Operation Fall Return 2020 – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Fri, 05 Feb 2021 15:38:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Operation Fall Return 2020 – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Hicks: When things went wrong, these Charleston institutions did things right https://today.citadel.edu/hicks-when-things-went-wrong-these-charleston-institutions-did-things-right/ Fri, 05 Feb 2021 15:38:04 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21852 General Glenn Walters addresses campus regarding COVID-19General Glenn Walters addresses campus regarding COVID-19Unlike some people, the Corps of Cadets (to use another military term) has “embraced the suck.” They know this isn’t an ideal situation, but they’re doing what has to be done to remain on campus.]]> General Glenn Walters addresses campus regarding COVID-19General Glenn Walters addresses campus regarding COVID-19

As seen in The Post and Courier
By Brian Hicks

Photo above: The Citadel President, General Glenn Walters, addresses campus regarding COVID-19 in March, 2020

A lot of folks are flat-out doing this pandemic all wrong.

They don’t keep their distance, refuse to stay home when possible and consider it an infringement on their “freedom” to wear a mask. After nearly a year of this madness, they still don’t understand they can unwittingly spread the virus to others.

Or they just don’t care.

Everybody gripes about these types, and with good reason. But today, let’s recognize some of those who are doing it right. There are thousands of people in this community who’ve helped minimize the virus’ spread and pitched in with key assists for everyone else — and they deserve our appreciation.

Let’s start with The Citadel.

As you might imagine, a military college with about 2,300 cadets living together in barracks has the potential to become a monumental petri dish.

As of Monday, the campus had just 18 positive cases in quarantine.

Col. John Dorrian, The Citadel’s vice president for communications and marketing, says the college unsurprisingly treated its efforts to fight the virus as a military campaign. And even as cases of COVID-19 have spiked in the Lowcountry and pretty much everywhere else, Operation Fall Return has been an astonishing success.

Like most colleges, The Citadel went online in March but was determined to get students back on campus for the fall because, well, that’s sort of the point of being in the Corps of Cadets.

They sacrificed some traditions — no parades, for instance — and limited off-campus leave. Cadets divide their time between in-person and virtual instruction, and they are subject to weekly, random COVID testing. And, because it could, the college made masks a mandatory part of cadet uniforms.

The college learned a lot about containing the virus over the summer when the Marine Corps used the campus as a staging area for new recruits headed to Parris Island. Ultimately, The Citadel spent months preaching a pretty simple suggestion that many others can’t seem to get through their heads.

“If you follow CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) recommendations, they work,” Dorrian says.

If only everyone employed such common sense.

Unlike some people, the Corps of Cadets (to use another military term) has “embraced the suck.” They know this isn’t an ideal situation, but they’re doing what has to be done to remain on campus and maintain some semblance of normal.

There’s a lesson there.

A number of local businesses have shown that same fighting spirit. Last week, at a virtual version of its annual Industry Appreciation Luncheon, Charleston County’s Economic Development Department saluted some local businesses that have responded to this crisis like patriots.

Brackish, the company that makes those snazzy bow ties, and Kate McDonald Bridal, which makes wedding gowns, put their seamstresses to work making face masks for front-line health care workers at the beginning of the pandemic (when those were in short supply).

Extremiti3D made face masks and anti-fogging face shields for nonmedical use. The Bourne Group made face shields for health care workers. And Multiplastics not only made face shields, but clear dividers and partitions for schools, churches and businesses around the state.

Summit Worx reconfigured its manufacturing operations to make air purifying respirators for FEMA, which sent them to hospitals dealing with the worst coronavirus outbreaks.

You may remember High Wire Distilling, in collaboration with Palmetto Brewing, manufactured sanitizer when there was a shortage early in the pandemic. Turns out they distributed more than 5,000 gallons of sanitizer to fire stations, shelters and charities. And Life Industries Corporation manufactured FDA- and CDC-approved sanitizer for those who couldn’t use alcohol-based sanitizers.

Finally, Limehouse Produce donated 1,200 boxes of fresh fruits and vegetables to the Lowcountry Food Bank in the early weeks of the pandemic, and has since worked with local hospitals to feed people who need it most.

Steve Dykes, the county’s executive director of economic development, says these companies are nothing short of inspiring, a credit to the county.

“Our businesses and community came together to respond to challenging circumstances, drawing upon the resiliency, generosity and grit that have always been at the core of this region,” Dykes says.

And that brings us back to a lesson that Dorrian says The Citadel has taught its entire campus: “It’s really not about you, it’s about everybody else.”

