Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Mon, 07 Mar 2022 19:47:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Dr. John Palms, ’58, honored by The Citadel’s Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics https://today.citadel.edu/dr-john-palms-58-honored-by-the-citadels-krause-center-for-leadership-and-ethics/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 19:47:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30927 The South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in awards review on Summerall Field in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, March 4, 2022. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelThe South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in awards review on Summerall Field in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, March 4, 2022. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The Citadel"We are very excited to honor and recognize Dr. John Palms as the 2020 recipient of the Krause Center for Leadership & Ethics award..."]]> The South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in awards review on Summerall Field in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, March 4, 2022. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelThe South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in awards review on Summerall Field in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, March 4, 2022. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The Citadel

Palms, former president of the University of South Carolina, honored during his alma mater’s military review parade

Photo above, left to right: Dr. John Palms, The Citadel Class of 1958, recipient of the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics, stands beside The Citadel Commandant of Cadets, Col. Thomas J. Gordon, USMC (Ret.), during the national anthem, to take review of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets military parade dedicated to Palms on March 4, 2022.

The Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics at The Citadel strives to create opportunities for leadership development, in support of the college’s mission to education and develop principled leaders. Additionally, the Krause Center works to recognize outstanding principled leaders from within the ranks of Citadel alumni.

Due to a pandemic-forced pause in the schedule, Dr. John M. Palms was recognized as the 2020 recipient of the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets’ dress parade on campus March 4, 2022.

“We are very excited to honor and recognize Dr. John Palms as the 2020 recipient of the Krause Center for Leadership & Ethics award for his service as a military officer, nuclear scientist, professor and President of the University of South Carolina which is unparalleled among the list of distinguished Citadel alumni,” said Bill Krause.

Palms was nominated for the 2020 award by The Citadel Foundation’s Chief Executive Officer and by the Dean for the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics in 2019.

It is my distinct privilege to present the nomination of Dr. John M. Palms, ’58, for the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics. An internationally recognized scientist and academician, national security advisor, eminent educator and public servant, distinguished Citadel graduate, and tireless advocate for humanitarian causes, Dr. Palms exemplifies, to the highest degree, the ethos of the Krause Award and the essence of servant leadership. His is the story of a life well-lived, a man running to win the prize for the upward calling.

Darin T. Zimmerman, Ph.D., Dean of The Citadel Swain Family School of Sciences and Mathematics

According to Zimmerman’s nomination, Palms was born in the Netherlands and immigrated to the U.S. in 1951, becoming a citizen in 1956. He graduated with a degree in Physics from The Citadel as a distinguished Air Force ROTC cadet in 1958, receiving a commission into the U.S. Air Force (USAF). While on active duty with the USAF, Palms completed a master’s degree in physics, served as a nuclear weapons officer and taught physics at the Air Force Academy. After being honorably discharged in 1970, Palms completed a Ph.D. in physics and joined the faculty of Emory University, where he rose through the ranks, ultimately being appointed as the Charles Howard Chandler Professor of Radiation and Environmental Physics. Palms’ 23-year career at Emory was one of ever-increasing responsibility and leadership, culminating in his role as the university’s chief academic officer. This accumulated experience led to a two-year turn as president of Georgia State University, after which he accepted the invitation to become the 26th president of the University of South Carolina, a post which he served faithfully and fruitfully for 12 years.

Left to right: Col. Tom Clark, USMC (Ret.), Executive Director for the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics, congratulates Dr. John Palms, ’58, recipient of the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics, on March 4, 2022, during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets military parade March 4 on campus in Charleston, South Carolina.

To complete his remarkably successful career, he presided as director of governing boards for several national corporations. He has scholarships named in his honor at Purdue University and Linn State Technical College, as well as a science research facility bearing his name at the University of South Carolina.

Jay Dowd, III, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer, The Citadel Foundation

According to Dowd’s letter of nomination, Palms has been awarded honorary doctoral degrees from several institutions of higher education, including The Citadel in 1980 and the University of South Carolina in 2002. He has received the Distinguished Alumni Award from two of the institutions from which he holds degrees—the University of New Mexico in 2003 and The Citadel in 2009. In 2002, he received the Order of the Palmetto, the highest honor bestowed by the State of South Carolina.

Other recipients of the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics, which was initiated in 2011, include Col. Myron C. Harrington Jr., ’60; Lt. Gen. Mike Steele, ’67; Dr. Stephen Sittnick, ’77; Sen. Fritz Hollings, ’42; former Charleston major (now Citadel professor) Joseph P. Riley Jr., ’64; William B. Sansom, ’64; Gen. William W. Hartzog, ’63; W. Henry Johnson Jr., ’75 and Frank P. Mood, ’60.

John Palms, Ph.D. - Krause Award
John M. Palms, Ph.D., The Citadel Class of 1958, recipient of the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics, 2020.

