Swain Department of Nursing – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Mon, 16 May 2022 21:50:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Swain Department of Nursing – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Careers in medicine: goals realized through The Citadel’s pre-health opportunities https://today.citadel.edu/careers-in-medicine-goals-realized-through-the-citadels-pre-health-opportunities/ Mon, 16 May 2022 21:50:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31942 "I think medicine is one of the most humbling professions and I’m excited at the prospect of building relationships and serving those around me."]]>

Photo above: Lt. Fernando Gonzalez, USN, The Citadel Class of 2016 seen second from the left, and Cpt. Dillon Graham, USAF, The Citadel Class of ’17, pictured fifth from the left pose with their classmates at the University of South Carolina Greenville Medical School graduation on May 6, 2022. Photo credit: Dr. Sarah Imam, The Citadel.

Two military doctors, an Air Force medical student and an Army nurse: all becoming servant leaders in medicine

The Citadel Director of Health Sciences, Sarah A. Imam, M.D., had two reasons to attend the University of South Carolina Greenville Medical School graduation. Drs. Fernando Gonzalez, The Citadel Class of 2016 and Dillon Graham, ’17, both completed the shared career goal of becoming medical doctors.

“It’s been an absolute pleasure being a part Fernando Gonzalez’s journey to becoming a doctor. He was a student and advisee of mine while he was a cadet at The Citadel, graduating in 2016. Now he is a medical school graduate, finishing in May, and is off to an Emergency Medicine Residency in Virginia in addition to serving in The United States Navy Reserve as a medical officer,” Imam shared following the ceremony.

Additionally, Imam was on hand to congratulate Capt. Dillon Graham, The Citadel Class of 2017 Regimental Commander.

“Dillon is a new medical doctor and a newlywed. His next step is going to a surgery residency in Greenville in addition to his promotion to captain in the Air Force. It was an exciting day and The Citadel was very well represented,” Imam added.

Every year cadets graduate from The Citadel to go on to medical school, becoming nurses, physician’s assistants or physical therapists. Imam says the college provides four years of pre-health guidance to help the cadets realize those goals.

“One of our Class of 2022 cadets who was a business major is going to medical school. Though biology might be a common pre-med major, is important to understand you can be any major and still go into medicine,” Imam stressed. “At The Citadel, we normally have 60 to 70 pre-health cadets with a variety of majors, plus our nursing majors. We make sure all cadets interested in health careers are accurately advised.”

Programs are in place at The Citadel where the cadets and students “simply have to be engaged in the two health career clubs to gain all the competencies that are needed to be considered for competitive medical programs after graduation,” Imam said.

Some of the benefits for cadets and students participating in The Citadel’s Pre-Health Society and Alpha Epsilon Delta, The Health Preprofessional Honor Society, include:

  • Discounted prep programs paid for with regular tuition (or GI Bill funds for veteran students)
  • Scholarships
  • Research opportunities
  • Mentor and job shadowing matches
  • Healthcare study abroad service experience
  • Organized and vetted volunteering opportunities

“These opportunities are carefully curated for the cadets and students to make their path to medicine a direct one,” Imam said.

Read about other Corps alumni who are successfully entering medical service below and here.

2nd Lt. Bennett Lucas, ’22, a U.S. Air Force-funded medical student

His service to others while a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets included serving as Alpha Company Commander. Now, 2nd Lt. Bennett Lucas’s service to country is getting underway as the recipient of a coveted Air Force Health Professional Scholarship Program (HPSP) slot. The program covers his tuition at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine: Columbia along with living expenses, with his commitment to serve as a medical officer for at least four years after that.

Lucas’s classmate, Cadet Olivia Hime, also bound for medical school, asked him and their peer, Malcom Jackson (below), a few questions about their experiences to date.

Cadet Bennett Lucas, The Citadel Class of 2022

Where are you from?

I am from Lexington, South Carolina. The most unique part of Lexington is that it has the “small-town” feel, but is close to the capital city of Columbia, as well as being a short drive to the beach or to the mountains. My family had land growing up and raised horses and chickens, so there was always plenty of work to be done as a kid.

What was the best part of being a cadet at The Citadel?

I think the best part of being a cadet is the relationships that you build. Whether it is with classmates or faculty members, The Citadel’s campus community is a really close one. This unique aspect has helped me in countless ways.

What inspired you to pursue a career in medicine? What do you plan to specialize in?

I decided to pursue medicine after an introductory Health Science course in high school. Since then, I have shadowed and had internships with many physicians who have guided me in pursuing this career path. I want to be a physician simply because I love people.

During my junior year as a First Sergeant in Sierra Company, a cadet fell over a third floor railing onto the quad. She was in my company, and I was one of the first people to rush to her side. Along with a few other cadets, we were able to stabilize her, and I called for an ambulance. I followed her to the hospital and stayed in the waiting room of the ER until her parents were able to meet us there. It was one of the most traumatic and impactful experiences I have had in my life and pushed me to continue pursuing a career as a physician.

I think medicine is one of the most humbling professions, and I’m excited at the prospect of building relationships and serving those around me. I plan on specializing in either cardiovascular or general surgery. I want to use my hands to serve those in critical need.

What is the hardest obstacle you overcame at The Citadel? In your journey to practice medicine?

The hardest obstacle I overcame while at The Citadel and in my journey to practice medicine was taking the MCAT. I took the test for the first time in January of my junior year. I didn’t put nearly enough time into preparing for the exam and my score reflected that. It was a huge setback and made me really question whether I had what it took to get into medical school. I used that experience as a motivator to study and prepare to take the MCAT again. After a second attempt, I scored high enough to get into medical school. What I thought would be a huge setback and obstacle turned into a motivator that I used to push myself toward success.

What do you like the most about the medical field? Is there anything you feel needs improvement?

I love that I can work hard to be prepared to help people who can’t help themselves. If I could change one thing about the medical field, it would be the medical disparities present in low-income areas. Especially in South Carolina, there are many places and people who don’t have access to sufficient healthcare. This should be considered a right, available to all regardless of socioeconomic status or class.

What is something you learned at The Citadel that you will take with you?

One thing I learned at The Citadel is that stress is artificial. Stress is an internal reaction to external factors, and it is up to you to decide whether or not you’re going to let things turn into stress.

What advice would you give someone following in your footsteps?

I would tell them to never stop putting yourself out there. Go for the positions of greater responsibility, apply for the internship you don’t think you’ll get and take chances. You’ll never be successful or achieve your highest potential unless you aim high. You’ll be amazed at the pieces that fall into place when you try. The worst that can happen is you get told no.

2nd Lt. Malcolm Jackson, ’22, Army nurse focused on caring for military families and veterans

Nursing Cadet Malcolm Jackson poses for a portrait in Stevens Barracks at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on April 12, 2021.

Tell us about your hometown

I’m from Bloomingdale, Georgia. It is a smaller city that is often overshadowed by its neighboring city, Savannah. Growing up in this area was unique in that it provided me with a diverse and geographically complex environment. Many athletic camps and summer programs I attended were hosted in the city of Savannah, while I grew up and attended school in the countryside.

What was the best part of being a cadet at The Citadel?

