Service Learning for the Krause Center. In that role, she led the development of the college’s robust program that now garners 30,000 hours of volunteer service annually. Through her work building relationships and supporting more than 35 community partners, Saylor twice led The Citadel to earn the Carnegie Foundation Elective Community Engagement Classification.

Saylor with MLK Picture Award
Saylor at the 2019 MLK Picture Award

In addition to other awards and commendations, in 2019 Saylor was honored for uniting members of the community with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Picture Awards in Charleston.

“I guess I’m just one of the soldiers trying to get up every day and do my best to be part of the solutions.”

Conway Saylor, Ph.D.

Honoring all 2020 retiring faculty

In all, 13 members of The Citadel faculty retired after the 2019-2020 academic year. Though they spent their final months working remotely due to the pandemic, their departure was and will continue to be felt and their contributions, lasting.

“I am delighted to have an opportunity to recognize the significant contributions of our colleagues who are retiring,” said Sally Selden, Ph.D., provost and dean of The Citadel. “They have made impressive contributions to their academic disciplines while simultaneously teaching and supporting our cadets and students. By awarding these faculty members Emeritus status, The Citadel is conferring an honor to show our respect for a distinguished career. We are grateful for their many years of services and for their impact on The Citadel community.”

Baker School of Business

Mike Barth, Ph.D.

Mike Barth, Ph.D., joined the faculty in 2007. He taught business finance, personal finance, business analytics and risk management. Barth became chair of the Accounting & Finance Department in 2019. Prior to becoming an educator, Barth served in the U.S. Army for nine years, and in the Army Reserves for six years, and as a Senior Research Associate with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners for five years.

Ron Green, Ph.D.

Ron Green, Ph.D., was hired as dean in 2007 and served in that position for six years. During his 13-year tenure at The Citadel, he taught graduate and undergraduate level courses in strategic management, health care management, operations management, and decision science. In addition, Green served as interim dean in 2017-18.

Al Katz, Ph.D.

Al Katz, Ph.D., served as a member of the college’s business faculty for 25 years. During his tenure, he developed several classes including professional selling, relationship marketing and professional development. After being named to fill the Alvah H. Chapman, Jr. Chair in 2008, Katz received the Undergraduate Faculty of the Year Award and was appointed the adult advisor of the Honor Committee.

School of Engineering

Michael Woo, Ph.D.

Michael H. Woo, Ph.D., was a member of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at The Citadel since 1985. His specialty areas included stormwater systems design and management, and hydrology and hydraulics. He earned his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Clemson.

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Carl Jensen, Ph.D.

Dr. Carl Jensen The Citadel

Carl Jensen, Ph.D., was the founding head of the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies. He served in the Navy for five years then enjoyed a 22-year a career in the Federal Bureau of Investigation as a field agent, supervisory agent, and forensic examiner/cryptanalyst. Additionally, Jensen was the lead instructor for the FBI National Academy’s terrorism course for several years. He joined The Citadel in 2017. Jensen has authored and co-authored over 70 books, articles, book chapters, and reviews and earned numerous awards for research and as an educator.

James S. Leonard, Ph.D.

James S. Leonard, Ph.D., joined the English Department at The Citadel in 1983. He has served as a full professor since 1993, including a year as chair of the Faculty Council and ten years as department head. His specialties include American Literature and Critical Theory. He is particularly known for his work on Mark Twain — having served as Editor of the Mark Twain Circular (1987-2008), Managing Editor of The Mark Twain Annual (2004-present), and Managing Editor/Editor-at-Large of the Mark Twain Journal (2012-present). He has also served a two-year term as President of the Mark Twain Circle of America and has co-chaired the quadrennial State of Mark Twain Studies Conference.

Julie Lipovsky, Ph.D.

Dr. Julie Lipovsky, The Citadel

Julie Lipovsky, Ph.D., ABPP, retired at the end of the fall in 2019 after 26 years at The Citadel. A professor of Psychology, Lipovsky served as the first assistant provost for diversity at the college. Her legacy includes developing a Clinical-Counseling graduate program and having led the way for formalized LGBTQ support services. Additionally, Lipovsky served as the co-chair of the college’s Diversity Equity and Inclusion Council, and established and directed a National Coalition Building Institute (NCBI) chapter at the college, teaching hundreds of campus constituents leadership skills to work successfully with diverse populations by creating more inclusive environments.

