Department of Mechanical Engineering – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Wed, 17 Mar 2021 18:16:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Department of Mechanical Engineering – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter follows up with 2020 Scholarship Awardees at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/women-in-defense-palmetto-chapter-follows-up-with-2020-scholarship-awardees-at-the-citadel/ Wed, 17 Mar 2021 18:16:11 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22741 Provided by Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter (WID) Pictured above (left to right): Cadets Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther, 2020 Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter  Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math]]>

Provided by Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter (WID)

Pictured above (left to right): Cadets Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther, 2020 Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter  Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Scholarship awardees

On a beautiful February day, representatives from the Women in Defense (WID) Palmetto Chapter headed to The Citadel to follow up with Cadets Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther, the awardees of the WID 2020 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Scholarship.

Layden is a senior and double majoring in Computer Science and German with minors in Cybersecurity and Fine Arts, and a member of the U.S. Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) at The Citadel. Guenther is a sophomore and is pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering and is also a member of AFROTC.

This academic year has been far from typical for the students. We asked Layden and Guenther whether they were on track with their goals, what unique challenges they faced this year, and what advice they would offer to other women pursuing STEM majors.

Both are on track with their ambitious goals despite restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Layden plans to commission with the USAF as a cybersecurity officer upon her graduation in May from The Citadel. She was on the dean’s list in the fall semester and is the vice commander of her AFROTC wing. Guenther has continued with her internship at the Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic, where she has been able to apply fundamentals of engineering.

Campus life has new challenges such as students can’t go into each other’s rooms, and they can’t hang out with friends like they did previously. Classes have shifted to a hybrid format, adding to an already demanding year. Guenther said, “Online learning has been a major challenge. It’s difficult to sit behind a screen to learn. One day you are online, the next day you are in person.” Since many clubs have stopped meeting, Layden is no longer able to participate in Judo and choir.

Both women had advice for other females pursuing STEM majors. Guenther said, “You shouldn’t focus on what anyone says you can or can’t do.” Layden said, “A lot of times, you’re going to be the only woman in the room, and you have to own that and be proud of that. It’s going to be really intimidating at times. Remind yourself that you are here for yourself. You’re doing great things, you’re going to do a great job. Stay on track, set realistic goals, and work towards them.”

The WID Palmetto Chapter’s STEM Scholarship is an annual award for women attending South Carolina colleges or universities pursuing degrees in STEM fields. Two annual scholarships of up to $2,500 are available, one of which is reserved for a veteran/member of the military/ROTC participant. Scholarship awards are made according to financial need, academic achievement, faculty recommendation, recognition and honors, activities, and personal essay.

The WID Palmetto Chapter, based in Charleston, South Carolina, was founded March 13, 2009. Their goal is to provide networking and professional development opportunities to promote advancement and recognition of women in national defense and security, to support military service members, and to encourage partnerships between the local contractor community and Department of Defense agencies.

For more information, please email chapter officers at https://widpalmettochapter.org/contact-us/.

]]>
22741
What to Do With a Mechanical Engineering Degree https://today.citadel.edu/what-to-do-with-a-mechanical-engineering-degree/ Fri, 11 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20760 Lt. Col. Robert Rabb, the Mechanical Engineering department head, describes the profession as "one of the broadest engineering disciplines."]]>

As seen in U.S. News & World Report, by Ilana Kowarski

Understanding how and why machines work isn’t necessarily intuitive. Some devices that seem simple on the surface, such as conveyor belts, actually rely on intricate technology and precise handiwork.

A mechanical engineering degree teaches someone how to build contraptions with moving parts, ranging from little objects like watches to enormous vehicles like space shuttles. Robot building teams often include mechanical engineers, and medical device manufacturing also involves mechanical engineering.

“It really is pretty hard to think of something that exists in the world that a mechanical engineer hasn’t had a hand in designing,” says Robert Hurlston, chief engineer and co-founder with Fidelis Engineering Associates, a Michigan-based engineering consultancy.

Hurlston, who has a doctorate in nuclear engineering, says the distinction between mechanical engineering and other areas of engineering is that it tends to focus on moving objects like cars and planes as opposed to stationary objects like bridges and buildings.

Eric Johnson, director of innovation with Bright Machines – a company that designs technology for the manufacturing industry – says that mechanical engineering was out-of-fashion for a long time due to an increased emphasis on other areas of engineering like software engineering and electrical engineering. But he suggests that it is now “cool again.”

Johnson notes that powerful emerging technologies like solar panels, electric cars and reusable rockets could not possibly be designed and produced without the labor of mechanical engineers.

Allen Robinson, head of the mechanical engineering department at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, notes that “the emergence of data science” has increased the number and variety of job options for mechanical engineers. They can now combine “machine learning” with engineering to address a wide range of formidable technical problems, “from water desalination to gene expression,” says Robinson, who has a doctorate in mechanical engineering.