If only that sentiment spread as easily as the virus.

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That Citadel vs. Alabama tape grabbed South Florida coach Jeff Scott’s attention https://today.citadel.edu/that-citadel-vs-alabama-tape-grabbed-south-florida-coach-jeff-scotts-attention/ Tue, 08 Sep 2020 17:58:47 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18415 The Citadel’s 10-10 halftime tie with No. 1-ranked Alabama in 2018 was on new South Florida coach Jeff Scott’s must-watch list for his players]]>

Photo: Citadel quarterback Brandon Rainey (16) rolls out to pass against Alabama during a game in 2018, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama (Courtesy: Butch Dill, Associated Press – File)

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Jeff Hartsell

There’s no particular reason why a football player at the University of South Florida should know much about The Citadel, a tiny FCS military school in South Carolina.

But you can bet almost every Bulls player knows something about superpower Alabama and legendary coach Nick Saban.

And that’s why a video of The Citadel’s 10-10 halftime tie with a No. 1-ranked Alabama team in 2018 was on new South Florida coach Jeff Scott’s must-watch list for his players. Scott, the former Clemson co-offensive coordinator, is set to make his college head-coaching debut when the Bulls host the Bulldogs at 1 p.m. Saturday at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa.

Alabama ended up beating The Citadel 50-17 that day in Tuscaloosa, but the first 30 minutes were all Scott needed to make his point.

THE CITADEL AT
SOUTH FLORIDA

When: 7 p.m. Saturday

Where: Raymond James Stadium, Tampa

TV: ESPN+

Tickets: None

“We went back and showed our guys clips from that game,” Scott said last week. “And one of the best lines came after The Citadel scored its first touchdown. The commentator said, ‘That’s the first points the Alabama defense has given up in 11 quarters.’

“That gets everybody’s attention right there.”

The Citadel ran for 275 yards against Alabama, averaging 4.6 yards per carry and holding the ball for 36 minutes, 23 seconds.

“Nick Saban told his guys, ‘This is a group over there who want to shrink the game,’ Scott said. “It’s limited possessions.”

At USF, Scott is replacing former coach Charlie Strong and taking over a squad that was 4-8 overall last season and 2-6 in the American Athletic Conference. Strong went 10-2 and then 7-6 in his first two seasons with the Bulls.

There might be easier ways for a coach to make his debut than against a triple-option team with a jones for FBS upsets (The Citadel beat Georgia Tech last year, the only FCS team to beat an FBS squad in 2019). But Scott said USF chose The Citadel from among several candidates when revamping its schedule after the coronavirus pandemic shut down much of college football for the 2020 season.

“We chose The Citadel,” Scott said. “And part of the reason, other than that we have a lot of respect for them and their program, is that we are going to play Navy later in the year. And Navy is always tough in our conference. Our goal is to find a way to compete and win in this conference, so we have to find a way to beat the option.

Former Clemson assistant coach Jeff Scott is now the head coach at South Florida. (Courtesy: Andrew Whitaker, The Post and Courier)

“It was the same way for us at Clemson with Georgia Tech. You better go attack it and figure it out.”

In a 35-3 loss to Navy and its triple-option last year, the Bulls allowed 434 rushing yards and 7.4 yards per attempt.

“To face this type of offense in the first game, it’s different,” Scott said. “In a normal year, the first game is about us and what we do. But the option is a different task for everyone, and this defense is going out there for the first time against a well-oiled machine. These guys are very confident, and they know what they are doing. It reminds me of the Georgia Tech teams when they had experienced guys back.

“If we’re not ready, not prepared and not reading our keys, we can get embarrassed very quickly.”

South Florida’s defensive coordinator is Glenn Spencer, who has held the same title at Florida Atlantic, Charlotte and Oklahoma State. 

One of Spencer’s main jobs is to fix USF’s run defense. In 2018 and 2019, the Bulls  ranked 122nd (247.5 yards per game) and 114th (208.6), respectively, in run defense, allowing 17 individual 100-yard rushing efforts during that 25-game span.

Spencer coaches a “30-float” scheme, with three down linemen up front and lots of movement in the back eight.

The Bulls lost three senior defensive ends from last season, but return a trio of linebackers in Antonio Green, Andrew Mims and Dwayne Boyles. Devin Gil, a transfer linebacker from Michigan, has opted out of the season.

