South Carolina Corps of Cadets – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 17 Dec 2020 21:19:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png South Carolina Corps of Cadets – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Six generations of Workmans and a wakeup https://today.citadel.edu/six-generations-of-workmans-and-a-wakeup/ Sat, 26 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20940 Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)When Billy Workman matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina.]]> Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)

By Cadet Merritt Reeves, The Citadel Class of 2022
Historic photos provided by The Citadel Archives and Museum

Photo above: Cadet-recruit William Douglas Workman V, The Citadel Class of 2024, a sixth generation Citadel cadet, poses for a portrait on campus on November 20, 2020.

When Billy Workman of Orangeburg matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina, a father-son tradition that dates all the way back to the late 19th century and his great-great-great-grandfather.

Billy’s full name: William Douglas Workman V.

In 1882, The Citadel resumed operations after closing its gates for 17 years after the Civil War. In that year, William Douglas Workman enrolled along with over a 100 other cadets. An 1886 graduate, he was the first of Billy’s ancestors to attend the college.

The second William Douglas Workman in the family line was William Douglas Workman Sr. who graduated from The Citadel in 1909 and was valedictorian of his class.

1909

William Workman Sr. was also the second, and the last, Workman to attend The Citadel before it moved from Marion Square campus to its current location on the Ashley River. Billy’s great-aunt, Dee Benedict, talked about her grandfather’s service during World War I.

 “If you look at my grandfather, he really was an absolute hero of the bunch,” said Benedict. “Back when South Carolina was in its own brigade, he led the charge and broke the back of the Germans.”

Dee Benedict, Billy Workman’s great aunt discussing William Douglas Workman Sr.

In 1935, William Douglas Workman Jr., Billy’s great-grandfather, graduated from The Citadel after holding the rank of battalion commander.

1935

In that year, the Corps numbered 89 cadets who were split into two battalions. William Workman Jr. was Benedict’s grandfather and, according to her, he served in North Africa during World War II. “After the war, he stayed in the reserves,” said Benedict, “He ran for the United States Senate against a newspaper man in Columbia and had 46% of the vote, which was amazing. There were a bunch of people who would get fired because they supported him which made it almost like a revival thing. Although he lost the race, that was the start of the Republican Party in South Carolina.”

Billy’s grandfather, William Douglas Workman III, graduated from The Citadel after serving as first sergeant in Tango Company. A 1961 graduate, he attended the college before it was integrated in 1966.

William Douglas Workman III, The Citadel Class of 1961

Billy’s father, Will (William Douglas Workman IV), who has a cotton ginning business in Orangeburg, was the last of the Workmans to attend The Citadel before the college turned co-ed. 

William Douglas Workman IV, '89
William Douglas Workman IV, ’89

He graduated in 1989 with the self-proclaimed title “centurion.” Known for his sense of humor, Will paid for this comedic streak throughout his years as a cadet with hundreds of tours. These punishments, however, hardly dimmed Will’s mischievous spirit.  According to Billy, he is still a jokester.  “He’s a pretty laid back guy,” said Billy, “but my going to The Citadel has loosened him up even more, and I can relate to him better.”

Doing what only felt natural, Billy is expected to graduate in 2024 with a Business Administration degree. After decades of forefathers who roamed the grounds of The Citadel, Billy finally joined the long line of Cadet Workmans. “Billy always had a choice on whether or not he would go to The Citadel,” said Will, “but when he decided he wanted to go for himself, it made me really proud. I was happy that the tradition wasn’t ending with me.”

William Douglas Workman V,
a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, who goes by Billy, posting for a portrait
at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on November 20, 2020.

The Workman family has seen the college through time and progress. Like Billy’s Citadel COVID-19 on campus freshman year, each generation has had difference experiences, but one thing remains constant—the lasting bond between alumni and college. With five generations before him, Billy feels a familial expectation, but he waits in earnest to fulfill this role and dreams even of continuing the legacy one day with a seventh William Douglas Workman.

Cadet Merritt Reeves is an intern in the Office of Communications and Marketing. A junior majoring in English with a Spanish minor, she has earned Gold Stars for academic excellence. After graduation, she plans to return to her home town of Columbia, South Carolina and attend law school.

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Tis the season: cadets share holiday thoughts and traditions https://today.citadel.edu/tis-the-season-cadets-share-holiday-thoughts-and-traditions/ Sat, 19 Dec 2020 17:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21150 Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019When you are kind, when you treat people with respect and show that you care about them, it goes a very long way.]]> Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019

Photo above: Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019

By Cadet Samantha Walton, Regimental Public Affairs NCO

Cadet Samantha Walton

I’m Samantha Walton. I am a junior, the Regimental Public Affairs NCO for the 2020-21 academic year, and am majoring in Political Science.

I am home in Macon, Georgia with my family for the our Winter Furlough from campus.

Christmas is a very important time for me as a Christian, as an individual, and as a member of The Citadel Gospel Choir.