Here is an overview of the numerous career options for someone who earns a mechanical engineering degree.

Jobs for People With Mechanical Engineering Degrees

The problem-solving approach and clear communication style that mechanical engineering students are taught are valuable skills, Johnson says, noting that mechanical engineers are typically excellent at analyzing and explaining complicated issues.

Because of their ability to understand and clarify difficult concepts and identify solutions to challenges, mechanical engineers are often recruited by management consulting firms, Johnson says. Mechanical engineers can also become outstanding project managers or business executives, he explains.

Joe Heaney, president of Lotus Biosecurity – a company that develops sanitation technology solutions for businesses operating in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic – notes that individuals with mechanical engineering degrees are well-suited for technical sales positions that involve explaining and customizing a technology firm’s products for prospective clients.

Mechanical engineers are also involved with research and development at many scientific laboratories, according to Heaney, who earned his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Baltimore-based Johns Hopkins University.

“Traditionally, mechanical engineering graduates have often gone into manufacturing, helping to design many of the home products and appliances that we use on a daily basis,” Bala Balachandran, chair of the mechanical engineering department at the University of Maryland’s A. James Clark School of Engineering, wrote in an email.

“With the emergence of advanced technologies, the door is now open for mechanical engineers to become involved in nanotech – for instance, in designing medicines and devices that work at a very tiny scale,” says Balachandran, who has a doctorate in engineering mechanics.

Marie Buharin, a hiring manager in the medical device industry, says she routinely hires mechanical engineers.

“We hire many mechanical engineers in the medical device industry,” says Buharin, who is also the founder of Modernesse, a website that provides career development advice. “It is one of the most commonly found majors among many departments within medical device companies.”

Lt. Col. Robert Rabb, department head and assistant dean for assessment at The Citadel – a military college in South Carolina – describes mechanical engineering as “one of the broadest engineering disciplines.”

Rabb – who has bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in mechanical engineering – notes that mechanical engineers can work on ambitious government building projects and often advance quickly into project leadership roles.

Mechanical engineers typically work with their hands, Rabb says. “Mechanical engineers are not at a desk all the time. We have to design, develop, build, and test. This requires us to see and touch something besides a computer.”

These are some examples of jobs where a mechanical engineering credential is valuable, according to experts.

  • Aerospace engineer.
  • Automotive engineer.
  • Biomedical engineer.
  • Business executive.
  • Construction engineer.
  • Entrepreneur.
  • Intellectual property attorney.
  • Manufacturing engineer.
  • Management consultant.
  • Mechanical engineer.
  • Patent lawyer.
  • Production engineer.
  • Project lead.
  • Project manager.
  • Petroleum engineer.
  • Process engineer.
  • Product designer.
  • Quality engineer.
  • Sales engineer.
  • Structural engineer.
  • Technology specialist.
  • Thermal engineer.

Employment Prospects Within Mechanical Engineering

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median salary among U.S. mechanical engineers in May 2019 was $88,430. It is possible to enter the profession with only a bachelor’s degree.

Someone who is considering a mechanical engineering education but who may feel unready for college may want to pursue a trade industrial apprenticeship, says Brian Keating, director of the Joint Apprenticeship & Training Fund for the United Service Workers Union Local 355 chapter in New York.

Keating notes that alumni of building trade apprenticeship programs sometimes go on to become mechanical engineers.

Experts note that it is often beneficial for mechanical engineers to seek supplemental education in computer science or business, but also suggest that such additional training is optional.

“A mechanical engineering degree affords the individual a virtual Swiss Army knife of skill sets,” Keith F. Noe, a partner with Lando & Anastasi, LLP, a Boston-based intellectual property law firm, wrote in an email.

Noe, who has a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering, says that the skills cultivated via a degree in this field are applicable to a wide array of industries and work assignments.

“A mechanical engineer has opportunities to work in the automotive, heating and cooling, manufacturing and aeronautic industries, to name a few,” he explains. “Projects can be revolutionary or evolutionary.”

Some mechanical engineering projects involve designing new products while others focus on either cost reduction, quality improvement or both.

“To use a sports analogy, a Mechanical Engineer is the utility player of the engineering world,” Tony Sanger, a senior vice president at the Turner & Townsend multinational consulting firm, wrote in an email. “The opportunities are endless.”

]]>
20760
Two Citadel cadets earn Women in Defense scholarships https://today.citadel.edu/two-citadel-cadets-earn-women-in-defense-scholarships/ Fri, 28 Aug 2020 20:20:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18188 The Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter is pleased to announce Cadets Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther as the awardees of its 2020 STEM Scholarship.]]>

Note: The Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter awards two scholarships annually to women studying a STEM discipline; this year, Citadel cadets earned them both

From the Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter

The Women in Defense (WID) Palmetto Chapter is pleased to announce Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther as the awardees of its 2020 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Scholarship.

