Department of Mathematics and Computer Science – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Fri, 28 Aug 2020 20:20:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Department of Mathematics and Computer Science – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Two Citadel cadets earn Women in Defense scholarships https://today.citadel.edu/two-citadel-cadets-earn-women-in-defense-scholarships/ Fri, 28 Aug 2020 20:20:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18188 The Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter is pleased to announce Cadets Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther as the awardees of its 2020 STEM Scholarship.]]>

Note: The Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter awards two scholarships annually to women studying a STEM discipline; this year, Citadel cadets earned them both

From the Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter

The Women in Defense (WID) Palmetto Chapter is pleased to announce Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther as the awardees of its 2020 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Scholarship.

Layden is a senior at The Citadel and a Computer Science and German double major with minors in Cybersecurity and Fine Arts. She is a member of the U.S. Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). Layden is contracted through the U. S. Air Force and will be commissioned upon graduation.

Guenther is a sophomore at The Citadel. She is pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering and is a member of the U.S. Air Force ROTC.

The WID Palmetto Chapter’s STEM Scholarship is an annual award for women attending South Carolina colleges or universities pursuing degrees in STEM fields. Two annual scholarships of up to $2,500 are available, one of which is reserved for a veteran/member of the military/ROTC participant. Scholarship awards are made according to financial need, academic achievement, faculty recommendation, recognition and honors, activities, and personal essay.

The WID Palmetto Chapter, based in Charleston, S.C., was founded March 13, 2009. Their goal is to provide networking and professional development opportunities to promote advancement and recognition of women in national defense and security, to support military service members, and to encourage partnerships between the local contractor community and Department of Defense agencies.

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Future federal cyber warriors selected for Citadel’s CyberCorps program https://today.citadel.edu/future-federal-cyber-warriors-selected-for-citadels-cybercorps-program/ Mon, 15 Jun 2020 14:35:39 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16822 Citadel_Cyber_SecurityCitadel_Cyber_SecurityFirst S.C. CyberCorps Scholarship for Service cadets selected to begin program this fall Four cadets at The Citadel will complete their junior and senior years as South Carolina’s first CyberCorps®]]> Citadel_Cyber_SecurityCitadel_Cyber_Security

First S.C. CyberCorps Scholarship for Service cadets selected to begin program this fall

Four cadets at The Citadel will complete their junior and senior years as South Carolina’s first CyberCorps® scholars. Cadets Andrew Lindenmeyer, Shiloh Smiles, Philip Quinn and Ashley Ruiz were selected as the college’s first participants in The Citadel’s CyberCorps® Scholarship for Service program.

“Being selected means that I will have a chance to apply my knowledge and passion for computer science and cybersecurity to a cause bigger than myself— national defense,” said Cadet Shiloh Smiles Smiles of Shepherdstown, West Virginia, upon learning she was selected. “I am honored and excited to be a part of the first cohort of this new program.”

Earlier this year, The Citadel was awarded a $2.8 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant – the largest federal grant in the college’s history – to create the state’s first CyberCorps® Scholarship for Service program. It is intended to educate the next generation principled leaders who will protect America in cyberspace.

“These cadets were selected for their professionalism and commitment to the field of cybersecurity, as well as their passion to serve our nation,” said Shankar Banik, Ph.D., professor and head of the Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences and the principal investigator for The Citadel’s CyberCorps® project.

The program is designed to recruit and train cybersecurity professionals to meet the needs of federal, state, local, and tribal government organizations. The program provides scholarships for undergraduate students pursuing a major in Computer Science, Intelligence and Security Studies, or Criminal Justice with a minor in Cybersecurity. Scholarship recipients will then pursue employment with a government entity in a cybersecurity-related position.

“This grant is a recognition of The Citadel’s uniqueness where principled leadership education is blended with multi-disciplinary Cybersecurity education. The CyberCorps® Scholarship for Service program at The Citadel will provide a steady supply of leaders for the government over the next several years, “said Banik. “A broader impact of the project includes the ability to recruit more diverse populations, women, and underrepresented groups to The Citadel and to cybersecurity professions.”

