Swain School of Science and Mathematics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 08 Aug 2019 15:15:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Swain School of Science and Mathematics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Welcoming new faculty and recognizing promotions https://today.citadel.edu/faculty-promotions-citadel/ Thu, 08 Aug 2019 15:15:45 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9862 Dr.-Sally-Selden-provost-and-dean-of-The-CitadelDr.-Sally-Selden-provost-and-dean-of-The-CitadelAs the academic year begins, The Citadel is welcoming new faculty to its ranks and celebrating the promotions of current faculty members, with a new provost in the lead. ]]> Dr.-Sally-Selden-provost-and-dean-of-The-CitadelDr.-Sally-Selden-provost-and-dean-of-The-Citadel

Photo above: Dr. Sally Selden, provost and dean of The Citadel

As the academic year begins, The Citadel is welcoming new faculty to its ranks and celebrating the promotions of current faculty members, with a new provost in the lead.

“I want to warmly congratulate our 17 faculty colleagues who were granted tenure and who were promoted,” said Sally Selden, Ph.D., provost and dean of The Citadel. “These are important professional milestones, which acknowledge their distinguishing scholarship, commitment to teaching, and service to The Citadel and the larger community.”

The 2019-2020 academic year is Selden’s first as provost for The Citadel. She joined the college over the summer, moving her family to Charleston from Lynchburg University in Virginia where she served in numerous leadership roles for 18 years.

Selden helped finalize faculty additions at The Citadel including nine tenured or tenure-track professors, two visiting assistant professors, four instructors, one visiting instructor and 10 new ROTC military science professors and experts.

“Our incoming class of new faculty represent a distinctive group of scholars and educators who are deeply committed to academic excellence,” Selden said. “Their expertise and diverse perspectives will enhance our programs and student experience.”

Finance lab at The Citadel
Finance lab at The Citadel

New tenured or tenure-track faculty include:

Christopher R. Bellon
Ph.D., East Tennessee State University
Assistant Professor, Department of Health and Human Performance

Jan Goldman
B.A., B.S., University of Texas at Austin; M.P.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; M.A.L.S., Georgetown University; M.Ed, Ed.D., George Washington University
Professor of Intelligence and Securities Studies

Ryan K. Giles
B.S., Rice University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering

Felice Knight
B.A., Furman University; B.A., Rhodes University; M.A., College of Charleston; Ph.D., The Ohio State University
Assistant Professor of History

Thad Le-Vasicek
B.S., Ph.D., University of Arkansas
Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Nandan H. Shetty
B.E., Dartmouth College; M.S., Ph.D., Columbia University
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering

Stavros Triantafyllidis
B.S. University of the Aegean, M.S. University of Miami, Ph.D. University of Florida
Assistant Professor of Health and Human Performance

Nathan Washuta
B.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Susan L. Wright
B.S., M.B.A., Clarkson University; Ph.D., Carleton University
Associate Professor of Business

Visiting faculty and full-time adjunct/director/instructor

John Altick
M.A., Ph.D., University of California Irvine
Visiting Instructor of Political Science and Leadership Studies

George Grieve
B.S., University of South Carolina Aiken; M.S., Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Columbia
Visiting Assistant Professor of Health and Human Performance

Crystal A. Hank
M.S., Ph.D., Radford University
Professor of Practice of Psychology

Michael Patrick Hendrix
B.A., Coastal Carolina University; M.A., Winthrop University; M.A., The Citadel; Ph.D., University of Stellenbosch
Instructor of Intelligence and Securities Studies

Soo Joung Kim
B.A., Chung-Ang University; M.A.Ed., Korea University, State University of New York at Buffalo; PhD., University of Maine
Visiting Assistant Professor of Education

Cory Nance
M.S., Georgia Southern University
Visiting Assistant Professor of Cyber and Computer Sciences

James A. Righter
Ph.D., Clemson University
Instructor of Mechanical Engineering

Arpit Sharma
B.S., North Maharashtra University; M.B.A., Northwest Missouri State University
Adjunct Instructor of Business

Shawn Smartwood
B.S., University of South Carolina; M.B.A., The Citadel; Project Management Professional
Adjunct Instructor of Business

Citadel ROTC cadets 2019

ROTC facuty

LT Bilal Awad, USN
Assistant Professor of Naval Science

Command Senior Chief Jazmin Davis, USN
(CMDCS NROTC Unit)

SFC Shawn Eidson, USA
Assistant Professor of Military Science

CDR Martin Griggs, USN
Executive Officer

SSgt Todd Hart, USMC
Assistant Marine Officer Instructor

LT Christopher Kenison, USN
Assistant Professor of Naval Science

Kevin Medert, USA
Instructor, Military Science

SGM Willie Murphy, USA
Senior Instructor, Military Science

Capt Heather Varner, USAF
Aerospace Science

MAJ Jason (Jay) Velasco, USA
Assistant Professor of Military Science

Citadel faculty gathering 2017

Faculty Promotions

Nancy Aguirre, Associate Professor and Tenure
History

Daniel Bornstein, Associate Professor and Tenure
Heath and Human Performance

Simon Ghanat, Associate Professor and Tenure
Civil and Environmental Engineering

Ronald Hayne, Professor
Electrical and Computer Engineering

Jason Howison, Associate Professor and Tenure
Mechanical Engineering

Lyle McAfee, Professor
Chemistry

Lauren Rule Maxwell, Professor
English

Gregary Mazarro, Tenure
Electrical and Computer Engineering

Dimitra Michalaka, Associate Professor and Tenure
Civil & Environmental Engineering