Layden is a senior at The Citadel and a Computer Science and German double major with minors in Cybersecurity and Fine Arts. She is a member of the U.S. Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). Layden is contracted through the U. S. Air Force and will be commissioned upon graduation.

Guenther is a sophomore at The Citadel. She is pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering and is a member of the U.S. Air Force ROTC.

The WID Palmetto Chapter’s STEM Scholarship is an annual award for women attending South Carolina colleges or universities pursuing degrees in STEM fields. Two annual scholarships of up to $2,500 are available, one of which is reserved for a veteran/member of the military/ROTC participant. Scholarship awards are made according to financial need, academic achievement, faculty recommendation, recognition and honors, activities, and personal essay.

The WID Palmetto Chapter, based in Charleston, S.C., was founded March 13, 2009. Their goal is to provide networking and professional development opportunities to promote advancement and recognition of women in national defense and security, to support military service members, and to encourage partnerships between the local contractor community and Department of Defense agencies.

]]>
18188
First small group of cadets return to campus https://today.citadel.edu/first-small-group-of-cadets-return-to-campus/ https://today.citadel.edu/first-small-group-of-cadets-return-to-campus/#comments Thu, 23 Jul 2020 21:59:23 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17334 Members of the athletic cadre returned to campus early to get special instruction on to train the incoming cadet-athlete recruits.]]>

Athletic cadre first to report back for Operation Fall Return 2020

About 30 of the South Carolina Corps of Cadet’s newest leaders arrived on campus July 23 and one-by-one, though muffled through masks, proudly said, “Good morning Sergeant Major,” in the First Battalion sally port.

“A lot of work went into this — a lot of planning,” said Capt. Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.), commandant of cadets. “But, in the end, we have a group of volunteer cadets that are going to be the athletic cadre, who will help us bring in almost 60 of the newest members of the Long Gray Line.”

Members of the athletic cadre returned to campus early to get special instruction on to train the incoming cadet-athlete recruits. Those knobs will arrive on campus July 29.

Capt. Geno Paluso, commandant of cadets, greets members of the athletic cadre

The athletic cadre’s arrival is a milestone in Operation Fall Return, an agile, conditions-based plan to safely return cadets and students to campus.

“It’s exciting to see what’s going to happen and how things will play out,” said Cadet Logan Braucht, a football player and Exercise Science major from Waycross, Georgia. “If any college can do it, it’s The Citadel. I’m excited to be able to have an impact on people around me and that’s something that I came here to learn — to be able to be a leader.”

Part of being a leader means embracing the changes necessary to keep everyone safe — like social distancing, wearing masks and new routines for entering and exiting the barracks.

But, despite all the things the COVID pandemic has changed, it hasn’t affected The Citadel’s model for developing principled leaders.

Athletic cadre members help incoming athlete-knobs learn and succeed in the Fourth-Class System, which represents the foundation of The Citadel’s signature four-year leadership development program. It creates discipline and instills the core values of honor, duty and respect.

“I think it’s important to develop leadership fundamentals early and properly, because the cadet recruits we are training will be teaching the next class and so on…” said Cadet Maddy Cardenas. “I think it’s important that we teach them the way that we’d like to be taught and the way that we want others to be taught behind us, as well.

Cardenas is a Mechanical Engineering major from Los Angeles, California, who plays volleyball for The Citadel.

“There are two things that we have to do. We have to deliver academics and we have to have a freshmen class — we have to have a knob class. You can’t break the The Citadel’s Long Gray Line,” continued Paluso. “This is the beginning of training the next generation of the Long Gray Line. Get them here. Get them trained. And, do it in a safe and efficient manner.”

“To come from having an early Recognition Day, to then being the first ones on campus, it’s definitely a different kind of experience than what I expected,” continued Braucht. “But I think it’s really going to help us have the mindset that that we need for the things we’re going to learn at The Citadel — to be able to overcome any obstacle.”

The full Class of 2024 arrives Aug. 8, with planned return of the upperclass cadets on Aug. 16.

For more information on Operation Fall Return, click here.

]]>
https://today.citadel.edu/first-small-group-of-cadets-return-to-campus/feed/ 1 17334
Citadel engineers in high demand around SC and the nation https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-engineers-in-high-demand-around-sc-and-the-nation/ Mon, 18 May 2020 20:56:53 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16465 There are distinct advantages for those graduating from one of the five oldest engineering programs in America, and one that is consistently ranked in the top 25 nationally. By graduation]]>

There are distinct advantages for those graduating from one of the five oldest engineering programs in America, and one that is consistently ranked in the top 25 nationally. By graduation each May, 85% of The Citadel School of Engineering students are employed, with 99 percent employed within two months of graduation.