Banik will be assisted by an interdisciplinary team of professors representing the Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences, Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, Department of Criminal Justice and The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence.

While at The Citadel, the CyberCorps® scholars will receive or participate in:

  • Full tuition scholarship for junior and senior years.
  • An annual stipend (for living expenses): $25,000 per year.
  • A professional allowance of up to $6,000 per academic year to attend the Scholarship for Service Job Fair, and fund other travel, books, or professional activities.
  • Mentorship and extracurricular activities to prepare them for cyber-related opportunities in federal, state, or tribal organizations.
  • Learning from cyber operations professionals in South Carolina in places such as the Naval Information Warfare Center (Atlantic) is located.

In turn, the cadets agree to:

  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress as determined by the CyberCorps® Scholarship for Service program.
  • Work in an executive federal agency post-graduation for the number of years of the scholarship award.
  • Complete one summer internship for at least 10 weeks, typically paid, with a government organization during the scholarship period.
  • Participate in the annual CyberCorps Job Fair, where they will engage with government recruiters.
  • Participate in cyber-related research and professional-development events, competitions and outreach activities.

New Bachelor of Science in Cyber Operations begins this fall

For the past decade, The Citadel has invested in advancing cyber security education through new programs, a dedicated cyber center, and professional partnerships. As a result, The Citadel is designated as a National Center for Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education by National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security and has earned numerous awards.

The Citadel is also part of a collaboration that resulted in the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act that provides $10 million in federal funding to create U.S. Department of Defense cyber institutes at the six Senior Military Colleges in the U.S. In addition, plans are drafted to install a sensitive compartmented information facility or SCIF on campus in the next several years.

In the fall, The Citadel launches its first Bachelor of Science in Cyber Operations. Previously, students could only minor in Cyber Security while majoring in Computer Science, Intelligence and Security Studies, or Criminal Justice.

“For some, combining cyber security with another major is still a good idea. But now, a fully dedicated major in Cyber Operations will allow cadets to focus more heavily on developing cyber defense skills,” said Banik. “The state and the nation need a highly educated cyber workforce to protect our interests in this burgeoning theater of cyber warfare.”

For more information about the Bachelor of Science in Cyber Operations, or about being considered for The Citadel’s CyberCorps® Scholarship for Service program, please contact Dr. Shankar Banik at baniks1@citadel.edu.

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Autonomous vehicles and AI: Citadel’s future engineers prepared to thrive in evolving technical landscape https://today.citadel.edu/autonomous-vehicles-and-ai-citadels-future-engineers-prepared-to-thrive-in-evolving-technical-landscape/ Thu, 18 Jul 2019 10:00:30 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9415 The availability of highly skilled engineers prepared to help lead the development of A.I. and its associated industries in the Charleston, South Carolina area is vital to the state's competitiveness and its economy. The Citadel School of Engineering, one of America's oldest engineering programs, is meeting that growing demand.]]>

Artificial intelligence is present in the daily lives of most people, even if few stop to consider the source. A.I. guides ride sharing apps, commercial airliners, and even mobile check deposits.

The availability of highly skilled engineers prepared to help lead the development of A.I. and its associated industries in the Charleston, South Carolina area is vital to the state’s competitiveness and its economy. The Citadel School of Engineering, one of America’s oldest engineering programs, is meeting that growing demand.

Cadet in electrical engineering lab at The Citadel

It takes computer, electrical and mechanical engineering ingenuity to develop the A.I. supporting an autonomous vehicle, for example. Engineering students at The Citadel are already learning how to integrate those disciplines and have been for years.

“The students are called upon to bring together knowledge from a variety of undergraduate courses to design the autonomous vehicle,” said Bob Barsanti, Ph.D., electrical and computer engineering professor at The Citadel, and a target tracking and signal processing expert. “They must be able to integrate the electronic sensors, digital communications, motors, and computer controls to complete the challenge.”

