Strategic Plan 2026 – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 20 May 2021 13:26:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Strategic Plan 2026 – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Rick and Mary Lee Bastin honored in ribbon-cutting ceremony https://today.citadel.edu/rick-and-mary-lee-bastin-honored-in-ribbon-cutting-ceremony/ Fri, 14 May 2021 21:52:27 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=24384 Bastin Hall, a state-of-the-art academic facility, was made possible because of a $6-million gift from the couple.]]>

The Citadel Foundation recognizes the two primary donors for the new home of the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

In a small, family ceremony — with limited attendance due to COVID precautions — The Citadel and The Citadel Foundation (TCF) recognized the efforts of Rick Bastin, Class of 1965, and his wife Mary Lee, that made the college’s newest academic building into a reality.

Bastin Hall, a state-of-the-art academic facility, was made possible because of a $6-million gift from the couple.

On Friday, May 14, the Bastins attended a small ribbon cutting ceremony for the new building, held in their honor.

“I was a Mercedes dealer, and the CEO of Mercedes used to preach to us: ‘We need to amaze and delight our customers.’ Well, this building amazes and delights me, and it’s beyond my greatest dreams that it would come out this well,” said Rick Bastin during the ceremony. “If you look back at Bond Hall and if you look at Bastin Hall now — this is not your grandfather’s Oldsmobile, this is something else.”

Rick Bastin, ’65, speaking at the ribbon cutting ceremony for Bastin Hall.

The new home for the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business is located on Hagood Avenue, near the football stadium. The building officially opened for classes in January 2021.

“It’s going to last — it’s not something that we did for one year. It was a project, and everyone will get the benefit of it. The building will be here for a long time” said Mary Lee Bastin. “We’ve been coming here forever, and the place has really grown. The quality of the students is just magnificent.”

In addition to the Bastins, more than 50 other individuals, families, businesses and Citadel classes stepped forward to name spaces within the building, providing the substantial donations needed to fully realize the vision for the building through TCF. In all, more than 450 donors contributed to the project at some level.

Once circumstances allow, this small ceremony will be followed by a larger, more public event to celebrate all those who contributed to the building’s construction.

Michael Weeks, Ph.D., dean of the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business, presenting a framed article on Bastin Hall to Rick Bastin

In addition to the upcoming event, plaques located throughout Bastin Hall recognize the areas funded by individual gifts, such as the Darby Family Lobby, in recognition of the Georgia and John Darby Family, ’85; the Jimmy Kerr, ’65, and Bunny Kerr Family Rooftop Terrace; and the Class of 1977 Great Lawn.

About the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

The Tommy & Victoria Baker School of Business develops innovative leaders of principle to serve a global community. The school is accredited by AACSB International and is a recognized leader in business education. 

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Citadel Board of Visitors elects new chair, vice chair https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-board-of-visitors-elects-new-chair-vice-chair/ Sat, 17 Oct 2020 14:28:49 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19468 The Citadel sealThe Citadel sealThe Citadel Board of Visitors elected Col. Myron C. Harrington Jr., U.S. Marine Corps, (Ret.), ’60, as Board chair. ]]> The Citadel sealThe Citadel seal

The Citadel Board of Visitors (BOV) elected Col. Myron C. Harrington Jr., U.S. Marine Corps, (Ret.), ’60, as Board chair. Col. Peter M McCoy, ’74, was selected to serve as vice chair of the BOV. Voting for both leaders was unanimous.

Harrington has served his alma mater in many capacities for decades, including on the BOV as secretary, general board member, vice chair and, most recently, as interim board chair upon the departure of Col. Fred. L. Price Jr. ’75, in September. 

“I am humbled by the faith my follow Board members have placed in me to serve in this capacity,” Col. Harrington said. “It is a privilege to serve, and I will do my best to continue the progress our college has made in recent years.”

Harrington graduated from The Citadel with a Bachelor of Arts degree in History in 1960.  He was commissioned as an officer in the Marine Corps in 1961 and served for 30 years. One of the highlights of his military career included service as company commander, Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, in the Republic of Vietnam in 1968, at the Battle for Hue City during the Tet Offensive. Other highlights of his military career included serving as commanding officer 3rd Recruit Training Battalion Parris Island, commanding officer 24th Marine Amphibious Unit in Beirut, Lebanon, and chief of staff of Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. 