I also appreciate the differences of my fellow students in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. We don’t all see this season in the same way.

As part of my role as Regimental Public Affairs NCO I work to keep cadets connected through communications and stories. This time, I asked a few cadets to share their thoughts about the holiday season after we all left campus for the break. This is what they emailed back to me.

Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu

Junior, Construction Engineering Major
Taiwan

Favorite holiday song?
My favorite holiday song is “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” because it is very jolly.

A tradition you cherish?
In Taiwan, most people don’t really celebrate Christmas as our holiday, but we do occasionally exchange gifts for fun and sharing joy.

Fondest holiday memory?
I remember when I was little, my dad came home very late once on Christmas eve, dressed up as Santa Claus, and gave me and my brothers presents. This was a special memory because we really didn’t normally celebrate Christmas. And last year I took an amazing trip to Austria.

Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019
Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019

Looking forward to?
I look forward to the decorations everywhere when in America with my host family. It is so magical to see all the lights, Christmas trees, and decorations everywhere you go. Additionally, I was looking forward to going home to Taiwan, but due to COVID-19 I am staying with my host family.

Caring for others in this challenging time?
I am helping my host family move to a new home, gathering things and delivering them for donations, and packing up.

Religious traditions?
I am not religious.

On your wish list?
A Netflix marathon!


Cadet Natalie Stewart, USMC contract

Sophomore, Psychology Major
Las Vegas, Nevada

Cadet Natalie Stewart’s Christmas tree and family dog

Favorite holiday song?
Happy Christmas by John Lennon

A tradition you cherish?
On Christmas my mom, sister and I sit in the living room together and share lots of love. We eat cookies, wear fuzzy pajamas, and spend time together.

Fondest holiday memory?
My fondest holiday memory is when I came home for Winter Furlough from my knob year. I hadn’t seen my family since I left for matriculation, since they live so far away. I remember coming home to my mom and sister, and I felt an immense rush of joy when they hugged me. 

This year we are taking extra precautions to keep my grandparents safe and ordering our gifts all online.

Looking forward to?
I am looking forward to relaxing and spending lots of time with my family and dogs. Since there isn’t much to do with COVID-19 regulations, we will all be home together this Christmas. I hope to make some cookies with my sister! 

Religious traditions?
My family isn’t a specific religion, but we always express the importance of spreading kindness and acceptance in the world. 

On your wish list?
I asked for a new pair of glasses and a watch. I’ll be going into 2021 with 20/20 vision – ha!

Band Company cadet Natalie Stewart prepares supplies before knob arrivals during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel.

Caring for others in this challenging time?
I think the first thing we can do as individuals is spread kindness and love (especially in times like these). For those who are able, there are programs you can reach out to, where you can help others in need. Having open arms (6ft away of course) and recognizing each other’s individual needs can go a long way.

I went through my closet the other day, and I posted what I gathered on my neighborhood page. I was glad I found some people my age who were in need of some clothes. We also got in touch with a local church, where you can “adopt a family” and it allows you to help out a family in need. 

“Use your voice for kindness, your ears for compassion, your hands for charity, your mind for truth, and your heart for love” – Anonymous (Buddhist quote)

Jaret Sean Price

Junior, Exercise Science Major
Aiken, South Carolina

Favorite holiday song?
Little Saint Nick by the Beach Boys

A tradition you cherish?
A tradition that I cherish is that every Christmas Eve after dinner my brother, sister, and I each open an ornament given to us by my Mom and Dad to hang on the family Christmas tree. This was something my Mom did as a little girl with her parents and carried it over when I was born. I hope one day I can continue this family tradition when I have children of my own.

Fondest holiday memory?
I don’t really have a fondest holiday memory. I just enjoy being home with my family and living in the “now.” Every Christmas leaves me with a new memory, and if I were asked what I remember from a certain Christmas then I’d be able to answer with a smile.

Looking forward to?
Each year I look forward to coming home from The Citadel for Winter Furlough and walking into the house to see that my parents have put up all 25 Christmas trees. Each Christmas tree, of course, has its own theme.

The COVID-19 pandemic really isn’t changing how we celebrate the holidays. We’re wearing masks, but still celebrating.

Religious traditions?
We put up my great-grandfathers manger and Nativity Scene that he built and the figurines my great-grandmother painted.

On your wish list?
Not much, just some closes and little things.

Caring for others in this challenging time?
Every Christmas season we do a sweep of clothes that we don’t wear anymore or that are too small on my younger siblings. Those clothes are collected and are taken to the local Goodwill for people who will need them.

When you are kind, when you treat people with respect and show that you care about them, it goes a very long way. As a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets I remember people who were kind and caring towards me, who took the time out of their day to check on me. That is someone I want to be, something that I don’t ever want to steer away from; and I truly believe that all Cadets are capable to doing this.