“The combination of a highly relevant engineering curriculum combined with four years of required leadership training makes a Citadel educated engineer a highly desired addition to many teams,” said Col. Ron Welch, USA (Ret), Ph.D., PE. and dean for The Citadel School of Engineering. “The Class of 2020 is no exception and finished with outstanding results.”

The breakout of 2020 graduates from the five Bachelor of Science degree programs and the four Master of Science programs is as follows:

South Carolina Corp of Cadets Bachelor of Science

  • Mechanical Engineering: 66
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering: 31
  • Electrical Engineering: 15
  • Construction Engineering: 9

Degree Transfer Undergraduate Programs (non-cadet)

  • Mechanical Engineering: 11
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering: 11
  • Electrical Engineering: 9

Master of Science Programs

  • Project Management: 20
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering: 2
  • Electrical Engineering: 2

Where are they working?

Here is a look at what some members of The Citadel School of Engineering Class of 2020 shared about their next steps and about their Citadel experience.

Christian Brackett

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Campobello, South Carolina
Destination: Lockheed Martin, Greenville, South Carolina

“The Citadel makes you become the kind of person everyone wants to be. You become reliable and honorable.”

John Croft

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Mount Pleasant, South Carolina
Destination: HITT Contracting for HITT Future’s Program as a project engineer based out of Falls Church, Virginia.

“The Citadel will mold you into the man or woman that you will want to become and set you up for your future. The value of the ring goes beyond that of any other college.”

Second Lt. Preston Dawes, USA

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Milton, Georgia
Destination: W.M. Jordan Company in Wilmington, North Carolina

“I got a 4-year Army ROTC scholarship my senior year of high school which solidified my choice to go to The Citadel to make myself the best leader possible.”

Second Lt. William Durnan

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Cheyenne, Wyoming
Destination: U.S. Army

“The Citadel provides a realistic experience of life. You learn to deal with difficult people and situations, the kind that you cannot back out of. It teaches you to remain humble always and understand the power of being a leader. For those that choose to pursue a leadership position in the Corps, you’ll know the challenge of juggling school, the duties of your position, physical exercise, extracurricular activities, and a social life. Ultimately you learn sacrifice, you can’t do everything or be everywhere and applying yourself in one place means you won’t be giving all your effort somewhere else. The Citadel will force you to prioritize and for many it will be a gut check but will likely make you a more mature person upon graduation.”

Ensign Ethan Eich

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Simpsonville, South Carolina
Destination: United States Navy

“The Citadel challenges every many and woman to be something more than just an individual.”

Second Lt. Jon-Scot Gilstrap, USAF

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: York, South Carolina
Destination: Working as an engineer in the U.S. Air Force, Join Base Charleston

“The Citadel’s attention to detail really develops you and teaches you how to prioritize time. Going forward, I hope to make a lasting impact on those around me, to do my job to the best of my ability and to make myself available to anyone who needs help. Also, I hope to keep the friendships which I made here at The Citadel for life.”

Nicholas Harington

Degree: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Hometown: Conway, South Carolina
Destination: Mead and Hunt working as an aviation civil engineer planning and designing airports

“I really liked the small size of The Citadel and the class sizes.”

Second Lt. Dennis McCann

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Long Island, New York
Destination: Civil engineer at Naval Information Warfare Center; U.S. Army Reserves

“The best reasons to attend The Citadel are the sense of community, the friendships and the connections.”

Thomas Murray

Degree: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Hometown: Mount Pleasant, South Carolina
Destination: Working as a civil designer for Dennis Corporation in Columbia, South Carolina

“At The Citadel you will make friends that will last a lifetime. Also, you will learn what it takes to develop yourself into a professional in your chosen occupation.”

Zacarias Neu

Degree: Construction Engineering
Hometown: Smyrna, Georgia
Destination: Project engineer with Whiting-Turner Contracting Company in the Charleston operation

“I will be working my way up to become a project manager on constructions sites. To me, the best reason to attend The Citadel is the lifelong family you gain.”

Gabriel Ramos

Degree: Electrical Engineering
Hometown: Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico
Destination: SAIC, Charleston

“The small class sizes give students access to a highly professional and knowledgeable staff. The professors’ backgrounds — which includes career military officers, industry executives, researchers, and academics — provided insight into my many options after graduation. As a bonus, The Citadel is in Charleston and you can’t beat that.”

Samuel Santiago

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Powell Butte, Oregon
Destination: United States Coast Guard

Dawn Wells, The Citadel Graduate College

Degree: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Hometown: Mount Pleasant, South Carolina
Destination: Mead and Hunt working as a transportation engineer with a focus on drainages design.

“I love The Citadel’s small class sizes, great professors, and the excellent, well-rounded curriculum.”