Read the full letter of nomination from The Citadel Foundation Chief Executive Officer here.

Read the full letter of nomination from the Dean of the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics here.

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Citadel cadets put the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. into action https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-cadets-put-the-words-of-dr-martin-luther-king-jr-into-action/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 20:35:23 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29982 The MLK Day of Service is a national effort to use the holiday honoring the civil rights leader into a day of community service.]]>

Photo: Cadets volunteering with Hope to Home on the MLK Day of Service. (Courtesy: Cadet Claire Thomas, ’23)

Some Citadel cadets spent the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday giving back to the local community.

The MLK Day of Service is a national effort to use the holiday honoring the civil rights leader into a day of community service. It was created by Congress in 1994 through the King Holiday and Service Act.

On Monday, Jan. 17, the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics — with sponsorship from The Citadel African American Alumni Association (C4A) — participated in this national event to honor the life and legacy of Dr. King. It’s one of the events the Krause Center regularly hosts to increase community service.

Attendees heard from two guest speakers: Tonya Matthews, Ph.D., CEO of the International African American Museum, and Henry Darby, principal of North Charleston High School and member of Charleston County Council.

The on-campus event was followed by service projects with Keep Charleston Beautiful, Charles Towne Landing and Hope to Home.

As seen on WCIV – ABC News 4

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Cadets volunteer at LEARN Horse Rescue https://today.citadel.edu/cadets-volunteer-at-learn-horse-rescue/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=28985 The Class of 2024 reported for work with enthusiasm, energy and an eagerness to give out animal cracker treats.]]>

By Alaina Rink, CGC ’22

Over a dozen horses and other farm animals are grateful to the team of more than 10 cadets who landscaped their pastures, washed their trailers and, of course, hand fed them treats.

The sophomore cadets traveled to Hollywood, South Carolina, where Livestock & Equine Awareness & Rescue Network (LEARN) provides horses with much needed rehabilitation and love. LEARN is a volunteer-run horse rescue that has been rehabilitating horses from across the state and educating the community since 2009. The nonprofit has already cared for over 300 horses, most of whom arrived malnourished.

Taking care of the rescue horses at LEARN is one of over 20 hands-on projects through which cadets served others during the Class of 1979 Leadership Day, on Oct. 20. This is when cadets at The Citadel replace classes with service opportunities in the Lowcountry as well as leadership training. The cadets arrived before 9 a.m. and were prepared to stay all day if needed. After hours cleaning stables, clearing brush and grooming the horses, cadets still had the energy to ride the horses.

Mason Wilkinson, a finance major from Prosperity, South Carolina, knows there are many ways to make a difference, but he hadn’t given thought to caring for horses until choosing an assignment for Leadership Day. His first inclination was to volunteer to pick up trash. However, there were already many cadets signed up for that option, and he knew he could be useful at the rescue too.

Wilkinson was quickly befriended by a leopard Appaloosa mule named Eddie (short for Edisto) who followed him around the pastures.

“Helping others is a good thing to do,” said Wilkinson, “but also someone could be having a bad day, so you never know when the simplest thing could help them out.”

Others have been there for Wilkinson. He expressed gratitude for the work of an upperclassmen who held him accountable for his studies. Now, Wilkinson holds rank as a clerk for Delta Company, which enables him to provide administrative support to his company.

The Class of 2024 reported for work with enthusiasm, energy and an eagerness to give out animal cracker treats. Eddie, in particular, looks forward to next year’s Class of 1979 Leadership Day when a new class of cadets puts their hooves on the ground.

Alaina Rink is a graduate assistant in the Office of Communications and Marketing while pursuing a master’s degree in English. She earned her undergraduate degree from the College of Charleston in secondary education English and taught in the Charleston area for four years.

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Cadets at The Citadel give thanks to healthcare workers https://today.citadel.edu/cadets-at-the-citadel-give-thanks-to-healthcare-workers/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 20:50:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29006 More than 1,000 goodie bags are now in the hands of local healthcare workers, a small sign to show how cadets are grateful for their work.]]>

Photo: Cadets (left to right) Collin Beck, Benjamin Johnson, Davis Fuller, Andrew Davis and Jesse Murdaugh — with other members of The Citadel community — delivering goodie bags to Shawn Jenkins Children’s Hospital.

More than 1,000 goodie bags are now in the hands of local healthcare workers. The gifts are a small sign to show how cadets at The Citadel, and members of the community, are grateful for their work.

“Healthcare workers are something that we cannot do without,” said Cadet Benjamin Johnson, who helped deliver the gifts. “Showing them appreciation, and showing them that their work does not go unnoticed, is something that I feel is important. Healthcare workers are the backbone of society.”

Giving back was a group effort — freshmen cadets packed the goodie bags on Oct. 20, during the Class of 1979 Leadership Day. The bags were then delivered by five cadets from the college’s new Alpha Epsilon Delta Healthcare Honor Society to local hospitals on Nov. 10.