Freshmen on Matriculation Day 2020

James Hayes III
Freshman, Civil Engineering Major
Ridgeland, South Carolina

Favorite holiday song?
“This Christmas” by Donny Hathaway. We always play this song during the Christmas season.

A tradition you cherish?
A tradition I cherish is when my family goes to my grandparents’ house. We all go there and eat good food, open gifts, and have great fellowship. It’s something I look forward to every year. Unfortunately with the pandemic I don’t think we can all go be with my grandparents.

Fondest holiday memory?
My grandma’s sweet potato pie. It’s a staple during the holiday season

Looking forward to?
I’m looking forward to spending time with my family and friends. I also like to fish so I’m looking forward to that as well.

I am also looking forward to going back to campus in January, but I hope we can have more interaction with our peers, though I know the restrictions were meant to keep us from getting COVID-19. I really enjoyed the battalion cookout we had before we left for furlough. I think doing more of those throughout the year would help a lot.

On your wish list?
I would like to get a guitar and keyboard piano because I started practicing on those instruments this past semester at The Citadel. 

Caring for others in this challenging time?
We are getting gifts for people at the homeless shelters. We are also taking some of our extra clothes and jackets there for people to use this winter.

Candles line the aisle at The Citadel Christmas Candlelight services
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Charleston County’s Dawson confirmed by US Senate to be new SC federal judge https://today.citadel.edu/charleston-countys-dawson-confirmed-by-us-senate-to-be-new-sc-federal-judge/ Thu, 17 Dec 2020 14:34:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21111 Dawson, 50, a 1991 graduate of The Citadel and 1997 graduate of the University of South Carolina Law School, will be the only African American male judge on the state’s federal bench. ]]>

As seen in The Charlotte Observer
By John Monk

Longtime Charleston County general counsel Joseph Dawson III was confirmed Wednesday by the U.S. Senate on a 56-39 vote as South Carolina’s newest federal judge.

Dawson, 50, a 1991 graduate of The Citadel and 1997 graduate of the University of South Carolina Law School, will be the only African American male judge on the state’s federal bench. He still will have to be formally sworn in.

Federal judges, who oversee federal civil and criminal hearings and trials, are lifetime appointments.

Dawson will likely take a significant pay cut to become a federal judge. In 2019, he was paid $421,357 by Charleston County, according to an article in The Charleston Post & Courier. As a district court judge, he will make approximately $216,000 a year.

It sometimes takes many months for a judicial candidate’s vetting to take place and his or her nomination to go through first the Senate Judiciary Committee and then the U.S. Senate.



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Citadel completes in-person fall semester https://today.citadel.edu/battle-posture-leads-to-mission-focused-fall-despite-historic-pandemic/ Thu, 10 Dec 2020 21:52:46 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20619 "We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our 177-year history."]]>

College’s mission focus overcomes pandemic

Operation Fall Return, a campus-wide effort encompassing every member of The Citadel campus community, set the conditions to accomplish the mission of completing fall semester in person, despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It is our duty to protect ourselves and others from COVID-19,” became the mantra, based on the college’s core values of honor, duty and respect.

College and Corps leadership — along with support teams — collaborated to set, adjust and maintain conditions allowing cadets, students, faculty and staff to be on campus beginning in mid-August, until the Corps started winter furlough Nov. 24 and faculty and staff depart for the holidays December 22.

Kelly Cup practice squads work on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, September 8, 2020.

There would be no break in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets’ Long Grey Line.

I write today as the Corps prepares to depart on winter furlough after one of the most unusual periods in Citadel history. I could not be more pleased with the performance of the Corps. We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our 177-year history. Our students, faculty, staff, and alumni showed what a united campus community can do—it’s inspiring watching everyone doing their part. The success we’ve achieved is only possible with everyone adapting and overcoming. 

The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.) in a letter to the campus community, November 20, 2020

Staging the base of fire

The objectives centered on the delivery of top-quality instruction coupled with continuing the in-person military training required for all cadets. The in-person training is mission critical for freshmen, who could not be recognized as members of the Corps in the spring without completing rigorous training objectives designed to develop them to assume leadership roles later in their cadet careers.

Ray Cervantes, contract manager for The Budd Group, demonstrates a backpack atomizer, which can clean an entire barracks in four hours, in Daniel Library at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, June 23, 2020.

Strict protocols were put in place for cadets and for all members of the campus community to protect the health of The Citadel family.

Examples of operational elements include the following, some of which remained in place all semester:

Freshmen socially distanced in chairs with face masks second day of challenge week Class of 2024 at The Citadel
Freshmen socially distanced in chairs with face masks second day of challenge week Class of 2024 at The Citadel

Matriculation Day, August 8

Foxtrot Company commander Alfred Gregg descends the stairs in Padgett-Thomas Barracks during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

The Matriculation Day process is usually completed in about two hours, but was stretched out to twelve to ensure social distancing.

Members of the Class of 2024 arrived on campus, said their goodbyes to their family at the curb, and had their temperatures checked before processing.

Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

Approximately 700 knobs matriculated, a class size mirroring those in non-pandemic years.

Mike Company XO Kenneth Spurlock checks with knobs to make sure they have their barbershop tickets in Padgett-Thomas Barracks during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

Class of 2024 Oath Ceremony and Challenge Week

An especially poignant Oath Ceremony was held on Summerall Field for the freshmen — with drone footage from above — showing the many people watching via livestream one of the first groups of college students safely gathered en masse since the pandemic took hold of America in the spring of 2020.

Challenge Week training was underway, with Cadre — the group of upperclassmen tasked with training the knobs — working efficiently to complete all necessary components. They also lived in the same barrack with the freshmen, reducing possible virus transmission from intermixing large groups of cadets.

Cadre lead Knobs from the Class of 2024 in Drill instruction during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, August 13, 2020.

Academics: Flexible and focused

Cadets walk along Jones Avenue at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, November 10, 2020.

Back to class for cadets and students meant alternating in person and remote class days, with many courses divided into two groups to allow for distancing in the classroom.

Led by the Office of the Provost — faculty, cadets and students leaned in, adapting to new technology for teaching and learning.

Dr. Simon Ghanat, teaches a HyFlex environmental engineering course in LeTellier course at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 25, 2020.

“We are so impressed with our faculty, cadets and students and their commitment. They continue to grow and improve within our new hybrid learning model,” said Diana Cheshire, Ph.D., director for the college’s Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching, Learning and Distance Education.

High profile academic engagements for cadets and students continued, including the Baker Business Bowl and competitions for the Citadel Cyber Security Team which “smoked the competition” in one event according to the organizer.

Dr. Cory Nance with members of The Citadel Cybersecurity Club after winning the National Cyber Range Complex “Capture the Flag” context

“The students learn a lot when they apply their skillset in a contest environment that simulates a situation from real world,” said Shankar Banik, Ph.D., professor and head of the Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences and student advisor of The Citadel Cybersecurity Club. “They won the Capture the Flag contest at the National Cyber Range Complex which was a big opportunity for our students to practice their skills in a cyber simulation based on the Department of Defense infrastructure and control systems.”

Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic hosts a “Capture the Flag” cyber competition event

Demonstration of unity and respect

Five rings on Summerall Field — made of members from The Citadel community, linked together — were a visual representation of what unites members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. In October, cadets, faculty and staff gathered, connecting themselves with spirit T-shirts, to stay safely distanced.

The event was conceived by Cadet Hayden Brown, captain of the basketball team, in response to the emotions filled, race-related activism and turmoil the nation saw for many months in 2020.

The Citadel community participates in a Unity Formation on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, October 7, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Despite all of the national attention and conversations surrounding inequities in our country, many remain apathetic. As the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, we are unified in our belief that no member of the Corps is any more important than another.

Cadet Ruby Bolden, regimental public affairs officer, reading the statement of unity on behalf of attendees

ROTC: Advancing future officers

ROTC training and labs moved along in a fashion similar to normal semesters, just in smaller, masked groups with more outdoor activities.

“I continued to be impressed by our Army ROTC Cadets at The Citadel whose performance this semester, in spite of the challenges they and all students face, has been exemplary,” said Col. John Cyrulik, professor of military science at The Citadel, in a statement. “These Army ROTC Cadets are mentally and physically tough, disciplined, and highly motivated. We have trained hard all semester to ensure we remain on-track to commission next year the largest cohort of Army officers from The Citadel since the Vietnam War.”

Senior ring celebrations

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2021 receives their class rings at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 25, 2020.

Though there was not a crowd to cheer them on, the significance of The Citadel Ring Presentation was not diminished for seniors. A livestream provided parents and loved ones the opportunity to view this cherished tradition, and the seniors were celebrated after with a private, outdoor reception.

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2021 receives their class rings during a presentation ceremony adjusted for COVID-19 conditions in McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 25, 2020.

And the juniors, less that a year away from their Ring Day, were able to be sized for their rings in late November to receive next fall.

Cadets from the Class of 2022 are sized for their senior class rings in the Holliday Alumni Center at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, November 17, 2020.

Athletics: Committed to the game

The Citadel football team travels from Charleston, South Carolina to Tampa, Florida in advance of their game against the University of South Florida on Friday, September 11, 2020.

Their commitment to their sport and their teammates meant enduring more than 30 nasal swab COVID-19 tests for each member of the Bulldogs football team — required by the NCAA — as they practiced, traveled and played a limited game schedule with one of the highlights being the game against West point. Plans are underway to play a more complete season in the spring.

The Citadel Volleyball Team poses for their team photograph with Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters ’79, USMC (Retired) in McAlister Field House in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, October 7, 2020.

The other cadet athletes playing indoor sports with contact also endured, and are enduring, numerous coronavirus tests. That isn’t discouraging the basketball team, on a five game winning streak at the time this was published.