After retiring from the Marine Corps, Harrington served in independent school education for which he earned numerous awards. He was headmaster (now headmaster emeritus) for Trident Academy in Mount Pleasant, an independent school specializing in the remediation of students with learning disabilities. He is past vice president and headmaster for the South Carolina Independent School Association, and past president of the Palmetto Association of Independent Schools.

Some of Harrington’s military commendations include the Navy Cross, Silver Star, Legion of Merit with two Gold Stars, Meritorious Service Medal with Gold Star, Navy Commendation Medal with Combat “V” and Gold Star, Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Gold Star, Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry and Vietnamese Staff Honor Medal 1st Class.

Col. Peter M. McCoy will serve as vice chair of the BOV. McCoy has volunteered in support of his alma mater for many years in a variety of capacities. 

“I am honored to continue serving The Citadel through the role of vice chair on the Board of Visitors,” said McCoy. “The importance of our mission to educate and develop principled leaders continues to resonate strongly as a need for our communities, our states and our nation. We will continue working together to fulfill this need.”

McCoy was elected to the BOV in 2012 by the South Carolina General Assembly.  He was elected to a second term, which he is currently serving, from 2018 – 2024. He has served on numerous committees.

Professionally, McCoy was a 30-year employee with Sonoco Products Company, a global packaging solutions company headquartered in Hartsville, South Carolina. He was an account manager with experience and leadership roles in both sales and manufacturing.

McCoy graduated from The Citadel in 1974 with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Education.

The Citadel BOV has 14 voting members. Ex-officio members include the governor, the adjutant general and the state superintendent of education; the other 11 members are graduates of The Citadel. Members serve six-year terms. There is no limit to the number of terms that a board member may serve and no age limit. Board members have the honorary rank of colonel in the Unorganized Militia of South Carolina. If members have earned a higher rank in U.S. military service, they may retain that rank.

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Academic schedule announced for spring 2021 semester https://today.citadel.edu/academic-schedule-announced-for-spring-2021-semester/ Tue, 13 Oct 2020 18:48:45 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19347 Dr. James Bezjian leads a Baker School of Business class on innovation in Bond Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, September 22, 2020. (Photo by Tom Thompson / The Citadel)Dr. James Bezjian leads a Baker School of Business class on innovation in Bond Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, September 22, 2020. (Photo by Tom Thompson / The Citadel)There are numerous adjustments due to the ongoing pandemic.]]> Dr. James Bezjian leads a Baker School of Business class on innovation in Bond Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, September 22, 2020. (Photo by Tom Thompson / The Citadel)Dr. James Bezjian leads a Baker School of Business class on innovation in Bond Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, September 22, 2020. (Photo by Tom Thompson / The Citadel)

Photo above: Dr. James Bezjian leads a Baker School of Business class on innovation in Bond Hall on September 22, 2020. (Photo by Tom Thompson / The Citadel)

The Citadel’s academic calendar for the spring 2021 semester is now available online. There are numerous adjustments due to the ongoing pandemic, including the elimination of spring break and study abroad engagements.

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets will return the week of January 10, with details forthcoming from the Office of the Commandant.

Students studying through The Citadel Graduate College (CGC) will return according to their course-type schedule as outlined below.

January 2021 key academic dates:

Jan. 6Registration opens online at 9 a.m. :
For all cadets and students wishing to modify or add to the courses they already registered for before the winter break.
Jan. 10Corps returns this week: Details TBD from Commandant’s Office
Jan. 11CGC compressed (8 week) courses begin.
CGC Joint Program courses begin.
Jan. 14Last add/drop day: CGC compressed (8 week) courses
Jan. 18 No classes : Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Jan 19 Dedicated Corps advising day.
Last add/drop day: CGC Joint Program courses.
Jan. 20Classes begin: Cadets, day-veteran and active duty, and regular schedule CGCs students
Jan. 26Last add/drop day: Cadets, day-veteran and active duty, and regular schedule CGC courses.
Jan. 27 Last day to request audit/pass or fail: Cadets

View the most current academic calendar here. With questions about registering for courses, please contact The Citadel Registrar on weekdays at registrar@citadel.edu, or by calling (843) 953-6969.

