Service Learning – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 04 Jun 2020 16:04:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.7 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Service Learning – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Citadel cadets look back, to lead the way forward https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-cadets-look-back-to-lead-the-way-forward/ Thu, 04 Jun 2020 16:04:01 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16707 Two servant leaders from The Citadel family — one current and one former cadet — are working to give back to the Charleston community.]]>

It’s a tense and difficult time in America. But that’s the kind of environment where principled leaders stand tall to help, demonstrating values like honor, duty and respect.

Two servant leaders from The Citadel family — one current and one former cadet — are working to give back to the Charleston community.

To be a servant leader means serving those around you and working to meet the needs of others.

Cadet Jackson Jenkins, a member of The Citadel Class of 2022, and 2nd Lt. Richard “Ben” Snyder (USA), the regimental commander for the Class of 2020, both started GoFundMe accounts in response to last week’s unrest for two different purposes.

Snyder’s fundraiser is called “24 Hours for Charleston,” raising money for the International African American Museum. On Friday, June 5, Snyder plans to walk around a track in Georgia for 24 hours, near where he is stationed for officer training. He says that he chose a track “to replicate the monotonous walk felt by peaceful-protestors as they search for a means to an end.”

“I think being alone with my thoughts, going in circles for 24 hours, will allow me to empathize with African-Americans that have walked for generations, have felt alone, and still not arrived at any final destination,” Snyder said. “It is important to me because I believe this is a simple way, any young man or woman, can be a part of the solution. By looking for an opportunity to be there for a neighbor, a friend, or even a stranger that has been mistreated.”

Jenkins decided to start a fundraiser for Mama Kim’s — a restaurant frequented by cadets for years — after it was damaged during the riots. It started with a $1,000 goal on Saturday May 31, but raised $16,000 by the end of the weekend.

“Mama Kim’s is really a touchstone part of cadet culture,” said Jenkins. “I think that so many people donated in such a short time because, in a large part, giving is also a huge part of Citadel culture. Mama really is a person that has helped several generations of cadets and is an adopted mother for the Corps. She is one of the best people out there, and when the opportunity arose to give back, everyone jumped at the chance.”

Jenkins plans to deliver the check to Mama Kim’s on Saturday, June 6.

Examples of civic leadership like this are part of the reason why the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching awarded The Citadel with the Carnegie Foundation Elective Community Engagement Classification for the second time in two consecutive cycles.

The classification is an evidence-based affirmation of best institutional practices earned through years of accountability and the presentation of that work. The Citadel and its South Carolina Corps of Cadets provide approximately 30,000 hours of community service annually, organized through the college’s Krause Center of Leadership and Ethics.

For more information about the Mama Kim’s fundraiser, see the news coverage below.

As seen on WCBD – Count on 2, by Katie Turner

Kim Onam Brown is known around the Lowcountry as “Mama Kim.” Her beloved Korean restaurant, “Mama Kim’s,” was recently damaged in Saturday’s riots.

When the community caught wind of what happened, many stepped in to help. Her shattered windows are now boarded up; covered with messages of hope and love.

“I feel like it’s my job to take care of everybody. But of course, they’re my heart, and I love them,” says Mama Kim.

She treats her customers as members of her family. Joking that some have called her “a computer” because she is a whiz at remembering names and details of the people she meets.

Her walls are covered in hundreds, if not thousands, of photos. A testament to the people that mean the most to her, and nearly 50 years in the restaurant business.

Mama Kim is especially known for taking care of students at The Citadel. Citadel Cadet Jackson Jenkins says she’s “an absolute saint to so many of us.”

Cadet Jenkins decided to start a GoFundMe for Mama Kim’s repair costs. In just 2 days, the community raised over $16,000.

The number has now reached over $17,000. Mama Kim is absolutely floored. She plans to give part of the money to her favorite people and places in the community to say ‘thank you.’

“I think Charleston is all sweet people, I really do. I’m going to give back part of it, I’m going to give it to some scholarship, to College of Charleston, a part to The Citadel, to the church. I’m going to fix up the windows and fix up the floors,” she says.

Coming up, Mama Kim will be celebrating her 50th year in the restaurant business. She has no plans to retire anytime soon!

“One thing that I always talk about is people asking ‘Mama when are you going to retire?’ I say, ‘I love people, and social, you know that’s why I cannot retire,’” she says.

For more on Mama Kim’s, click here.