Finding the fun

Knobs play intramural kickball on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, August 31, 2020.

To keep the campus community and the Corps energized, a number of COVID-safe activities were held.

Intramural practices and competitions were increased.

Food trucks and games were brought in on the weekends that the Corps didn’t have leave.

And G3, the college’s new bulldog, made his debut.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020.

G3 has a new house he shares with the first team of cadet handlers to hold rank positions related to caring for the beloved mascot.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

G3’s official name, Gen. Mike D. Groshon, will be familiar to many in The Citadel family and in Charleston. He was named for Coach Mike D. Groshon, Citadel Class of 1976, who passed away in 2016, after caring for several generations of mascots.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020.

Servant leadership continuum

Servant leadership looked a bit different throughout the semester, but it did not stop. There was not a traditional Leadership Day…

The Citadel Republican Society places American Flags around Summerall Field in commemoration of the 19th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, September 10, 2020.

…but there was plenty of volunteer service.

Citadel cadets led by Dr. Sarah Imam volunteer with Soldiers’ Angels to Supply Low-Income Veteran Families with Food Assistance at the Elks Lodge in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, October 9, 2020.

The Citadel Health Careers Society turned out to help veterans in need, for example, and the Krause Center of Leadership and Ethics grew its children’s reading initiative and continued organizing COVID-19 safe ways to help the college’s community partners.

Launching three major developments

1. Our Mighty Citadel 2026 strategic plan
The Citadel’s new strategic plan, Our Mighty Citadel 2026, is now in place to serve as the guideline for the college’s evolution. The Citadel Board of Visitors (BOV) voted to approve the plan in September. Academic programing, how the college interacts with the region and the community, and the campus infrastructure are at the center of the plan.

“The Citadel has played a large role in shaping Charleston and South Carolina since its creation 177 years ago, and its new strategic plan is an encouraging sign that will continue to be the case.”

The Post and Courier Editorial Staff

2. Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF, ’77, Center for Climate Studies Climate variability, risks and the advancement of solutions will be the focus of a new, interdisciplinary Center for Climate Studies being established at The Citadel. The Center’s mission will be to promote climate science through education, research, outreach and the development of public-private partnerships, according to Scott Curtis, Ph.D., recently named the Dr. John Lining Professor of Physics and director of the Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF ’77 Center for Climate Studies.

Construction progress on the Swain Boating Center at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

3. Swain Boating Center
The Swain Boating Center at The Citadel is restoring the campus water culture with some major upgrades, thanks to a generous donation from Dr. and Mrs. Christopher C. Swain, Class of 1981. New docks, a picnic pavilion and new equipment including motor and sail boats, kayaks, canoes, paddleboards and fishing gear are being used by cadets, faculty, staff and alumni.

Gospel Choir stays united with virtual performance to close out semester

The Citadel Gospel Choir, directed by their dedicated leader, Momolu Cooper, ’10, records songs in Johnson Hagood Stadium’s club level at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 19, 2020.

One last, revered annual tradition of each fall semester, the Citadel Candlelight Services, cannot take place this Christmas season, but The Citadel Gospel is finding a way to bring joy to others.

The choir, a group that normally performs during the heavily attended Candlelight Services and around the city and state, didn’t let the pandemic stop them. Though their live engagements were cancelled, the devoted members of the choir gathered – with safe distancing – to record a variety of songs. The recordings will be played at events where the choir cannot safely perform.

Cadet Col. Nick Piacentini: maintaining lines of resistance to coronavirus

Almost last because that’s where he’d ask to be, but not least, is a regimental commander leading his 2,300, 18 – 21 year old classmates through their Citadel experience during an unprecedented, sweeping pandemic.

“I am extremely proud of how the cadets have really led themselves when it concerns their duty to follow our COVID-19 protection protocols to keep themselves and others safe. We have a strong team of regimental officers, staff and NCOs and everyone worked to maintain the conditions needed to keep us on campus this fall. We are striving to be an example of what ‘right’ looks like.

To me, being able to complete a face-to-face fall semester shows the kind of person a Citadel cadet is, someone with the grit needed to push through our mission together.”

Cadet Col. Nick Piacentini, Regimental Commander, South Carolina Corps of Cadets

Watch a news report with Piacentini here.

#1 for the 10th year!

And in the midst of it all, The Citadel was ranked #1 Top Public College in the South for the tenth consecutive year by U.S News & World Report.

“We want prospective students to know why The Citadel experience is superior. We encourage high school students and their parents to contact us to discuss what the college offers for their areas of interest in a specially tailored, one-on-one conference, “said Sally Selden, Ph.D., SPHR, provost and dean of The Citadel.