The college’s Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) team developed a winning design for the 2019 competition. Their intelligent vehicle, Bender, finished fifth out in the design portion of the competition, just behind powerhouse universities including: 1. Georgia Institute of Technology, 2. Manipal Institute of Technology from India, 3. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and 4. Hosei University from Tokyo. As in years past, the college had a strong presence among the nearly 50 institutions at the annual competition at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan, a testament to the electric and autonomous vehicle skills developed within the The Citadel School of Engineering.

Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering
Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering

The Citadel was one of very few institutions offering only up to a Master’s degree to earn a place within any of the four portions of the competition.

“It is clear that our Citadel engineering team performed extremely well against some of the top schools around the world, and is a front runner in preparing engineers for the global industry surrounding electric and autonomous vehicles,” said Col. Ronald Welch, USA (Ret.),Ph.D., dean of The Citadel School of Engineering. “The Citadel School of Engineering is answering the call of local companies to produce the talent needed within a burgeoning electric and autonomous vehicle industry within the Lowcountry and South Carolina.  

The Citadel has been competing in the IGVC since 2011 when it secured rookie of the year honors, along with a ninth place finish in the Autonomous Navigation challenge. The Citadel’s other high finishes include a seventh place in the design competition in 2014, and a ninth place in the 2016 autonomous navigation challenge.

The Citadel’s Pablo Bot in 2016

The engineering faculty believe that competitions push students farther, and provide real world experience not found in the classroom. The faculty use a variety of competitions to engage students and promote the teaming skills desired by employers, one is the IGVC and another is the IEEE Regional Robotics Competition. The Citadel students are regularly in the top five within the regional robotics competition. 

Engineering at The Citadel has been producing engineers for the region, state, and nation since 1842. The Citadel School of Engineering meets regularly with regional industry leaders to ensure its graduates are meeting the companies’ present and future technical and professional requirements and will continue to partner with The Chamber of Commerce, the Charleston Regional Development Council, and the Charleston Corridor to ensure the greatest needs area being fulfilled with exceptionally skilled, locally developed engineers.

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Hundreds of students Storm The Citadel for 2019 STEM competition https://today.citadel.edu/stem-storm-the-citadel-2019-award-winners/ Mon, 11 Feb 2019 23:01:22 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=5988 Carolina Park K-5 Trebuchet Team competing at Storm The Citadel 2019Carolina Park K-5 Trebuchet Team competing at Storm The Citadel 2019Students from around the state are celebrating the result of their hard work after a successful showing at the ninth annual Storm The Citadel event. Hundreds of students, from K-12]]> Carolina Park K-5 Trebuchet Team competing at Storm The Citadel 2019Carolina Park K-5 Trebuchet Team competing at Storm The Citadel 2019

Students from around the state are celebrating the result of their hard work after a successful showing at the ninth annual Storm The Citadel event.

Hundreds of students, from K-12 to college, visited The Citadel campus Feb. 9 to compete in trebuchet, bridge building, robotics and water bottle rocket competitions.

Student participates in the robotics competition during Storm The Citadel 2019
Student adjusts the trajectory of his robot during Storm The Citadel 2019

This year, the rules were a little different for competitors in the Centurion division which includes students in grades 6-12 and in college, plus military personnel. They could plan and practice, but they did not know the actual target distance they would be aiming for until just days before the competition. The teams were informed of three possible distances to be used in the matches two weeks out. They had to choose one of them and report their selection a week before competition day.

The Citadel's own Storm The Citadel trebuchet team 2019
The Citadel’s own Storm The Citadel trebuchet team 2019 took 1st place in their division

Storm The Citadel is co-hosted by Google and The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence along with the School of EngineeringZucker Family School of Education and the School of Science and Mathematics, The event promotes science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and allows students to use the skills they learn in the classroom in a new and exciting way.

Kindergarten Trebuchet team from Healthwood Elementary School
Kindergarten Trebuchet team from Healthwood Elementary School

Results of the trebuchet competition

After spending months learning about the physics behind the medieval-style devices and designing and building their own, teams competed in Storm The Citadel’s trebuchet competition. The teams were split into two different divisions – Hoplite and Centurion – and were judged on accuracy, distance, spirit and design.