William Money, Tenure
Baker School of Business

Robert Rabb, Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Silvia Roca-Martinez, Associate Professor and Tenure

Scott Segrest, Associate Professor and Tenure
Political Science

Alison Smith, Associate Professor and Tenure
Modern Languages, Literature and Cultures

Russel Sobel, Tenure
Baker School of Business

Breeanne Swart, Associate Professor and Tenure
Mathematics

Mary Katherine Watson, Tenure
Civil & Environmental Engineering

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The Lowdown: Plastics Research https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-ocean-plastic-pollution-weinstein-research-national/ Fri, 31 May 2019 10:00:12 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8510 Citadel researcher Dr. John Weinstein with cadets and students collecting samples of oysters for microplastic pollution researchCitadel researcher Dr. John Weinstein with cadets and students collecting samples of oysters for microplastic pollution researchNationally renown ocean toxicology researcher, Dr. John Weinstein, chair of the Department of Biology at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. talks with OHM Radio about how plastic trash in waterways impacts sea and human life.]]> Citadel researcher Dr. John Weinstein with cadets and students collecting samples of oysters for microplastic pollution researchCitadel researcher Dr. John Weinstein with cadets and students collecting samples of oysters for microplastic pollution research

As heard on 96.3 Ohm Radio, Charleston

The head of The Citadel Biology Department, John Weinstein, Ph.D., is leading change through ongoing, collaborative environmental toxicology research related to the impacts of degrading plastics and tires on waterways and marine life. The research is conducted by undergraduate cadets and graduate students, in conjunction with funding Weinstein and the college have received from the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium and other sources.

Weinstein’s work is being followed by journalists and scientists. Below is an interview he did with OHM Radio in May 2019.

https://www.mixcloud.com/ohmradio/the-lowdown-plastics-research-5-29-19/
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Fortifying the Doors of the Internet https://today.citadel.edu/fortifying-the-doors-of-the-internet/ Mon, 13 May 2019 15:29:31 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8227 Citadel cadets stand in front of whiteboard with IOT mapCitadel cadets stand in front of whiteboard with IOT mapCitadel cadets conduct research to ensure the security of the IoT As seen in The President’s Report 2018 A laptop, a smart phone, a router, a Nest thermostat, an Echo Dot,]]> Citadel cadets stand in front of whiteboard with IOT mapCitadel cadets stand in front of whiteboard with IOT map

Citadel cadets conduct research to ensure the security of the IoT

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

A laptop, a smart phone, a router, a Nest thermostat, an Echo Dot, a smart switch, a smart bulb—they’re in homes across the country and throughout the world. And they are the subject of a research project in a Thompson Hall computer lab that three computer science majors have been working on for over a year.

Cadets John Delpizzo, Elizabeth Spoehel, and Richard Honeycutt, all cyber security minors, have been analyzing the security of the IoT for over a year.
Cadets John Delpizzo, Elizabeth Spoehel, and Richard Honeycutt, all cyber security minors, have been analyzing the security of the IoT for over a year.

Cadets John Delpizzo, Richard Honeycutt and Elizabeth Spoehel, all cyber security minors, are analyzing the IoT under the direction of faculty advisor Col. Shankar Banik, Ph.D., a professor of cyber and computer sciences. An IoT, or internet of things, is a network that is created when multiple devices connect and interact with each other.

“When you have a number of devices manufactured by different vendors, each connection—Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, ZigBee—opens a door that makes the consumer vulnerable to attack by cyber hackers,” said Banik.

Delpizzo, Honeycutt and Spoehel began the project by identifying all possible connections created by the devices—a physical layer graph (PLG). Next they created an RLG (requirement layer graph) that identified all of the requirements of the IoT user.

“The goal,” said Banik, “is to develop algorithms that will map the RLG to the PLG to ensure that the IoT is secure. The consumer may have to turn off connections that are not needed—to shut those doors—so that there are fewer access points to secure.”

Collectively, the cadet team has an impressive resume. They have scholarships and internships. They are members of the Cyber Team that participates in various cyber contests throughout the year. Delpizzo has an Air Force contract, and he serves as president of the cadet Cyber Security Club. Honeycutt has an Army contract. Spoehel is pursuing a second major in mathematics. And together the three cadets may just create a solution to the vulnerability created by the internet of things.