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Class of 2021 to receive their bands of gold during Sept. 25 celebration https://today.citadel.edu/class-of-2021-to-receive-their-bands-of-gold-during-sept-25-celebration/ Fri, 04 Sep 2020 21:07:53 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18329 Hand of a woman cadet close up showing new citadel ring at ceremonyHand of a woman cadet close up showing new citadel ring at ceremonyThe Class of 2021 will be celebrated with a traditional Ring Presentation Ceremony Sept. 25, with a livestreamed ceremony for parents.]]> Hand of a woman cadet close up showing new citadel ring at ceremonyHand of a woman cadet close up showing new citadel ring at ceremony

Ring ceremony to be livestreamed for families; Parents Weekend events curtailed

The seniors comprising the Class of 2021 will be celebrated with a traditional Ring Presentation Ceremony at 5 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 25, in McAlister Field House, attended by the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, Veteran and Active Duty students.

Attendance at the ceremony will be restricted to only ring-eligible seniors due to the need for social distancing to reduce the spread of COVID-19, but the event will include the same rich traditions that recipients are anticipating for this important milestone.

Understanding the importance this event also holds for parents and families of the seniors, the college will provide a livestream of the ceremony with link details available on The Citadel Today newsroom and on social media closer to the date.

“Our seniors deserve every bit of pageantry for earning their much anticipated rings as every other member of the Long Grey Line who came before them,” said the Commandant of Cadets, CAPT Geno Paluso. “While we wish we could provide everything we would normally on a Parents Weekend, we are pleased to be able to provide this in-person ring ceremony for the Class of 2021. We ask parents, family and friends to respect the protective measures put in place for the weekend for the good of all.”

After the ceremony, the cadets, veteran and active duty students will proceed to The Citadel War Memorial to salute, and then to Summerall Chapel for the traditional tapping of their rings on the chapel door, immediately followed by a tented reception for the seniors and senior administration only. Access to Summerall Field and related facilities will be limited to the those who received rings, and required faculty and staff, during this process. Barracks will remain closed to only those assigned to live in each specific facility.

Leave for members of the Class of 2021 for Friday evening may be announced at a closer date. There will be a ring walkthrough photo opportunity for seniors and their parents in the spring, as conditions permit.

The normal Parents Weekend events on campus, such as open barracks and a dress parade, are cancelled out of an abundance of caution for everyone concerned.

The Bulldogs will play Eastern Kentucky University the day after the ring ceremony, Sept. 26, at Johnson Hagood Stadium. Attendance will be limited to season, club-level, and suite ticket and pass holders, as well as designated cadets.

“We understand that it is hard for things to be different, and that it may be disappointing to parents not to be able to enjoy a traditional Parents Weekend, but we greatly appreciate your understanding in the knowledge that everything possible is being done to keep your sons and daughters safe and the campus operating safely during this challenging time,” Paluso said.

Decisions about general leave for freshmen and other cadets will be announced closer to Sept. 25.

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Taking care of each other on campus https://today.citadel.edu/taking-care-of-each-other-on-campus/ Thu, 27 Aug 2020 19:24:51 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18146 The Citadel Office of Cadet Activities is delivering meals on wheels to help care for cadets in quarantine.]]>

Cadet activities team brings “meals on wheels” to quarantined cadets

On this day there are seven lunch boxes being picked up by Mrs. Shelton Milner…meaning there are seven cadets in quarantine on campus because of COVID-19.

Milner picks them up and packs them up, then drives around campus to deliver the meals to the doorsteps of the houses where the cadets are staying.

Cadet activities team in a golf cart delivering meals on campus.

Today it’s ham, green beans, rice and cake.

Lunch box with ham and green beans for cadets

Milner and her colleagues follow a specific process with each drop.

“I knock on the door, set down the food, then the drinks and step away,” she says. “Then we chat from a distance. I know they’re a little bored being separated from the Corps so I like to make sure they are doing okay and have someone to talk to.”

Milner, the events and cadet activities manager for The Citadel, doesn’t have a lot of events to manage during this unusual, socially distanced fall semester, so she and the Office of Cadet Activities team personally make sure the cadets get their meals on time.

Shelton Milner of The Citadel cadet activities team visits with cadets in quarantine

“They’re my kids – really all cadets are my kids,” Milner says while on the run making deliveries. She’s worked in the Office of Cadet Activities for 20 years and she says it’s the only job, and the best job, she’s ever had.

“They keep me young. They make me happy.”

The cadets she visits from a distance seem to feel the same about her.

“This means the world to us,” said one of the cadets answering the door in a mask to retrieve the meal. “It’s great when Mrs. Milner visits even if it’s just to hear her shout ‘how’s it going in there y’all’ from a distance. She’s the best. And she reminds us we’ll be back in the barracks soon.”