Centurion Overall

Boy Scouts Troop 502 Isle of Palms accepting Overall Accuracy Award
Boy Scouts Troop 502 Isle of Palms accepting Overall Accuracy Award

Cane Bay Middle School accepting Overall Distance Award
Cane Bay Middle School accepting Overall Distance Award

First Place Accuracy Award – Boy Scouts Troop 502 Isle of Palms

Second Place Accuracy Award – Cane Bay Middle School

Third Place Accuracy Award  (tie) – St. Stephen Middle School

Third Place Accuracy Award (tie) – Palmetto Scholars Academy

Distance Award – Cane Bay Middle School

Centurion Middle School

St. Stephen Middle School accepting Accuracy Award
St. Stephen Middle School accepting Accuracy Award

Cane Bay Middle School accepting Distance Award
Cane Bay Middle School accepting Distance Award

First Place Accuracy Award – St. Stephen Middle School

Second Place Accuracy Award – Cane Bay Middle School

Third Place Accuracy Award – College Park Middle School

Distance Award – Cane Bay Middle School

Spirit Award – Marrington Middle School

Centurion High School

Boy Scouts Troop 502 Isle of Palms accepting High School Accuracy Award
Boy Scouts Troop 502 Isle of Palms accepting High School Accuracy Award

Palmetto Scholars Academy accepting High School Distance Award
Palmetto Scholars Academy accepting High School Distance Award

First Place Accuracy Award – Boy Scout Troop 502 Isle of Palms

Second Place Accuracy Award -Palmetto Scholars Academy

Distance Award – Palmetto Scholars Academy

Spirit Award – Boy Scout Troop 502 Isle of Palms

Centurion College/Professional

Citadel cadets accepting college distance and accuracy awards
Citadel cadets accepting college distance and accuracy awards

First Place Accuracy Award – The Citadel

Distance Award – The Citadel

Hoplite Division

First Place Accuracy Award – Wild Knights – Buist Academy

Second Place Accuracy Award – Kingsbury Knights Lambda Squad – Kingsbury Elementary School

Third Place Accuracy Award – Kingsbury Knights Gamma Squad – Kingsbury Elementary School

First Place Spirit Award – Dragon Builders – Devon Forest Elementary School

Second Place Spirit Award – Launching Ladies – St. Andrew’s School of Math and Science

Third Place Spirit Award – Wild Knights – Buist Academy

Design Poster Award – Wasabi Warriors – Buist Academy

Video Award – Launching Ladies – St. Andrew’s School of Math and Science

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Gravity, traction, and trajectory – the winning formula for Storm The Citadel 2019? https://today.citadel.edu/gravity-traction-and-trajectory-the-winning-formula-for-storm-the-citadel-2019/ Tue, 20 Nov 2018 22:50:19 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4954 Storm The Citadel 2018 - The Mid Evil Miracles celebrate as their ball lands in the bucket for 3-points at Storm the Citadel, Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, in Charleston, SC.Storm The Citadel 2018 - The Mid Evil Miracles celebrate as their ball lands in the bucket for 3-points at Storm the Citadel, Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, in Charleston, SC.The Feb. 9, 2019 event will once again bring up to 3,000 visitors to campus for what is now a tradition for many of the teams that compete. But as STEM teachers from K-12 schools, engineering mentors, business, community, college and military team leaders consider their strategies, some of them have a have a new puzzle to ponder.]]> Storm The Citadel 2018 - The Mid Evil Miracles celebrate as their ball lands in the bucket for 3-points at Storm the Citadel, Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, in Charleston, SC.Storm The Citadel 2018 - The Mid Evil Miracles celebrate as their ball lands in the bucket for 3-points at Storm the Citadel, Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, in Charleston, SC.
The Mid Evil Miracles celebrate as their ball lands in the bucket for 3-points at Storm the Citadel 2018

The 2019 Storm The Citadel competition will bring changes presenting trebuchet competitors with increased math and engineering challenges as they design, build and test their medieval-style catapults.

The Feb. 9, 2019 event will once again bring up to 3,000 visitors to campus for what is now a tradition for many of the teams that compete. But as STEM teachers from K-12 schools, engineering mentors, business, community, college and military team leaders consider their strategies, some of them have a new puzzle to ponder.