“One reason I chose to help is so that we could give back a small token of our appreciation to all the healthcare workers that have been working so diligently with those affected by COVID over these difficult times,” said Cadet Jesse Murdaugh. “We tend to take their care for granted until it may be that they are caring for one of our own loved ones. I just wanted them to know that, at The Citadel, we appreciate their hard work everyday.”

The gifts, packed in bags with hand-written messages from the freshmen cadets, contained snacks, lotion and lip balm.

Usually, freshmen cadets will travel to local schools and speak with students there, sharing stories of leaders who have impacted them. This year, due to COVID, they weren’t able to make it to the schools — but found another way to give back.

“When we realized that the cadets wouldn’t be able to visit schools in Charleston County, we had a short period of time to find other ways for the more than 650 cadets to contribute,” said Christina Arnold, director of service learning and community engagement for the Krause Center. “We organized four stations on campus, and one of those put together goodie bags for health care heroes. It’s just a little something to remind them they are important as they continue to be on the front lines of covid-19 and all the limitations and policies that have resulted from it.”

So far, more than 100 bags have been delivered to nurses with the Charleston County School District, 400 to the Shawn Jenkins Children’s Hospital and 600 to the Medical University of South Carolina Hospital. 400 more bags will to to Roper St. Francis after Thanksgiving.

“Giving back to healthcare workers that put in so much effort to take care of the community felt really good,” said Cadet Davis Fuller. “It felt even better that I was able to represent The Citadel while doing so.”

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The big picture for 2022-23 https://today.citadel.edu/the-big-picture-for-2022-23/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 18:13:58 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=27923 Citadel pipes band playing on Parents Weekend 2021Citadel pipes band playing on Parents Weekend 2021Key dates for The Citadel’s biggest events for upcoming academic year Photo above: The Citadel Pipe Band playing during open barracks on Parents’ Weekend 2021 The dates for the Bulldogs]]> Citadel pipes band playing on Parents Weekend 2021Citadel pipes band playing on Parents Weekend 2021

Key dates for The Citadel’s biggest events for upcoming academic year

Photo above: The Citadel Pipe Band playing during open barracks on Parents’ Weekend 2021

The dates for the Bulldogs football schedule and for many of the big events for the 2022 – 23 academic year are now posted on The Citadel Today on one, easy to access page. They are also listed below, with several dates to be added as soon as they are available.

Matriculation Day

Saturday, Aug. 13

Matriculation Day is when hundreds of cadet-recruits report to campus and officially begin their Citadel careers. Processing for members of the Class of 2026 will begin at the Holliday Alumni Center, where they will receive company and room assignments; later, the incoming class will get haircuts, uniforms and necessarily equipment. Starting on Matriculation Day and continuing through the rest of the year, the cadet-recruits will began to receive their military instruction.

Parents’ Weekend

Parents’ Weekend 2021 at The Citadel

Friday, Oct. 7 – Sunday, Oct. 9

Parents’ Weekend features traditional events like the military dress parade, drill competitions and performances by the Regimental Band and Pipes. But the highlights of the weekend are the promotion of Fourth Class (freshman) cadets to conclude the cadre training period and the presentation of class rings to the First Class (senior) cadets.

Leadership Day

TBA

During The Citadel’s annual Leadership Day, all regularly scheduled classes are replaced with an on or off-campus training, seminar or service project for all cadets. Day students living off-campus and graduate students may also participate in the event.

Leaders in Philanthropy Weekend

Friday, Oct. 28 – Sunday, Oct. 30

Every fall, the newest Leaders in Philanthropy gather on campus with family and friends to be inducted into The Citadel’s legacy, cumulative, and lifetime giving societies, which represent donors of estate gifts, 25-year consecutive giving, or cumulative contributions totaling $100,000 or more.

Homecoming

Friday, Nov. 4 – Sunday, Nov. 6

As early as the Class of 1886, Citadel graduates have been holding reunions on campus to celebrate their achievements and catch up with their classmates. Homecoming now spans three days and includes not only reunion celebrations, but a host of activities that highlight the Corps of Cadets and alumni achievements.

Corps Day and Recognition Day

The Recognition Day Gauntlet for the Class of 2024 takes place at The Citadel on Thursday, March 25, 2021.

TBA

Corps Day is the birthday of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, and is one of the most highly attended weekends at The Citadel. Attractions include dress parades, awards presentations, special cadet performances and athletic events.

Recognition Day is a momentous occasion in the life of a knob. It means the end for rigid formations, walking in single file at breakneck speed and the highly regimented way of life that is The Citadel’s Fourth-Class System: the toughest college military training system in the country.

Class of 2023 Commencement

May 6, 2023

Commencement exercises are held in May of every year to confer academic degrees upon members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets and students in The Citadel Graduate College. A week of events leads up to graduation day, including the Star of the West competition for the best drilled cadet, commissioning ceremonies, and the Long Gray Line parade in which the graduating class becomes part of the long gray line of alumni when they transfer command to the upcoming senior class.

