Department of Political Science – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Fri, 18 Mar 2022 21:17:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Department of Political Science – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 The Citadel faculty serving as expert resources on Ukraine and many trending issues https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-faculty-serving-as-expert-resources-on-ukraine-and-many-trending-issues/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 21:17:17 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31308 Photo: Dr. Jeffrey Rogg, a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, during an interview with WCSC-TV on Wednesday, March 16. Faculty answers call to contribute from media,]]>

Photo: Dr. Jeffrey Rogg, a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, during an interview with WCSC-TV on Wednesday, March 16.

Faculty answers call to contribute from media, community

Many of those working to fulfill the mission to educate and develop principled leaders at The Citadel, regularly demonstrate their own leadership by serving as contributing experts for media reports and community interests.

Members of the college’s five schools are often called upon for their insight expertise in a variety of fields. Jeffrey Rogg, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies within the School of Humanities and Social Science is just one of many examples of the relevant and insightful expertise found on campus.

As the third week of the Russian invasion of Ukraine came to a close, Rogg spoke with WCSC-TV, the local CBS affiliate, to help viewers in the Lowcountry understand more about the war and what it could mean for the United States.

When asked about the motives behind the invasion, Rogg answered: “From Vladimir Putin’s view, he believes that the greatest tragedy to befall modern Russia was the collapse of the Soviet Union. Because of that, he’s been intent on not just restoring the Soviet Union or even the Russian Empire, but also the pride and the power of Russia.”

To see more of the coverage from Rogg’s interview with Live 5 News, click here.

“One of the many strengths of an education at The Citadel is the access to experts who can put critical global events – such as Russia’s war in Ukraine – into a wider context,” said Brian Madison Jones, Ph.D., dean of The Citadel’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences. “As the Military College of South Carolina, we’re uniquely positioned to help our cadets, students and community understand what is currently happening and what it means.”

Throughout multiple newscasts, Rogg discussed the historical context for the invasion, what a no-fly zone would entail, how the war could affect the American economy and a range of other topics.

“Within the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, professors from the Departments of Intelligence and Security Studies, Political Science and History, including military history, are studying these events in real time for use in the classroom and offering expert insight and analysis to help the next generation of leaders understand and address the great challenges of today and tomorrow,” Jones said.

Other examples of The Citadel faculty in the news

Shankar Banik, Ph.D.
Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences – Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics

South Carolina National Guard attends Cyber Boot Camp at The Citadel
DVIDS

Conference series helps Army identify U.S. infrastructure risks
The Watch

Hee Yoon Kwon, Ph.D.
Department of Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Economics – Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

The continuing supply chain saga
South Carolina Public Radio

Side effects of pipeline shutdown linger in Lowcountry
WCIV – ABC News 4

David Preston, Ph.D.
Department of History – School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Citadel professor curates new perspectives on Revolutionary War
Moultrie News

When young George Washington started a war
Smithsonian Magazine

John Weinstein, Ph.D.
Department of Biology – Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics

Tires: The plastic polluter you never thought about
National Geographic

Citadel experiment will analyze how PPE degrades in coastal environments
The Post and Courier

John Zardus, Ph.D.
Department of Biology – Zucker Family School of Science and Mathematics

Some barnacles can more around to improve feeding position
The Scientist

For information about joining the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, click here.

To learn more about non-cadet undergraduate and graduate programs offered by The Citadel, click here.

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Joseph P. Riley, Jr., ’64, earns Collaborative Achievement Award from American Institute of Architects https://today.citadel.edu/joseph-p-riley-jr-64-earns-collaborative-achievement-award-from-american-institute-of-architects/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31144 Prof. and former Charleston Mayor Joe P. Riley Jr. teaching at The CitadelProf. and former Charleston Mayor Joe P. Riley Jr. teaching at The CitadelAcross four decades of leadership, Riley continuously considered Charleston’s public realm first and foremost.]]> Prof. and former Charleston Mayor Joe P. Riley Jr. teaching at The CitadelProf. and former Charleston Mayor Joe P. Riley Jr. teaching at The Citadel

Note: Joseph P. Riley, Jr. is a member of The Citadel Class of 1964, and the first occupant of the Joseph P. Riley, Jr., Endowed Chair of American Government and Public Policy, a professorial position on the faculty of The Citadel School of Humanities and Social Sciences he assumed after retiring from public service as mayor of Charleston for 40 years. The photo above shows Riley teaching on campus at The Citadel.

As seen on AIA.org

When Joseph P. Riley became mayor of Charleston, South Carolina, in 1975, the city’s urban center was quickly deteriorating. Over his 10 terms as Charleston’s leader, Riley completely transformed the city into a top cultural destination and positioned himself as one of the country’s most visionary and effective leaders. Few understand as well as Riley the many ways in which architecture, urbanism, and human fabric intersect to create great places, and he has forged a path for generations of mayors to follow his positive example.