Fall 2020 Photo Gallery

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Excellence in Leadership: Lt. Sarah Zorn https://today.citadel.edu/excellence-in-leadership-lt-sarah-zorn/ Tue, 08 Dec 2020 17:19:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20611 Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Army leaders have strong intellect, physical presence, professional competence, high moral character, and serve as role models. Lt. Zorn has been recognized for her selfless care within the ‘Thunderbolt’ community.]]> Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)

As seen on DVIDSHub
Joint Base Lewis McChord, Washington
By Sgt. Casey Hustin, 17th Field Artillery Brigade

Photo above: Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade) 

JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — An Army Leader is anyone who by virtue of assumed role or assigned responsibility inspires and influences people to accomplish organizational goals— 1st. Lt. Sarah Zorn, who for the past six months has accomplished that and more within the 5th battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 17th Field Artillery Brigade, has her own idea of what makes a great Leader.

“You have to be competent; you have to be confident; you have to care—and a little common sense doesn’t hurt,” said 1st Lt. Sarah Zorn, an operations officer with Bravo Battery. “I feel like that philosophy kind of defines my leadership approach and who I want to be as a lieutenant.”

Zorn demonstrated her innate ability to pursue actions, focus thinking, and shape decisions for the greater good of the organization both in and outside the chain of command of the ‘Black Knight’ platoon.

“Lt. Zorn has filled the role as the headquarters platoon leader,” said Capt. Grayson Williams, Company Commander with B-Btry., 5th Bn., 3rd FAR. “She really just wants to see others succeed in her platoon. She just goes the extra mile to make sure that the platoon succeeds. Her ability to provide that insight and always the desire to learn has been instrumental in the success for the battery so far.”

From making history as the first female regimental commander at the Citadel for 2,300 cadets, to becoming a platoon leader of 20 soldiers, Lt. Zorn stays focused on doing the job at hand and doing it right.

“I think that transition from big picture to a little bit smaller picture really fundamentally is all the same,” said Zorn. “So—I come into work every day and I tell myself I’m just going to do the next right thing—whether it be the next right thing for soldiers, the next right thing for the battery—the next right thing for the team.”

Army leaders have strong intellect, physical presence, professional competence, high moral character, and serve as role models. Lt. Zorn has been recognized for her selfless care within the ‘Thunderbolt’ community.

“I’d like to highlight just how much genuine care she has for soldiers,” said Williams. “I know she has taken time out of her weekends to work on care packages for families with new babies in the battery. Lt. Zorn just wants to see the whole battery succeed, and really she shows this commitment as she volunteers her own time to really provide and deliver what the battery is asking for.”

Zorn said, “I would say to anyone who’s considering this or maybe anyone who is brand new and who is doubting themselves—this (the Army) is one of the most rewarding careers that you could ever have.”

The most successful Army Leaders, like Lt. Zorn, recognize that great organizations are built upon the mutual trust and confidence of our greatest assets—our people—who come together to accomplish peacetime and wartime missions—and so long as we continue to inspire leaders like Lt. Zorn to join us—we cannot fail.

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Gov. McMaster Names SCHP Veteran Robert Woods, a Citadel alum, to Lead S.C. Department of Public Safety https://today.citadel.edu/gov-mcmaster-names-schp-veteran-robert-woods-a-citadel-alum-to-lead-s-c-department-of-public-safety/ Thu, 03 Dec 2020 17:04:39 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20541 Robert Woods graduated from The Citadel in 1988 with a Bachelor's Degree in History and was awarded gold stars in every semester he attended.]]>

Photo: Governor Henry McMaster and Robert Woods, front right, at the nomination announcement (Courtesy: South Carolina Department of Public Safety)

As seen in Greenville Business Magazine, by David Dykes

Note: Robert Woods graduated from The Citadel in 1988 with a Bachelor’s Degree in History and was awarded gold stars in every semester he attended.

Gov. Henry McMaster nominated Robert G. Woods, IV as director of the South Carolina Department of Public Safety (SCDPS). Woods has been serving as the acting director of SCDPS since February and is a 29-year veteran of the South Carolina Highway Patrol (SCHP). 

“Nobody is better suited to lead the South Carolina Department of Public Safety than Mr. Woods,” McMaster said. “His proven ability to lead and solve complex problems through innovative policy decisions and public outreach will continue to serve South Carolina well and will help the agency maintain its status as one of the finest law enforcement agencies in the country.”

During his time as acting director, Woods has worked to increase department communication, improve employee morale, and implemented data-driven programs to create safer highways. 

Going forward, Woods plans to strengthen relationships with state and local law enforcement leaders and increase recruitment and retention efforts. 

Before being named acting director at SCDPS, Woods oversaw the Highway Patrol’s administrative support section as a Highway Patrol major. 

Before that, he served as commander of the Highway Patrol Emergency Traffic Management Unit. 

Woods is a 1988 graduate of The Citadel and holds a master’s degree in human relations and conflict management from Columbia College. He is also a graduate of the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy Leadership Institute and holds a certified public manager credential. 