 

Jamison Mahoney, 17 in grey, and Byron DeJesus, 17, both of Chapin, SC., and the Center for Advanced Field Studies, prepare their trebuchet for competition at Storm the Citadel 2018
Jamison Mahoney, 17 in grey, and Byron DeJesus, 17, both of Chapin, SC., and the Center for Advanced Field Studies, prepare their trebuchet for competition at Storm the Citadel 2018

The rules are changing for competitors in the Centurion division which includes 6-12 grade students, college students and military personnel. They can plan and they can practice, but they won’t know the actual target distance they’ll be aiming for until just days before the competition. The teams will be informed of three possible distances to be used in the matches two weeks out. They will have to choose one of them and report their selection a week before competition day.

“We are excited to implement this rule change and give many teams that have competed with us before a new challenge,” said Jennifer Albert, Ph.D., director of The Citadel’s STEM Center of Excellence. “We also hope that this change will allow each team the opportunity to hit a target.”

Back for its second year will be the Trebuchet Video Award, which shows competition attendees the stories behind building and testing the trebuchets. Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) related activities will be available for students between competition times for the second year as well.

Registration open for 2019

Storm The Citadel 2018 Lego robotics competitions
Storm The Citadel 2018 Lego robotics competitions

Co-hosted by Google and The Citadel’s STEM Center of Excellence along with the School of Engineering, Zucker Family School of Education and the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics, Storm The Citadel promotes STEM education and allows students to use the skills they learn in the classroom in tangible, exciting ways. This will be the ninth year teams from around the state travel to campus to battle in the day-long event that includes four competitions:

  • bridge building
  • Lego robotics
  • trebuchet
  • water bottle rocket competitions

    Cadet Kiara Parrish, of India Co., launches water rocket at Storm the Citadel 2018
    Cadet Kiara Parrish, of India Co., launches water rocket at Storm the Citadel 2018

“The event is a chance to focus on the importance of educating the next generation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, so it’s great to see so many K-12 students be excited about these concepts and participate in the competitions year after year,” said Albert.

Teams interested in participating in Storm The Citadel 2019 have until Friday, Dec. 14 to register. To register, or for more information, please visit the Storm The Citadel website.

More STEM fun in 2019

Other 2019 events sponsored by The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence include:

Feb. 23 – Regional Science Olympiad Competition at Newberry College  (Div. B & C)

March 2 – Regional Science Olympiad Competition at The Citadel (Div. A, B, & C)

March 16 – State Science Olympiad Competition at The Citadel (Div. B & C)

May 11 – KidWind Challenge at The Citadel

For more information on any of those events please visit this website, or email jalbert@citadel.edu.

 

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Director of National Intelligence; Deputy Director of FBI speaking at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/director-of-national-intelligence-deputy-director-of-fbi-speaking-at-the-citadel/ Mon, 25 Jun 2018 14:10:45 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=2465 Charleston, South CarolinaCharleston, South CarolinaGlobal and national security leaders to participate in Intelligence and Cybersecurity Conference The U.S. Director of National Intelligence and the Deputy Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation along with]]> Charleston, South CarolinaCharleston, South Carolina

Global and national security leaders to participate in Intelligence and Cybersecurity Conference

Top global leaders attending 2018 Intelligence and Cybersecurity Conference at The Citadel David Bowdich, FBI Deputy Director

The U.S. Director of National Intelligence and the Deputy Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation along with other industry influencers, academics and students, will come to Charleston Sept. 25 – 26 for the 2018 Intelligence and Cybersecurity Conference at The Citadel. Daniel Coats and David Bowdich will be the featured speakers at the conference that will also include panels with intelligence professionals from government agencies and private security companies, as well as presentations by academic faculty, cadets and students.

“The 2018 Intelligence and Cybersecurity Conference at The Citadel offers frank and informed discussions on current threats, challenges that will emerge, capabilities and defense strategies” said Carl Jensen, Ph.D., professor and head of The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies. “Professionals at all levels of law enforcement, academia, intelligence and cybersecurity operations, as well as students will find the conference to be a valuable investment of their time.”