Across four decades of leadership, Riley continuously considered Charleston’s public realm first and foremost. His work to develop the city’s Waterfront Park, the redevelopment of the urban renewal-era Gaillard Center into new city offices, and his insistence that Charleston’s government remain in the city’s heart demonstrate his forward-thinking vision. The International African American Museum, designed by Moody Nolan and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, will reaffirm Riley’s commitment to the city and, more importantly, to its entire history when it opens later this year. Riley considers the project the most important work of his lifetime.

“Joe believes in architecture,” wrote Christian Sottile, AIA, professor and former dean at Savannah College of Art and Design, in a letter nominating Riley for the Collaborative Achievement Award.

“As mayor, Joe always surrounded himself with outstanding designers, recognizing that the bone structure of a good city, and all its fine-grained details, mattered.”

Christian Sottile, AIA

Throughout his leadership, Riley endeavored to ease racial tensions by working closely with the African American community. Charleston, committed to racial harmony and progress, saw a significant decrease in crime as it simultaneously experienced a stunning revitalization of its historic business district. During Riley’s tenure as mayor, the city amassed an impressive record of innovation in public safety, housing, the arts, and development. Today, it is often hailed as one of the most livable and progressive cities in the U.S.

Read the full article here.

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Law Enforcement career jumpstart: first cadets are sworn in as community service officers https://today.citadel.edu/law-enforcement-career-jumpstart-first-cadets-are-sworn-in-as-community-service-officers/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 22:40:54 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31155 The Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for Sergeant Reagan Moore, Private First‐Class Cameron McNeill, Community Service Officer Brandon Birsner, Imani Bowie, David Desplaces and Chelsea Sitarik at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The ceremony was the first time current cadets were sworn in as community service officers. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelThe Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for Sergeant Reagan Moore, Private First‐Class Cameron McNeill, Community Service Officer Brandon Birsner, Imani Bowie, David Desplaces and Chelsea Sitarik at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The ceremony was the first time current cadets were sworn in as community service officers. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelThe Citadel welcomed its first class of cadet Community Service Officers during a ceremony led by the college's Department of Public Safety.]]> The Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for Sergeant Reagan Moore, Private First‐Class Cameron McNeill, Community Service Officer Brandon Birsner, Imani Bowie, David Desplaces and Chelsea Sitarik at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The ceremony was the first time current cadets were sworn in as community service officers. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelThe Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for Sergeant Reagan Moore, Private First‐Class Cameron McNeill, Community Service Officer Brandon Birsner, Imani Bowie, David Desplaces and Chelsea Sitarik at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The ceremony was the first time current cadets were sworn in as community service officers. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The Citadel

By Cadet Olivia Hime, Regimental Public Affairs NCO

The Citadel welcomed its first class of cadet Community Service Officers during a ceremony in early March led by the college’s Department of Public Safety.

“This is a first in the history of The Citadel,” said Captain Shaun Ferguson, who developed and oversees the Public Safety internship program. “We have never had interns who then went on to become sworn officers, serving their community, while they are still cadets.”

Friends, family and other guests gathered for the event in the Swain Boating Center on campus. The three cadets were sworn in alongside a member of the college’s faculty, and two experienced officers recently hired by Public Saftey.

The Citadel Department of Public Safety’s Captain Sean Ferguson speaks during an Oath Ceremony for the department’s new officers at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022.

“Right now, the cadets will be working as community service officers, patrolling campus to identify any issues compromising safety and security and helping where needed, with the assistance of our more senior officers, like myself,” Ferguson explained.

The next step is to guide the cadet-officers as they earn their Class 3 Constable Certification, attaining a degree of authority that allows young officers to experience the responsibilities and rewarding nature of law enforcement, according to Ferguson.

“I hope that this program helps the college produce the leaders law enforcement needs,” said Mike Turner, chief of The Citadel Department of Public Safety and a member of The Citadel Class of 1986. “I worked with a lot of violent crimes early in my law enforcement career and the ability to bring closure to the families of victims has been one of the most rewarding aspects that I have carried with me. Working here at The Citadel, I want to make a difference not only for the college but for the cadets. Law enforcement is a constant process during which you will never stop learning and always have room for improvement.”

The Chief of The Citadel Department of Public Safety, Mike Turner, Class of ’86, speaks during the Oath Ceremony for the departments new officers at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022.

Turner said the Public Safety team is looking forward to working with the cadet-officers and to growing the college’s intern-to-officer program.

Introducing The Citadel’s new Community Service Officers

Cadet Brandon Birsner Mount Pleasant, South Carolina

Cadet Brandon Birsner, The Citadel Class of 2023, takes an oath to become an officer with The Citadel Department of Public Safety after training as an intern. Birsner is from Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina.