Bulldogs Football

DateGame and event
Sept. 3at Campbell
Sept. 10vs. ETSU – Military Appreciation
Sept. 17at Mercer
Oct. 1at App State
Oct. 8vs. Furman – Parents’ Day
Oct. 15at Wofford
Oct. 22at WCU
Oct. 29vs. Samford – Leaders in Philanthropy Weekend
Nov. 5vs. UTC – Homecoming
Nov. 12vs. Lynchburg – Hall of Fame induction
Nov. 19at VMI
 Major Events  A list of The Citadel’s primary celebrations can be found below. A full schedule for each event will be added here when it becomes available. Matriculation Day  Saturday, Aug. 13  Matriculation Day is when hundreds of cadet-recruits report to campus and officially begin their Citadel careers. Processing for members of the Class of 2026 will begin at the Holliday Alumni Center, where they will receive company and room assignments; later, the incoming class will get haircuts, uniforms and necessarily equipment. Starting on Matriculation Day and continuing through the rest of the year, the cadet-recruits will began to receive their military instruction. Parents’ Weekend  Friday, Oct. 7 – Sunday, Oct. 9  Parents’ Weekend features traditional events like the military dress parade, drill competitions and performances by the Regimental Band and Pipes. But the highlights of the weekend are the promotion of Fourth Class (freshman) cadets to conclude the cadre training period and the presentation of class rings to the First Class (senior) cadets. Leadership Day  TBA  During The Citadel’s annual Leadership Day, all regularly scheduled classes are replaced with an on or off-campus training, seminar or service project for all cadets. Day students living off-campus and graduate students may also participate in the event. Leaders in Philanthropy Weekend  Friday, Oct. 28 – Sunday, Oct. 30  Every fall, the newest Leaders in Philanthropy gather on campus with family and friends to be inducted into The Citadel’s legacy, cumulative, and lifetime giving societies, which represent donors of estate gifts, 25-year consecutive giving, or cumulative contributions totaling $100,000 or more. Homecoming  Friday, Nov. 4 – Sunday, Nov. 6  As early as the Class of 1886, Citadel graduates have been holding reunions on campus to celebrate their achievements and catch up with their classmates. Homecoming now spans three days and includes not only reunion celebrations, but a host of activities that highlight the Corps of Cadets and alumni achievements. Corps Day and Recognition Day  TBA  Corps Day is the birthday of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, and is one of the most highly attended weekends at The Citadel. Attractions include dress parades, awards presentations, special cadet performances and athletic events.  Recognition Day is a momentous occasion in the life of a knob. It means the end for rigid formations, walking in single file at breakneck speed and the highly regimented way of life that is The Citadel’s Fourth-Class System: the toughest college military training system in the country. Class of 2023 Commencement  TBA  Commencement exercises are held in May of every year to confer academic degrees upon members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets and students in The Citadel Graduate College. A week of events leads up to graduation day, including the Star of the West competition for the best drilled cadet, commissioning ceremonies, and the Long Gray Line parade in which the graduating class becomes part of the long gray line of alumni when they transfer command to the upcoming senior class. Bulldogs Football Date	Game and event Sept. 3	at Campbell Sept. 10	vs. ETSU – Military Appreciation Sept. 17	at Mercer Oct. 1	at App State Oct. 8	vs. Furman – Parents’ Day Oct. 15	at Wofford Oct. 22	at WCU Oct. 29	vs. Samford – Leaders in Philanthropy Weekend Nov. 5	vs. UTC – Homecoming Nov. 12	vs. Lynchburg – Hall of Fame induction Nov. 19	at VMI
The Citadel football team celebrating after beating North Greenville University 45 – 13 in a non conference game at The Citadel on, September 18, 2021.
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The Citadel Class of 1979 Leadership Day to be held Oct 20 https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-class-of-1979-leadership-day-to-be-held-oct-20/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 20:25:39 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=27776 Citadel cadets frame a house for Habitat for Humanity on Leadership Day 2018Citadel cadets frame a house for Habitat for Humanity on Leadership Day 2018New this year will be a closing celebration, honoring Medal of Honor recipient, Sgt. Kyle White, with the entire South Carolina Corps of Cadet.]]> Citadel cadets frame a house for Habitat for Humanity on Leadership Day 2018Citadel cadets frame a house for Habitat for Humanity on Leadership Day 2018

War on Terror Medal of Honor recipient to participate

Photo above: Citadel cadets frame a house for Habitat for Humanity on Leadership Day 2018

The Citadel Class of 1979 Leadership Day is an annual event when more than 1,000 cadets go out into the Lowcountry to help community partners through volunteer service. Others study leadership and ethics with professionals on and off campus. And, each year, a Medal of Honor recipient visits to share their leadership story.

The day is organized by the college’s Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics and is now being funded by The Citadel Class of 1979.