The best part of being a cadet at The Citadel was the challenges that I had to overcome to progress and grow my cadet career. I was raised to never quit and readily accept challenges, which often helped me develop my overall character, demeanor and discipline.

What inspired you to pursue a career in medicine? Are you planning to specialize in one area?

My family was the biggest influence on my career choice. My sister and my aunts were constantly beacons of success and happiness in their nursing careers. In my senior year of high school, I often visited and cared for my great-grandfather, which also pushed me to choose a medical profession that would have the most patient-practitioner interaction. I am grateful for the relationship I developed with my great-grandfather as a result of the care I provided him. This, along with the opportunities to learn and practice medicine, cemented nursing as my desired career of choice.

I plan on specializing in Psychiatry or Critical Care for active duty, veterans, their families and the surrounding communities. I understand that mental health is at a critical point in today’s society and we need support for our armed services. This is where I believe I can have a profound impact on people’s lives.

What was the hardest obstacle you overcame at The Citadel? In your journey to practice medicine?

The most difficult obstacle I overcame at the Citadel was my own complacency. My sophomore year roommate, along with my parents, motivated me to make the most of the opportunities provided at The Citadel. In my journey to practice medicine, the largest obstacle is the uncertainty that comes with inexperience and building confidence to an extent where you can actively recollect and apply knowledge from the classroom.

What do you like the most about the medical field? Is there anything you feel needs improvement?

What I like most is the ample opportunity to improve the lives of patients in different areas of healthcare practice. If there was anything to improve, that which is most important to me would be the regulation of nurse to patient ratio designed by governing boards of nursing professionals.

What is something you learned at The Citadel that you will take with you?

I’ve learned many concepts and takeaways that I’ve adopted into my way of thinking. Of these, I will always remember to lead without recourse. This means doing the right thing even when no one is looking and ensures a confident leader who will navigate morally and ethically through any adverse situation.

What is your next step?

After graduating from The Citadel I will study for my NCLEX and, after passing, proceed to my Basic Officer Leader Course in San Antonio, Texas. Ideally, I would like to be stationed in Washington D.C. to work at Walter Reed Hospital. I feel this would be a great learning opportunity and work environment.

What advice would you give someone following in your footsteps?

My only advice is to put your heart into everything you do. If you put your effort and care into your tasks, obligations or job, you will gain from it in one way or another. One of the most underappreciated gifts is often character development. We are growing as long as we live. Our only limit is what we place on ourselves.

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Heading out to help heal https://today.citadel.edu/heading-out-to-help-heal/ Thu, 12 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31992 Class of 2022 nursing graduates post for a photograph after their pinning ceremony on May 5, 2022, in Summerall Chapel on campusClass of 2022 nursing graduates post for a photograph after their pinning ceremony on May 5, 2022, in Summerall Chapel on campusThe Swain Department of Nursing is recognizing its fourth graduating class, celebrating the graduation of 15 cadets and 12 non-cadet students.]]> Class of 2022 nursing graduates post for a photograph after their pinning ceremony on May 5, 2022, in Summerall Chapel on campusClass of 2022 nursing graduates post for a photograph after their pinning ceremony on May 5, 2022, in Summerall Chapel on campus

Photo above: The Class of 2022 nursing graduates pose for a photograph after their pinning ceremony at Summerall Chapel on May 5, 2022

The Citadel Swain Department of Nursing graduates 29 future nurses

The Swain Department of Nursing is recognizing its fourth graduating class.

On May 5, the department’s Class of 2022 received their nursing pins during a traditional pinning ceremony in the college’s Summerall Chapel. Presenting new nurses with a pin or badge dates back centuries. At The Citadel, the pin is presented after a four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree is earned.

Cadet Reanna Wrecsics, The Citadel Class of 2022, poses for a photo with nursing professor, Linda Edgerton, during the Swain Department of Nursing Pinning Ceremony in Summerall Chapel on May 5, 2022.

I am very proud of where I am today. It took hard work and determination. I have family members who are nurses and I did not want to do anything else. I’d recommend attending The Citadel for the nursing program, and for the Division 1 Track and Field team!

Cadet-athlete Reanna Wrecsics, The Citadel Class of 2022, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, from Chapin, South Carolina

There are 15 cadets and 12 evening (non-cadet) nursing graduates in the group.

Thashemina Mekel Brown, seen on the left, Class of 2022 nursing evening program graduate, poses for a photograph with nursing professor, Holly Donahue, on May 5, 2022, in Summerall Chapel on campus.

The Citadel’s evening nursing program was perfect for me as a working person with a family. I am looking forward to my new nursing job with Novant Health in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Thashemia Brown, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2022

The guest speaker for the ceremony served as the Surgeon General, Headquarters, for the U.S. Air Force, Pentagon and also served as the first Surgeon General of the U.S. Space Force before recently retiring.

“You can help lead the change where you work. You are at the bedside 24/7. You’ll know what works and what doesn’t. As nursing leaders you will be learning throughout your entire career. You will provide the evidence and lead when change is needed,”said Lt. Gen. Dorothy A. Hogg, USAF (Ret.), the pinning ceremony speaker.

The Citadel launched its nursing program in 2017, earning national accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education in 2019 and graduating the inaugural class of nursing cadets and students in May of 2019.

South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2022 nursing graduates

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2022 Bachelor of Science in Nursing graduates posing for a photograph in Summerall Chapel after the Nurse Pinning Ceremony on May 5, 2022.

Joel Joseph Tropezado Baslot (Outstanding Students in Nursing Award)
Shelby Ruth Brooks
Ademar Yarial Cubero
Mya Monaye Dollard
Cameron Taylor Fuller (Lisa Whetstone Caring Award)
Trenton James Gambrell
Dahrel Ghazaleh
Malcolm Jackson (Nursing Research and Scholarship; Outstanding Students in Nursing Award)
Addison Shaw Jeffcoat
NIcholas Owens
Kevin Pham
Karrina Tremblay
Aaron Royce Tyler
Reanna Janine Wrecsics
Isabella Domeica Yates

The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2022 Bachelor Science in Nursing graduates


The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2022 Bachelor of Science in nursing graduates (evening program)

Renae Towcimak (Outstanding Students in Nursing Award)
Seung David Baek (Nursing Leadership Award)
Thashemia Mekel Brown
Michaela Halli Caron
Sarah Ghaffari
Alexis Knapp
Mallory Sandra Lipton
Tameka McCullough
Akeisha Patel
Emily Spielvogel
Amy Thompson
Nicholas Tupper
McKenna Jeanne Vergnolle

Learn more about studying nursing at The Citadel as a cadet or in the non-cadet evening program by visiting this website. Sending questions to nursing@citadel.edu.

The Citadel nursing pin
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From knob to nurse, Second Lt. Catherine Hill serves Charleston and America by living her dream https://today.citadel.edu/from-knob-to-nurse-second-lt-catherine-hill-serves-charleston-and-america-by-living-her-dream/ Wed, 23 Mar 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=25354 2nd. Lt. Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, receives her diploma at graduation from her father, Lt. Col. Rustin Hill, '90The Citadel Class of2nd. Lt. Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, receives her diploma at graduation from her father, Lt. Col. Rustin Hill, '90The Citadel Class of"All nurses lead whether at the bedside, in the community, or at hospitals. Catherine Hill is most certainly doing that."]]> 2nd. Lt. Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, receives her diploma at graduation from her father, Lt. Col. Rustin Hill, '90The Citadel Class of2nd. Lt. Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, receives her diploma at graduation from her father, Lt. Col. Rustin Hill, '90The Citadel Class of

Photo above: Second Lieutenant Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, receives her diploma at graduation from her father, Lt. Col. Rustin Hill, The Citadel Class of 1990, during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets commencement ceremony in May 2021.