Currently holding the position of Romeo Co. Human Affairs Sgt., Cadet Brandon Birsner is a junior majoring in Political Science. He plans to become a Class I Officer upon graduating in 2023. Birsner has helped to fuel The Citadel PSAF Internship program by fostering connections with agencies providing that provide NARCAN training to assist in saving the life of a person who has overdosed on opioids or other substances, as well as the local Polar Plunge fundraiser.

Cadet Imani Bowie – Augusta, Georgia

Cadet Imani Bowie, The Citadel Class of 2023, takes an oath to become an officer with The Citadel Department of Public Safety after training as an intern. He is from Augusta, Georgia.

In addition to now being a sworn-in Community Service Officer, Cadet Imani Bowie is a member of the South Carolina National Guard. He is the South Carolina Corps of Cadets Squad Sgt., the Army Dept. Recruiting Sgt. and a future Honor Court Representative. Bowing is majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies and will graduate in 2023.

“I have learned a lot from this program so far and it has led me to consider pursuing a career in law enforcement after college,” Bowie said. “It has also helped me with my confidence and opened my eyes to all of the work that goes into being a police officer. I have developed a lot of respect for those in this line of work.”

Cadet Chelsea Sitarik – Folly Beach, South Carolina

Cadet Chelsea Sitarik, The Citadel Class of 2022, takes an oath to become an officer with The Citadel Department of Public Safety after training as an intern. She is from Folly Beach, South Carolina.

A senior in Charlie Company, Cadet Chelsea Sitarik is studying Criminal Justice and Psychology. She plans to continue her education and earn a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology following graduation. Sitarik is also pursuing a career in law enforcement. She has dedicated much of her time to the the internship program and the Public Safety team describes her as someone who will be a great asset to any law enforcement team in the future.

David Desplaces, Ph.D. – Citadel faculty member with the Baker School of Business

The Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for Sergeant Reagan Moore, Private First‐Class Cameron McNeill, Community Service Officer Brandon Birsner, Imani Bowie, David Desplaces and Chelsea Sitarik at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The ceremony was the first time current cadets were sworn in as community service officers. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The Citadel
Citadel Professor, Dr. David Desplaces, takes an oath to become an officer with The Citadel Department of Public Safety. He is a member of the Baker School of Business faculty and also holds extensive emergency management experience.

Professor David Desplaces, Ph.D., holds extensive experience in emergency management as a member of the Lowcountry Incident Management Team, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxillary, Captain in the South Carolina State Guard Provost Marshall Detachment (critical infrastructure protection unit), among other positions. On the other side of his career, Deplaces is a professor of Strategic Management with the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business at The Citadel, with expertise in global commerce and trade, cultural management, leadership, change management and entrepreneurial venturing.

New Class I Officers

Private First-Class Cameron McNeill

Private First-Class Cameron McNeill has 11 years of law enforcement experience. Earlier in his career, he served in both Dorchester and Collin counties as a sheriff’s deputy and in North Charleston as a full time SWAT officer. For the last 12 years, McNeill served as a member of the State Department Bureau of Diplomatic Security. He conducted protective operations for U.S. diplomats in Afghanistan for approximately five years and trained in the High-Threat Operations branch for the following seven years. Upon completion of the academy, he will become a full-time trainer for The Citadel Department of Public Safety.

Sgt. Reagan Moore

Sergeant Reagan Moore, an experienced law enforcement professional is sworn as an officer in with The Citadel Department of Public Safety March 1, 2022.

Before joining The Citadel Department of Public Safety, Sgt. Reagan Moore worked with Coastal Carolina University’s Department of Public Safety as an investigator. She has been a law enforcement professional for eight years, working for the city of Conway, the Green County Sheriff’s Office and the J. Reuben Long Correctional Center. Moore has a wide range of experience and holds degrees in Criminal Justice, Criminology, Online Security and Education.

The Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for new officers while friends and family looked on at the Swain Boating Center on campus in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022.
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Live and learn in DC with The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/live-and-learn-in-dc-with-the-citadel/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 19:46:56 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=28820 David James Hardcastle, with his skateboard, sitting in front of the national capitolDavid James Hardcastle, with his skateboard, sitting in front of the national capitol"Studying in D.C. this semester is helping me make important and meaningful connections that I otherwise would likely have not made."]]> David James Hardcastle, with his skateboard, sitting in front of the national capitolDavid James Hardcastle, with his skateboard, sitting in front of the national capitol

Photo: Cadet David Hardcastle, ’22, with his longboard at Capitol Hill

Sign up by Dec. 15 to spend springtime in DC

Living and learning in the city that runs America, for the essentially the same price you’re spending on a semester’s tuition, isn’t an opportunity that comes everyday…unless you attend The Citadel. Cadets and students majoring in Political Science or Intelligence and Security Studies, with a minimum grade point average of 2.5, are eligible for The Citadel in D.C. one-semester program.

“Studying in D.C. this semester is helping me make important and meaningful connections that I otherwise would likely have not made,” said Cadet David Hardcastle. He is an Intelligence and Security Studies major who expects to graduate in May with the Class of 2022. “I think the most compelling thing about The Citadel in D.C. experience is the independence we have here.”