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A Foundation for Leadership https://today.citadel.edu/a-foundation-for-leadership/ Mon, 13 May 2019 14:19:03 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8182 Citadel cadets frame a house for Habitat for Humanity on Leadership Day 2018Citadel cadets frame a house for Habitat for Humanity on Leadership Day 2018Citadel cadets team up with Sea Island Habitat for Humanity to help tackle Charleston's afforable housing crisis during the college's annual leadership day]]> Citadel cadets frame a house for Habitat for Humanity on Leadership Day 2018Citadel cadets frame a house for Habitat for Humanity on Leadership Day 2018

Citadel cadets team up with Habitat for Humanity during the college’s annual leadership day

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

Housing is not a luxury Dara Brown takes for granted. With one of the highest-priced housing markets in the South, Charleston has become unaffordable for many of its citizens. Fortunately for Brown, a 23-year-old veterinary technician, Citadel cadets teamed up with Sea Island Habitat for Humanity to help provide affordable housing to people in need.

General Glenn Walters, president of The Citadel, helps a cadet bend a piece of rebar on Leadership Day 2018.
General Glenn Walters, president of The Citadel, helps a cadet bend a piece of rebar on Leadership Day 2018.

Nearly 50 cadets along with Marine Capt. John Moreno from the Naval ROTC unit were on hand during Leadership Day 2018, laying rebar and digging the foundation for Brown’s house, putting down sod at the house of a single mother and installing the tresses on the house of another single mother.

“Seeing all of those cadets here today pulled at my heartstrings,” said Brown. “I was shocked to see the sheer number who came out to help me and my neighbors. It was overwhelming.”

Leadership Day began in 2011 as Heroism Day, a Corps-wide initiative focused on community service and civic engagement. The annual day devoted to service projects and leadership training is organized each year by the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics, the hub of leadership and service learning at the college. On Leadership Day in 2018, cadets volunteered a total of 8,721 hours. Over the course of 2018, cadets devoted 33,107 hours to volunteer service for an economic impact of almost $800,000.

On Leadership Day alone, cadets contributed 356 hours of volunteer service time to the Sea Island Habitat project—a substantial effort that will make a difference in the lives of three Charleston families and in the lives of the cadets who learned to lead by serving others.

General Glenn Walters, president of The Citadel, speaks with cadets on the job site at Sea Island Habitat for Humanity on Leadership Day 2018.
General Glenn Walters, president of The Citadel, speaks with cadets on the job site at Sea Island Habitat for Humanity on Leadership Day 2018.

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Community Knows No Distance https://today.citadel.edu/community-knows-no-distance/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 19:00:13 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=5360 Matthew HammondMatthew HammondAs a freshman, Matthew Hammond joined his Kilo Company classmates working with Metanoia, a nonprofit organization that focuses on holistic community development. Three years after becoming involved with the Metanoia project, Hammond is one of the co-leaders of the Kilo Company service project, and develops lesson plans, coordinates cadet schedules and actively volunteers.]]> Matthew HammondMatthew Hammond

There are 2,500 miles between Fillmore, California, and North Charleston, South Carolina. But for Cadet Matthew Hammond, who grew up in California and moved across the country to pursue a computer science degree and a military career, community knows no distance.

In high school, Hammond volunteered with the local sheriff’s department for four years, doing everything from organizing toy drives to responding to domestic abuse calls. Fillmore Fire Chief and Assistant City Manager Rigo Landeros, who served as Hammond’s mentor, fostered his enthusiasm for service. During Hammond’s senior year of high school, Landeros unexpectedly passed away.

“Chief Landeros’s death had a profound impact on me. And when I was awarded a scholarship in his name for service above self, it was something that stuck with me and motivated me to keep going.”

Hammond was also driven by his goal to become an Army officer, and in The Citadel, he found a college where he could continue the fire chief’s legacy of service by pursuing a four-year Army ROTC contract.

As a freshman, Hammond joined his Kilo Company classmates working with Metanoia, a nonprofit organization that focuses on holistic community development. Three years after becoming involved with the Metanoia project, Hammond is one of the co-leaders of the Kilo Company service project. Along with Kilo Company classmate Cadet Michael Lima, Hammond develops lesson plans, coordinates cadet schedules and actively volunteers.

For the 15 Kilo Company cadets who volunteer at St. Matthews Missionary Baptist Church, Monday afternoons find them working with a group of school children from one of the poorest neighborhoods in South Carolina.

From finger painting to playing the piano, the children Hammond encounters at St. Matthews are eager to explore all the experiences the cadets have to offer—art, music, educational activities and dance.

Work at St. Matthews is not without its challenges. A fourth grader who was having trouble learning a song reminded Hammond what it was like to be young and frustrated. With calm and encouraging words, Hammond helped to break the song down into something more manageable. Learning the notes one at a time, the fourth grader finally mastered the song.

The look on the child’s face cemented Hammond’s purpose in life. Even though small, that one smile reminds him why he serves.Click To Tweet

Although Mondays tend to be Hammond’s busiest day of the week, knowing that he gets to spend the afternoons with the children at St. Matthews re-energizes him, reminding him what really is important in life.

“It’s humbling to realize the effect we have on these children, and I am gratified to have had the opportunity to play a part in their lives.”

To view more student and cadet stories, visit mighty.citadel.edu.

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