Student Success Center ready to help

The Citadel Student Success Center is always standing by to help cadets and students studying in person, or remotely, every semester.

To make an appointment for subject-area tutoring, or writing assistance please call the center at (843) 953-5305 or email them at sscenter@citadel.edu.

Appointment requests are processed within 24 hours, sometimes more quickly. Requests are not checked on weekends or holidays. Once your appointment request has been processed, you will be contacted with your appointment date and time. 


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Cadet selected to serve on board for National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society https://today.citadel.edu/cadet-selected-to-serve-on-board-for-national-collegiate-hispanic-honor-society/ Tue, 13 Oct 2020 13:11:05 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19367 Cadet Micah Cohen's yearbook photoCadet Micah Cohen's yearbook photoThe National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society, has named The Citadel's Micah L. Cohen as the newest member of its Board of Student Advisers.]]> Cadet Micah Cohen's yearbook photoCadet Micah Cohen's yearbook photo

As seen in a news release from sigmadeltapi.org

Note: Cadet Micah Cohen is a Modern Languages major and a World History minor. He has earned gold stars for high academic achievement. He serves as in the rank of major in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, as an academic officer. Additionally, Cohen is serving his second year as vice president for the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society. Cohen attends The Citadel on an Army contract and is expected to earn a commission to become an officer upon graduation in May 2021. He is from Richmond, Virginia.

Sigma Delta Pi Names The Citadel’s Micah Cohen as Newest Members of
Board of Student Advisers

The Executive Committee of Sigma Delta Pi, the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society, has named The Citadel’s Micah L. Cohen as the newest member of its Board of Student Advisers (BSA).

Cohen begins his two-year term effective immediately and joins a very active and well-established BSA that was founded in 2016 and is currently chaired by Bailey Mitchell of Eastern Illinois University.

Sigma Delta Pi’s BSA provides national leadership opportunities to select student members who offer feedback to the national Executive Committee (EC) on select issues related to the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society. Such consultations between the EC and the BSA may include but are not limited to: 1) identifying strategic initiatives to bolster membership. 2) providing a student perspective on proposed initiatives of the Executive Committee. 3) identifying areas of potential improvement with Sigma Delta Pi’s various programs. 4) discussing select issues and concerns at both the national (EC) and local (chapter) levels. One of the BSA’s main projects is its quarterly newsletter Sigma Delta Pideas.

With its national office at the College of Charleston in South Carolina, Sigma Delta Pi is a member of the Association of College Honor Societies, the nation’s only certifying agency for college and university honor societies.

For more information contact Mark P. Del Mastro at delmastromp@cofc.edu

1stBattalionStaff- Cadet Micah Cohen
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Citadel cadets and students volunteer for veterans in need https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-community-volunteers-for-veterans/ Fri, 09 Oct 2020 18:15:15 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19287 The Citadel Health Careers Society and others from the college spent Friday morning supplying low-income veteran families with food assistance.]]>

The Citadel community is always looking for opportunities to give back to those who have served and sacrificed for their country.

That’s why The Citadel Health Careers Society, joined by others from the college, spent their Friday morning volunteering with Soldiers’ Angels, supplying low-income veteran families with food assistance.

About 250 veterans were served, and each received about 70 pounds of food — including fresh fruit and vegetables, grains, frozen chicken, many varieties of frozen meals and canned goods, as well as drinks.

Citadel cadet preparing food bags while volunteering for Soldiers’ Angels

“We simply have the best at The Citadel, said Sarah Imam, M.D., faculty administrator for the society and a professor in the Department of Health and Human Performance. “Not only did this group of cadets and students volunteer, they did so wholeheartedly and with enthusiasm. They interacted with the veterans, addressed them with courtesy, asked them about their branch and thanked them for their service.

In total, 25 cadets, one veteran graduate student, and three members of the faculty and staff were on site to help those heroes who are in need.

Sarah Imam, M.D., with cadets volunteering for Soldiers’ Angels

“I had students from across the school from all majors — not just those that are pursuing a health career — who joined in with The Citadel Health Careers Society event today,” continued Imam. “These students genuinely care about our community and our veterans.”