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Citadel postpones parade, events honoring Class of 2020 https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-postpones-parade-events-honoring-class-of-2020/ Wed, 26 Aug 2020 18:00:05 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18140 Due to the evolving COVID-19 environment, the parade honoring the Class of 2020 which had been scheduled for the weekend of September 18-19 will be postponed.]]>

Due to the evolving COVID-19 environment, the parade honoring the Class of 2020 which had been scheduled for the weekend of September 18-19 will be postponed. Also postponed is the opportunity for 2020 graduates to walk the stage and receive their diplomas from General Walters or a legacy presenter. The Citadel will announce a new date once conditions enable such large gatherings.

Citadel leadership made the decision, along with cancelling all review parades in September, in order to keep the campus and local communities safe through the pandemic.

“We will conduct in-person events to honor the Class of 2020 when conditions permit,” said Gen. Glenn Walters, USMC (Ret.) president of The Citadel. “It will be a great day when we can welcome the Class of 2020 back to campus and fully celebrate their accomplishments together as a Citadel family.”

For more information about COVID-19, and the actions The Citadel is taking to keep campus safe, click here.

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Meet The Citadel’s new mascot, Gen. Mike D. Groshon, aka G3 https://today.citadel.edu/meet-the-citadels-new-mascot-gen-mike-d-groshon-aka-g3/ Sat, 22 Aug 2020 10:00:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18050 The Times and Democrat covers one future superstar, the new mascot for The Citadel, Gen. Mike D. Groshon. His new friends call him G3 for short.]]>

As seen in The Times and Democrat

Operation Fall Return 2020 at The Citadel has about 2,301 central figures: 2,300 cadets and cadet recruits, and one future superstar who represents the return of the live mascot program to campus. His name is Gen. Mike D. Groshon. His new friends call him G3 for short.

“He’s hot, but he’s really happy to be out here with the cadets. He’s not really sure yet what to do but he loved being petted,” said Cadet Marrik Kelley. Kelley is one of two cadet captains who oversee the Mascot Handling Team.

G3’s official name, Gen. Mike D. Groshon, will be familiar to many in The Citadel family and in Charleston. He was named for Coach Mike D. Groshon, Citadel Class of 1976, who passed away in 2016, after caring for several generations of mascots.

“Mike Groshon had been running the program out of the goodness of his own big heart, caring for the bulldogs since 2003,” said Lt. Col. Kevin Dougherty, USA (Ret.), Ph.D., assistant commandant for leadership programs at The Citadel. Dougherty oversees the mascot program and the cadet handlers, among his many other duties. “When Mike died, our Commandant, Capt. Geno Paluso, began planning how to transition the program to the Commandant’s Dept. so we could get cadets more involved.”

Naming G3 after Groshon was the decision of the 1977 Citadel alumnus who donated the English bulldog to the college, Dr. John Bradford. Bradford is a local veterinarian who has cared for many of the mascots through the years, including G3’s predecessor, Gen. Robert P. Carson (G2), who died in 2019. The Citadel’s other living mascot, Boo X, lives with Bradford now, and is expected to retire to “mascot emeritus” in the fall.

Bradford officially transferred control of G3 to the cadets on Aug. 6. The Mascot Handling Team consists of six cadets for the 2020-2021 academic year.

Bulldogs’ fans can look forward to seeing and visiting with G3 at future events as the pandemic allows. “G3’s house on campus is decorated with mascots memorabilia and items from his namesake. We hope to hold open houses during big weekends, like Corps Day.” Otherwise, Doughtery says G3 needs his privacy and visitors are not permitted.

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Introducing nine new Swain School of Science and Mathematics professors https://today.citadel.edu/introducing-nine-new-swain-school-of-science-and-mathematics-professors/ https://today.citadel.edu/introducing-nine-new-swain-school-of-science-and-mathematics-professors/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2020 20:02:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17822 ouis Brems - The Citadel 2017-18 SY, Math Lab, Mobius Shapes, Classroom, Rigo Flores,ouis Brems - The Citadel 2017-18 SY, Math Lab, Mobius Shapes, Classroom, Rigo Flores,The Swain School of Science and Mathematics welcomes nine new faculty members for the 2020-2021 academic year.]]> ouis Brems - The Citadel 2017-18 SY, Math Lab, Mobius Shapes, Classroom, Rigo Flores,ouis Brems - The Citadel 2017-18 SY, Math Lab, Mobius Shapes, Classroom, Rigo Flores,

Above Photo: Citadel Mathematics professor, Dr. Rigoberto Florez, teaching a class in 2018

The Swain School of Science and Mathematics is comprised of seven departments: Biology, Chemistry, Cyber and Computer Sciences, Health and Human Performance, Mathematical Sciences Nursing and Physics.