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From the Depths of the Marsh https://today.citadel.edu/from-the-depths-of-the-marsh/ Mon, 13 May 2019 15:14:58 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8220 The Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash ArtThe Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash ArtCitadel cadets bring awareness to plastic pollution by turning trash into art As seen in The President’s Report 2018 When Cadet Caroline Klauber, a business administration major, enrolled in a fine]]> The Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash ArtThe Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash Art

Citadel cadets bring awareness to plastic pollution by turning trash into art

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

When Cadet Caroline Klauber, a business administration major, enrolled in a fine arts class as a freshman to fill a space in her schedule, she discovered her inner artist. Klauber also learned she likes working with paints, pastels, charcoal and even trash to create her art.

Yes, trash.

Matthew Miller, '19, participates in an effort to remove trash from the marsh.
Matthew Miller, ’19, participates in an effort to remove trash from the marsh.

Last fall, Klauber, now a fine arts minor, joined a group of cadets from her drawing and digital illustration classes under the direction of Professor Rick Sargent to create a sculpture out of marsh trash for a recycled art contest.

“Working with trash was a first for me,” said Klauber, who plans to go to art school following graduation.

Some 20 cadets, faculty members and children spent an afternoon in the marsh picking up litter to prepare for the project, filling trash bags with bottles, cans, straws, Styrofoam and even a traffic cone that would be used to create an art piece.

“The marsh is our backyard,” said Cadet Elliott Scurry, a biology major enrolled in Sargent’s drawing class who plans to study environmental law after graduation. “There’s more than seven tons of trash out in the harbor, and projects like this bring awareness to the problem of pollution.”

With 12 trash bags brimming with trash, Sargent and the cadets put their artistic skills to the test over the next few weeks, crafting a freestanding pelican from the marsh debris.

“It was an opportunity to grow as an artist,” said Klauber. “It was a team project. We chose to make a pelican because it is native to the coast.”

The inaugural Port Royal Sound Foundation Recycled Art Contest was hosted in November to raise awareness of the plastic bag ban in Beaufort County and the importance of a clean and healthy marine environment. The cadet sculpture, named “Feeding on Plastic,” received honorable mention.

The Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash Art
The Citadel art department’s Tiffany Silverman helps Caroline Klauber, Skler Addy, and Rya Salter reposition a diving pelican the cadets were sculpting, made mostly from trash they collected from the edges of the Ashley River. Post and Courier/Wade Spees/Staff

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21 down, 9,979 to go: The Citadel graduates its first class of nursing students https://today.citadel.edu/21-down-9979-to-go-the-citadel-graduates-its-first-class-of-nursing-students/ https://today.citadel.edu/21-down-9979-to-go-the-citadel-graduates-its-first-class-of-nursing-students/#comments Sun, 05 May 2019 10:00:12 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=7955 Nursing pins during The Citadel's first-ever pinning ceremonyNursing pins during The Citadel's first-ever pinning ceremonyAs seen in The Post & Courier, by Jerrell Floyd By 2030, a major nursing shortage has been predicted for South Carolina — the fourth worst in the country. So]]> Nursing pins during The Citadel's first-ever pinning ceremonyNursing pins during The Citadel's first-ever pinning ceremony

As seen in The Post & Courier, by Jerrell Floyd

By 2030, a major nursing shortage has been predicted for South Carolina — the fourth worst in the country.

So that’s why The Citadel’s first-ever graduating class of nursing students is seen both as a welcome addition to the state’s health sector and a sure path to future employment.

“I’m coming away prepared to work as a nurse,” said Emily Banks, who was among the first 21 graduates from the school’s new Bachelor of Science in Nursing program.

Nursing graduates during The Citadels first-ever pinning ceremony
Nursing graduates during The Citadels first-ever pinning ceremony

At a pinning ceremony just before commencement, department head Dr. Amelia Joseph emphasized the projected shortage.

SC will have the 4th-worst nursing shortage in the country by 2030, new report says
“The baby boomer nurses are leaving the profession,” she said.

Last fall, the National Center for Health Workforce Analysis also detailed the projected shortage. Its data said that in the next 12 years South Carolina will need around 10,000 additional nurses.

These numbers don’t surprise Joseph. Not only are a large group of nurses and instructors getting ready to retire, but a growing number of older people are looking at South Carolina as a place to retire.

“It’s all creating this perfect storm,” she said. “Nurses are that final line of defense, and I hope that’s what we taught them (the students) to be.”

The program initially got approval from the South Carolina Board of Nursing in 2016, and it takes two years for non-cadet students and four years for cadets to complete. Non-cadet students have to complete general education requirements at another institution before joining the program.

It’s also one of the few evening nursing programs in the area.

Honored to finish her own career teaching the new generation, Joseph said she’s excited to see where The Citadel’s program goes from here. It was started with only nine students.

Those nine students, she said, really shaped the program and its resources.

“We didn’t even have sheets on our bed,” Joseph said, referring to the earliest days.

The school eventually added 11 evening students and one cadet. It also added an advanced simulation lab and more partnerships for training.

For the future, Joseph said the program has learned to be more sensitive to the student’s unique needs. More specifically, she said they’ve learned to acknowledge the evening student’s schedule restraints.

“The evening students have busy lives,” she said.

Banks was one of the 11 evening students. After graduation, she will work at the Ralph Johnson VA Medical Center in its Post Baccalaureate Nurse Residency program.