“I would choose The Citadel all over again”

For as long as she could remember, Catherine Hill wanted to be a nurse

That was how her story began at The Citadel, when Hill matriculated as a knob in August of 2017 from her home in North Garden, Virginia. She entered college with an Army scholarship and a declaration to major in nursing — military service, nursing and attending The Citadel, all traditions in her family.

Now, Second Lt. Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, is living her dream. Like many in her family, she is serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. She is a a reservist for the Army Nurse Corps.

Hill’s fulltime role is serving young patients and their families as a nurse at MUSC Shawn Jenkin’s Children’s Hospital.

“While The Citadel is developing principled leaders, our nursing program is growing the next generation of nurse leaders,” said Lenora S. Horton, Ph.D., an instructor with The Citadel’s Swain Department of Nursing. “Second Lieutenant Catherine Hill clearly exemplifies the highly desirable traits of a leader who lives by the values of honor, duty and respect. All nurses lead whether at the bedside, in the community or at hospitals. Catherine is most certainly doing that.”

Catherine Hill, while a cadet, administering a COVID-19 vaccine to a member of The Citadel staff during a clinic at McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 24, 2021.

After graduating, and while preparing for her nursing board examination, Hill took the time to answer these questions.

Q. What is the one thing you miss the most about The Citadel?

A. It goes without saying that The Citadel experience isn’t just about the place, it’s about the people that you get to see everyday. I will miss the memories I have made with all my friends and the endless laugher you can hear in the barracks of cadets enjoying their time together. I will miss all the people that I have become closer with nursing program and hope to see them again soon. 

Q. What do you miss the least about The Citadel?

A. I definitely do not miss 6 a.m. formations. 

Q. Who is the one person at The Citadel who had the most positive impact on your time here and why?

A. I would have to say that my brother 2nd Lt. Russ Hill (Rustin Hill II), who graduated in 2020, had the most positive impact on my time at The Citadel. Although he graduated last year, he taught me a lot throughout my time here at school. He taught me to stand up for myself and to never be ashamed of the person I am. He always looked out for me and was never afraid to stand up for me. I was fortunate enough to get to live in the same battalion as him, and because of that we now share so many memories that we will tell as we get older. The best advice he gave me was that if I could find humor and laugh at any hard situation in life that came my way, I would always win. 

Cadet Catherine Hill with her older brother, Russ Hill. Provided by Catherine.

Q. How has your mindset changed since studying, and then starting your career in nursing during one of history’s worst pandemics?

It was inspiring, especially, to watch my Mom working as a nurse during the pandemic while finishing my degree at The Citadel. If anything, the pandemic has made me love nursing even more. Nursing is truly a selfless career path. 

One of my top memories while training at The Citadel to become a nurse was helping people on campus during the pandemic. As senior nursing students we were honored to be asked to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. Our nursing instructor said it best, ‘we are making history getting to distribute the vaccine to the faculty and staff at The Citadel.’ As as a nation we patiently but anxiously waited for a vaccine to come out with the hopes that one day we would return to normal. Having the opportunity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine seems like a small role, however, it was truly an honor to be a part of the solution to this crisis.

2nd Lt. Catherine Hill, fall 2021

Q. What advice do you have for young people considering a nursing degree?

I have two pieces of advice to those who are seeking to pursue a nursing degree.

One. Make sure you are choosing to become a nurse because you genuinely love taking care of others not because of the pay. You will play a vital role in tough situations and you have to possess the ability to be empathic and put yourself in someone else’s shoes. It is incredibly challenging but also the most rewarding thing you will ever do. It truly is a blessing to stand by a patient’s side and watch as they make a full recovery and also be that person to hold their hand when they don’t.

My second piece of advice is to make friends with the other people in your nursing program. Nursing is collaborative and deals a lot with working alongside others. Becoming close with a group of your fellow nursing students will enhance your experience in nursing school through the tough times as well as learn to collaborate with others. I had had the ability to become very close with my nursing peers as there were only eight of us. We were a very tight group, taking the same classes and studying for tests together for four years. They have made this experience one that I will never forget and I am thankful for them. 

More about the Swain Department of Nursing

The Swain Department of Nursing expects to have 22 nurses graduating as part of the Class of 2022 on May 7. A traditional Nurse Pinning Ceremony will be held at 3:30 p.m. on May 5 at Summerall Chapel to honor the graduates and recognize their dedication toward completing their degrees and their commitment to serve as nurses in the future. The group will be addressed by Lt. Gen. Dorothy A. Hogg, USAF (Ret.), the former Surgeon General, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Pentagon.

The mission of the Nursing Program is to educate and develop cadets and students to become principled leaders in the healthcare environment and profession of nursing by incorporating The Citadels core values of honor, duty and respect into the learning experience.

For more information about studying nursing as a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, or as a non-cadet, evening undergraduate, please visit the Swain Department of Nursing web section here, email nursing@citadel.edu, or call (843) 953-1630.

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree at The Citadel is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

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Nurses from Citadel’s first class of BSN graduates help deliver professor’s baby at MUSC https://today.citadel.edu/nurses-from-citadels-first-class-of-graduates-help-deliver-professors-baby-at-musc/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 19:13:37 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=28275 PXL_20210827_120200912-1PXL_20210827_120200912-1Nurses Maddy Salem and Tamar Sternfeld reflect on helping Citadel family, working as nurses since graduating amid pandemic Michael and Jacey Verdicchio got a happy surprise when checking into the]]> PXL_20210827_120200912-1PXL_20210827_120200912-1

Nurses Maddy Salem and Tamar Sternfeld reflect on helping Citadel family, working as nurses since graduating amid pandemic

Michael and Jacey Verdicchio got a happy surprise when checking into the the hospital for birth of their second child, Ezra, a few months ago.

Michael is a Ph.D. computer science professor in the Department of Cyber and Computer Science at The Citadel. Jacey, his wife, is pursuing an M.A. in Clinical Counseling with the college’s Department of Psychology. They are “all-in” — living, teaching and studying on The Citadel campus with Ezra, their 4-year old Betsy, and Jack, their golden retriever.

Left to right: Ezra, Jacey, Michael and Betsy Verdicchio in November 2021. Photo credit: Rebecca Olsen with Rebecca Lynn Photography

The Verdicchios never expected their two nurses at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to also be part of The Citadel family. They were thrilled to learn both women were members of the first graduating class of The Citadel’s recently developed Swain Department of Nursing.

“Our labor and delivery nurse, Tamar, was in the first graduating class of our Citadel nursing program,” said Michael. “When our son was finally ready to come out 30 minutes after shift change, our new nurse, Maddy, also turned out to be an alumna of our program. So, our son Ezra was delivered by two Citadel nursing alumnae (along with some boring doctors, I guess- smile). With Maggy and Tamar as our nurses, me a professor and Jacey, a graduate student – it was a very Citadel experience!”