Under the leadership of Dean Darin Zimmerman, Ph.D., the school has more than 50 tenured/tenure-track faculty and about 425 cadet majors. The school also offers 15 master’s degree level programs and certificates (non-cadet), as part of The Citadel Graduate College.

The Swain School of Science and Mathematics welcomes nine new faculty members for the 2020-2021 academic year.

Department of Chemistry

Robert Granger, Ph.D., professor and department head

Granger is an inorganic/analytical chemist with a background in laser spectroscopy and electrochemistry and joins The Citadel as the new head for the Department of Chemistry. He is the lead author of a nationally bestselling textbook on Instrumental Analysis (Oxford University Press).

Granger’s research interests include transition metal chemotherapeutic drug design and the study of electrocatalysis as it pertains to carbon-carbon bond formation (i.e. artificial photosynthesis). He holds a Ph.D. in Analytical/Inorganic Chemistry from Purdue University.

Read more about Granger here.

Megan Moyer, Ph.D.

With prior experience teaching chemistry at Carthage College, and as a teacher’s assistant at Colorado School of Mines, Moyer has taught General Chemistry 1 and 2 with associated labs. She is a member of the American Chemical Society and holds Ph.D. in Applied Chemistry from the Colorado School of Mines.

Moyer has a history of volunteerism including for summer STEM camps for girls. Moyer was awarded Most Outstanding Teaching Assistant in Chemistry (2018) and Catalysis Symposium Top Presenter (2018).

Read more about Moyer here.

Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences

Computer Science class taught by Dr. Michael Verdicchio, 2017

Prosenjit Chatterjee, Ph.D.

Chatterjee holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro. His specialization includes computer vision, deep learning, neural networks, data analytics, data mining, artificial intelligence, and machine learning. Chatterjee’s research centers on human face, iris based biometric authentication, and behavioral biometrics-based authentication.

Chatterjee has almost six years of teaching experience in different organizations and institutions and more than eight years of industry experience in software industry. He worked as a senior software engineer, database administrator, quality assurance team lead, and business enabler with the world’s leading banking and financial sectors such as Credit Suisse, Bank of New York Mellon (BNYM), and Wells Fargo. Chatterjee was the senior developer in the insurance vertical giant MetLife, John Hancock.

Department of Physics

Scott Curtis, III, Ph.D., John Lining Professor of Physics
Director for the Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., ’77, Center for Climate Studies

Curtis joins The Citadel as the director for the new Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., ’77, Center for Climate Studies. The center is under development, and was recently named for Near, who passed away in March of 2020, an alumnus, veteran and physics professor.

Curtis joins The Citadel from East Carolina University (ECU), in North Carolina, where he was titled Distinguished Professor in the Natural Sciences and Mathematics. During his time at ECU he acquired close to $1.4 million in grants and fellowships. Additionally, Curtis has authored more than 150 books, book chapters, peer-reviewed journal articles and scientific white papers for presentations. He is engaged frequently to speak around the nation on issues including climate change, coastal water hazards and flooding. Curtis has participated as an editor for five scientific journals.

Curtis’s research centers on tropical climate variability with an emphasis on precipitation and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. He earned a Ph.D. and a Master of Science, both in Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences, from the University of Wisconsin. Some of his distinctions include named Center for Sustainability Outstanding Affiliate Faculty Member from ECU, and the Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers Research Award.

Kaelyn Leake, Ph.D.

Leake holds a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of California. She earned a Bachelors of Science degree in Engineering Science and Physics from Sweet Briar College in Virginia. Prior to joining The Citadel, Leake taught Dynamics and Kinematics, Electrical Circuits, Modern Electronic Technology, How it Works, Designing a Sustainable Future, and Properties of Materials at Sweet Briar.

Leake has received several awards, including Outstanding TA Award, University of California, Santa Cruz, 2013-2014, and the QB3 Keck Fellowship, University of California, Santa Cruz, 2009-2010.

Read more about Leake here.

Hank Yochum, Ph.D.
Professor and Department Head

Yochum joins The Citadel as professor and Physics Department head from Sweet Briar Collage where he worked for 18 years as a professor. He was also as associate dean for Academic Affairs, and the director for The Margaret Jones Wyllie ’45 Engineering Program, which was ABET accredited.