Jensen served in the FBI for 22 years, is an author, a researcher and the co-director for The Citadel Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies, a National Security Agency and U.S. Department of Homeland Security designated center of academic excellence.

“We are thrilled to offer an unprecedented opportunity to have a face-to-face discussion with the head of U.S. intelligence at our conference.”

The Honorable Daniel Coats

Coats, the Director of National Intelligence (DNI), is the head of the U.S. Intelligence Community. He directs the implementation of the National Intelligence Program and acts as the principal advisor to the President, the National Security Council, and the Homeland Security Council for national security matters. Coats graduated from Wheaton College, served in the U.S. Army from 1966 – 1968, then earned his Juris Doctor from the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

Coats served in the U.S. House of Representatives, then in the U.S. Senate for 18 years, and was a member of the Senate Armed Service Committee and Select Committee on Intelligence. Coats was Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany for four years and returned to the Senate in 2011 to focus on protecting Americans from terrorist threats. Coats retired from the Senate in 2017 and became the fifth DNI. 

Deputy Director David Bowdich

Bowdich was appointed deputy director of the FBI in March 2018 and oversees all FBI domestic and international investigative and intelligence activities. Bowdich began his FBI career in 1995 as a special agent and served as a SWAT Team operator and sniper. He then went to FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C., as part of the Criminal Investigative Division and Director’s Office before returning to California to supervise a multiagency gang task force. Bowdich then became the assistant special agent in charge in San Diego over all non-white-collar crime criminal violations, the Imperial County Resident Agency, the SWAT Team, and the Evidence Response Team.

From September 2012 to December 2014, Bowdich served as the special agent in charge of the Counterterrorism Division in the Los Angeles Field Office. In that role, he led the Joint Terrorism Task Force as well as all crisis management and response assets. Bowdich became the assistant director in charge of the FBI’s Los Angeles Field Office in December 2014 before being appointed the associate deputy director of the FBI in April 2016, a position in which he was responsible for the management of all FBI personnel, budget, administration, and infrastructure.

Take a look at the conference agenda here.

Examples of panels include:

  • Preventing and disengaging from terrorism: Insights from the U.S. government and front line practitioners
  • International hot spots and challenges
  • How harsh are enhanced interrogation techniques?
  • Creating and teaching defense intelligence
  • Education and training challenges for Cybersecurity and Intelligence

This is The Citadel’s third Intelligence and Cybersecurity Conference. Please click here to register, or for more information, email lsmalls2@citadel.edu or call Lauren Smalls at (843) 953-6886.

Members of the news media wishing to cover the conference are welcome, but should email kkeelor@citadel.edu  by Sept. 19 to provide the required information and credentials to attend.

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Senior Military Colleges push to secure collective national cyber institute https://today.citadel.edu/senior-military-colleges-push-to-secure-collective-national-cyber-institute/ Wed, 13 Jun 2018 19:50:37 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=2377 Citadel cadets Oath CeremonyCitadel cadets Oath CeremonyAmerica's Senior Military Colleges work toward DOD Cyber Institute amendment for FY19 NDAA with South Carolina's Senators Graham and Scott.]]> Citadel cadets Oath CeremonyCitadel cadets Oath Ceremony

Senators Graham, Scott assisted SMCs with related defense bill amendment

America’s Senior Military Colleges (SMC) worked jointly to address the escalating need for highly trained cyber operations and cybersecurity leaders. The colleges, which include The Citadel, the University of North Georgia, Norwich University, Texas A&M, Virginia Military Institute and Virginia Tech worked with their congressional leaders on an amendment authorizing the Secretary of Defense to establish cyber institutes at SMCs. The measure could accelerate the growth of the existing pipeline of disciplined, capable leaders educated by the SMCs for armed forces, Department of Defense and civilian cyber enterprises.

The goal is for the Senior Military Colleges Cyber Institute amendment to be included in the final Fiscal Year 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (FY19 NDAA).

Five of the six SMCs, including The Citadel, already offer cyber security minors and are National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education.