Master of Science in Project Management Graduates

Professional project managers work in almost every industry and work as leaders who plan and execute projects and are key contributors to the success of that venture. The Citadel’s Project Management Program, operated by the School of Engineering, is accredited by the world’s leading specialized accrediting body for project management programs, Global Accreditation Center for Project Management Education Programs.

Working professionals from many job sectors study project management.

“I will continue my work for the Naval Information Warfare Center as a security specialist, working my way up the ranks of leadership,” said Michael Popovich, The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2020. “My duties include deployment of a physical enclave into a cloud environment and maintaining management, operational, and technical security controls to protect critical medical health information for US service members.”

Popovich has a son who is a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, which is one of the reasons he considered The Citadel for his master’s degree.

“My hope is to build a meaningful family legacy rich in tradition. My younger brother graduated from the Corps of Cadets in 2008 and my oldest son is currently part of the 2022 class. I have two other boys and I intend for them to both attend The Citadel in the future. My dream is for the family table to be full of Citadel rings during future holidays.”

The full list of the college’s new Master of Science in Project Management 2020 graduates is as follows:

  • Christina Soyden Arnold
  • John Zachary Burchfield
  • Jay Baxter Caldwell III
  • Daniel Alexander Curlee
  • Stephen Pablo Fernandez de Bobadilla
  • Martin James Fosberry III
  • Kara Marie Klein
  • Mary Frances Mace
  • Jeremy Stephen Mackey
  • Patrick Dennis Magnum, Jr.
  • Sara Moeller Massey
  • Scott Owens
  • Matthew Kellard Paiva
  • Brian Benjamin Parker
  • Benjamin Franklin Parmenter II
  • Michael Jacob Popovich
  • Gabriel Omar Ramos
  • Thomas Adam Schaefer
  • John Lucas Semsar
  • Devon Lambert Wall

To learn more about The Citadel School of Engineering, please visit this website.

]]>
16465
Engineering cadets win $10,000 for ‘wall-climbing’ robot https://today.citadel.edu/engineering-cadets-win-10000-for/ https://today.citadel.edu/engineering-cadets-win-10000-for/#comments Sat, 25 Apr 2020 22:57:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=15899 Take a drone, a remote-controlled car, five senior mechanical engineering cadets — put them together — and what do you get?A $10-thousand-winning idea.]]>

Take a drone, a remote-controlled car, five senior mechanical engineering cadets — put them together — and what do you get?

A $10-thousand-winning idea.

Team “Wall Dynamic Inspection System” is the winner of the Baker Business Bowl VI (BBB). The team is working to construct a robot that allows bridge inspectors to do their jobs easier and without affecting traffic.

Prototype of Wall Dynamic Inspection System

“We wanted to solve a common problem we observed. We were frustrated with heavy traffic caused by bridge inspections, so we wanted to find a way to solve that problem,” said Cadet Rafael Gonzalez, one of the team’s presenters. “What we found was that the problem was worse than we imagined; there is a huge number of structurally deficient bridges across America that need inspection.”

That’s where Wall Dynamic Inspection System comes in. The robot drives up and down bridges, using drone-like fans to push itself against walls and defy gravity.

“We hope that by reducing the high cost, time, and skill level associated with bridge inspections, we can streamline the inspection process, improve public safety, and do something about inconvenient bridge traffic,” Gonzalez continued.

The team is currently working on the first prototype for the Wall Dynamic Inspection System.

“The team will pursue our second prototype to improve upon this original design,” said Cadet Jonathan Urbanic, project manager and presenter. “Once this is complete, the team will finalize this product and prepare to sell our Wall Dynamic Inspection System to contractors and DOT personnel so that bridge inspections and public safety may be improved.”

Cadet Jonathan Urbanic with the prototype Wall Dynamic Inspection System

This year the competition was held via Zoom, due to the campus closure.

Each of the five final teams had 30 minutes to present their business ideas, and to answer questions from the judges.

Team Wall Dynamic Inspection System includes:

  • Jonathan Urbanic
  • Zachary Crosby
  • Rafael Gonzalez
  • Trace Guy
  • Connor Munday

“We are very thankful to the Baker Bulldog Business Bowl and the judges that participated for this opportunity,” said Urbanic. “The team worked extreme hours for the last year to make this happen, and we are very proud to finish the year well.”

Team Rewind Filters came in second place, earning $5,000 for their business. The company’s goal is to create a machine that cleans and repurposes used water filters so that they can be reused.

The Baker Business Bowl is a program aimed at helping budding entrepreneurs who have an idea for a new product or service, and the desire to turn that idea into a business. It’s open to cadets, evening undergraduate students, and graduate students.

Contestants participate in teams and compete in three rounds. The final five teams are given the opportunity to attend a series of educational workshops on how to develop their full business plan.