Prior to becoming a professor, Yochum was an engineer with Lucent Technologies/OFS Specialty Photonics. His research interests include matter physics and nanotechnology, including nano structured optical devices.

Yochum earned his Ph.D. in Physics from Wake Forrest University in 1999. He returns to Charleston, working not far from his alma mater, The College of Charleston, where he obtained a Bachelor of Science in Physics.

Department of Mathematical Sciences

Cadets in a Math lab working on Mobius strips, in 2018.

Jeff Lyons, Ph.D.

Lyons teaching expertise ranges from College Algebra, Pre-calculus, Trigonometry and Calculus to Applied Engineering Math and Differential Equations. He joins The Citadel following visiting professorships at Trinity University and University of Hawaii. Before that he was a professor at Nova Southeastern University.

Some of Lyons publications include An Application of the Layered Compression-Expansion Fixed Point Theorem to a Fractional Boundary Value Problem (2019) in the Panamerican Mathematical Journal, and Two Point Fractional Boundary Value Problems with a Fractional Boundary Condition (2018) in the Fractional Calculus and Applied Analysis. He participated as a presenter in a virtual conference in 2020 for the Recent Advances in Differential and Difference Equations and Their Applications.

Lyons earned his Ph.D. in 2011 from Baylor University, where he also earned a Master and Bachelor of Science in Mathematics.

Swain Department of Nursing

Holly Donahue, instructor

PHoto of Holly Donahue, a nursing instructor at The Citadel.

Donahue is originally from LaGrange, Georgia and now resides in the Charleston area. She is a graduate of Columbus State University where she earned her Master in Science degree with a major in Nursing Education in 2019. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from LaGrange College in 2015.

Before joining the Swain Department of Nursing, she served as the emergency department clinical educator at Trident Medical Center for the last year and a half. As a relatively new nurse educator, she is enthusiastic and passionate about nursing education and looking forward to contributing to the growth of the nursing department and future generation of nursing leaders.

Leonora Horton, Ph.D.

Horton is a graduate of the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) where she earned a Ph.D. in Nursing/Clinical Research. Her Master of Science degree was obtained from Columbia University NYC with a major in Nurse-Midwifery.

Horton has been practicing clinically for more than 35 years. She was a nurse-midwife for 30 years in which time she has held both administrative and faculty roles for MUSC. Her teaching experience includes the education of students of nursing, nurse-midwifery, physician assistants, and medical students as well as first and second year OB/GYN residents. She was the immediate past Nurse Midwifery program director at MUSC.

In addition, Norton the held the position of Doctor of Nursing Practice Program Director for South University Online as an associate professor. Her teaching expertise for South University included Research Methods, Women’s Health, Organization and Systems Leadership Nursing, DNP Field Experiences, and DNP Scholarly Project Courses.

Some of Horton’s achievements include the 2011 and 2012 Golden Lamp Teaching Award and the 2010 Outstanding Clinical Faculty Award.

Read more about Horton here.

Ctiadel cadet nursing majors learning from Dr. James Pelletier in simulation lab
Citadel cadet nursing majors learning from Dr. James Pelletier in simulation lab in 2019



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The Corps comes home to campus https://today.citadel.edu/the-corps-comes-home-to-campus/ Mon, 17 Aug 2020 15:45:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17835 Sunday, August 16 marked one of the last major milestones in The Citadel's Operation Fall Return 2020, when most of the cadets returned to campus.]]>

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets, now back in the barracks, is buckling down and preparing to begin classes later this week.

Sunday, August 16 marked one of the last major milestones in The Citadel’s Operation Fall Return 2020, when most of the cadets returned to campus on a staggered schedule, understanding that it is their duty to help protect themselves and others from COVID-19.

Samantha Walton, the Regimental Public Affairs non-commissioned officer, spent the day checking in on the recently-returned cadets.

In their own words: Cadets talk about being back on campus

Thomas Hammerstone
Sierra Company Commander

“I feel pretty good! I’m excited. I see the South Carolina Corps of Cadets being back at school as an opportunity to show the rest of the country how to operate successfully in the COVID-19 environment. If any institution can do it successfully and correctly, it’s definitely us here at The Citadel. I am very enthused about senior year as I complete this four-year leadership experience and earn my undergraduate degree in conclusion to receiving my ring at parents’ weekend and spending time with my classmates.”

Carleton Bailiff III
Athletic Officer for Regimental Band and Pipes

“I think it’s a bittersweet feeling! I feel like we all have to remember to remain vigilant during this COVID-19 pandemic. Despite the virus, I’m still excited for my senior year. Every day is like my last chance to do something for the first time. I’m looking forward to getting my ring, graduating and seeing my classmates become commissioned officers.”