“Future cyber leaders must be able to empower their teams to foresee and resolve complex, and often threatening, problems,” said U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-South Carolina). “Our Senior Military Colleges are already deeply invested in this type of national security education. They provide the discipline, ethics training and academic rigor the next generation of cyber leaders need. They are ready for this step.”

Graham and U.S. Sen. Tim Scott (R-South Carolina) both agreed to support the Senior Military Colleges Cyber Institute amendment, which was included in the Senate Armed Services Committee FY19 NDAA that is now under consideration on the Senate floor. The University of North Georgia initiated the collaboration, with the amendment sponsored by U.S. Congressman Jody Hice (R-Georgia), and signed by Georgia’s full congressional delegation.

“With cyber threats affecting nearly every sector of our society, we need capable and trained professionals in our Department of Defense and other agencies who are prepared to proactively and effectively counter this dangerous trend,” said U.S. Sen. Tim Scott. “We need our nation’s cyber training facilities, especially our Senior Military Colleges, to train the next generation of leaders to help secure Americans’ information and to further advance our overall national security. I was glad to have worked with my colleague Sen. Graham to advocate for the inclusion of the Senior Military Colleges Cyber Institute Amendment in the Senate version of the FY19 NDAA.”

SMCs, must meet specific criteria such as a military structured corps of cadets, physical fitness and military training through the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC), cadet codes of conduct and military uniform requirements−all in addition to offering bachelor’s degrees and above. Together, the SMCs produce about 900 new U.S. military officers annually.

“The real challenge is not just finding people who understand cyber operations and network security, but developing leaders who can build teams of innovators to help shape the ever-changing cyber landscape,” said the president of The Citadel, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa. “We are thankful for the support our South Carolina Senators Lindsey Graham and Tim Scott are giving to this important national security effort.”

Other examples of SMC Cyber Institute advantages:

  • Accelerating the expansion of America’s cyber workforce for national defense
  • Leveraging already robust international partnerships for collaborative cyber defense
  • Interdisciplinary, innovative research with all participating cadets residing on SMC campuses
  • Annual cyber competition for SMC cadets with ROTC units and all military branches
  • Growth for the established cyber security minor programs at The Citadel and four other SMCs

The FY19 NDAA passed in the House on May 24. The Senate will consider it at a later date.

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REU program focus on Dr. Shankar Banik https://today.citadel.edu/reu-program-focus-on-dr-shankar-banik/ Wed, 13 Sep 2017 15:12:26 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=2276 Cadet James Andrus REU ProgramCadet James Andrus REU ProgramDr. Shankar Banik, Mathematics and Computer Science at The Citadel, was one of our recent REU recipients for “Ensuring Fairly Timed Network Communication.”]]> Cadet James Andrus REU ProgramCadet James Andrus REU Program

As seen in SC EPSCoR/IDeA

Dr. Shankar Banik, Mathematics and Computer Science at The Citadel, was one of our recent REU recipients for his project, “Ensuring Fairly Timed Network Communication.”

In this SC EPSCoR /IDeA REU funded research project at The Citadel, Cadet James Andrus proposed a remodel of the Delay-Variation Bounded Multicast Tree (DVBMT) problem. He referred to this problem as the Interval Multicast Subgraph (IMS) problem. IMS addresses the requirements of DVBMT, and reflects an interval of acceptable delay values for paths. This problem arises in collaborative and competitive applications where all the participants are expected to receive the message almost at the same time and before a specified period of time. For example, in an online game, if the move of a player is not viewed by all other players at the same time, fairness of the game cannot be ensured. By solving IMS rather than DVBMT, Cadet Andrus was able to find solutions for larger graphs more efficiently. He proposed Interval Multicast Algorithm (IMA) that uses an interval of acceptable delay as user input as well as ensures that a destination is not used as an intermediary for any path from the source to the destinations in the resulting multicast subgraph. This ensures that no malicious mishandling of a message can occur in competition applications between destinations. He provided proof of correctness and complexity of the proposed algorithm. He also analyzed performance of the proposed algorithm using simulation experiments.

Cadet Andrus was guided by Drs. Banik, Mike Verdicchio and Breeanne Baker Swart.

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