The Citadel Health Careers Society is a student-led organization, for cadets and students — from any major — wanting to pursue any career within healthcare. The society helps members be more competitive applicants for postgraduate studies.

The volunteers from The Citadel worked at the Elks Lodge in Charleston from 8 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. on Friday, October 9.

Soldiers’ Angles has a global network of volunteers — representing all 50 states and 12 countries abroad — who work tirelessly to ensure that those who serve or have served are supported, uplifted and remembered through a variety of support programs.

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Members of the Corps of Cadets seek “a more perfect union” https://today.citadel.edu/members-of-the-corps-of-cadets-seek-a-more-perfect-union/ Thu, 08 Oct 2020 15:15:26 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19249 To maintain social distance, the cadets connected themselves with spirit T-shirts, each holding a separate side.]]>

Five rings on Summerall Field — made of members from The Citadel community, linked together — are a visual representation of what unites members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

At 7 p.m. on Wednesday, October 7, cadets gathered and stood together, using a physical connection to highlight their camaraderie. To maintain social distance, the cadets connected themselves with spirit T-shirts, each holding a separate side.

In addition to the Corps, members of The Citadel faculty and staff attended to show their support.

Those who attended the Unity and Respect event — designed by the Corps, for the campus community — were responding to an email sent by Cadet Hayden Brown, captain for The Citadel basketball team.

Cadet Hayden Brown speaking ahead of the Unity and Respect event

The event “has no political/group/organization affiliation,” Brown wrote in an email. “We are standing for unity. We are standing for a respect that is bigger than ourselves. We are standing in love for our neighbors. We are standing with empathetic hearts.”

Brown and other members of the Corps worked together to write a statement to explain the purpose of the Unity and Respect event.

Regimental Public Affairs Officer Cadet Ruby Bolden read that statement during the event, on behalf of those attending.

Cadet Ruby Bolden speaking during the Unity and Respect event

Despite all national attention and conversations surrounding inequities in our country, many remain apathetic. As the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, we are unified in our belief that no member of the Corps is any more important than another. Our core values are honor, duty, and respect; our honor is tested by how we respond to acts of injustice and the empathy we share with others. Without respect for one another, we will fail – as future leaders, as a nation, and as a people. We will stand on Wednesday, linked together, with the intent to form a more perfect union. As cadets who have come to The Citadel to pursue our education and develop into principled leaders, we believe we should empower and support each other, and every member of our community. Every member.

After, Bolden joined her classmates and stood in silence for a few moments before delivering the concluding remarks:

“Life is a race. It requires endurance — it requires grit. Life is also a race that cannot be run alone. When life’s challenges end, another one is peaking over the horizon. The person to your left and right has taken the initiative — the commitment — to see you through your struggles, just as you will for them. We do not stand alone. We live to embody the values of honor, duty and respect. We will forever remain committed to these core values, not only for ourselves, but also for those beside us.”

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17 reasons why The Citadel School of Engineering is ranked among the top in the nation https://today.citadel.edu/17-reasons-why-the-citadel-school-of-engineering-is-ranked-among-the-top-in-the-nation/ Tue, 06 Oct 2020 20:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19106 Electrical Engineering students participate in laboratory work in Grimsley Hall in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Electrical Engineering students participate in laboratory work in Grimsley Hall in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)"Highly successful engineering alumni in leadership positions who are strikingly engaged in cadet and graduate support."]]> Electrical Engineering students participate in laboratory work in Grimsley Hall in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Electrical Engineering students participate in laboratory work in Grimsley Hall in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Photo above: mechanical engineering cadets in lab before COVID-19 in early 2020

Citadel engineering ranked the 17th best program in America by U.S. News & World Report, but why?

The Citadel School of Engineering is consistently ranked among the top 25 engineering programs in America by U.S. News & World Report. The newest list puts it at position 17.