Arista Couture
Regimental Admin Clerk

“I enjoy being back on campus. I definitely like the on-campus lifestyle versus being at home, but with the COVID challenges it’s definitely going to be a unique type of year. I’m looking forward to seeing what the Regimental Staff and the rest of the Corps can do to make it comfortable during these unforeseen circumstances for everyone, including the knobs. I’m thrilled to get further educated in my major — nursing — and also get back into the Air Force unit.”

Sharize Roper
Human Affairs Corporal

“I feel pretty good. I mean, you’re always a little apprehensive, but I really think that the Corps is doing a good job since I’ve been here. I’m excited to begin classes and for the school year to start. Although it’s going to be challenging and quite different, I’m looking forward to that challenge because that’s why you come to The Citadel.”

William “Jay” Smith
Football Defensive Line

“It feels good because I get to be around my friends and my classmates. I’m excited for the school year cause I’m going into my junior year, only one more year until I graduate. This school year is going to be different from others because everyone will have to work together and remain even more disciplined than before in what we are doing.”

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Top 5 things evening undergraduate and graduate students need to know before returning to classes https://today.citadel.edu/top-5-things-students-in-the-citadel-graduate-college-need-to-know-before-returning-to-classes/ Wed, 12 Aug 2020 15:38:23 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17629 As The Citadel moves forward with Operation Fall Return 2020, an agile, conditions-based plan to return cadets and students to face-to-face instruction, college leadership is communicating regularly to keep all constituents informed.]]>

As The Citadel moves forward with Operation Fall Return 2020, an agile, conditions-based plan to return cadets and students to face-to-face instruction, college leadership is communicating regularly to keep all constituents informed.

One of the sessions, held on August 6, was focused on students within The Citadel Graduate College — including graduate, college transfer, veteran, veteran-day and active duty students.

Nearly 100 people watched as The Citadel Provost, Sally Selden, Ph.D., along with the associate provost of enrollment management Kelly Brennan, Ph.D., and other college officials, supplemented other communications provided by the college since the beginning of the pandemic.

Throughout the process, college leaders, faculty and staff, and members of The Citadel community have been heavily involved in making campus safe to continue the mission – to educate principled leaders in all walks of life.

“We have been in constant contact with different medical professionals. We’ve been engaged with the Medical University of South Carolina; we have a presidential advisory board, which is comprised of medical professionals who’ve looked at our plan and given us feedback,” said Selden during the virtual town hall. “We’ve also submitted our plan to South Carolina’s Council on Higher Education, which is the governing body in the State of South Carolina that oversees all of higher education. We are on campus adhering by all CDC and DHEC regulations and, in fact, we’re doing things that they suggest we don’t have to, such as testing.”

The top 5 takeaways from the virtual conversation, which included real-time questions from students, are as follows:

  1. Students taking face-to-face courses must be tested for COVID-19, approximately two weeks prior to start of classes. Negative test results should be emailed to cgc@citadel.edu; if a student tests positive, they should call The Citadel Graduate College office at (843) 953-5089.
  2. Based on the CDC and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) guidelines, any student who tests positive for COVID-19 before returning to campus will begin classes remotely, and will receive a return-to-class date based on the date of their positive test.
  3. Students should be checking their “Week at a Glance” schedule daily. That is where they will find information on the format of their class (face-to-face, A/B, hybrid, or virtual) as well as the location of their classrooms. It will also instruct students in A/B hybrid classes which days they should be in class and which days they should be attending virtually. (Note: If a face-to-face course transitions to online, it will be marked “hybrid,” however the building and room number will be listed as “online.”)
  4. Two masks will be distributed to all students taking face-to-face courses; they will be distributed to the student’s first class on campus; CGC students will not have to go to a special location to get their masks. (Note: The distribution will be based on student schedules, as of two days before the start of classes. If students change their schedule two day or fewer days prior to classes, their masks will take some time to catch up to them.)
  5. There is a process in place to consider student accommodations for virtual learning, if any students have a medical or personal reason that may impact their ability to return in person for the fall semester. The Campus Assessment Team, led by David Allen, Ph.D., can be reached through this form.

“We appreciate you being part of our community,” said Brennan as the virtual town hall concluded. “We want to continue to support you towards your educational goals. That is what we are all here for — program directors, our deans, our professors, you name it. So please, again, reach out and keep asking questions.”