Michael, Jacey and Ezra Verdicchio after Ezra’s birth at MUSC in the fall of 2021.

For Jacey, the shared Citadel connection was a comfort.

“Labor is a stressful time, and you are entrusting your health and the health of your baby to people you are only just meeting in the hospital. Finding the common ground of The Citadel allowed us to quickly establish rapport with our nurses and feel more at ease. Furthermore, both of The Citadel-trained nurses were incredibly skilled, had a wonderful bedside manner and helped us feel safe and cared for,” Jacey said in an email after the family was back home on The Citadel campus.

The Verdicchio’s biggest concern was about delivering Ezra in the hospital during a pandemic.

“Our nurses put us at ease with that too,” Jacey explained. “I was nervous about having to wear a mask throughout the physically exhausting feat of labor, but luckily we were both able to take our masks off once in the delivery room since we’re vaccinated.”

The nurses, Maddy Salem and Tamar Sternfeld, both graduated from The Citadel Swain Family School of Mathematics and Science with Bachelor of Science in Nursing degrees in May of 2019. They went straight to work after passing their boards – just when the pandemic was dramatically escalating in South Carolina and globally.

They agreed to answer some questions reflecting on helping deliver Ezra, and on their nursing careers beginning during the continuing pandemic.

Q. What was it like helping members of The Citadel family as part of your job as a MUSC labor and delivery nurse?

Maddy: As a nurse, I find it extremely important to develop a bond with all my patients and their support people. This bond doesn’t happen within the first hour or two of a shift, but an effort that spans the duration of my time with each patient. To care for the Verdicchio family was such a pleasure, in that this bond existed instantaneously and was personal, creating such a sweet environment. The Verdicchios were extremely kind which in my book goes a long way, especially as the world is enduring a crisis. The time spent with them was truly refreshing and filled my cup to overflow for my other patients. To help families, specifically the Verdicchios, bring life into this world is something I never thought I would have the opportunity to do. The Citadel gave me that chance and in turn allowed me to experience Ezra’s first breaths alongside his loving parents. For this I am grateful, and to know that Dr. Verdicchio is committed to the education of others is a beautiful thing knowing he is allowing future Citadel grads to follow their dreams. 

Tamar: As soon as they found out I was a Citadel alum, it was as if we had been friends for decades. It made the entire birth experience more like a family affair instead of just three strangers being together. It was made even better that Maddy was coincidentally assigned to be the day shift nurse and assume care. It was so wonderful to have both of us present for the delivery even though we work on opposite shifts and both meet Baby Ezra. I am always honored when I am able to participate in someone’s delivery and I am even more honored that I was able to be a part of this one with the connections to The Citadel. 

Q. What do you enjoy most about your work as a nurse?

Maddy: This question is tough. There are so many things that make nursing difficult and strenuous, but the joys that come from caring for others brings about a sense of endurance that pushes me through the hard aspects of my job. I think knowing that I get to support women during one of the most strenuous events of their lives is what I enjoy the most. Knowing that I get to carry their burdens and think analytically for them and their baby or babies while they endure the pains and joys of labor is life giving to me. To watch people become parents and hold their newborn for the first time and experience the love and joy in the room is something that words cannot begin to describe. 

Tamar:  ​I became a nurse because I enjoy helping people. I became a Labor and Delivery nurse because I enjoy working with mothers and their babies. The best part of being an Labor and Delivery nurse is the teamwork and, more than any other environment I’ve worked in, we have to function as a team. What I loved the most about The Citadel’s nursing program is that every class incorporated teamwork and leadership, not only core elements of a Citadel education, but also core elements of quality nursing care. Every time I work with Maddy, it’s evident that we shared that foundation in our nursing training and being able to work together to bring Ezra into the world brought all of those pieces together. 

Tamar Sternfeld Citadel Class of 2019, nurse wearing protective gear
Tamar Sternfeld, ’19, in personal protective equipment during her first year of working as a nurse at MUSC.

Q. What has it been like going straight into you new careers as nurses nursing during a historic pandemic?

Maddy: So, I am 24. I’m not sure about you, whether you are older or younger than me, but when I first began to understand the pandemic, I thought it was nothing and would be over in no time. I share my age because I think it contributed to how naïve I was to the severe nature of what has become an historic event. I had a trip to Thailand planned for March 17, 2020. I was packed and ready to go. Two hours prior to boarding, I realized how serious this pandemic was and chose to stay. This decision was disheartening, but it pales in comparison to what I saw while working on the COVID unit located in the main hospital of MUSC. To watch individuals leave this world without their loved ones at their side brought on a sadness that I will forever take with me. I have the opinion that this pandemic has strengthened nurses. For me, I believe that it has shaped the way I approach each patient. Understanding the reality that life can be over in the blink of an eye, and I have a responsibility to care for lives, grew my understanding of true nursing. It has not been easy. Short staffed, over worked, and, frankly, underpaid are all things I think about. What keeps me going is asking myself these questions: What if it was me in room 222 needing help? Who would be there for me? Who would help me if I couldn’t help myself? Through all the hardship, knowing I get to be that person for the patient in room 222 makes the pandemic disappear. 

Tamar: When we graduated in May of 2019, we had no idea what was in store for us. The BC months of in-hospital training (Before COVID) were a great opportunity for me to get my “sea legs.” I was able to find my stride and build confidence in my skills before the entire world put them to the test. I’m so very grateful for the way that things panned out.

Q. What advice do you have for nursing students who are considering which area of service to go into?

Maddy: Ask questions. Find a mentor. Befriend your staff be it other nurses, techs, secretaries, physicians, security, environmental services, etc. Treat your patient as if you are the patient. Never lose sleep over a mistake you may make. We are all human and prone to error but learn from each moment. I wanted to start with general advice, because I believe that if I didn’t have these basics down, I wouldn’t be successful in a specialty area. The truth is, I would recommend starting in an area that will allow you to master skills such as a surgical unit. If there is a specialty you are considering, find a way to shadow that unit within the hospital where you are working med-surg. Learn about the staff there and ask them questions about what they like and don’t like about their jobs. Beyond this, when choosing an area, know you are choosing a specific population of patients. Know yourself and what you can handle. Don’t be afraid to make a change. Nursing jobs will always be there, be patient and don’t settle. You owe that to your patients. 

Tamar: One of the best things about nursing is that you don’t just have to be one thing forever. Try all of the flavors of ice cream before deciding which one you like. There are so many options out there. There is something to fit every person. Be willing to try something new and you will find the right fit. 

Learn more about applying for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing at The Citadel here.

The Citadel’s Swain Department of Nursing first graduating class 2019

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Upcoming News from The Citadel – November and December 2021 https://today.citadel.edu/upcoming-news-from-the-citadel-november-and-december-2021/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 16:44:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=28120 Russ Pace-The CitadelRuss Pace-The CitadelA look at some of the events happening on The Citadel’s campus, including Homecoming 2021, the Christmas Candlelight Service and more.]]> Russ Pace-The CitadelRuss Pace-The Citadel

Photo: Gen. Walters, USMC (Ret.), ’79, president of The Citadel, with the South Carolina Corps of Cadets during the Homecoming Review parade in 2019

Day of the Dead celebration

Friday, Oct. 29 – Friday, Nov. 5
Daniel Library
Free, open to the public

Dia de los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead, is a holiday celebrated in Latin America, when people honor their loved ones who have passed on.