Engineering cadets participate in laboratory work in LeTellier Hall at The Citadel instructed by Dr. Rebekah Burke, before COVID-19, in February 2020

But what makes it stand out above so many other programs? U.S. News & World Report uses a complex methodology to build the rankings based on data each college provides annually to the U.S. Department of Education. That’s important, of course. But here are 17 reasons why engineering cadets, students, faculty, staff, alumni and the campus community think The Citadel School of Engineering ranks among America’s superior programs:

  1. Full-time doctorate level, faculty instructors only – no teaching assistants
  2. Disciplined and dedicated cadets and students who are savvy about time management
  3. Hands-on learning with advanced equipment on campus for real-world engineering practice
  4. Industry-leading faculty members producing high-impact partnerships, change-leading research and publications while serving as leaders in professional associations and community STEM engagement
  5. Low student to faculty ratio with student services team, providing tailored guidance to ensure each student’s success
  6. Innovation mindset: Engineering cadets won $10,000 for their idea the Baker Business Bowl in 2019
  7. Freshmen stay, and return the next year; high freshmen retention rate
  8. Ongoing collaboration between civilian, veteran, and active duty populations of cadets, students, and faculty
  9. Consistent student success in engineering competitions
  10. They’re cool: they build robot hands to teach sign language
  11. A hearty menu of options with five undergraduate degrees, four graduate degrees (some fully online) and 14 career-enhancing graduate certificates
  12. Strong relationships with leading South Carolina engineering industry enterprises
  13. High regard for program by deans and senior faculty at peer institutions
  14. 98% job placement within 2 months of graduation
  15. Highly successful engineering alumni in leadership positions who are strikingly engaged in cadet and graduate support
  16. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering is ranked #9 in America by U.S. News & World Report, and has ranked in the top 10 numerous times
  17. Producing principled, highly-trained engineers since 1842

Louis Brems – The Citadel SY 18-19, Peyton Campbell, President’s Report, Engineering

Boost your potential: consider transferring to The Citadel to complete your engineering degree

The Citadel School of Engineering offers a non-cadet, evening program for degree transfer students who complete their first two years at Trident Technical College, or another regionally accredited institution.

South Carolina residents have flexible and affordable guaranteed access  to the non-cadet, evening undergraduate degree options after meeting minimum admissions requirements. The college’s 2+2 Transfer Program will save a South Carolina resident an average of more than $20,000 over the course of 4-years, when compared with the costs of completing a 4-year degree at a public university.

Applicants will work with Citadel admissions advisors to complete a 2-year associates degree, which includes engineering prerequisites (with at least a 2.0 GPA), at a regionally accredited college and then transfer to The Citadel to earn a Bachelors of Science in one of 5 engineering disciplines

For more information, email transfer@citadel.edu or call (843) 953-5089.

Engineering faculty and cadets lead K-12 competitions during Storm The Citadel 2018

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New Center for Climate Studies to be established at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/new-center-for-climate-studies-to-be-established-at-the-citadel/ Tue, 29 Sep 2020 19:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19004 Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)The Center’s mission will be to promote climate science through education, research, outreach and the development of public-private partnerships.]]> Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF, ’77, Center for Climate Studies under development

Photo above: Dr. Scott Curtis, director for the new Center for Climate Studies, surveying atmospheric conditions from atop Grimsley Hall.

Climate variability, risks and the advancement of solutions will be the focus of a new, interdisciplinary center being established at The Citadel. The official name: the Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF ’77 Center for Climate Studies.

Near, a member of The Citadel Class of 1977, career meteorologist for the Air Force and dedicated professor of Physics at the college, passed away in March of 2020.

“Lt. Col. Near knew the importance of climate science work firsthand. He demonstrated extraordinary generosity by providing the college, through The Citadel Foundation, a $1.865 million gift to initiate the Center. Ever humble and not wanting to receive any recognition for his donation, Jim specified that his gift remain anonymous until his passing,” said Darin Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean for The Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics at The Citadel.

The mission

Jenkins Hall, Thomas Hall and Grimsley Hall are seen from Summerall Field at The Citadel

The Center’s mission will be to promote climate science through education, research, outreach and the development of public-private partnerships, according to Scott Curtis, who holds a Ph.D. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. Curtis was recently named the Dr. John Lining Professor of Physics and director of the Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF ’77 Center for Climate Studies.