What attracted her to The Citadel was the flexibility. While a student, Banks could work at the VA as a student nurse technician. She also was pregnant when she started the program.

After welcoming her first child and having to balance family obligations and work, she found the evening program was a great selling point. She and her classmates expect to find many opportunities.

“I think that it’s a need that The Citadel is helping to fill,” she said.

Each graduate must now pass a national licensing board exam.

Joseph expressed confidence. “I feel like they’re well prepared for it,” she said.

The Citadel said most of the inaugural class plans to remain in South Carolina. The school also has a class of four-year cadets in the nursing program who are on track to graduate soon. Not including the upcoming graduates, there are 85 students in the program.

Though The Citadel’s inaugural class had 21 students, some faculty hope the number may grow to as many as 200 in the coming years.

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Dr. Dena Garner earns Governor’s Award for Excellence in Scientific Research https://today.citadel.edu/garner-governor-award-scientific-research-citadel/ Wed, 01 May 2019 21:00:40 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=7806 Governor Henry McMaster presents Dr. Dena Garner, The Citadel's director of research, an award of excellenceGovernor Henry McMaster presents Dr. Dena Garner, The Citadel's director of research, an award of excellenceThe Citadel Director of Undergraduate Research, Dena Garner, Ph.D., is the recipient of one of the top science awards presented by the state of South Carolina. Governor Henry McMaster presented Garner]]> Governor Henry McMaster presents Dr. Dena Garner, The Citadel's director of research, an award of excellenceGovernor Henry McMaster presents Dr. Dena Garner, The Citadel's director of research, an award of excellence

The Citadel Director of Undergraduate Research, Dena Garner, Ph.D., is the recipient of one of the top science awards presented by the state of South Carolina. Governor Henry McMaster presented Garner with the Award for Excellence in Scientific Research at a Predominately Undergraduate Institution at a ceremony in Columbia on May 1, 2019.

Garner received a letter from the Governor earlier in the year that read:

Dear Dr. Garner,

It is my pleasure to congratulate you on being chosen to receive the 2019 Governor’s Award

Governor Henry McMaster presents Dr. Dena Garner, The Citadel's director of research, an award of excellence
Governor Henry McMaster presents Dr. Dena Garner, The Citadel’s director of undergraduate research, the Governor’s Award of Excellence in Scientific Research

for Excellence in Scientific Research at a Predominately Undergraduate Institution. You are very deserving of this recognition for your outstanding work in exercise physiology and human performance. Your work on mouthpiece use and exercise, concussion assessment, and traumatic brain injury is significant and has national and international implications, and your development of the ArmourBite Performance Mouthpiece that is widely used by professional, college and elite athletes is especially commendable.

You have been a wonderful ambassador in South Carolina for excellence in scientific research, and our work to revolutionize the manner in which concussions are diagnosed on the sideline is outstanding. I thank you for your contributions to scientific research and education and wish you continued success.

Yours very truly,

Hentry McMaster

Garner is a full professor in the Department of Health and Human Performance, the Director of Undergraduate Research and the Assistant Provost for Research and Policy at The Citadel. In these roles, she leads and promotes research and scholarly activity campus wide, works to secure external grants for undergraduate research and directly leads cadets and students by facilitating their engagement in research projects.

Garner has been working in the area of mouthpiece use and effects on human performance since 2005 with studies that have focused on reaction time, lactate, and cortisol and the effect of mouthpiece use on these parameters. In addition, her research has focused on mouthpiece use during steady state exercise and effects on oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange as well as the proposed mechanisms for positive effects on airway dynamics in a healthy population. Garner is the author of many scholarly scientific publications related to this work.

Garner, a mother of six, joined The Citadel in 2004 while completing her post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Neurology at the Medical University of South Carolina. Before her move to Charleston, she worked at Oregon State University where she received her doctoral degree in exercise physiology. She earned a masters degree from the University of South Carolina in exercise physiology and an undergraduate degree from Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina.

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Inaugural class of nurses graduating from The Citadel May 4 https://today.citadel.edu/first-nurses-graduating-from-the-citadel/ https://today.citadel.edu/first-nurses-graduating-from-the-citadel/#comments Mon, 29 Apr 2019 13:13:29 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=7593 The Citadel's first class of nursing students will accept their Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Degrees during commencement ceremonies on May 4, 2019. ]]>

The Citadel’s first class of nursing students will accept their Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degrees during commencement ceremonies on May 4, 2019. The group of 20 evening undergraduates, and one cadet nursing student, will share the honor of making history for the college as the inaugural nursing class.

Before graduating, they will take part in the college’s first Nurse Pinning Ceremony at 3:30 p.m. on Thurs., May 2, in Buyer Auditorium on campus. The ceremony is a long standing tradition in the nursing industry and represents a symbolic welcoming of new nurses into the profession.

Where they’re going next

Most members of the nursing Class of 2019 will remain in South Carolina, where, according to a projection by RegisteredNursing.org, one of the worst nursing shortages in America will take hold by 2030, topped only by New Jersey, Texas, and California.