]]>
https://today.citadel.edu/engineering-cadets-win-10000-for/feed/ 1 15899
Alumnus president flies mechanical engineering cadets to world-leading company, makes offers to three https://today.citadel.edu/alumnus-ceo-flies-mechanical-engineering-cadets-to-world-leading-company-makes-offers-to-three/ Tue, 21 Apr 2020 21:13:04 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=15829 Not long before the pandemic became a daily actuality, four seniors majoring in mechanical engineering enjoyed an experience they won’t likely forget.]]>

Cadets and mechanical engineering head, Dr. Robert Rabb, on a private plane bound for Jonesboro, Arkansas, Feb. 24, 2020

Not long before the pandemic became a daily actuality, three seniors and one junior, majoring in mechanical engineering, enjoyed an experience they won’t likely forget.

It was the president of Hytrol, David Peacock, that made it happen. Hytrol is a world leader in the design and manufacturing of material handling conveyer systems for a variety of industries, with Amazon as one of its largest customers. Not surprisingly, Peacock is a Citadel alumnus, Class of 1984. Peacock is also a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who served more than 12 years. 

“Mr. Peacock is very passionate about his alma mater and believes strongly in the quality of students The Citadel produces,” explained Natalie Shew, director of academic partnerships for Hytrol. “For this reason, he asked me to reach out to the Mechanical Engineering Department head, Dr. Robert Rabb, to set up a visit. We flew up to Charleston and met with Dr. Rabb, some cadets and the Dean of Engineering. We flew the cadets back to Hytrol the next day on our company jet.”

Cadets Alex Delorme, Ryan Huntington, David “Evan” McDonald and Miles Pappas found themselves on the jet and prepping for interviews.

Alex Delorme, David “Evan” McDonald, Ryan Huntington, Miles Pappas and Robert Rabb, Ph.D.

“We could hardly believe it. It was an incredible and motivating opportunity for us, and we met some great people,” Huntington said following the trip.

Shew said the cadets spent the day learning about what Hytrol designs and manufactures.

“They met with various leaders and had time to ask them questions about the business, engineering positions and internships at Hytrol. We also took them on a tour of Jonesboro and the Arkansas State University campus so that they could get a feel for life in Northeast Arkansas,” Shew said.

Several days after the trip, Huntington received and accepted a job offer from Hytrol. He begins working with Hytrol after graduation, joining the 140 engineers employed there. 

“Like The Citadel, Hytrol has values that everyone lives by and they all genuinely care about each other. I will be working as a design engineer thanks to the generosity of Mr. Peacock. I look forward to working with the company and growing as an engineer and as a person.”

David Peacock, Class of 1984 president of Hytrol

McDonald also received a job offer but had already accepted an engineering position elsewhere, thus had to decline. Delorme accepted an internship proposal.

“This exciting new partnership with Hytrol is not only a testament to the quality of engineers produced by The Citadel School of Engineering, it reflects the kind of commitment and generosity for which the college’s alumni network is known and respected,” Rabb said.

Shew says she will be working with Rabb and The Citadel Career Center on an ongoing basis to recruit mechanical engineering cadets to support Hytrol’s needs.

“It is a very beneficial dialogue when we hear from alumni like David Peacock, who are industry leaders regarding current needs in the workforce. This allows The Citadel Career Center team to be more nimble to the market to meet those demands.  We very much appreciate and look forward to continuing this productive relationship with Mr. Peacock and Hytrol,” said Page Tisdale, director of The Citadel Career Center.

For more information about The Citadel School of Engineering, one of the oldest in America and a 
top-25 nationally ranked program, visit this webpage.

]]>
15829
Autonomous vehicles and AI: Citadel’s future engineers prepared to thrive in evolving technical landscape https://today.citadel.edu/autonomous-vehicles-and-ai-citadels-future-engineers-prepared-to-thrive-in-evolving-technical-landscape/ Thu, 18 Jul 2019 10:00:30 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9415 The availability of highly skilled engineers prepared to help lead the development of A.I. and its associated industries in the Charleston, South Carolina area is vital to the state's competitiveness and its economy. The Citadel School of Engineering, one of America's oldest engineering programs, is meeting that growing demand.]]>

Artificial intelligence is present in the daily lives of most people, even if few stop to consider the source. A.I. guides ride sharing apps, commercial airliners, and even mobile check deposits.

The availability of highly skilled engineers prepared to help lead the development of A.I. and its associated industries in the Charleston, South Carolina area is vital to the state’s competitiveness and its economy. The Citadel School of Engineering, one of America’s oldest engineering programs, is meeting that growing demand.

Cadet in electrical engineering lab at The Citadel

It takes computer, electrical and mechanical engineering ingenuity to develop the A.I. supporting an autonomous vehicle, for example. Engineering students at The Citadel are already learning how to integrate those disciplines and have been for years.