The Department of History’s Day of the Dead alter in 2019

The solemn celebration of life and death is held annually on campus by the Department of History, in the Daniel Library.

A traditional “Dia de los Muertos” altar will be on display in Daniel Library from Friday, Oct. 29 – Friday, Nov. 5. Photos provided by members of the Corps of Cadets, students, faculty and staff will be included on the alter to memorialize their loved ones.

Cadets and the Witting Tree

Monday, Nov. 1 – Thursday, Nov. 11
Outside Summerall Chapel
Free, open to the public

Throughout the first 11 days of November, cadets from Lutheran Campus Ministry will hang 242 blank dog tags on the tree next to Summerall Chapel.

The cadets will hang 22 of the dog tags each day on the Witting Tree. The purpose of that number is to raise awareness that an average of 22 veterans commit suicide daily in the U.S.

This is the third year that the Chapel and members of the Corps of Cadets have participated in the national veteran suicide awareness program.

At 12 p.m. on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, the Chapel will hold a brief blessing ceremony. Veteran cadets attending will be invited to remove the dog tags from the tree on that day.

Citadel nursing students hold blood pressure screening

Tuesday, Nov. 2
5 – 7 p.m.
In front of Coward Hall, The Citadel campus
Free, open to the public

Evening undergraduate nursing students from The Citadel’s Swain Department of Nursing will be using their educations to help members of the local community on Tuesday, Nov. 2.

High blood pressure, a known contributor to heart disease and stroke, led to the death of more than a half million Americans in 2019. According to the CDC, South Carolina has been identified as one of the top ten states for high blood pressure.

That’s why the nursing students will hold a blood pressure screening, from 5 – 7 p.m. in front of Coward Hall, to identify each individual’s risk factors for high blood pressure, check their blood pressure and provide education on high blood pressure prevention.  

Blood pressure screenings, early identification and intervention, and lifestyle modifications can increase health and longevity. 

Cadets’ works of art on display in Daniel Library

Friday, Nov. 5
Daniel Library, The Citadel campus
Free, open to the public

Beginning on Friday, Nov. 5, art created by sophomore cadets enrolled in The Citadel’s “Literature of War” class will be on display in Daniel Library.

The exhibit will feature around 25 pieces, collected over the last two semesters, inspired by America’s military engagements — from World War I through the Global War of Terror.

The “Literature of War” course centers on mostly veteran-written fiction and journalism, and it covers themes from combat training to PTSD. In addition to writing two formal papers, the class asks students to artistically express a moment in the reading that connects with them.

The Citadel Commandant publishes book on leadership

Wednesday, Nov. 10

A new leader at The Citadel will release a book on leadership and character development on Wednesday, Nov. 10.

Drawing from 30 years of experience leading Marines, The Citadel Commandant of Cadets Col. Thomas Gordon, USMC (Ret.), ’91, wrote Marine Maxims: Turning Leadership Principles into Practice.

Col. Thomas J. Gordon, USMC (Ret.), The Citadel’s Commandant of Cadets, during Matriculation Day 2021

The book is a collection of 50 principle-based leadership lessons that Gordon acquired throughout his career, meant to provide future leaders with a professional development plan.

The book will be available at The Citadel Bookstore, Amazon and other retailers.

Baker Business Bowl VIII: Elevator Pitch round

Thursday, Nov. 11
3 p.m.
Bastin Hall Room 105, streamed via Zoom
Free, open to the public

Ten teams — made up of Citadel cadets and students — will compete for a place in the finals of the Baker Business Bowl VIII. To get into the finals, those teams must make it through the Elevator Pitch round, which will be held on Thursday, Nov. 11, starting at 3 p.m.

This semi-final round consists of a five-minute summary presentation, where teams explain their potential business ideas to a panel of business experts. After the brief presentation, the judges will hold a ten-minute question and answer session with each team.

The teams competing in the semi-final round are:

  • ACE Aeronautical Engineering Consulting
  • American Drone Delivery
  • Colonic Tattoo
  • HWB Creations
  • Mercurial Fitness – Fitness for Sickness
  • Re-Store Medical Equipment
  • Ryde
  • The Auditory Assistant
  • Trident Jet Nozzle
  • Wound Closure

The top teams will move on to the final round, which will be held in February 2022. The final winning team will earn $10,000 to invest in their proposed business.

The Baker Business Bowl is a program aimed at helping budding entrepreneurs who have an idea for a new product or service, and the desire to turn that idea into a business. It’s open to cadets, evening undergraduate students, and graduate students.

Homecoming 2021

Friday, Nov. 12 – Sunday, Nov. 14
Various times
The Citadel campus
Many events are free and open to the public

Homecoming 2021, honoring the classes that end in ‘1 and ‘6, will be held on Friday, Nov. 12 – Sunday, Nov. 14.

The weekend welcoming graduates of The Citadel back to their alma mater is one of the biggest events of the year on campus.

Notable events include: an open house of Bastin Hall for donors and alumni, the Twilight Parade and Homecoming Review parade on Summerall Field, open barracks for parents and guests, a performance by the Summerall Guard and Bulldogs football versus Wofford.

For a full schedule of events, click here.

The Citadel hosts National Collegiate Rugby tournament games

Friday, Nov. 19 – Sunday, Nov. 21
Various times
The Citadel campus
Free, open to the public

The Citadel will be one of six host locations for the National Collegiate Rugby Men’s Regional Championships over the weekend of November 19-21.

The quarterfinals for the south region of both the Men’s Division II and the Men’s Small College Cohen Cup and Challenge will be held on campus.

Formed in 2020, National Collegiate Rugby evolved from the National Small College Rugby Organization, which was founded in 2007. Originally created to support the growth and development of small college rugby, the organization now serves college rugby programs of all sizes.

2021 Candlelight Service

Friday, Dec. 3 – Sunday, Dec. 5
7:30 p.m.
Summerall Chapel
Free, open to the public

After a pause due to the pandemic, one of Charleston’s longest-running and most memorable holiday traditions will return. The Summerall Chapel’s 2021 Christmas Candlelight Services will be held on Friday, Dec. 3 – Sunday, Dec. 5. at 7:30 p.m. 

Cadets from the Corps, Praise Band, Catholic and Gospel Choirs, together with members of The Citadel Regimental Band will join together to provide the holiday celebration that members of The Citadel family look forward to each year.

As in the past poinsettias will be used to decorate the chapel; they may be purchased for $12 each, in honor of a loved one, and then picked up on Monday after the last service. To place an order, call Geri Jones, chapel administrative assistant, at 843-953-5049. The Chapel office must receive these requests no later than Friday, Nov. 19. 

Cookies, Cocoa and Coding

Saturday, Dec. 4
10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Thompson Hall, The Citadel campus
Free, open to the public

The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence has a unique way to help get students into the Christmas spirit. It’s called “Cookies, Cocoa and Coding” and there are plenty of all three!