Many in the class already have already accepted jobs. Others have secured positions for the next step in their educational careers. All 21 are committed to dedicating their futures to improving the health of others through caring and expertise, taking The Citadel’s core values of honor, duty and respect with them.

Meet some of the members of the Swain Department of Nursing Class of 2019

Emily Banks

Emily Banks Citadel Class of 2019 nursing student working at the VA medical center in Charleston. S.C.

Emily Banks, an evening undergraduate nursing student in The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2019, spent much of her time while away from class working as a student nurse technician at the Ralph A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Charleston through a partnership the college has with the center. She’s originally from Toms River, New Jersey, but lives in Charleston now.

Banks’s next step? She earned one of 10 coveted positions with the Ralph A. Johnson VA Medical Center Post Baccalaureate Nurse Residency Program.

“Emily Banks will be part of our highly competitive, 12-month long nurse residency program which consists of both didactic and clinical experiences designed to enhance the nurse’s transition from new graduate to competent, professional nurse,” said Joyce McElroy, MSN, RN, CEN, CNE, nurse manager, nursing academic education at the Ralph A. Johnson VA Medical Center. “The Post Baccalaureate Nurse Residency program at the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center is the only nurse residency program accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education in the state of South Carolina.”

Banks believes The Citadel’s partnership with the VA is key to her success. “It’s a perfect fit, and the college and the VA really support each other and the students.”

Cadet Abigail Koger

Cadet Abigail Koger (left)
Cadet Abigail Koger (left), with one of her Citadel nursing professors, Dr. Robin Matutina

Abigail Koger is The Citadel’s very first cadet nursing graduate. She studied on an accelerated schedule, and is graduating ahead of the others in the first class of cadet nurses because she already had many of the basic credits required.

Koger, who is from Taylors, South Carolina, says she is driven by the opportunity to help her community and save lives.

“I think future cadets should consider nursing at The Citadel because the instructors are phenomenal. I have been pushed beyond my limits and have grown so much as a result,” Koger said. “I also think The Citadel’s core values of honor, duty and respect instilled in every cadet combine perfectly with the field of nursing. For cadets, The Citadel is a very tough and challenging environment, but you grow so much as a person while being here, it really pays off.”

Samantha Lisek

Samantha Lisek, Citadel Class of 2019, nursing graduate
Samantha Lisek, Citadel Class of 2019, nursing graduate

“I want to be a nurse because my goal is to make a difference and a positive impact in patients’ lives every day. I have always enjoyed caring for others in need, said Samantha Lisek, Citadel Class of 2019 evening undergraduate nursing student. “It has been my dream since I was 12 years old to work or go to school at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC).”

Lisek, a Greenwood, South Carolina, is fulling her dream right after graduation. She has a new job working as a nurse in the pediatric operating room at MUSC.

“Specifically, I wanted to be a nurse in pediatrics after witnessing the experiences of my 10 year old nephew, Thomas, who has had a brain tumor removed and multiple reconstructive surgeries at MUSC over seven years. My goal is to give back the excellent support and care my family received to the families of pediatric patients whom I will be caring for at MUSC,” Lisek said.

Tamar Sternfeld

Tamar Sternfeld is one of the first people to graduate from the Swain Department of Nursing at The Citadel. She is a member of the Evening undergraduate nursing Class of 2019.

Tamar Sternfeld will be working at the Medical University of South Carolina in the area of digestive health, as part of their New Grad Nurse Residency Program. She said the evening undergraduate program made it possible for her to pursue her dream of becoming a bedside nurse.

“Our nursing education at The Citadel is focused on teamwork and leadership, both of which will be highly utilized during my career as a nurse. The scheduling of classes made it possible for me to work, go to school, and be a mom, all at the same time,” Sternfeld said.

Information for prospective nursing students

The South Carolina Board of Nursing approved The Citadel’s new program in the fall of 2016. First, the evening undergraduate nursing students (non-cadet) began taking classes in the summer of 2017 through the 2 + 2 program. The evening nursing students earn their required general education and prerequisite courses at a other institutions, most often a community college, then complete their nursing degree at The Citadel.

The first class of cadet nursing students began their four years of study in the fall of 2017. This traditional four-year baccalaureate program is available to students in the Corps of Cadets, as well as veteran students.

The mission of the Swain Department of Nursing is to educate and develop cadets and students to become principled leaders in the healthcare environment and profession of nursing by incorporating The Citadel’s core values of honor, duty and respect into the learning experience. The program was made possible through the vision and generosity of the Swain family, after whom the department, and the Swain School of Science and Mathematics are named.

The curriculum follows guidelines developed by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing in The Essentials for Baccalaureate Nursing Education and incorporates competencies from the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses initiative.

For more information, or to apply to study nursing at The Citadel, please email nursing@citadel.edu or call (843)953-1630.