“The students are called upon to bring together knowledge from a variety of undergraduate courses to design the autonomous vehicle,” said Bob Barsanti, Ph.D., electrical and computer engineering professor at The Citadel, and a target tracking and signal processing expert. “They must be able to integrate the electronic sensors, digital communications, motors, and computer controls to complete the challenge.”

The college’s Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) team developed a winning design for the 2019 competition. Their intelligent vehicle, Bender, finished fifth out in the design portion of the competition, just behind powerhouse universities including: 1. Georgia Institute of Technology, 2. Manipal Institute of Technology from India, 3. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and 4. Hosei University from Tokyo. As in years past, the college had a strong presence among the nearly 50 institutions at the annual competition at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan, a testament to the electric and autonomous vehicle skills developed within the The Citadel School of Engineering.

Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering
Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering

The Citadel was one of very few institutions offering only up to a Master’s degree to earn a place within any of the four portions of the competition.

“It is clear that our Citadel engineering team performed extremely well against some of the top schools around the world, and is a front runner in preparing engineers for the global industry surrounding electric and autonomous vehicles,” said Col. Ronald Welch, USA (Ret.),Ph.D., dean of The Citadel School of Engineering. “The Citadel School of Engineering is answering the call of local companies to produce the talent needed within a burgeoning electric and autonomous vehicle industry within the Lowcountry and South Carolina.  

The Citadel has been competing in the IGVC since 2011 when it secured rookie of the year honors, along with a ninth place finish in the Autonomous Navigation challenge. The Citadel’s other high finishes include a seventh place in the design competition in 2014, and a ninth place in the 2016 autonomous navigation challenge.

The Citadel’s Pablo Bot in 2016

The engineering faculty believe that competitions push students farther, and provide real world experience not found in the classroom. The faculty use a variety of competitions to engage students and promote the teaming skills desired by employers, one is the IGVC and another is the IEEE Regional Robotics Competition. The Citadel students are regularly in the top five within the regional robotics competition. 

Engineering at The Citadel has been producing engineers for the region, state, and nation since 1842. The Citadel School of Engineering meets regularly with regional industry leaders to ensure its graduates are meeting the companies’ present and future technical and professional requirements and will continue to partner with The Chamber of Commerce, the Charleston Regional Development Council, and the Charleston Corridor to ensure the greatest needs area being fulfilled with exceptionally skilled, locally developed engineers.

]]>
9415
Meet Bender, The Citadel School of Engineering’s self-driving vehicle https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-engineering-unmanned-self-driving-vehicle/ Thu, 06 Jun 2019 20:07:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8667 Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of EngineeringBender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering]]> Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of EngineeringBender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering

Post competition update:

The Citadel’s team came in 5th place (out of 45 entries) in the Design Competition:

1. Georgia Institute of Technology
2. Manipal Institute of Technology
3. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
4. Hosei University
5. The Citadel
6. IIT Madras

Congratulations Citadel team!

June 6, 2019

Bender is on the run. So are 45 other intelligent vehicles. They’re converging, with their student inventors, in Rochester, Michigan where they will face off to show off their swagger.

Five engineering students from The Citadel’s evening undergraduate program are with Bender, and their professor, Bob Barsanti, Ph.D., at the 27th Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition at Oakland University.

“This is an exciting opportunity for our students because it is a really fun way to experience being an engineer, learn about self-driving, unmanned vehicles, and to work with the technology of the future,” Barsanti explained. 

Two electrical engineering majors, Rutledge Detyens and William Quade, and three mechanical engineering students, Nicole Flexner, Justin Geisler and Michael Rudd comprise the team that created Bender. The team was formed last fall and has worked together on Bender ever since

“Building an intelligent ground vehicle requires students to design and construct an autonomous vehicle that can navigate a football field sized obstacle course  using a variety of modern sensors,” Barsanti said.

The three day competition includes four competition categories:

  • Auto-Nav Challenge – the full obstacle course requiring the vehicles to perform full autonomous operation throughout
  • Design Competition – students must document their vehicle development  in a design report, followed by an in-person presentation to judges
  • Inter-Operability Profile Challenge – students make their vehicles more interoperable, by requiring development of a Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems (JAUS) compliant vehicles, which is the architecture currently used for military robots
  • Self-Drive Challenge – demonstration of full road operations: lane keeping, lane switch, merging, avoiding crossing obstacles (simulated pedestrians/vehicles), taxi pickup of passengers, pothole detection, stop and crosswalk lines detection, right/left turn and intersection detection/logic, navigation to GPS waypoints and autonomous parking.

Barsanti’s teams have finished in the top ten several times, most recently finishing in ninth place in the navigation competition, but he says this trip really is about the journey, rather than the win.