Intelligence and Securities Studies professor, Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, Ph.D., who directs The Citadel in D.C. program, says 90% of a student’s time there is spent outside of the classroom, as a group. “It’s the exposure to the inner-workings of the nation’s capitol, including access to embassies, leading figures on Capitol Hill and experts in international affairs, intelligence and diplomacy that really make an impact on the cadets and students who come here for a semester.”

Hardcastle’s career goal? “My goal is simply to contribute to and help those in need. My internship here in D.C. is with Parents for Peace. There I’m learning some niche communications and problem-solving skills that are specific to the intelligence and counter-terrorism community, though I cannot reveal any more than that due to the privacy agreements related to the opportunity,” he said.

There are about 12 cadets and students studying in D.C. each semester. Every person in The Citadel in D.C. program engages in an internship aligned with their career interests, during their semester there, with the help of The Citadel Career Center.

Examples of just some of the other internship sites The Citadel in D.C. students have experienced include:

“It a phenomenal opportunity for any cadet to live amongst others in the ‘real world’ outside of The Citadel for a semester. It broadens your perspective,” Hardcastle added.

Cadet David Hardcastle, The Citadel Class of 2022, sitting outside of the townhouse where he is living during his semester in Washington, DC.

How does it work?

The full course offerings, providing 9 credit hours for Political Science and Intelligence and Security Studies students can be seen here.

The tuition a cadet or student is already paying to attend The Citadel covers all living and travel expenses, other than food, for the semester in D.C. Food costs will be deducted from your tuition amount. Students in the program stay in WISH program housing, in Capitol Hill Classic Houses. There is an additional $500 program fee, not covered by tuition.

Muhammad Fraser-Rahim teaching in Washington, DC
The Citadel professor of Intelligence and Security Studies, Dr. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim teaching cadets and students in Washington, D.C.

Spring schedule

Those studying in DC for the spring semester will follow The Citadel’s normal 2021-22 academic calendar. You’ll move into your living quarters on Jan. 15, have a day of orientation, then begin the class schedule Jan. 19. Internships will begin after that, depending on the location. Classes end April 20, and you’ll move out April 29 or 30.

To learn more about studying with The Citadel in DC or to sign up, contact studyabroad@citadel.edu, or email the program head, Dr. Muhamamd Fraser-Rahim, at hfrasera@citadel.edu. The deadline is Dec. 15.

Summertime option

The Citadel in DC Summer Program is a 10-week program in Washington DC from June – August. This experience also involves living, learning and interning in DC. Cadets and students can earn up to 9 academic credits — 3 academic and 6 internship credits — in the summer section. Contact studyabroad@citadel.edu for more information.

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My Ring Story: “through adversity to the stars” https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-through-adversity-to-the-stars/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 21:09:32 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=27579 Cadet Ashley Ruiz is from Taylor, Michigan. She is a double major in both Intelligence and Security Studies and Political Science.]]>

Meet Cadet Ashley Ruiz, Class of 2022

Cadet Ashley Ruiz is from Taylor, Michigan. She is a double major in both Intelligence and Security Studies and Political Science, with a minor in Cybersecurity. This year, Ruiz serves as the 5th Battalion Academic Officer.

Q. What is engraved inside your ring and what is its significance?

A. The Latin phrase “per aspera ad astra.”

Its translation is “through adversity to the stars.” It’s a reminder to be resilient. Success isn’t possible without failure and shortcomings, but failure is not futile. It’s your ability to remain steadfast in pursuit of your dreams, even when you meet obstacles, that defines who you are.

Q. Why do you think the ring symbolizes?

The symbolism is not that of your own achievement, but of the bond that it establishes between those who came before you, those who will graduate with you and those who will come after you. The ring’s worth is made greater by the family, mentors, educators and, most importantly, classmates who pushed you along the harder path. Its weight is made up of each late night and early morning, every sweaty parade and PT session, and all the good and bad times that you experience throughout your cadet career.

5th Battalion Staff before the first dress parade of 2021

Q. Did you ever envision this moment?

No, I did not. After graduating high school in 2017, I was in an unstable living situation where I often had to live out of my car. Meanwhile, I had to work 40 hours a week just to pay my bills and afford to take courses at my local community college. I wasn’t sure what direction my life was headed in. However, one day I decided that I wanted to add structure to my life, get a four-year college education and challenge myself to do something meaningful. I decided a military college would be the best option to achieve these things and I ultimately stumbled across The Citadel.

Luckily, I was accepted on a nearly full-ride academic scholarship. I never imagined how transformative this experience would be for me, nor how much the personal adversity I faced before matriculating would translate into the hard-work mentality which has allowed me to be successful at The Citadel. Seeing the ring on my finger makes the journey feel like it has come full circle and I cannot be more grateful.