Bo Moore, Ph.D.

Winfred “Bo” Moore, Ph.D., retires after serving as dean for the School of Humanities and Social Sciences since 2008. After serving in the U.S. Army Signal Corps, Moore joined the faculty of The Citadel in 1976, rising through its ranks as a professor and department head, then finally as dean 12 years ago.

“Dean Moore’s leadership has been an immense asset to The Citadel. He was instrumental in launching initiatives that led to the development of a multitude of new programs including American Government & Public Policy, Oral History, Fine Arts, Overseas Studies, Diversity Education, and Intelligence & Security Studies,” Selden said.

P. Michael Politano, Ph.D.

P. Michael Politano, Ph.D., ABPP, joined The Citadel as a professor of Psychology in 1991. He is a certified school psychologist and a licensed clinical psychologist with Board Certification in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. He directed The Citadel Graduate College Program in School Psychology and served as interim department head two times.

Swain School of Science and Mathematics

Charles Groetsch, Ph.D.

Charles Groetsch, Ph.D., joined The Citadel in 2006 as the founding dean of the School of Science and Mathematics, now called the Swain School of Science and Mathematics. During his career, he served as editor or co-editor of nine academic journals concentrated in mathematics. He was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and recipient of the Mathematical Association of America’s George Póyla Award.

Lyle McAfee, Ph.D.

Lyle McAfee, Ph.D., joined The Citadel as a professor of Chemistry in 1988. He taught general chemistry, in organic chemistry and scientific research.

John I. Moore Jr., Ph.D.

Louis Brems – The Citadel SY 18-19, John Moore, Android App Development, Classroom

John Moore, Ph.D., a former department head for the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, joined The Citadel in 1976 and taught for six years, leaving to work in software engineering and web technologies. He returned to the college in 2003, leading the department for a decade. Moore taught a variety of courses in mathematics and computer science including Data Structures and Algorithms, Compiler Design and Object-Oriented Design Patterns.

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Cadet mentor, future nurse, builder of “Little Free Libraries” selected as Newman Civic Fellow https://today.citadel.edu/cadet-mentor-future-nurse-builder-of-little-free-libraries-selected-as-newman-civic-fellow/ Fri, 06 Mar 2020 16:40:03 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=14374 Cadet Jesse Crook, The CitadelCadet Jesse Crook, The CitadelIn recognition of his civic service, Crook was selected as a 2020 Newman Civic Fellow, after being nominated by The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters]]> Cadet Jesse Crook, The CitadelCadet Jesse Crook, The Citadel

With his sights set on becoming a pediatric nurse, Cadet Jesse Crook, from Gastonia, North Carolina, will be continuing the servant leader work that has long been a part of his life.

As an Army contract cadet in his junior year, he has already completed 635 hours of volunteer service. He devotes his spare time to two things: supporting those in crisis following a disaster or trauma and promoting equal access for children with special needs and their families.

In recognition of his civic service, Crook was selected as a 2020 Newman Civic Fellow, after being nominated by The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.).

A portion of that nomination letter reads:

As one of the first Citadel cadets on path to graduate in our new Bachelor of Arts in Nursing program, Cadet Crook is a fine scholar and cadet, achieving Dean’s List or President’s List each of his six semesters at The Citadel. He has distinguished himself as an outstanding young leader. He is a leadership scholar, working toward a minor in Leadership Studies, and served in our cadet chain of command as a squad corporal. In this role, Cadet Crook was directly responsible for training and mentoring freshmen cadets.

Cadet Crook is on track to commission in the Army as a nurse upon graduation, and ultimately aspires to specialize in pediatric nursing. He chose this discipline in part as a result of his extensive volunteer service to children with special needs. He volunteered at Camp Rise Above, an outdoor summer camp for youth with Sickle Cell disease, Down syndrome, cancer and other chronic conditions. He assists less-experienced cadets and volunteers in adjusting while maintaining an authentic presence and finding strengths in everyone.

As an Eagle Scout in a rural North Carolina community, he built and distributed close to two-dozen “Free Little Libraries” promoting literacy in impoverished neighborhoods.

In word and deed, this exemplary nursing major demonstrates selfless service to his classmates and our community.

Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.) President, The Citadel

The Citadel’s nomination for this position is one of the highest awards the college offers to a rising senior. As a Newman Civil Fellow, Crook will network with other “world makers” from around the country, both electronically and in person at the November annual conference.

The Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics at The Citadel will recognize Crook’s achievement during the annual Community Partner Awards celebration on Friday, April 24, following the Corps’ military dress parade. The college’s 2019 Newman Fellow, Braxton McDuffee, will assist in this recognition.

Crook’s personal statement on Campus Compact.com

My mom was a librarian in a high-poverty school in Gastonia, North Carolina. She would return from school and tell me that children were taking books from the library. One might think they were ‘stealing’ them, but it was much more riveting and unnerving than that. These children were taking books from the library because at home they had none to call their own.

I wanted to change that, so for my Eagle Scout project I built 21 Little Free Libraries in their communities. I remember seeing children run in joy to the boxes, knowing they would have free books to take home – their own books.

This was my first of many encounters with children facing problems that I did not have. As I went into college, I began volunteering with organizations that support children with a parent affected by cancer, families in disaster environments, and children with chronic health conditions to give them what every child deserves – a normal life.

As I work toward a career as a pediatric nurse, the bravery and perseverance of the young people I have tried to serve inspires me to live my own life as an engaged and grateful member of my community.

Citadel Cadet Jesse Crook, Newman Civic Fellow
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Welcoming new faculty and recognizing promotions https://today.citadel.edu/faculty-promotions-citadel/ Thu, 08 Aug 2019 15:15:45 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9862 Dr.-Sally-Selden-provost-and-dean-of-The-CitadelDr.-Sally-Selden-provost-and-dean-of-The-CitadelAs the academic year begins, The Citadel is welcoming new faculty to its ranks and celebrating the promotions of current faculty members, with a new provost in the lead. ]]> Dr.-Sally-Selden-provost-and-dean-of-The-CitadelDr.-Sally-Selden-provost-and-dean-of-The-Citadel

Photo above: Dr. Sally Selden, provost and dean of The Citadel

As the academic year begins, The Citadel is welcoming new faculty to its ranks and celebrating the promotions of current faculty members, with a new provost in the lead.

“I want to warmly congratulate our 17 faculty colleagues who were granted tenure and who were promoted,” said Sally Selden, Ph.D., provost and dean of The Citadel. “These are important professional milestones, which acknowledge their distinguishing scholarship, commitment to teaching, and service to The Citadel and the larger community.”

The 2019-2020 academic year is Selden’s first as provost for The Citadel. She joined the college over the summer, moving her family to Charleston from Lynchburg University in Virginia where she served in numerous leadership roles for 18 years.

Selden helped finalize faculty additions at The Citadel including nine tenured or tenure-track professors, two visiting assistant professors, four instructors, one visiting instructor and 10 new ROTC military science professors and experts.

“Our incoming class of new faculty represent a distinctive group of scholars and educators who are deeply committed to academic excellence,” Selden said. “Their expertise and diverse perspectives will enhance our programs and student experience.”

Finance lab at The Citadel
Finance lab at The Citadel

New tenured or tenure-track faculty include:

Christopher R. Bellon
Ph.D., East Tennessee State University
Assistant Professor, Department of Health and Human Performance

Jan Goldman
B.A., B.S., University of Texas at Austin; M.P.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; M.A.L.S., Georgetown University; M.Ed, Ed.D., George Washington University
Professor of Intelligence and Securities Studies

Ryan K. Giles
B.S., Rice University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering

Felice Knight
B.A., Furman University; B.A., Rhodes University; M.A., College of Charleston; Ph.D., The Ohio State University
Assistant Professor of History

Thad Le-Vasicek
B.S., Ph.D., University of Arkansas
Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Nandan H. Shetty
B.E., Dartmouth College; M.S., Ph.D., Columbia University
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering

Stavros Triantafyllidis
B.S. University of the Aegean, M.S. University of Miami, Ph.D. University of Florida
Assistant Professor of Health and Human Performance

Nathan Washuta
B.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Susan L. Wright
B.S., M.B.A., Clarkson University; Ph.D., Carleton University
Associate Professor of Business

Visiting faculty and full-time adjunct/director/instructor

John Altick
M.A., Ph.D., University of California Irvine
Visiting Instructor of Political Science and Leadership Studies