We believe our endowment of The Class of 1979 Leadership Day will have a positive and lasting impact on every cadet, in every class, long after they graduate. It also ensures that the legacy of the Class of 1979 extends well beyond The Citadel’s gates and into the future.

Col. Leo Mercado, USMC (Ret.), former Commandant of Cadets, The Citadel Class of 1979

On this day the regular class schedule is paused and cadets, students and many members of faculty and staff are involved in service learning. Before the pandemic, The Citadel provided an average of 20,000 hours of community service annually. The college hopes to eventually get back to that level of service as more face to face opportunities for volunteers become available.

Honored guest for the day: Sgt. Kyle White, Medal of Honor Recipient

Photo of Sgt. Kyle White courtesy of the Congressional Medal of Honor Society

Specialist Kyle J. White distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a radio telephone operator with Company C, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade, during combat operations against an armed enemy in Nuristan Province, Afghanistan on November 9, 2007. 

Those are the words from the beginning of White’s Medal of Honor citation on the Congressional Medal of Honor website. White will be at The Citadel on Oct. 20 to share his story personally. He’ll be addressing freshmen at 9:30 a.m. in McAlister Field House, which is open to the public. Later in the day, White will be honored by the South Carolina Corps of Cadets on campus during a closing activity.

According to the Congressional Medal of Honor Society, there have been 3,508 recipients total. White is one of 66 living recipients.

What cadets will do

Leadership Day assignments depend on the grade level of the cadets, as listed below.

Freshmen are led by trained upperclassmen and normally visit elementary schools, engaging the students in an activity to increase their awareness of heroism and service to others. Due to the pandemic, the freshmen will stay on campus this year and create packages and materials for teachers to provide the lesson on heroism at a later date.

Cadets volunteering at Lowcountry Food Bank in Charleston for Leadership Day in 2019

Sophomores choose from a variety of service projects on and off campus. Below are some of the places they will be volunteering.

  • Bicycles for Humanity at Porter-Gaud School
  • Bulls Island, Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge
  • Keep Charleston Beautiful cleanup locations: Gadsden Green Housing Authority, Food Lion (King St.), South Carolina Aquarium, Sanders Clyde Elementary School
  • Learn Horse Rescue, Awendaw
  • Lowcountry Orphan Relief
  • Sea Island Habitat for Humanity in Ravenel
  • The Green Heart Project

Juniors The Junior Ethics Enrichment Experience is a one-day seminar on ethical decision making and character development designed to promote ethical culture. Cadets will learn how to recognize the moral dimensions of complex cases, make ethical decisions using well-developed theories and develop their character using virtue ethics.

Seniors The LDRS 411 Senior Leadership Integration Seminar is typically an off-campus, full-day professional development seminar. Cadets engage with career professionals to learn about their leadership and ethics practices, then faculty facilitators aid cadets in planning how to apply their four-year, Citadel Leader Development Program education to their lives their lives after graduation based on their field of study.

New this year will be a closing celebration, honoring Sgt. White, with the entire South Carolina Corps of Cadets on Summerall Field beginning at 5:15 p.m.

Citadel cadets, joined by Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg, volunteer with Hope to Home, the Krause Center’s community partner of the year in 2020.
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Future cadets learn from three Vietnam era Medal of Honor recipients https://today.citadel.edu/future-cadets-learn-from-three-vietnam-era-medal-of-honor-recipients/ Thu, 15 Jul 2021 14:53:16 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=25265 Citadel Success Institute students listen to three Vietnam War area Medal of Honor recipients.Citadel Success Institute students listen to three Vietnam War area Medal of Honor recipients."To succeed you've got to lead from the front at all times. You are there to show them the way."]]> Citadel Success Institute students listen to three Vietnam War area Medal of Honor recipients.Citadel Success Institute students listen to three Vietnam War area Medal of Honor recipients.

They all served in Vietnam. They all risked their lives for the sake of others. And all three wear the medal that requires every person in active military service, at any level, to salute them.

Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics representative, Ted Fienning, and Medal of Honor recipients Michael Thornton, Sammy Davis and Harold Fritz address Citadel Success Institute students in Mark Clark Hall’s Buyer Auditorium at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, July 14, 2021.

Medal of Honor recipients Michael Thornton, Sammy Davis and Harold Fitz visited with students attending The Citadel Success Institute. The event was part of the students’ freshman year introduction to life at The Citadel, before they matriculate as cadet recruits with the Class of 2025 in August.

Lt. Michael Edwin Thornton, from the Upstate of South Carolina, is the only Medal of Honor recipient in over 100 years to save the life of another recipient, who had also performed heroic, lifesaving actions months earlier. The story of how Sgt. Sammy Lee Davis earned the Medal of Honor in 1967 served as the inspiration for some of the war scenes in “Forrest Gump.” And Lt. Col. Harold Arthur Fritz was a first lieutenant the Army leading his seven-vehicle armored column to escort a truck convoy on January 11, 1969 when they came under attack and he saved the lives of his men.