Q. Who inspired you throughout your journey here at The Citadel?

My mom. Resilience is an integral value to me, and my mom is the embodiment of resilience. As a single parent, she sacrificed so much to make sure that I was successful and had the opportunity to go to college. She often put her dreams to the side to make sure that my dreams were actualized, and that is truly inspiring to me.

Cadet Ashley Ruiz, center, with Cadets Reanna Wrecsics and Jack Simone at the first home football game of the 2021 season

Q. When you look down at your ring, what will you remember about your experience?

Ordinary and mundane moments. Things like laughing in the mess hall, sitting out on the dock with friends, barracks shenanigans, pulling all-nighters for SMIs or tests, and much more.

What are three things The Citadel taught you?

  1. Hard work is the greatest key to success. Whatever your aim is (good grades, a high PT score, etc.), it all depends on the effort you are willing to put into it.
  2. Your days depend on your mindset. You have the choice to make the best or worst of your experience at The Citadel.
  3. Practice empathetic leadership. You can solve a lot of problems by understanding why people react positively or negatively to something. Empathetic leadership gives you the ability to give everyone a fair shot at telling their story, rather than making rash judgments based on rumors. Furthermore, it forges a greater foundation of trust.

About The Citadel Class of 2022 Ring Stories

Left to right: MSG Olivia Hime, Regimental Public Affairs NCO, and MAJ Samantha Walton, Regimental Public Affairs Officer, Class of 2022

The Class of 2022 Ring Presentation Ceremony was held on Friday, Oct. 1. The stories presented here are the result of the leadership of Regimental Public Affairs officer, Major Samantha Walton, and Regimental Public Affairs Non Commissioned Officer, Cadet Olivia Hime. Both women will also receive their rings and will graduate in May.

Walton, who is from Macon, Georgia, attends The Citadel on an U.S. Army scholarship and will accept a commission to become an officer upon graduating. She is majoring in Political Science and holds the Charles Foster Scholarship.

Hime, who is from Holly Springs, North Carolina, is a junior and a member of The Citadel Honors Program. She is majoring in Biology, has repeatedly earned gold stars and President’s List positions for academic excellence. Hime will graduate in May, a year early, and plans to attend medical school to become a physician.

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My Ring Story: working together to build on the legacy of those who came before https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-working-together-to-build-on-the-legacy-of-those-who-came-before/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=27500 Cadet Tyler Mitchell, from Columbia, SC, is a Political Science major. He serves as president of The Citadel College Democrats.]]>

Photo: Tyler Mitchell, second from left, with fellow members of The Citadel College Democrats leadership team (Jalen Singleton, Keyshawn Gascey and Ronald “Deuce” Prince) at The South Carolina State House on April 21, 2021

Meet Cadet Tyler Mitchell, Class of 2022

Cadet Tyler Mitchell, from Columbia, SC, is a Political Science major. He serves as president of The Citadel College Democrats and is a member of The Citadel Gospel Choir and The Citadel African American Society.

Q. What quote is inside your ring, and what is its significance?

A. 1 Kings 2:2, “I go the way of all the earth; be strong, therefore, and prove yourself a man.”

This scripture pertains to embarking on an odyssey where you have no other option but to press forward when tribulations come along. In doing that, you grow in mind, body and spirit and develop into a more sophisticated person. Never put your faith in feelings because your emotions can change like the weather. You have to control your feelings and allow God to direct you to the right path.

Q. Did you ever envision this moment?

I did. But I knew I had to take care of my responsibilities in the classroom and in the Corps if I wanted to make this moment a reality. If you don’t have a blueprint to coincide with your vision, then it is nothing except a dream. No matter the challenges, I told myself I wasn’t going to quit.

Q. What was the most difficult obstacle that you conquered to earn the ring?

A. In the Fall 2020 semester, I took 19 credits, and had an internship and a work-study job — all while recovering from COVID-19. To motivate myself to push through, I had my pictures that I took with Barack Obama, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris from when I went to the debate in Charleston pinned to the bulletin board on my desk in my dorm. That way I got to look at great leaders every morning and know, if I applied my God-given talents to everything I did, that I would soon be in the position they’re in. Wearing the ring is proof that I embraced the challenges before me and made it through the trials and tribulations.

Tyler Mitchell with now-President Joe Biden at The 2020 Presidential Debate at The Gaillard Center in Charleston, South Carolina on February 25, 2020

Q. Does wearing the ring make you feel like you have special obligations?

A. The obligation I have is to be true to who I am and what God has planned for my life. I want to secure my legacy by building positive engagements with the next generation of Citadel cadets. We must pay it forward as we continue to grow in every aspect of our lives. I want to make sure that important issues are addressed and solutions are provided.

Q. In what way has this institution impacted your life?

A. The Citadel taught me the value of teamwork. In order to accomplish a set goal to benefit everyone, you must be willing to put aside any personal discord you have with a teammate and come to a common understanding. Pride and egos have to be checked, and it requires a sense of humbleness on all accounts.