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Is there plastic in Columbia’s drinking water? One study says yes https://today.citadel.edu/is-there-plastic-in-columbias-drinking-water-one-study-says-yes/ Thu, 28 Feb 2019 11:00:19 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=6312 Plastic particles discoverd through Citadel testing. Photo Courtesy of WIS TVPlastic particles discoverd through Citadel testing. Photo Courtesy of WIS TVAs seen on WIS-TV, by Paul Rivera For months, WIS has been investigating the effects of plastic waste on our Midlands waterways. On Monday, we told you about a floating]]> Plastic particles discoverd through Citadel testing. Photo Courtesy of WIS TVPlastic particles discoverd through Citadel testing. Photo Courtesy of WIS TV

As seen on WIS-TV, by Paul Rivera

For months, WIS has been investigating the effects of plastic waste on our Midlands waterways.

On Monday, we told you about a floating pile of trash that routinely collects at the start of the Columbia Canal, a source of our drinking water. The concern is that over time plastic breaks down, and then turns into potentially harmful microplastics or microscopic pieces of plastic.

In Part 1 of our WIS investigation, we collected samples of natural water and filtered to see how much if any material was slipping through the cracks.

Sarah Kell, a marine biology graduate student at the College of Charleston, helped us collect our samples. Part of her graduate research focuses on microplastics and how they affect us and the environment.

In total, we collected samples from 5 different natural water sites. One in the Columbia Canal, two along the Congaree, and two in Lake Murray. We then took tap water samples from 6 different locations like WIS-TV and the South Carolina Statehouse. We also analyzed 6 different brands of bottled water including Aquafina, Dasani, and Fiji Water.

Graduate student Sarah Kell evaluating water samples in lab at The Citadel
Graduate student Sarah Kell evaluating water samples in lab at The Citadel

Kell’s graduate program partners with the microplastics lab at The Citadel military college, which is where she met Dr. John Weinstein, the chairman of the biology department.

Sarah Kell, a Marine Biology graduate student at the College of Charleston, helped us collect our samples. Part of her graduate research focuses on microplastics and how they affect us and the environment.

Sarah Kell, a Marine Biology graduate student at the College of Charleston, helped us collect our samples. Part of her graduate research focuses on microplastics and how they affect us and the environment.

“What we found in our research is that these items break down a whole lot faster than people probably think,” Weinstein said.

Once in Weinstein’s lab, Kell got to work, showing us how she combs through the water sample.

“I will place them into a dish in order to analyze the sample to look for microplastics,” Kell said.

Kell and her team found microplastics in all of our river and lake samples. Here is what we found in our natural water samples.

Plastic particles discoverd through Citadel testing. Photo Courtesy of WIS TV
Plastic particles discovered through Citadel testing. Photo Courtesy of WIS TV

Different colored fragments, broken down from larger plastics were found in 100 percent of the samples. Microbeads, which were used in cosmetics and facewash, but have since been banned in the United States were found in 60 percent of the samples.

Fibers, likely from clothes, both man-made and natural were found in all of the samples. The fibers come from several different sources: washing machine drainage, drier machine venting, and normal shedding.

Foam from items like Styrofoam was also found in all of the samples.

The most abundant types of microplastics, however, came from tires. As tires break down, they leave particles on roads which wash into our water supplies when it rains. Weinstein’s research found these tire wear particles in Charleston Harbor as well.

Our experts expected to find a lot of particles in the river and lake samples, but what about filtered water?

Every single tap water sample contained microplastics (fibers, fragments, and one tire wear particle) were among the particles.

Plastic micro particles discovered in WIS water samples tested in lab at The Citadel
Plastic micro particles discovered in WIS water samples tested in lab at The Citadel

“At the capital is where we found the three fragments and one fiber,” Kell said. Even the legislators whose work could address this in the future, are drinking plastic.

The more promising news is that Kell and her team only found one and a half microplastics per liter in the most contaminated tap water sample. Compared to the highest natural sample, which came out to a whopping 90 microplastics per liter.

After analyzing the results, it is clear that our water filtration process cleans out a lot of the contaminants, but we wanted to know why that number isn’t zero. We took our findings to Columbia Water and spoke with Clint Shealy, the assistant city manager, for Columbia Water.

Shealy says our WIS investigation, is the first study he has seen being done on microplastics in Columbia. We then asked how are the microplastics getting through our filtration systems?

“What we use is not a straining process if you will, that would remove every particulate from the water,” Shealy said.

Shealy says the system is designed to take care of anything that is a health concern. He says more studies would have to be done on the health risks of microplastics before the city would invest in a tighter filtration system.

“Unless there’s a known health risk, generally, utilities and the drinking water industry don’t strain the water, or filter the water down to that level if there’s no known health risk because those processes are very cost prohibitive.”

Columbia is not the only city facing this problem. One study found microscopic plastic fibers in more than 94 percent of United States Tap water.

What we know now, is that microplastics can kill marine life.

While the full effects of microplastics on the human body are still being researched, we do know the health risks that the chemicals inside plastics could pose for humans. We spoke with Dr. Dana Nairn, who works at Providence Health in Columbia, she broke down some potential health risks.

“Diabetes, there are issues with weight gain, it affects the thyroid gland. Decreased fertility in both males and females,” Nairn adds, “The autism spectrum disorders.”

However, for the purposes of the WIS investigation, Shealy and our experts say there have not been enough studies to show the health risks of microplastics so that is why people like Kell are doing the work they are doing.