Any students, knobs, cadets or parents with questions about Operation Fall Return and COVID-19 protocols can find Frequently Asked Questions here, or use this form to send a question.

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Meet The Citadel’s new mascot, Gen. Mike D. Groshon, a.k.a. G3 https://today.citadel.edu/meet-the-citadels-new-mascot-gen-mike-p-groshon-a-k-a-g3/ Tue, 11 Aug 2020 18:14:23 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17696 Citadel mascot Gen. Mike P. Groshon with two cadet handlers on Aug 6, 2020Citadel mascot Gen. Mike P. Groshon with two cadet handlers on Aug 6, 2020And learn the new mascot Knob Knowledge Operation Fall Return 2020 has about 2,301 central figures: 2,300 cadets and cadet recruits, and one future superstar who represents the return of]]> Citadel mascot Gen. Mike P. Groshon with two cadet handlers on Aug 6, 2020Citadel mascot Gen. Mike P. Groshon with two cadet handlers on Aug 6, 2020

And learn the new mascot Knob Knowledge

Operation Fall Return 2020 has about 2,301 central figures: 2,300 cadets and cadet recruits, and one future superstar who represents the return of the live mascot program to campus. His name is Gen. Mike D. Groshon. His new friends call him G3 for short.

G3’s first official duty occurred during the Class of 2024 Oath Ceremony, on Aug. 10 where he was publicly introduced.

“He’s hot, but he’s really happy to be out here with the cadets. He’s not really sure yet what to do but he loved being petted,” said Cadet Marrik Kelley. Kelley is one of two cadet captains who oversee the Mascot Handling Team.

G3’s official name, Gen. Mike D. Groshon, will be familiar to many in The Citadel family and in Charleston. He was named for Coach Mike D. Groshon, Citadel Class of 1976, who passed away in 2016, after caring for several generations of mascots.

Coach Mike Groshon with G2 and Boo X

“Mike Groshon had been running the program out of the goodness of his own big heart, caring for the bulldogs since 2003,” said Lt. Col. Kevin Dougherty, USA (Ret.), Ph.D., assistant commandant for leadership programs at The Citadel. Dougherty oversees the mascot program and the cadet handlers, among his many other duties. “When Mike died, our Commandant, Capt. Geno Paluso, began planning how to transition the program to the Commandant’s Dept. so we could get cadets more involved.”

Naming G3 after Groshon was the decision of the 1977 Citadel alumnus who donated the English bulldog to the college, Dr. John Bradford. Bradford is a local veterinarian who has cared for many of the mascots through the years, including G3’s predecessor, Gen. Robert P. Carson (G2), who died in 2019. The Citadel’s other living mascot, Boo X, lives with Bradford now, and is expected to retire to “mascot emeritus” in the fall.

Citadel cadet pets mascot bulldog, G3

Bradford officially transferred control of G3 to the cadets on Aug. 6. The Mascot Handling Team consists of six cadets for the 2020-2021 academic year.

“The team includes two seniors who serve as cadet captains and focus on planning, two juniors who serve as master sergeants and focus on administration and logistical support, and two sophomores who serve as corporals and focus on the actual daily care and handling,” said Dougherty. “They were all were selected as part of last year’s normal competitive rank board process.”

Cadet mascot handler Sienna Gonzalez with G3 in McAlister Field House on Aug. 6

For Cadet Sienna Gonzalez, who has four dogs at home, it’s kind of a dream position to have within the Corps. “I love dogs so much and always have. Living with G3 in his house and taking care of him is a privilege,” said the Biology major who intends to become a physician.

G3, broad shouldered and a tad stumpy at 65 pounds, is 15 months old and expected to grow more. His favorite treat is milk-bones.

Bulldogs’ fans can look forward to seeing and visiting with G3 at future events as the pandemic allows. “G3’s house on campus is decorated with mascots memorabilia and items from his namesake. We hope to hold open houses during big weekends, like Corps Day.” Otherwise, Doughtery says G3 needs his privacy and visitors are not permitted.

What is The Citadel Mascot:

I come from a long line of Generals and Boos

I eat knobs and Paladins and kangaroos

If you’re scared of my bark, don’t mess with my bite

For The Citadel blue I’ll do what is right

Peace and honor, God and country, I will fight for thee

I’m The Citadel bulldog. It’s a great day to be me!

New Knob Knowledge poem, circa 2020

To donate to The Citadel Mascot Program, please contact The Citadel Foundation via email at give@citadel.edu, or call (843) 953-5297.

G3 taking a breather on his first day of “work” as the new Citadel mascot at McAlister Field House on Aug. 6
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