Q. How will you bring a new meaning to the ring?

A. I am hoping to graduate from The Citadel to continue my leadership development. When I matriculated, I made a promise to myself: that I would build upon the legacy of the first black men who joined the Corps of Cadets and made my attendance possible.

Q. What is your next step after you leave The Citadel?

A. I plan to attend law school, become a JAG in the United States Air Force and be a public servant in the state of South Carolina.

Tyler Mitchell on the first day of his senior year, August 25, 2021

About The Citadel Class of 2022 Ring Stories

Left to right: MSG Olivia Hime, Regimental Public Affairs NCO, and MAJ Samantha Walton, Regimental Public Affairs Officer, Class of 2022

The Class of 2022 Ring Presentation Ceremony was held on Friday, Oct. 1. The stories presented here are the result of the leadership of Regimental Public Affairs officer, Major Samantha Walton, and Regimental Public Affairs Non Commissioned Officer, Cadet Olivia Hime. Both women will also receive their rings and will graduate in May.

Walton, who is from Macon, Georgia, attends The Citadel on an U.S. Army scholarship and will accept a commission to become an officer upon graduating. She is majoring in Political Science and holds the Charles Foster Scholarship.

Hime, who is from Holly Springs, North Carolina, is a junior and a member of The Citadel Honors Program. She is majoring in Biology, has repeatedly earned gold stars and President’s List positions for academic excellence. Hime will graduate in May, a year early, and plans to attend medical school to become a physician.

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Owner of QVC and HSN Hires David Rawlinson as Its Next CEO https://today.citadel.edu/owner-of-qvc-and-hsn-hires-david-rawlinson-as-its-next-ceo/ Thu, 15 Jul 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=25267 David Rawlinson II graduated from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets with a political science degree in 1998.]]>

As seen in The Wall Street Journal, by Suzanne Kapner

Note: David Rawlinson II graduated from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets with a political science degree in 1998. The college recently asked him to reflect on the value of education from The Citadel.

I have found that many of the leadership lessons I learned from The Citadel, from the tumultuous female integration to finding our way as knobs, have provided the foundation for everything that I have done. The Citadel is a special place!

David Rawlinson II, The Citadel Class of 1998

E-commerce executive tapped to run retailer looking to adapt after pandemic

The parent of QVC and HSN has hired David Rawlinson II as its next chief executive, as the cable-TV and online retailer seeks to adapt to changing consumer habits.

Qurate Retail Inc. said Mr. Rawlinson will assume the post on Oct. 1, after a two-month transition during which he will serve as president and CEO-elect. He will succeed current Qurate CEO Mike George, who is retiring at year-end, the company said.

Mr. Rawlinson, 45 years old, is a former executive at market researcher NielsenIQ and industrial supplier W.W. Grainger Inc. GWW 0.46% He will join Qurate’s board in January.

Mr. Rawlinson, who is Black, takes the helm at a time when companies are trying to diversify their workforces, executive suites and boardrooms in the wake of racial protests following the killing of George Floyd during an arrest by Minneapolis police. Qurate’s Chief Financial Officer Jeffrey Davis, who has held the role since October 2018, is also Black.

“Representation matters,” Mr. Rawlinson said in an interview. “It’s important for every young person to see that their future is limitless.”

Mr. Rawlinson said he was drawn to the job because his mother watched QVC and HSN when he was a boy growing up in Rock Hill, S.C.

“It was the background music of my childhood,” he said.

Much has changed in the business since then. Qurate, which also owns online retailer Zulily as well as catalog mailers Frontgate and Garnet Hill and other retail brands, has transitioned from selling mostly on TV to becoming a large e-commerce player.

Greg Maffei, Qurate’s chairman, said Mr. Rawlinson has a mandate to continue that evolution. The company is facing steeper competition coming out of the Covid-19 pandemic as more retailers launch live-streaming platforms.

“David is well suited to be that change agent,” Mr. Maffei said.

“We’re in the middle of a real change in consumer behavior,” Mr. Rawlinson said. “Some of it was driven by the pandemic and some of it was happening before.”

Like other retailers, Qurate has bounced back from the depths of the pandemic. Revenue increased 14% to $3.3 billion in the three months to March 31. The company swung to a net profit of $206 million from a loss of $20 million a year earlier.

Mr. Rawlinson earned a B.A. in political science from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. He received a law degree from the University of South Carolina School of Law and an M.B.A from Harvard University.

In 2008, he became a White House Fellow in the George W. Bush administration and transitioned to a senior adviser for economic policy at the White House National Economic Council under President Barack Obama.

He ran the online business of Grainger from 2015 to 2020 before joining NielsenIQ, which provides large retailers with market share and other data.