“There is a critical need for expanded climate work of this nature in the Lowcountry, coastal areas and around the country as evidenced by flooding, increasing storm magnitude and climate driven wildfires,” said Curtis, who will teach atmospheric and oceanic physics in addition to directing the Center. “Once activated, the Center will be unique in South Carolina higher education. There are several centers that focus on water, the environment and hazards, but none have climate as their central mission, like The Citadel’s new Center will.”

The Citadel is placing such importance on the Center that its establishment appears as Objective 6.3 within The Citadel’s strategic plan, Our Mighty Citadel 2026: Advancing Our Legacy of Leadership.

Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of The Citadel’s new Center for Climate Studies

In his first month as director, Curtis met with several climate stakeholders in the Lowcountry, including the Chief Resilience Officer for the City of Charleston, Mark Wilbert, and Mount Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie who graduated from The Citadel in 1983.

Curtis also recently released the 2nd annual Climatological Research Studies Grant (CRSG) competition. The CRSG will fund up to $60,000 in research projects related to climate science. In addition, Curtis is preparing a proposal for the Center to the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, to be reviewed in early 2021.

The Center will:

  • Inform and promote the design of sustainable, scientifically sound, technologically feasible, economically efficient and ethically defensible climate risk management strategies.
  • Guide curriculum development in atmospheric and climate science.
  • Conduct place-based research with undergraduates.

“We hope the Center will be readily recognized as an entity that will not only serve campus, but our Lowcountry neighbors, the citizens of South Carolina and beyond,” said Curtis.

Research activities

Planned research activities within the Center will include the relationship of climate and variability to:

National security

Climate effects are a critical issue facing the nation’s military and citizenry into the foreseeable future. In the 2019 “Report on Effects of a Changing Climate to the Department of Defense,” 79 mission assurance priority installations were experiencing some effect of climate or would realize vulnerabilities within the next 20 years.

Coastal environment and infrastructure

Recurrent flooding is also a priority issue for policy makers in the Lowcountry of South Carolina. According to the Charleston NWS, coastal flood events in Charleston occurred 89 times in 2019, which far exceeded any other year in the record dating back to 1980. Nuisance flooding is costly to coastal communities through loss of revenue and degradation of infrastructure. Severe heat waves are detrimental to tourism, rising sea surface temperatures affect fish populations and acute drought events can decrease freshwater supply and increase salinity levels, which affects agricultural productivity and ecosystem services.

Public health and welfare

The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the necessity of science literacy. Like public health science, climate science is inherently global, involves many feedback loops and requires the critical analysis of data trends. Climate extremes also can be linked to health disparities. For example, The Post and Courier recently reported that in Charleston “flooding can cause transportation hardships that lead to lost workdays and health risk for those who have to slog through water teeming with E. coli and toxic chemicals.” In addition, temperature and humidity extremes contribute to heat stress for field workers.

For these reasons, from 2020 to 2023 the Center will be a collaborator on an EPA grant: “Predicting Drinking Water Contamination from Extreme Weather to Reduce Early Life Contaminant Exposure.” 

For more information, contact The Citadel Department of Physics at (843) 953-5122.

The moon is seen over Padgett-Thomas Barracks during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020
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Citadel launches climate science research center with $2 million donation https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-launches-climate-science-research-center-with-2-million-donation/ Tue, 29 Sep 2020 16:15:30 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19034 Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)As seen in The Post & CourierBy Chloe Johnson A new research center at The Citadel will focus on climate change — the first group dedicated exclusively to this work in]]> Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Dr. Scott Curtis, Director of the new Citadel Climate Center, poses for a portrait on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, September 23, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

As seen in The Post & Courier
By Chloe Johnson

A new research center at The Citadel will focus on climate change — the first group dedicated exclusively to this work in the Lowcountry. 

Called the Lt. Col James B. Near Jr. Center for Climate Studies, it was started with an almost $2 million donation from its namesake.

Near, an Air Force veteran, was a meteorologist and 1977 Citadel graduate who worked in the school’s physics department. He died in March, and asked that his donation be kept anonymous until after his passing. 

The center will be headed by Scott Curtis, who was previously on the faculty at East Carolina University. He spent part of his career at the NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, where he analyzed atmospheric satellite data.