“Serving as director of SCDPS was something I would have never imagined during my time with the South Carolina Highway Patrol but serving this department and my state in an interim director capacity has truly been one of the greatest privileges of my career,” Woods said. “My primary goal has been to stabilize the department and break down any barriers leading to inefficiencies so that our personnel are energized and excited about their jobs and the challenge of serving this state’s citizens with excellence.” 

“The SC Department of Public Safety cannot be the DPS of 20 years ago. We must take advantage of technology, equipment and training to ensure the safety of our law enforcement and in turn the safety of the citizens and visitors to our state,” Woods said. “We must provide our law enforcement and civilian support personnel with sound training and empower our employees to lead as we tackle the challenges of 21st century policing.”

The governor’s nomination is subject to Senate approval. 

Woods, 54, is a resident of Lexington County and is married with five children. 

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Majority of South Carolina colleges going virtual after Thanksgiving break https://today.citadel.edu/majority-of-south-carolina-colleges-going-virtual-after-thanksgiving-break/ Tue, 01 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20427 Citadel cadets packing to leave for winter furloughCitadel cadets packing to leave for winter furloughThey’re going to take their exams remotely, reducing that movement on public transportation and airlines and reducing that possibility of having COVID-19 come back to campus.]]> Citadel cadets packing to leave for winter furloughCitadel cadets packing to leave for winter furlough

As seen on WCIV-TV, by Carolina Balchunas

This week, college kids will be home from college. There’s been a lot of talk about what to do before and during the holiday, but the semester isn’t over yet. What happens after Thanksgiving?

Majority of schools are going fully virtual after the Thanksgiving break.

Clemson University, the University of South Carolina, Charleston Southern University, the College of Charleston and the Citadel will finish out the semester online.

“We’re not going to have people come back after the Thanksgiving break,” said Col. John Dorrian, the Citadel’s vice president of communications and marketing. “They’re going to take their exams remotely, reducing that movement on public transportation and airlines and reducing that possibility of having COVID-19 come back to campus.”

Between students, faculty and staff, the Citadel only had 171 reported COVID-19 cases this year. Aside from a few currently in isolation, Dorrian said they’ve cleared cadets to go home and credits the cadets for making it possible.

“They implemented through peer leadership a lot of the measures that led us to the success of them being able to finish today,” Dorrian said. “For example, the last two weekends, the corps of cadets stayed on campus and just did on campus activities, so they could reduce the possibility of spreading COVID, catching COVID, and then bringing it home over the holidays.”

He said the collective commitment helped the school stay on course and maintain much of the unique Citadel experience, which cannot be replicated in an online environment.

Watch the video version of this story on WCIV.com here.

On Tuesday, Citadel cadets packed up and cleared out the barracks, and many were greeted by parents eager to have them home. Bob Cave was there to pick his son up and said he’s proud of how the Citadel has handled the pandemic throughout the semester.

“I think kids need to be at school and these kids need to be at school. They need to have the Citadel experience. Doing this from home is not the Citadel experience, so they need to be on campus in my opinion,” Cave said. “But I think it’s great, I think it’s great having them home, having them home for about a month and a half, I think is great.”

Dorrian said they conducted random testing every two weeks this semester and will continue in the spring, adding everyone will be tested when they return next year.

The Citadel, CSU, CofC and USC are all starting the spring semester on Monday, January 11, a week later than usual due to the cancellation of spring break.

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The Citadel looks to prevent spreading COVID amid holiday travel https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-looks-to-prevent-spreading-covid-amid-holiday-travel/ Mon, 23 Nov 2020 22:02:04 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20406 All year long, officials have tried to make the campus something of a bubble to keep the virus controlled.]]>

As seen on WCSC – Live 5 News, by Nick Reagan

Despite health officials pleading for people to stay home, more than 50 million could be traveling for Thanksgiving according to AAA.

Fred Roark and his family will not be traveling because of the virus.

Normally, his sister comes down from Indiana but this year the risk of spreading the disease is just too high.

“I have multiple risk factors, so consequently I have to be conscience of my own personal involvement with other people,” Roark said. “I’d like my sister to be down here because I only see her once a year, and this year it will be zero times.”

While the travel estimate is a substantial decrease from the 2019, it is still a lot of people who could potentially spread the coronavirus. However, not everyone has the option to stay where they are.

Many college campuses are shutting down between Thanksgiving and the New Year, requiring students to return home.

The Citadel is taking a slightly different approach.

All year long, officials have tried to make the campus something of a bubble to keep the virus controlled. Cadet Colonel Nicholas Piacentini is in charge of the entire cadet corps and is responsible for their success and wellbeing.

“Everyone knew this year was going to be different,” Piacentini said. “It was tough at first. It’s hard to wear a mask. It’s hard to be 6-feet apart from people, but the more and more we did it, the more it became daily routine.”

At the beginning of the year, cadets were prohibited from leaving campus for two weeks. That was to protect fellow cadets, staff and faculty. Now, before anyone leaves for the winter break the quarantine is back.