George Grieve
B.S., University of South Carolina Aiken; M.S., Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Columbia
Visiting Assistant Professor of Health and Human Performance

Crystal A. Hank
M.S., Ph.D., Radford University
Professor of Practice of Psychology

Michael Patrick Hendrix
B.A., Coastal Carolina University; M.A., Winthrop University; M.A., The Citadel; Ph.D., University of Stellenbosch
Instructor of Intelligence and Securities Studies

Soo Joung Kim
B.A., Chung-Ang University; M.A.Ed., Korea University, State University of New York at Buffalo; PhD., University of Maine
Visiting Assistant Professor of Education

Cory Nance
M.S., Georgia Southern University
Visiting Assistant Professor of Cyber and Computer Sciences

James A. Righter
Ph.D., Clemson University
Instructor of Mechanical Engineering

Arpit Sharma
B.S., North Maharashtra University; M.B.A., Northwest Missouri State University
Adjunct Instructor of Business

Shawn Smartwood
B.S., University of South Carolina; M.B.A., The Citadel; Project Management Professional
Adjunct Instructor of Business

Citadel ROTC cadets 2019

ROTC facuty

LT Bilal Awad, USN
Assistant Professor of Naval Science

Command Senior Chief Jazmin Davis, USN
(CMDCS NROTC Unit)

SFC Shawn Eidson, USA
Assistant Professor of Military Science

CDR Martin Griggs, USN
Executive Officer

SSgt Todd Hart, USMC
Assistant Marine Officer Instructor

LT Christopher Kenison, USN
Assistant Professor of Naval Science

Kevin Medert, USA
Instructor, Military Science

SGM Willie Murphy, USA
Senior Instructor, Military Science

Capt Heather Varner, USAF
Aerospace Science

MAJ Jason (Jay) Velasco, USA
Assistant Professor of Military Science

Citadel faculty gathering 2017

Faculty Promotions

Nancy Aguirre, Associate Professor and Tenure
History

Daniel Bornstein, Associate Professor and Tenure
Heath and Human Performance

Simon Ghanat, Associate Professor and Tenure
Civil and Environmental Engineering

Ronald Hayne, Professor
Electrical and Computer Engineering

Jason Howison, Associate Professor and Tenure
Mechanical Engineering

Lyle McAfee, Professor
Chemistry

Lauren Rule Maxwell, Professor
English

Gregary Mazarro, Tenure
Electrical and Computer Engineering

Dimitra Michalaka, Associate Professor and Tenure
Civil & Environmental Engineering

William Money, Tenure
Baker School of Business

Robert Rabb, Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Silvia Roca-Martinez, Associate Professor and Tenure

Scott Segrest, Associate Professor and Tenure
Political Science

Alison Smith, Associate Professor and Tenure
Modern Languages, Literature and Cultures

Russel Sobel, Tenure
Baker School of Business

Breeanne Swart, Associate Professor and Tenure
Mathematics

Mary Katherine Watson, Tenure
Civil & Environmental Engineering

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The Lowdown: Plastics Research https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-ocean-plastic-pollution-weinstein-research-national/ https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-ocean-plastic-pollution-weinstein-research-national/#comments Fri, 31 May 2019 10:00:12 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8510 Citadel researcher Dr. John Weinstein with cadets and students collecting samples of oysters for microplastic pollution researchCitadel researcher Dr. John Weinstein with cadets and students collecting samples of oysters for microplastic pollution researchNationally renown ocean toxicology researcher, Dr. John Weinstein, chair of the Department of Biology at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. talks with OHM Radio about how plastic trash in waterways impacts sea and human life.]]> Citadel researcher Dr. John Weinstein with cadets and students collecting samples of oysters for microplastic pollution researchCitadel researcher Dr. John Weinstein with cadets and students collecting samples of oysters for microplastic pollution research

As heard on 96.3 Ohm Radio, Charleston

The head of The Citadel Biology Department, John Weinstein, Ph.D., is leading change through ongoing, collaborative environmental toxicology research related to the impacts of degrading plastics and tires on waterways and marine life. The research is conducted by undergraduate cadets and graduate students, in conjunction with funding Weinstein and the college have received from the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium and other sources.

Weinstein’s work is being followed by journalists and scientists. Below is an interview he did with OHM Radio in May 2019.

https://www.mixcloud.com/ohmradio/the-lowdown-plastics-research-5-29-19/
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