One more thing, if you thought about playing it safe and drinking bottled water, instead of tap water, well we have bad news for you, the study found on average more potential microplastics in plastic bottled water, than tap water.

Larger studies have been done on the microplastics found in bottled water where 93 percent of samples found microplastics.

Since we don’t know enough about these microplastics, we are diving a little deeper into the health risks caused by plastics with our experts Wednesday on WIS.

Read the full study here. 

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Hundreds of students Storm The Citadel for 2019 STEM competition https://today.citadel.edu/stem-storm-the-citadel-2019-award-winners/ Mon, 11 Feb 2019 23:01:22 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=5988 Carolina Park K-5 Trebuchet Team competing at Storm The Citadel 2019Carolina Park K-5 Trebuchet Team competing at Storm The Citadel 2019Students from around the state are celebrating the result of their hard work after a successful showing at the ninth annual Storm The Citadel event. Hundreds of students, from K-12]]> Carolina Park K-5 Trebuchet Team competing at Storm The Citadel 2019Carolina Park K-5 Trebuchet Team competing at Storm The Citadel 2019

Students from around the state are celebrating the result of their hard work after a successful showing at the ninth annual Storm The Citadel event.

Hundreds of students, from K-12 to college, visited The Citadel campus Feb. 9 to compete in trebuchet, bridge building, robotics and water bottle rocket competitions.

Student participates in the robotics competition during Storm The Citadel 2019
Student adjusts the trajectory of his robot during Storm The Citadel 2019

This year, the rules were a little different for competitors in the Centurion division which includes students in grades 6-12 and in college, plus military personnel. They could plan and practice, but they did not know the actual target distance they would be aiming for until just days before the competition. The teams were informed of three possible distances to be used in the matches two weeks out. They had to choose one of them and report their selection a week before competition day.

The Citadel's own Storm The Citadel trebuchet team 2019
The Citadel’s own Storm The Citadel trebuchet team 2019 took 1st place in their division

Storm The Citadel is co-hosted by Google and The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence along with the School of EngineeringZucker Family School of Education and the School of Science and Mathematics, The event promotes science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and allows students to use the skills they learn in the classroom in a new and exciting way.

Kindergarten Trebuchet team from Healthwood Elementary School
Kindergarten Trebuchet team from Healthwood Elementary School

Results of the trebuchet competition

After spending months learning about the physics behind the medieval-style devices and designing and building their own, teams competed in Storm The Citadel’s trebuchet competition. The teams were split into two different divisions – Hoplite and Centurion – and were judged on accuracy, distance, spirit and design.

Centurion Overall

Boy Scouts Troop 502 Isle of Palms accepting Overall Accuracy Award
Boy Scouts Troop 502 Isle of Palms accepting Overall Accuracy Award

Cane Bay Middle School accepting Overall Distance Award
Cane Bay Middle School accepting Overall Distance Award

First Place Accuracy Award – Boy Scouts Troop 502 Isle of Palms

Second Place Accuracy Award – Cane Bay Middle School

Third Place Accuracy Award  (tie) – St. Stephen Middle School

Third Place Accuracy Award (tie) – Palmetto Scholars Academy

Distance Award – Cane Bay Middle School

Centurion Middle School

St. Stephen Middle School accepting Accuracy Award
St. Stephen Middle School accepting Accuracy Award

Cane Bay Middle School accepting Distance Award
Cane Bay Middle School accepting Distance Award

First Place Accuracy Award – St. Stephen Middle School

Second Place Accuracy Award – Cane Bay Middle School

Third Place Accuracy Award – College Park Middle School

Distance Award – Cane Bay Middle School

Spirit Award – Marrington Middle School

Centurion High School

Boy Scouts Troop 502 Isle of Palms accepting High School Accuracy Award
Boy Scouts Troop 502 Isle of Palms accepting High School Accuracy Award

Palmetto Scholars Academy accepting High School Distance Award
Palmetto Scholars Academy accepting High School Distance Award

First Place Accuracy Award – Boy Scout Troop 502 Isle of Palms

Second Place Accuracy Award -Palmetto Scholars Academy

Distance Award – Palmetto Scholars Academy

Spirit Award – Boy Scout Troop 502 Isle of Palms

Centurion College/Professional

Citadel cadets accepting college distance and accuracy awards
Citadel cadets accepting college distance and accuracy awards

First Place Accuracy Award – The Citadel

Distance Award – The Citadel

Hoplite Division

First Place Accuracy Award – Wild Knights – Buist Academy

Second Place Accuracy Award – Kingsbury Knights Lambda Squad – Kingsbury Elementary School

Third Place Accuracy Award – Kingsbury Knights Gamma Squad – Kingsbury Elementary School

First Place Spirit Award – Dragon Builders – Devon Forest Elementary School

Second Place Spirit Award – Launching Ladies – St. Andrew’s School of Math and Science

Third Place Spirit Award – Wild Knights – Buist Academy

Design Poster Award – Wasabi Warriors – Buist Academy

Video Award – Launching Ladies – St. Andrew’s School of Math and Science

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Oceans, human health; climate change focus of unique new $5.7 million alliance https://today.citadel.edu/climate-change-citadel-research-south-carolina-ocean-health/ Thu, 17 Jan 2019 15:04:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=5629 Ocean trash on beachOcean trash on beachMore than 20 researchers from five colleges and universities are beginning their work aimed at better protecting human health through the new Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions.]]> Ocean trash on beachOcean trash on beach

NIEHS-funded university collaboration aimed at discovering impacts to drive prevention

The first multi-academic institution center in South Carolina to study the effects of ocean health-related illness and the interactions from climate change is initializing its operations. Funded by a $5.7 million grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), more than 20 researchers from five colleges and universities are beginning their work aimed at better protecting human health through the new Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions.