Starting last weekend, cadets were required to stay on campus and away from the general public.

“This two week period is not only to protect the campus community but also to protect our friends and family at home, because now this is bigger than just campus,” Piacentini said. “We could easily take COVID home . . . going home is what’s going to be pretty deadly or can be. By staying on campus and quarantining we are really protecting our loved ones and other people’s loved ones as well.”

The ability to restrict a student’s movement is not something most colleges can do, but then again The Citadel is not like most colleges.

“Our military structure gives us a huge advantage of implementing and enforcing policies, but what is unique about The Citadel is our peer leadership structure is exquisite here,” Piacentini said. “That’s what allows us to exceed so much. It’s each one of us looking out for each one of us to do the right thing. That has been the biggest attribute to our success.”

Click here to see the current number of COVID cases on campus.

Despite the lockdown, Piacentini is making sure there is some rest and relaxation during the closed weekends. Last weekend, food trucks were brought in and cadets could participate in a variety of activities.

This weekend there will be a cookout and the annual Thanksgiving festivities. Once cadets leave campus for Thanksgiving they will not come back until January.

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A “General” review of the closed weekend https://today.citadel.edu/a-general-review-of-the-closed-weekend/ Mon, 16 Nov 2020 21:53:37 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20176 Cadets, who can't leave campus before returning home for the long Thanksgiving/winter furlough, enjoyed some fun diversions for the on-campus weekend.]]>

Photo: Citadel mascot Gen. Mike D. Groshon, also known as G3, reviewing the food trucks on campus

With just over a week of on-campus classes left, cadets at The Citadel are doing what leaders do: making sure they stay safe so they can keep others safe.

Since they will soon be returning to their hometowns, and due to increasing cases of COVID-19 nationwide, cadets can’t leave campus during their last two weekends before the long Thanksgiving/winter furlough.

But with the goal of keeping the cadets engaged (while squeezing in some early holiday celebrations), The Commandant’s Office and the Office of Cadet Activities arranged some fun diversions for the two on-campus weekends.

The cadets (occasionally joined by G3) were kept busy with activities like intramurals, swim meets, corn hole games, DJ entertainment and food trucks. But if it sound like the cadets are having too much fun — don’t worry — the weekend kicked off with a Spirit PT across campus.

The closed weekend also opened new doors.

“For the first time in my cheerleading experience, I had the opportunity to cheer on the Bulldogs at a wrestling match,” said Cadet Lauren Sordo, a junior Biology major from Orchard Park, New York. “It was a great way to start the day. After the match, my team and I went to the food trunks and played games. The activities on the parade deck were a fun way to engage with other cadets and increased moral for a few hours.”

Next weekend will also include battalion cookouts and Thanksgiving festivities.

The last day of classes this fall for cadets and students at The Citadel is November 24. They will take finals from home following Thanksgiving and will not return until January.

The Citadel President, Provost and Commandant will update parents on how the fall has gone and on what to expect for the spring semester return during the final Virtual Town Hall for the semester. It is scheduled for 7 p.m., November 19 and will be livestreamed on The Citadel Facebook page.

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Congress’s new faces include ex-astronaut, Citadel’s first female grad https://today.citadel.edu/congresss-new-faces-include-ex-astronaut-citadels-first-female-grad/ Thu, 12 Nov 2020 19:41:58 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20147 Nancy Mace, Citadel Class of 2000, will represent South Carolina’s Lowcountry after beating freshman Democratic Rep. Joe Cunningham.]]>

Photo: Nancy Mace, then and now, on the left as a cadet at The Citadel

As seen in The Wall Street Journal, by Natalie Andrews

More women and people of color are headed to Congress after an election in which Republicans cut into the Democrats’ majority in the House but left the Senate up for grabs. A retired astronaut, a former football coach and the first woman to graduate from the Citadel are among the new lawmakers on their way to the Capitol, with some races still left to be called.

Republicans are on track to boost the number of women in the House significantly, after starting the current Congress with just 13, and only one new woman in the freshmen class. This year at least 26 women will be part of the House GOP conference.

The gains reflect longstanding efforts by GOP organizations such as the National Republican Congressional Committee, Congressional Leadership Fund and Winning for Women, which invested heavily in 2020 races. Many of the new GOP women won back seats lost to Democrats in the previous cycle.

While Democrats lost seats this year in the House, they are set to bring more Black members and women to their caucus, and more young faces. The overall split in the House currently stands at 218 Democrats and 202 Republicans, with several seats still to be decided.

Some people to watch for in the next Congress include:

Nancy Mace: She will represent South Carolina’s Lowcountry after beating freshman Democratic Rep. Joe Cunningham to move the seat to Republican control. In 1999, she became the first woman to graduate from The Citadel, the military school in South Carolina. Ms. Mace, 42, is a single mother of two children, which she spoke about in the race. She served in the state legislature.

To see the full list on The Wall Street Journal’s article, click here.

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