The Citadel's 2016 intelligent vehicle, Pablobot, and its student creators
The Citadel’s 2016 intelligent vehicle, Pablobot, and its student creators

“The machine is built as part of a senior capstone design project here at The Citadel. It is the product of  ten months of student effort. It has a lot of advanced technology including GPS navigation, LIDAR detection, video capture, and computer imaging,” he explained. “All of the systems are integrated and controlled by a computer running specialized robot software and algorithms. This is cutting edge work for undergraduate students.”

The outcome of Bender’s performance will be shared here when the team returns from the competition.

 

]]>
8667
Top jobs for School of Engineering graduates; what they say about The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/top-jobs-for-school-of-engineering-graduates-what-they-say-about-the-citadel/ Fri, 10 May 2019 10:00:27 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8145 Candace works at the Google Data Center in Monks Corner, South Carolina. "I decided to attend The Citadel Graduate College, because they're seen as the best in the Lowcountry for Project Management."]]>

The Citadel School of Engineering is one of the oldest programs in America and is consistently ranked among the top 25 programs in the nation. The School of Engineering offers four bachelor of science, four master of science, and 13 graduate certificate programs.

The majority of the cadets and students studying the fields of civil, construction, electrical and mechanical engineering, as well as project management, are employed before they graduate, with nearly 100 percent are employed within two months of graduation. Approximately 80 percent of those graduates stay in South Carolina for their careers.

Meet some of The Citadel Class of 2019 School of Engineering graduates:

Robert Alexander Perry, Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering

Robert Alexander Perry, The Citadel Class of 2019, Evening Undergraduate Program

Robert, who is originally from North Augusta, South Carolina, attended The Citadel through the Evening Undergraduate Program. He works for Santee Cooper as an electrical engineer.

The Citadel makes you a disciplined learner and provides you with an opportunity to learn from accomplished professionals in the various engineering fields. Robert Alexander

Caleb Carter, Bachelor of Science, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Caleb Carter, The Citadel Class of 2019
Caleb Carter, The Citadel Class of 2019

Caleb has a new job with Infrastructure Consulting and Engineering, PLLC. He’ll be involved in the execution of construction engineering and inspection duties on projects for the South Carolina Department of Transportation and for Charleston County government. As a cadet at The Citadel, he served as president of the student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

The Citadel is the greatest institution in the country to me. Here, we train individuals to be leaders. The same thing cannot be said about other schools. This journey helped me become the man I want to be by challenging me mentally, academically, and physically. Cadets are leaps and bounds more prepared to enter the real world after graduation than those from other schools, because of the training at The Citadel. Persevering when faced with obstacles becomes second nature. Caleb Carter

2nd Lt. Abigail Murn, U.S. Army, Bachelor of Science, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Abigail Murn, The Citadel Class of 2019

Abigail is a 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Army, accepting a commission just prior to graduating from The Citadel in May of 2019. While a cadet, Abigail served as captain of The Bulldogs’ volleyball team, and as president of The Citadel chapter of the Society of Women in Engineers, in addition to being active in the American Society of Civil Engineering. Just before graduation, Abigail was selected for The Citadel’s Community Ambassador Award for her service as “an outstanding mentor to female students at The Citadel majoring in engineering, helping host a Society of Women Engineers conference at The Citadel with 225 participants from across the state, and leading fellow engineering cadets and students in hosting two Introduce a Girl Scout to Engineering events.

Candace Pringle, Master of Science, Technical Project Management

Candace Pringle, The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2019, Project Management

Candace works at the Google Data Center in Monks Corner, South Carolina. “While in The Citadel’s project management program, I received a promotion from an entry level technician, to an entry level associate program manager (APM). Now, based on my performance as an APM, I’ve been encouraged by leadership to go apply for a promotion to the next level as well,” Pringle said. “I will not only apply my project management skill set to my full-time job, I will use what I’ve learned in all areas of my life and outside of employment expenditures.”

The Citadel Graduate College is a well respected school. I attended Clemson University as an undergraduate for Industrial Engineering, because they were the best in the state for that program. I decided to attend The Citadel Graduate College, because they’re seen as the best in the Lowcountry for Project Management. In addition, they have the graduate center in North Charleston which saved me from having to travel downtown; and they offer evening courses. I’ve learned so much from this program and I’m willing to share my experience with anyone who asks. Candace Pringle

Ensign Joseph Scerbo, U.S. Navy, Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering

Joseph Scerbo, The Citadel Class of 2019

Joseph’s hometown is Flemington, New Jersey. After graduating from The Citadel, his first assignment with the Navy is Nuclear Power School for submarine duty. Scerbo’s goal is to lead a division of sailors, and become qualified to operate and pilot submarines.

The best reason to attend The Citadel is to learn true life lessons at a place where you can mold yourself into a leader. Joseph Scerbo

Citadel ROTC Commissioning Ceremony, Joseph Scerbo third row from left on end

 

 

]]>
8145