The event will be from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 7 in Thompson Hall, on The Citadel’s campus.

Students and parents are invited to come to the event, which features coding tutorials and treats, including cookies, cocoa and coffee. Students will use code.org’s tutorials, in order to practice different concepts and skills within computer science.

The event is free and open to students from kindergarten to 12th grade.

To register, click here.

Events from The Citadel Athletics

Media should contact John Brush Assistant AD for Athletic Communications

The Citadel Wrestling vs. Queens

Wednesday, Nov. 3
7 p.m. (Doors open at 6 p.m.)
McAlister Field House
Free, open to the public

The Citadel Wrestling Bulldog Open Tournament

Saturday, Nov. 6
9 a.m. (Doors open at 8 a.m.)
McAlister Field House
Tickets starting at $10 for adults and $5 for children

The Citadel Basketball Home Opener & Veterans Day

Friday, Nov. 12
12 p.m. (Doors open at 11 a.m.)
McAlister Field House
Tickets starting at $12

Athletics would like to invite the retired veterans and active-duty military members of The Citadel community to be honored at our halftime ceremony celebrating Veterans Day. A limited number of free tickets will be provided through the Holy City Hero initiative for those participating in the halftime ceremony. If you are interested in participating, please contact sportmarketing@citadel.edu with your name, rank and branch.

The Citadel Football Homecoming 

Saturday, Nov. 13
2 p.m. (Main Gates open at 12:30 p.m.)
Johnson Hagood Stadium
Tickets starting at $17

The Citadel Basketball vs. Carver College

Thursday, Nov. 18
7 p.m. (Doors open at 6 p.m.)
McAlister Field House
Tickets starting at $12

Athletics will be collecting canned food at the doors to help the Charleston Community. Fans can also drop off items at the McAlister Field House Ticket Office the week leading up to the game. 

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My Ring Story: leaning into the challenges towards triumph https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-leaning-in-to-the-challenges-toward-triumph/ Wed, 29 Sep 2021 14:49:26 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=27173 Cadet Mya Dollard on the high jumpCadet Mya Dollard on the high jump"Honor, Duty, and Respect are now significantly instilled within me."]]> Cadet Mya Dollard on the high jumpCadet Mya Dollard on the high jump

Meet Cadet Mya Monaye Dollard, Class of 2022

Cadet Mya Monaye Dollard is an athlete on the track and field team, a gold star-earning scholar, and a future nurse. She is from Lake City, South Carolina.

Q. What quote is engraved inside your ring?

A. The quote that is inside of my ring is “And Still I Rise” and #LLRG. They are significant to me because I have faced so many obstacles while being here at The Citadel, yet I have earned my ring.

The engraving #LLRG pays tribute to the late Mr. Ra’Shaud Graham, The Citadel Class of 2017 and a mentor to me and so many others. It means Long Live Ra’Shaud Graham. He was an inspiration and motivated me to keep pushing forward and to believe in myself and losing him was hard for us all.

The biggest obstacle I faced while being here is when my mother was diagnosed with advanced-stage cervical cancer in early July of 2020 which also was the peak of COVID-19. Her diagnosis was life-altering, not only to me but to my family. Seeing someone you love so sick and not being able to be there for them was heartbreaking. The first semester of 2020, my mother went through weeks of aggressive chemotherapy and radiation. I felt helpless, but thankful that my little sister was there with my mom. I wanted to make my mother proud, so I finished both semesters of my junior year with Gold Stars. In December of 2020, a few days before Christmas, she finally got to ring the bell for beating cancer, thus the engraving, “And Still I Rise.”

Cadet Mya Dollard with family at high school graduation
“This was June 6th, 2018. Pictured from right to left is Vincent Cole (boyfriend), my mother Mikiko Dollard, me, and my father, Samuel Dollard. This was taken on the night of my High school graduation at Johnsonville High.

Q. What is the number one way this institution impacted your life?

A. This institution provided me with everlasting life lessons and friendships.

Q. What are three things the Citadel taught you that you wouldn’t have learned at another college?

A. Honor, Duty, and Respect are now significantly instilled within me. I believe that many other schools do not take the time to emphasize the importance of these characteristics as a human being. But, here at the Citadel, we do!

Q. What will you think while looking at your Citadel band of gold on your finger?

A. My ring will remind me about my own perseverance. It will remind me of all the days that I did not think I could go on, yet I pushed through with the best version of myself. I believe that this institution has helped me grow as an individual while having the great support of my mentors, teammates and peers.

Cadet athlete Mya Dollard wearing her jersey and stethoscopes
Photo provided by The Citadel Athletics

Q. Why do you think it is important for people to understand the symbolism and weight of The Citadel ring?

A. The Citadel Ring conveys the message of overcoming adversity while being a principled leader in all aspects of life. The Citadel breaks you down to mold you into the best version of yourself, setting you up for success in life.

Q. “We wear the ring” is a repeated phrase amongst Alumni. What does it mean to you to wear the ring?

A. It means unity and strength! I do believe that it takes grit and fortitude to be here at The Citadel. I am honored to be part of a group that took a oath committing to take the road less traveled. I am a proud Citadel woman!

Cadet Mya Dollard pictured on left
“This was April 12 , 2018, signing day when I accepted my Citadel scholarship to become a cadet-athlete with the Track and Field team. I am on the left with my younger sister Sa’Mya Dollard on the right. She now attends the University of South Carolina, Class of 2023.”
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A new kind of Frankenstein: bringing cadavers back to life in the classroom https://today.citadel.edu/a-new-kind-of-frankenstein-bringing-cadavers-back-to-life-in-the-classroom/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 15:38:11 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=26948 Cadets work with Dr. Clinton Moran, Biology, on a new Anatomage table, the newest addition to Duckett Hall’s state-of-the-art anatomy and physiology lab at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 31, 2021. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelCadets work with Dr. Clinton Moran, Biology, on a new Anatomage table, the newest addition to Duckett Hall’s state-of-the-art anatomy and physiology lab at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 31, 2021. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The Citadel"This is absolutely going to make learning anatomy more memorable and more fun."]]> Cadets work with Dr. Clinton Moran, Biology, on a new Anatomage table, the newest addition to Duckett Hall’s state-of-the-art anatomy and physiology lab at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 31, 2021. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelCadets work with Dr. Clinton Moran, Biology, on a new Anatomage table, the newest addition to Duckett Hall’s state-of-the-art anatomy and physiology lab at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 31, 2021. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The Citadel

Take a peek into the new Anatomy and Physiology Lab at The Citadel

Forget the dusty plastic leg, torso and skeleton models clattering around from hooks in the back of the labs. Their usefulness in the anatomy lab is coming to a close at The Citadel.

Instead, turn down the lights and illuminate the beating heart, manipulate the moving circulatory system, or bring the cadaver of a man who died of cancer back to life digitally to observe the tumors as they grow, before virtually dissecting him.

Cadets work with Dr. Clinton Moran, Biology, on a new Anatomage table, the newest addition to Duckett Hall’s state-of-the-art anatomy and physiology lab at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 31, 2021. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The Citadel
Cadets work with Dr. Clinton Moran on the college’s Anatomage table in The Citadel Anatomy and Physiology Lab August 31, 2021.

The Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics is now using an Anatomage table and learning system that enables cadets and students to examine real medical case studies with a technology that transforms cadavers into digital living bodies that function and respond.

“The virtual dissection table unscrambles the complex layers of the human body for cadets and students getting degrees in biology, nursing, or health and human performance,” said Clinton Moran, Ph.D., a professor of physiology at The Citadel. “There are many animal cases also, so we won’t need to order and dissect preserved animal specimens. The potential for cross-disciplinary learning through our new Anatomage technology is also expansive.”

In addition to the dissection table, two large wall monitors show the entire class what those at the table are doing. Moran’s class was one of the first to use the Anatomage in the college’s new Anatomy and Physiology Lab this fall.

“This is really something. It’s crazy-real,” said Cadet Reed Reichel, a junior from Beaufort, South Carolina, after using the table for the first time. Reichel is majoring in exercise science and plans to go to graduate school with the goal of becoming a physical therapist. “This is absolutely going to make learning anatomy more memorable and more fun.”

How does it work?

The Anatomage system offers four gross anatomy cases, more than 20 high-resolution regional anatomy cases, and more than 1000 pathological examples. These digital human models function as practice patients for medical schools, physical therapy schools and colleges/universities across the country. 

Cadets work with Dr. Clinton Moran on the college’s Anatomage table in The Citadel Anatomy and Physiology Lab August 31, 2021.

A few things it can do:

  • Help students visualize the microstructures of the brain, ear, and eyes.
  • Enable students to visually examine how cardiac and other vital functions are carried out in an active, living human body.
  • Involve students in hands-on kinesiology simulation activities to understand how a living body physiologically produces motions. 

“Anatomage provides an interaction with anatomy inside a living human body that we could never offer before,” said The Citadel’s Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics Dean, Darin Zimmerman, Ph.D. “The Citadel is deeply grateful to the Swain family for helping provide this unparalleled learning experience.”

Cadets work with Dr. Clinton Moran on the college’s Anatomage table in The Citadel Anatomy and Physiology Lab August 31, 2021.

The software for The Citadel’s system will be upgraded as new functionality becomes available. For example, the next software update, Table 8, includes a digital pregnancy, from beginning to birth.

Want a closer look?

See what the Anatomage technology can do in the demonstration video below.

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New leader selected to head The Citadel’s Swain Department of Nursing https://today.citadel.edu/new-leader-selected-to-head-the-citadels-swain-department-of-nursing/ Fri, 23 Apr 2021 17:53:27 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=23349 Beginning work on June 1, 2021, Kim Subasic, Ph.D., will officially become department head for the Swain Department of Nursing. ]]>

Photo: Kim Subasic, Ph.D., who begins work as the head of the Swain Department of Nursing on June 1

Even before the pandemic changed how we understand nursing, South Carolina was expected to deal with a critical shortage of nurses by the next decade.

That’s why the Swain Department of Nursing at The Citadel has been working — since its inception — to increase the number of skilled leaders within the field.

Now, that department will itself have a new leader: Kim Subasic, Ph.D. Subasic will begin work on June 1, 2021.

Subasic is currently serving as the chair of the department of nursing for the University of Scranton. In her current role there, she guides more than 400 nursing students with the help of 23 full-time faculty members.

Subasic earned a Ph.D. from Saint Louis University, a Master of Science in Nursing Education from the University of Massachusetts and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Saint Francis University.

“In keeping with the mission of The Citadel, my goal for the Swain Department of Nursing is to produce graduates who will become leaders in the field of nursing,” said Subasic. “Characteristics that I hope to help instill in every graduate are high ethical standards, a passion for the profession, and empathy for the patient and family.”

The Swain Department of Nursing currently has 33 cadet nursing students — with just under 10 expected to graduate this May — and 39 non-cadet, evening nursing students — with 25 expected to graduate. The Swain Department of Nursing was launched in January 2017, after a generous donation from the brothers David C. Swain Jr., ’80, and Christopher C. Swain, ’81, as well as their wives: Mary and Debora, respectively.

 “This past year has made it ever so clear that the world needs caring nurse leaders who will operate with excellence on the front lines of health care,” said Darin Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean of the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics. “We are extremely fortunate to have an experienced leader in Dr. Kimberly Subasic to shepherd the Swain Department of Nursing to a prominent position in nursing education.”

Subasic will be the second head of the department, after the retirement of Amy Joseph, Ph.D., who was critical to the founding of and early successes of the program. Under her leadership, the department officially received its accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and, one year after that, was invited to join the premier nursing honor society, Sigma Theta Tau.

To find out more about studying nursing at The Citadel, call 843-953-1630 or email nursing@citadel.edu.

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Citadel nursing students, athletics trainers help vaccinate faculty and staff on campus https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-nursing-students-help-vaccinate-faculty-and-staff-on-campus/ Thu, 25 Mar 2021 13:44:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22941 In partnership with Plantation Pharmacy, Faculty and staff are given the Johnson & Johnson Janssen coronavirus vaccine in McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 24, 2021. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)In partnership with Plantation Pharmacy, Faculty and staff are given the Johnson & Johnson Janssen coronavirus vaccine in McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 24, 2021. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)"Having the opportunity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine seems like a small role, however, it is truly an honor to be a part of the solution to this crisis gripping our nation."]]> In partnership with Plantation Pharmacy, Faculty and staff are given the Johnson & Johnson Janssen coronavirus vaccine in McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 24, 2021. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)In partnership with Plantation Pharmacy, Faculty and staff are given the Johnson & Johnson Janssen coronavirus vaccine in McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 24, 2021. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Slots still open for on-campus vaccine clinic Friday, March 26

Photo above: Cadet Victoria Conley, a senior Nursing major, administers a Johnson and Johnson Janssen COVID-19 vaccination injection.

The Citadel is holding two COVID-19 vaccination clinics for faculty and staff, and tapped into an on-campus resource to help: senior nursing students from the Swain Department of Nursing. There are 32 nursing students who are expected to graduate in May, eight helped with the vaccination clinic. Additionally, five trainers with the college’s athletics teams are also helping give vaccines.

Bulldogs Coach Brent Thompson getting the Johnson & Johnson Janssen coronavirus vaccine, administered by athletics trainer Jenna Byrd, in McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, on Wednesday, March 24, 2021.

All faculty, staff , campus partners, vendors and contractors are eligible to receive the Johnson and Johnson Janssen vaccine, as well as high-risk cadets and students, by appointment. It is the vaccinate that only required one dose. The first clinic was March 24 and the students helped vaccinate more than 180 people.

The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.), ’79, visits with cadets and students from the Swain School of Nursing at the college’s vaccination clinic for faculty and staff on March 24, 2021

“The nursing students and athletic trainers did an incredible job, as did both nursing faculty instructors,” said Leah Schonfeld, assistant vice president/chief resources officer for The Citadel Department of Human Resources. “The students and trainers were very professional, checking employees after their shots, and following all of the necessary procedures.”

The next clinic on campus is Friday March 26, with registration required in advance through this link: The Citadel COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic FRI 26 MAR 21.