Curtis’ own work has focused on large-scale phenomenon like the El Niño climate pattern and precipitation trends. 

Mark Wilbert, chief resilience officer for Charleston, hailed the move, saying it will “raise the awareness from a super respected institution in the state that the climate science is real and the climate threat is real.”

Curtis said his goal for the ongoing fall semester is in part to learn about the existing research efforts in the area.

There’s already a rich scientific community in the Lowcountry. The state-funded S.C. Sea Grant Consortium provides towns with technical information about the environment, the College of Charleston’s Lowcountry Hazards Center maps flooding, and there’s a local presence from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, among others. 

“The center’s already trying to get itself ingrained in what’s happening here as much as possible,” Curtis said. “We don’t want to reinvent the wheel. We don’t want to duplicate efforts.”

Curtis said there could be more to contribute to the understanding of the conditions that set up sudden, extreme precipitation, or rain bombs, that sometimes unleash flooding chaos on Charleston.

The center is designed to involve faculty across disciplines at The Citadel in climate research. For example, Curtis hopes that engineering expertise at the school will lead to work on potential flooding fixes.

The center will also focus on environmental health issues and is supporting water quality research to identify dangerous microbes and microplastics in floodwaters. 

The Citadel’s new group will also focus on how a changing climate affects national security. Some military installations in the state, including the Marine Corps training base on Parris Island and Coast Guard stations in Charleston, have been flagged in the past as vulnerable to rising seas

“Regardless of who’s in the White House and the political structure, I think the military is really taking this seriously,” Curtis said. 

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Hispanic Heritage spotlight: Citadel cadet, Maria Contreras-Muñoz https://today.citadel.edu/hispanic-heritage-spotlight-citadel-cadet-maria-contreras-munoz/ Mon, 28 Sep 2020 18:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18896 Contreras-Muñoz is as impressive off the field as she is on. The Computer Science major, minoring in Cyber Security and Information Systems, also serves as Academic Officer for Third Battalion."]]>

Photo above: Citadel soccer captain, Cadet Maria Contreras-Munoz (lower left) leading the team during a game.

As seen on News2, WCBD-TV
By Sophia deSaussure

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)– This month, WCBD is celebrating Hispanic heritage by honoring the contributions of Hispanic Americans to the culture, history, and achievements of the United States.

Maria Contreras-Muñoz was born in Guatemala and moved to the United States to attend and play soccer at Montverde Academy in Florida. During her time on the team, they ranked No. 1 nationally by the National Soccer Coaches Association of America and she finished with a 21-2-0 record as a senior.

In 2017, Contreras-Muñoz joined the Citadel’s soccer team. Citadel Soccer Coach Ciaran Traquair said the cadet – who now serves as the Bulldog’s team captain – is passionate about the game.

“She enjoys being under pressure with the ball at her feet,” he said.

Traquair said her sportsmanship and genuine care for others sets her apart from other players.

“I would say out of the 28 kids I have on my team she has the highest level of respect out of the group,” he said.

Contreras-Muñoz is as impressive off the field as she is on. The Computer Science major, minoring in Cyber Security and Information Systems, also serves as Academic Officer for Third Battalion.

As Academic Officer, she is responsible for leading the academic success of about 500 cadets in her battalion, with the help of eight other of officer cadets who report to her.

“As an Academic Officer I get to teach them and help them without punting that much pressure on them,” she said.

Traquair said nominating the midfielder as team captain was a big decision given her already intense workload.

“Putting Maria in that position, obviously I had to consider how would she handle the demands of the day to day routine. She has to manage over discipline issues [in the Corps of Cadets] and just being in a leadership position in general,” he said. “I would say she has handled that better than any kid I could ever bring on– whether they were from Charleston, South Carolina or Guatemala,” he continued.

She said she balances it all thanks to her upbringing that had an immense emphasis on education.

“Everything you put in, the commitment you put in, that is the same result you are going to get back, so it is very important to commit yourself to what you want,” she said.

Maria said it’s the emphasis on education along with a deep respect for faith and family that sets her ‘Hispanic Heritage’ apart.

“I think that is what makes us unique,” she said. “We are very family-oriented and we just bring that to the work place to them team that’s in you– you care for people,” she added.

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