The Congressional Medal of Honor Society hosted two days of events in Charleston for 20 Medal of Honor recipients in Charleston. The presentation at The Citadel by Thornton, Davis and Fritz was one of them.

A Citadel Success Institute student asks a question of Medal of Honor recipients Michael Thornton, Sammy Davis and Harold Fritz at The Citadel in Charleston on Wednesday, July 14, 2021.

The CSI students asked the men questions during the visit. One student from Ohio asked about the relationship between bravery and leadership.

“Bravery covers all soldiers who risk their lives for their country. They are all brave just by showing up. But leadership is different. To succeed you’ve got to lead from the front at all times. You are there to show them the way. When I was 18 or 19 in Vietnam I had 81 troops. I tried to earn their respect by putting myself in their place and by helping take care of their families.”

Lt. Michael Edwin Thornton, USN (Ret.) Medal of Honor recipient

Each man took a turn at answering every question.

“Being a brave leader means standing alone if you must take the tough decision. That is what a leader does,” said Fritz.

Medal of Honor recipient speaking at The Citadel
Medal of Honor recipient Sammy Davis addresses Citadel Success Institute (CSI) students at The Citadel on Wednesday, July 14, 2021.

Davis answered after considering the event that led to his Medal of Honor recognition.

“Looking back at that day, I was shot 30 times when I kept going to get my brothers. That’s not being brave. That’s love and it makes you do things beyond what seems humanly possible sometimes. I loved all of those men. I knew in my heart I was doing for them what they would do for me,” Davis said.

A student from Kentucky asked the men about the most “influential mistakes leaders can make that can impact their character.”

Medal of Honor recipient Harold Fritz stands to address Citadel Success Institute students in Mark Clark Hall’s Buyer Auditorium at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, July 14, 2021.

Fritz responded, “Quitting. You don’t lose until you quit trying. You give it all that you have every day and correct your course as you go along.”

Davis responded to that question with an anecdote about a mistake he made early on while in Vietnam. “I spotted a guy, the enemy, a distance away. I crawled through the brush to try to get close to him. When I got there I froze. All I could think of was a John Wayne movie, so I stood up and yelled, ‘stick em up.’ I came out okay – but knew from then on to always have a plan and don’t do it alone.”

A detail of Sammy Davis’ Medal of Honor before an address to Citadel Success Institute students at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, July 14, 2021.
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Cadets show respect for veterans in Operation Enduring Honor https://today.citadel.edu/cadets-show-respect-for-veterans-in-operation-enduring-honor/ Tue, 20 Apr 2021 15:36:58 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=23573 “The efforts of the cadets were an outward demonstration of honoring veterans who have served our country.”]]>

Everyone deserves a seat at the table.

Making sure wounded veterans in our community can have exactly that is why nine cadets from The Citadel’s Alpha Company and Palmetto Battery donated part of their Saturday, even on a weekend when they’d been granted general leave and a reprieve from the President’s Inspection.

It took the cadets around three hours to build four wheelchair-accessible picnic tables for two locations in the state. They assembled the tables on April 17, even getting a special visit from South Carolina State Rep. Joe Bustos and Maj. Gen. Michael Regner, USMC (Ret.), Class of 1976.

Those tables will be put to use in two locations: the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 8760 — in Beaufort — and Operation Patriots FOB — a recreation park for veterans in Ridgeville.

“This project was important because it taught that service to others can still be carried out at a time when many activities have been cancelled or postponed due to COVID,” said Lt. Col. Glenn Remsen, SCSG, Teaching Activities and Counseling (TAC) Officer for Palmetto Battery and a member of the Class of 1994. “All of the cadets who participated were volunteering during their general leave period and truly demonstrated that service to others comes before self. Both Rep. Bustos and Gen. Regner were extremely impressed when they learned that all of the participants were cadets who freely gave up their leave time to participate.”

Cadets who volunteered include: Connor Deans, Matthew Earp, Eric Liebal, Tyler Martin, Alexander McCabe, Jacob Proctor, Claire Thomas, Dylan Tuzenew and Henry Winkler.

The Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics supported the effort by covering the building supply costs.

Operation Enduring Honor is an all-volunteer group that comes together to build wheelchair-accessible picnic tables and place them in recreational areas to ensure anyone with any physical challenges can enjoy the outdoors.

“In addition to being a project of service, this was a project of honor,” concluded Remsen. “The efforts of the cadets were an outward demonstration of honoring veterans who have served our country.”

All photos are courtesy of Cadet Eric Wilson.