Left to right: Cadet Catherine Hill, Logan Nelson and Amauri Bowman, all Class of 2021 nursing students, pose for a quick photo during the The Citadel faculty and staff vaccination clinic on March 24, 2021.

The future nurses welcomed the opportunity to help thwart the pandemic. Cadet Catherine Hill will graduate in May and accept a commission as an Army officer nurse.

As senior nursing students we were honored to be asked to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. Our nursing instructor Dr. Linda Edgerton said it best, ‘we are making history getting to distribute it to the faculty and staff at The Citadel.’

This time last year we were sent home, anxiously wondering what the next year had in store for us. No one thought we would be where we are today and as a nation we patiently waited for a vaccine to come out with the hopes that one day we would return to normal. Having the opportunity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine seems like a small role, however, it is truly an honor to be a part of the solution to this crisis gripping our nation.

Cadet Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, U.S. Army-bound nursing major

Linda Edgerton, Ph.D., one of the college’s nursing instructors, helped train the student nurses on the vaccination procedures and oversaw their work.

“As this year’s nursing students graduate and enter health care settings as professional nurses, COVID-19 will continue to be present,” said Linda Edgerton.  “After helping vaccinate faculty and staff on campus, they know they are already making a difference and will be even more prepared work. This pandemic is an historic public health crisis and these women and men will likely remember helping safeguard The Citadel’s faculty and staff with vaccinations their whole lives.”

Left to right: Cadet Victoria Conley, ’21; The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.), ’79; and Cadet Catherine Hill, ’21, show off their Citadel bands of gold while visiting during the college’s vaccination clinic for faculty and staff.

The campus community would like to thank the following Class of 2021 nursing students and the athletic trainers helping with the clinics.

Nursing students

  • Cadet Jesse Crook
  • Cadet Catherine Hill
  • Amauri Bowman, Citadel Graduate College evening student
  • Courtney Marsh, Citadel Graduate College evening student
  • Cadet Victoria Conley
  • Drexyl Blair, Citadel Graduate College evening student
  • Logan Nelson, Citadel Graduate College evening student
  • Cadet Kate Manzione

Citadel Bulldogs athletic trainers

  • Jenna Byrd
  • Jonathan Chang
  • Andy Clawson
  • Aliyah Duren
  • Michelle Lomonaco

All members of campus participating in The Citadel’s vaccinations clinics are provided with a laminated vaccination card.

For more information about studying Nursing at The Citadel, please visit The Swain Department of Nursing at this link, or

In partnership with Plantation Pharmacy, Faculty and staff are given the Johnson & Johnson Janssen coronavirus vaccine in McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 24, 2021.
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New Center for Climate Studies to be established at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/new-center-for-climate-studies-to-be-established-at-the-citadel/ Tue, 29 Sep 2020 19:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19004 Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)The Center’s mission will be to promote climate science through education, research, outreach and the development of public-private partnerships.]]> Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF, ’77, Center for Climate Studies under development

Photo above: Dr. Scott Curtis, director for the new Center for Climate Studies, surveying atmospheric conditions from atop Grimsley Hall.

Climate variability, risks and the advancement of solutions will be the focus of a new, interdisciplinary center being established at The Citadel. The official name: the Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF ’77 Center for Climate Studies.

Near, a member of The Citadel Class of 1977, career meteorologist for the Air Force and dedicated professor of Physics at the college, passed away in March of 2020.

“Lt. Col. Near knew the importance of climate science work firsthand. He demonstrated extraordinary generosity by providing the college, through The Citadel Foundation, a $1.865 million gift to initiate the Center. Ever humble and not wanting to receive any recognition for his donation, Jim specified that his gift remain anonymous until his passing,” said Darin Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean for The Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics at The Citadel.

The mission

Jenkins Hall, Thomas Hall and Grimsley Hall are seen from Summerall Field at The Citadel

The Center’s mission will be to promote climate science through education, research, outreach and the development of public-private partnerships, according to Scott Curtis, who holds a Ph.D. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. Curtis was recently named the Dr. John Lining Professor of Physics and director of the Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF ’77 Center for Climate Studies.

“There is a critical need for expanded climate work of this nature in the Lowcountry, coastal areas and around the country as evidenced by flooding, increasing storm magnitude and climate driven wildfires,” said Curtis, who will teach atmospheric and oceanic physics in addition to directing the Center. “Once activated, the Center will be unique in South Carolina higher education. There are several centers that focus on water, the environment and hazards, but none have climate as their central mission, like The Citadel’s new Center will.”

The Citadel is placing such importance on the Center that its establishment appears as Objective 6.3 within The Citadel’s strategic plan, Our Mighty Citadel 2026: Advancing Our Legacy of Leadership.

Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of The Citadel’s new Center for Climate Studies

In his first month as director, Curtis met with several climate stakeholders in the Lowcountry, including the Chief Resilience Officer for the City of Charleston, Mark Wilbert, and Mount Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie who graduated from The Citadel in 1983.

Curtis also recently released the 2nd annual Climatological Research Studies Grant (CRSG) competition. The CRSG will fund up to $60,000 in research projects related to climate science. In addition, Curtis is preparing a proposal for the Center to the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, to be reviewed in early 2021.

The Center will:

  • Inform and promote the design of sustainable, scientifically sound, technologically feasible, economically efficient and ethically defensible climate risk management strategies.
  • Guide curriculum development in atmospheric and climate science.
  • Conduct place-based research with undergraduates.

“We hope the Center will be readily recognized as an entity that will not only serve campus, but our Lowcountry neighbors, the citizens of South Carolina and beyond,” said Curtis.

Research activities

Planned research activities within the Center will include the relationship of climate and variability to:

National security

Climate effects are a critical issue facing the nation’s military and citizenry into the foreseeable future. In the 2019 “Report on Effects of a Changing Climate to the Department of Defense,” 79 mission assurance priority installations were experiencing some effect of climate or would realize vulnerabilities within the next 20 years.

Coastal environment and infrastructure

Recurrent flooding is also a priority issue for policy makers in the Lowcountry of South Carolina. According to the Charleston NWS, coastal flood events in Charleston occurred 89 times in 2019, which far exceeded any other year in the record dating back to 1980. Nuisance flooding is costly to coastal communities through loss of revenue and degradation of infrastructure. Severe heat waves are detrimental to tourism, rising sea surface temperatures affect fish populations and acute drought events can decrease freshwater supply and increase salinity levels, which affects agricultural productivity and ecosystem services.

Public health and welfare

The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the necessity of science literacy. Like public health science, climate science is inherently global, involves many feedback loops and requires the critical analysis of data trends. Climate extremes also can be linked to health disparities. For example, The Post and Courier recently reported that in Charleston “flooding can cause transportation hardships that lead to lost workdays and health risk for those who have to slog through water teeming with E. coli and toxic chemicals.” In addition, temperature and humidity extremes contribute to heat stress for field workers.

For these reasons, from 2020 to 2023 the Center will be a collaborator on an EPA grant: “Predicting Drinking Water Contamination from Extreme Weather to Reduce Early Life Contaminant Exposure.” 

For more information, contact The Citadel Department of Physics at (843) 953-5122.

The moon is seen over Padgett-Thomas Barracks during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020
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