OHHCI

The University of South Carolina, College of Charleston, The Citadel, Baylor University, and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science were awarded the NIEHS grant in the fall of 2018 for the center that is headquartered at the University of South Carolina’s (USC) Arnold School of Public Health, in Columbia. The Center will be led by Geoffrey I. Scott, clinical professor and chair in the USC Department of Environmental Health Sciences. The Center’s deputy director is Paul A. Sandifer, director of the Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health at the College of Charleston. Scott and Sandifer will work with a team of scientists who are faculty leaders at all five institutions. Additionally, researchers and environmental public health practitioners from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference, and the Lowcountry Alliance for Model Communities will participate.

Working against time for everyone

The intersection of climate change and urbanization is nowhere more apparent than in the coastal zone, as increasing global temperatures, sea level rise, and coastal flooding meet growing population centers and economic hubs in coastal communities in South Carolina, the United States and the world.

Common coastal ecosystem problems include:

  • Increased frequencies and severity of harmful algal blooms, water-based plants that can grow out of control and produce potent toxins that can impact human and animal health;
  • Antibiotic resistance in disease-causing microbes such as Vibrio bacteria, that live in coastal waters and can cause harmful infections through the consumption of raw/under-cooked shellfish and wound infections;
  • Contaminants of emerging concern such as microplastics in coastal waters resulting from trash and tire decomposition;
  • Pharmaceutical and personal care product contamination from discharges into sewer systems including byproducts of human use, metabolism and disposal of expired medicines.

The Center’s main purpose will be to assess the effects of illness and disease related to ocean health, to then use the information to develop forecasts that prevent human exposure to these stressors, and other prevention strategies. In particular, the scientists aim to look at climate change-related factors that may enhance the presence of disease-causing Vibrio bacteria and harmful algal blooms, and their production of toxins that are harmful to fish, marine mammals and humans.

“Elevated levels of dangerous Vibrio bacteria and harmful algal blooms toxins can adversely affect human health by increasing human exposure in drinking water, seafood and in surface waters used for recreation,” said Scott. “By establishing predictive water quality and environmental variables, we can develop models and early warning forecasts to alert the public, prevent exposure and thus better protect ecosystem and human health.”

The Center’s scientists at work

 

Professor John Weinstein, leading ocean toxicology researcher, The Citadel
Professor John Weinstein, leading ocean toxicology researcher, The Citadel

The OHHCI scientists will work on different portions of the research simultaneously to maximize the results more efficiently. The USC team will assess impacts of increased exposure to climate stressors (rising temperatures and changing salinities) on associated diseases and illness, such as Vibrio bacteria in seafood and wound infections, and on harmful algal bloom toxin effects non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. These analyses will indicate the extent and magnitude that climate change may have on these illnesses under future climate scenarios. This will be used to better identify vulnerable populations and help tailor community-engagement activities for these susceptible communitieshttps://youtu.be/UTRwSlyEv6w.

“With coastal populations ever-increasing, the need for science to focus its attention towards mitigating and preventing the potential impacts of climate change on the health of its most-vulnerable citizens, has never been greater,” said Darin Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean and Traubert Chair for the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics at The Citadel. “Tackling the complex problems that exist at the nexus of the climate-ocean-health environment – such as enhanced uptake of emerging contaminants within the food chain and increased exposure to water-borne pathogenic bacteria, requires the kind of collaborative, multi-disciplinary team of experts that will compose this Center.“

Co-investigators at USC include Sean Norman, Alan Decho, Jamie Lead, Saurabh Chatterjee, Shuo Xiao, Dwayne Porter (USC Environmental Health Sciences), Bo Cai (USC Epidemiology and Biostatistics), Daniela Friedman (USC Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior), and John Ferry, Tim Shaw, Susan Richardson (USC Chemistry). Drs. Bryan Brooks, Thad Scott, and Scott James of Baylor University will lead the research on Harmful Algal Blooms. Dr. John Weinstein of the Department of Biology at the Citadel will lead the research on the environmental health effects of microplastics. Dr. Heath Kelsey of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science will be part of the Center focused on community engagement, facilitating communication amongst the researchers and communities.

The Center is engaging in field and laboratory projects in South Carolina and Texas and will lead related community engagement through a variety of venues. For more information, please see the Center website at the Arnold School of Public Health website or contact the Center’s Office at 803-777-8940.

 

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