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At the Citadel, a three-step approach to keeping college-age Eagle Scouts involved https://today.citadel.edu/at-the-citadel-a-three-step-approach-to-keeping-college-age-eagle-scouts-involved/ Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:22:40 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22319 Members of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South CarolinaMembers of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South CarolinaThese Eagle Scouts take trips together, host events for local packs and troops, and complete acts of service in the community.]]> Members of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South CarolinaMembers of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South Carolina

As seen on ScoutingMagazine.org
By Bryan Wendell

Photo above: Members of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South Carolina

The saying, repeated at Eagle Scout courts of honor for generations, goes something like this: “The Eagle Scout Award isn’t the end of your journey. It’s the beginning.”

It should sound like a challenge — something to remind young people that they remain Eagle Scouts for life.

And yet, when Eagle Scouts turn 18 and are no longer youth members of the BSA, the Scouting part of their journey often does end.

They move away to attend college or start a career, effectively closing their Scouting chapter until they have kids of their own.

Ted Fienning and his colleagues at the Citadel have a plan to change that.

“As an Eagle myself, I’m very familiar with the feeling many young Scouts have that it’s, ‘get it done by 18 or you’re out!’” he says. “That’s a consistent message to our Scouts: You’re done at 18. In effect, it means that at a time when Scouts are leaving their home towns to head to college, we allow them to disappear. And we do so right when they’re at the pinnacle of training, having earned Scouting’s highest award.”

Fienning is the staff advisor for the Citadel Eagle Scout Association, or CESA — a group of 50 Eagle Scouts who attend the senior military college in Charleston, S.C. These Eagle Scouts take trips together, host events for local packs and troops, and complete acts of service in the community.

They’re led by CESA President Jackson Jenkins, an Eagle Scout from Troop 392 of the Quapaw Area Council in Arkansas and a junior political science major at the Citadel.

“It was always taught to me by my Scoutmasters — Mr. Ken, Mr. Scott, Mr. Mark and others — that giving back to the program as an adult is one of the most important things I could do,” Jenkins says. “When I learned that the Citadel had an Eagle Scout Association, I jumped at the chance to get involved with the group and stay involved with Scouting as a college student.”

Through CESA, Jenkins says he’s been able to make friends, serve others and “continue to grow both myself and other young Eagles as leaders, all while being able to have fun and fulfill that promise I made to give back to the program that gave so much to me.”

So how do they do it? How has CESA bridged the gap between youth and adult Scouting? By taking a three-pronged approach.

Members of the Citadel Eagle Scout Association in Fall 2017. (Courtesy of CESA)

1. Give them a shared purpose

Young people, especially those in college, want to make an impact. They want to know that their work matters.

For the members of CESA, that shared purpose is serving others.

“We identify an annual project or two that they can plan, serve and sink their teeth and skills into,” Fienning says.

Last year, they launched a Cub Scout Adventure Rodeo. This year, they’re hosting a Scouting University (at an actual university), as well as designing and building a trail for a nearby state park.

“We also train them on adult Scouting opportunities and connect them to packs and troops to help out where they can,” Fienning says.

Members of the Citadel Eagle Scout Association in Fall 2016. (Courtesy of CESA)

2. Remove financial barriers

CESA members pay no dues.

CESA covers all costs, including transportation to and from service events, like CESA’s “Mom & Me” and “Dad & Me” camps or support at the Coastal Carolina Council’s other Scouting events.

To make this work, you need an advocate who works for the college. In addition to his role as CESA advisor, Fienning is the associate director for professional leadership programs at the Citadel, meaning he has the administration’s ear.

Fienning worked with the college’s foundation to build a Citadel Eagle Scout Association Fund. The fund raised more than $6,000 in a campaign last year, which will go a long way toward meeting the group’s $1,500 annual budget for some time.

Over the years, this fund will kick out 5% of endowed funds to keep these Eagles serving in perpetuity. The fund will pay for equipment, logistics, food and more.

“Working with the college foundation really reduces the administrative burden of tracking accounts and donors, plus it lends credibility to the Eagle Scout Association and its ties to the college,” Fienning says.

Members of the Citadel Eagle Scout Association volunteered at a Cub Scout day camp in October 2019. (Courtesy of CESA)

3. Feed them

It’s a tradition as old as colleges themselves.

“College students will gather for free food,” Fienning says.

Sure enough, CESA leaders understand that food isn’t the only reason members attend meetings, but it helps. CESA cooks its meals outdoors in large batches — a delicious serving of nostalgia that makes these Eagle Scouts remember time spent in their home troops.

“Scouts bring their mess kits, and we eat well,” Fienning says.

Starting your own collegiate Eagle Scout Association

Want to start an Eagle Scout Association at your school and keep these young Eagles around the Scouting campfire?

To help CESA grow, Fienning says he worked closely with Ray Capp and the BSA Alumni Association. That’s a great place for anyone to start.

To learn more about the Citadel Eagle Scout Association, visit the group’s official Facebook page.

Jackson Jenkins, CESA president

‘One of the greatest influences on my life’

Jenkins, the CESA president and Eagle Scout, is a shining example of why we need groups like CESA.