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Citadel begins demolishing historic Capers Hall and will construct a new academic building https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-begins-demolishing-historic-capers-hall-and-will-construct-a-new-academic-building/ Fri, 18 Jun 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=24832 Demolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/StaffDemolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/StaffPhoto above: Demolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/Staff As seen in The Post and Courier, by Thomas Novelly The Citadel started demolishing its]]> Demolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/StaffDemolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/Staff

Photo above: Demolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/Staff

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Thomas Novelly

The Citadel started demolishing its largest and most historic academic buildings on campus to make space for a new, updated space to be used by cadets in 2023.

Capers Hall was built in 1949 and has housed classrooms and offices for the English, history and political science departments for generations of Citadel students. But on June 8, a demolition crane began to poke holes in the walls and rip plaster from the fortress-like white building, slowly removing it from campus one chunk at a time. 

Demolition will continue through the summer.

Citadel officials plan to build a 107,700-square-foot replacement in two years which will house classrooms, a 250-seat performing arts auditorium, an art gallery and a computer lab for the school’s Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies.

The project carries a $67 million price tag. About $15 million of that will be provided by the S.C. General Assembly, with the rest coming from state institution bonds and capital reserve funds. The Legislature also had to approve the renovation. The Citadel Foundation is also soliciting donations to offset some of the construction costs. 

Jeff Lamberson, vice president for The Citadel’s Office of Facilities and Engineering, said the seven- decade-old academic building lacked a lot of modern amenities needed for students and teachers. While he’s sad to see some of the campus history disappear, he said he’s eager for the school to provide more modern space.

“The classrooms will be much bigger and more flexible in nature,” Lamberson said. “You will be able to move around the furniture and you’ll have all types of audio and visual computer aids for students.”

Some historic elements from the old version will be repurposed for the new building. 

Concrete, masonry and stucco from demolition will be hauled off-site, crushed and recycled into the new building’s site foundation and parking area. And the distinctive iron-frame light fixtures will be used in the new offering. 

The Citadel originally sought approval from the state to do extensive renovations at Capers Hall but opted for a total rebuild after conducting a structural evaluation in 2014. Rather than spend an estimated $7 million to $8 million reinforcing those walls to meet modern international building codes, the school decided to start from scratch.

The construction of a new academic space puts a slight burden on faculty members for the upcoming school year.

Employees with Thompson Turner Construction and The Citadel watch as demolition begins on Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/StaffLauren Petracca

Brian Jones, dean for The Citadel’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences, said some classrooms will relocate to the library, other campus buildings and even mobile trailers while the renovation is taking place.

“We’ve already transitioned the faculty, and they’re already up and running in their new spaces,” Jones said.

Capers Hall was named for two brothers, Confederate Brig. Gen. Ellison Capers and Maj. Francis W. Capers, who was superintendent of The Citadel from 1853 to 1859.

The demolition comes amid a nationwide reckoning of Confederate imagery in public spaces and in the U.S. military. Retired Marine Corps Gen. Glenn M. Walters, president of The Citadel, said in a memo last year he was “establishing a committee to further study historical figures for whom structures are named.” 

The committee’s progress on researching and identifying buildings was sidelined by COVID-19, but they will resume their duties in the fall.

Presently, there are no plans to change the name of the hall when it is rebuilt. 

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Citadel cadets tour the International African American Museum site https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-cadets-tour-the-international-african-american-museum-site/ Thu, 04 Feb 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21832 Citadel cadets enrolled in the course “The Why and the How: The Making of the International African American Museum,” tour the site of the International African American Museum with Professor Joseph P. Riley, Jr., the former Mayor of Charleston, on Tuesday, February 2, 2021. Dr. Elijah Heyward, the museum’s Chief Operating Officer, led the tour of the museum, which is slated to open in 2022. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Citadel cadets enrolled in the course “The Why and the How: The Making of the International African American Museum,” tour the site of the International African American Museum with Professor Joseph P. Riley, Jr., the former Mayor of Charleston, on Tuesday, February 2, 2021. Dr. Elijah Heyward, the museum’s Chief Operating Officer, led the tour of the museum, which is slated to open in 2022. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Former mayor Joe Riley and Citadel cadets in his class toured the International African American Museum currently under construction.]]> Citadel cadets enrolled in the course “The Why and the How: The Making of the International African American Museum,” tour the site of the International African American Museum with Professor Joseph P. Riley, Jr., the former Mayor of Charleston, on Tuesday, February 2, 2021. Dr. Elijah Heyward, the museum’s Chief Operating Officer, led the tour of the museum, which is slated to open in 2022. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Citadel cadets enrolled in the course “The Why and the How: The Making of the International African American Museum,” tour the site of the International African American Museum with Professor Joseph P. Riley, Jr., the former Mayor of Charleston, on Tuesday, February 2, 2021. Dr. Elijah Heyward, the museum’s Chief Operating Officer, led the tour of the museum, which is slated to open in 2022. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Photo: Former Mayor of Charleston and current Citadel professor, Joe Riley, ’64, speaking to his class as they tour the International African American Museum construction.