We need to keep young people like him engaged — especially while their greatest Scouting memories are still fresh on their minds.

Jenkins has been an unofficial Scout since he was 4 and started tagging along on his older brother’s Cub Scout adventures.

The instant he could join, Jenkins did.

“Ever since then, it’s been one of the greatest influences on my life,” he says. “The Scout Oath and Law, the examples of my adult leaders, and the amazing experiences gained on so many countless days and nights of camping have shaped me into the person I am today. I am so very thankful for all of it.”

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Parades, programs and presentations: Citadel finds new ways to celebrate MLK Day despite pandemic https://today.citadel.edu/parades-programs-and-presentations-citadel-finds-new-ways-to-celebrate-mlk-day-despite-pandemic/ Fri, 15 Jan 2021 19:30:54 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21447 Citadel Cadet float in MLK Day Parade, Charleston, SC Jan 21 2019Citadel Cadet float in MLK Day Parade, Charleston, SC Jan 21 2019On Monday and Tuesday, Citadel cadets, students, faculty and staff will find new and socially distant ways to celebrate King's legacy.]]> Citadel Cadet float in MLK Day Parade, Charleston, SC Jan 21 2019Citadel Cadet float in MLK Day Parade, Charleston, SC Jan 21 2019

Photo: Citadel cadets participating in a previous Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade

Citadel to celebrate Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. January 18-19

It may be the first Martin Luther King Jr. Day to be held in the COVID-19 environment, but that won’t stop communities across the country — including The Citadel — from honoring the life and legacy of one of the nation’s greatest leaders.

On Monday and Tuesday, Citadel cadets, students, faculty and staff will find new and socially distant ways to celebrate and share King’s legacy.

An (un)traditional parade

On Monday, for the 49th year, the City of Charleston will be hosting a parade to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

However — this is the first year that the parade will be held virtually, in order to help maintain social distancing and reduce the spread of COVID-19.

The virtual parade will be broadcast live at 12 p.m. on WCBD-TV Count on 2 News.

One thing that won’t change is The Citadel Gospel Choir‘s participation in the event. The group pre-recorded a few of their songs, with the intent of using the video in place of a live performance.

The Gospel Choir is not the end of The Citadel community’s involvement with the City’s celebrations; Anita Zucker, namesake of the college’s Zucker Family School of Education, will serve as the keynote speaker for the MLK Summit on Tuesday, Jan 19, at 7:30 a.m.

Learn more about The Citadel’s neighbor, Denmark Vesey’s Garden

Before a monument honoring him was erected in Hampton Park, near The eastern border of The Citadel campus, Denmark Vesey was a formerly enslaved person accused of planning a major slave revolt in Charleston.

Now — 199 years after his execution — two members of The Citadel community will interview the authors of Denmark Vesey’s Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy, written by Ethan Kytle, Ph.D., and Blain Roberts, Ph.D, both history professors at California State University, Fresno.

The authors will speak with J. Goosy Smith, Ph.D., and John Ray Roberts from the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. The interview will be livestreamed at Daniel Library on Monday, Jan. 18 at 1 p.m., and also be available to watch at this link.

At 2:30 p.m., following the livestreamed interview, The Citadel’s Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation Center (TRHT) will facilitate a CitListen dialogue session for those who watched the interview. The CitListen session will focus on the interview’s implications for principled leaders seeing to promote equity and inclusion.

Participants can join the session at this link.

National Day of Racial Healing CitListen session

The following day, from 12 – 1:30 p.m., TRHT will hold A Charleston Metro City-wide virtual CitListen session on the fifth annual National Day of Racial Healing.

The session will be a Racial Healing Circle, which brings together a diverse group of people in a safe and respectful environment. Anyone is welcome to join this CitListen — however, being on web camera will be required for participants.

This session is in collaboration with the Sophia Institute’s Social Justice and Racial Equity Collaborative. The Sophia Institute’s website says the group’s mission is to inspire action by advancing bold strategies that promote personal, structural and systematic change in social justice and racial equity.

To participate in Tuesday’s CitListen session, click here.

Black History Intercollegiate Consortium honors Citadel professor

Also on Tuesday, the Black History Intercollegiate Consortium will host its annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. program virtually at 6:30 p.m.

The Citadel’s award recipient this year is the college’s Chief Diversity Officer, Shawn Edwards.

“Dr. Edwards has done an outstanding job as our Diversity Officer and has certainly embraced the principles and ideals of Dr. King in her work on campus and in the community,” said Robert Pickering Jr., ’94, director of The Citadel’s Multicultural and International Student Services.

The Consortium was established 30 years ago and the members include Charleston Southern University, The College of Charleston, The Medical University of SC, The Citadel, and Trident Technical College.  The mission of the organization is to collaborate efforts and encourage the study and celebration of African American History.  The joint MLK program is one of the consortium’s most successful programs.

To virtually join the Consortium as it recognizes Edwards and other 2021 award recipients, click here.

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