As seen on WCSC – Live 5 News, by Ann McGill

Cadets studying American history at The Citadel will experience history in the making. To kick off recognition of Black History Month at the military college of South Carolina, they will tour the International African American Museum currently under construction in Charleston.

The students are enrolled in the spring semester course titled, “The Why and the How: The Making of the International African American Museum.”

The instructor is Joseph Riley. The former Charleston mayor is a graduate of the class of 1964, and now serves in the role of professor of American Government and Public Policy at his alma mater.

Riley will tag team with history professor Kerry Taylor, Ph.D., who specializes in African American history. Taylor is director of the Charleston Oral History program at The Citadel.

“I believe for the students this will be a most meaningful college experience, for they will study a project that is under construction and learn much about our nation’s long-hidden history,” Riley said in a statement from the school.

“Upon graduation, in years to come, I have no doubt the museum will be part of their return visits to Charleston.”

The IAAM is located near the South Carolina Aquarium along the Charleston Harbor, and is set to open in 2022.

According to the IAAM website, “This museum is about a journey that began centuries ago in Africa, and still continues. It is about the journey of millions of Africans, captured and forced across the Atlantic in the grueling and inhumane Middle Passage, who arrived at Gadsden’s Wharf in Charleston, South Carolina and other ports in the Atlantic World. Their labor, resistance and ingenuity and that of their descendants shaped every aspect of our world.”

A statement released by the school describes the goal of the class. This collaborative course, while offering Citadel cadets the unique opportunity to learn African American history through the establishment of the IAAM, is as much a study of history as it is a study of the making of history, drawing additionally on the disciplines of marketing, finance, architecture and design, civil engineering, public policy, and project management.

Riley and Taylor are planning a second visit to the museum later in the semester.

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Citadel ’02 alumna selected for American Red Cross board of directors in Illinois https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-02-alumna-selected-for-american-red-cross-board-of-directors-in-illinois/ Mon, 30 Nov 2020 15:27:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20419 Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002Note: Ragan Freitag Pattison graduated from The Citadel in 2002 with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. She went on to earn a Juris Doctor, Law from Mississippi College]]> Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002

Note: Ragan Freitag Pattison graduated from The Citadel in 2002 with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. She went on to earn a Juris Doctor, Law from Mississippi College School of Law in 2008. Photo courtesy of America Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley website.

As seen in The Herald-News

ROMEOVILLE – The American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley on Friday announced the appointment of Ragan Freitag Pattison to the organization’s board of directors. Board members are chosen based on their commitment to the Red Cross mission as well as their individual expertise, experience and willingness to serve the needs of the board. 

Pattison is the director of state and local government market for Wight & Co. She was one of the first women to graduate The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, earning her bachelor’s degree in political science with a concentration in American government. 

After graduating The Citadel, Pattison returned home and began her early civic career serving as alderwoman for the city of Wilmington.

During that time, she worked for former U.S. Rep. Jerry Weller, R-Streator, handling constituent concerns and legislative matters within the district.

In 2005, she entered Mississippi College School of Law in Jackson, Mississippi.

During her time in law school, she served on the committee for the law school chapter for Habitat for Humanity, where they raised money and built new homes for the victims of Hurricane Katrina.

Pattison graduated from law school in 2008, and that year, she also was admitted to practice law in Illinois. Pattison had a successful career practicing criminal defense, family law and governmental law with Kavanagh Grumley & Gorbold LLC. Currently, she is a licensed attorney with Gwendolyn J. Sterk and the Family Law Group P.C. 

While practicing law, Pattison ran and successfully won two elections, serving as a Will County Board member and commissioner for the Forest Preserve of Will County. Pattison served as chairwoman of the Will County Capital Committee, where she began working with Wight & Co. She continued working with Wight & Co. as she transitioned into the chief of staff role for the Will County Board. 

Pattison’s relationship with Wight & Co. was instrumental as the Will County Courthouse project began to kick off, sparking a series of capital projects for Will County. 

“The Red Cross does its best work because local people volunteer their time to help their community,” said Brian McDaniel, executive director of the American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley.

“Pattison is a talented leader who makes an impact every day. She has a strong commitment to the Red Cross mission, and we are fortunate to have her join the chapter board. Without board members like Ragan, backed by the organizations she works with, we wouldn’t have as strong of an organization as we do.” 

Brian McDaniel, executive director of the American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley

The American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley always is welcoming new board members. Those interested in volunteering as a board member or community volunteer leader should contact McDaniel at 815-370-6729 or brian.mcdaniel2@redcross.org.

The American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley serves more than 1 million people in five counties in northern Illinois, including Kankakee, Will, Grundy, Kendall and La Salle.

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families.

The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For information, visit www.redcross.org/ILRiver or follow on Twitter @RedCrossIL. 

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