Department of English Fine Arts and Communication – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Mon, 12 Jul 2021 16:04:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Department of English Fine Arts and Communication – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Big ballet to be in Charleston July 17 https://today.citadel.edu/big-ballet-to-be-in-charleston-july-17/ Mon, 12 Jul 2021 23:00:08 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=25224 Black and white photo of American Ballet Theater tour busBlack and white photo of American Ballet Theater tour busAs seen in Charleston Currents The American Ballet Theatre will be in Charleston July 17 for a free outdoor performance at The Citadel’s parade ground, Summerall Field. To attend, you]]> Black and white photo of American Ballet Theater tour busBlack and white photo of American Ballet Theater tour bus

As seen in Charleston Currents

The American Ballet Theatre will be in Charleston July 17 for a free outdoor performance at The Citadel’s parade ground, Summerall Field. To attend, you are asked to RSVP for the first-come, first-served performance.

Presented by the Charleston Gaillard Center, ABT Across America is being staged in eight cities across the country.  Each show will be performed without an intermission. Repertory for ABT Across America will feature Lauren Lovette’s La Follia Variations, a work for eight dancers set to music by Francesco Geminiani, Jessica Lang’s Let Me Sing Forevermore, a pas deux blending ballet and jazz vocabulary set to songs sung by Tony Bennett, Darrell Grand Moultrie’s Indestructible Light, a celebration of American jazz music, and a classical pas de deux from ABT’s extensive repertoire. 

  • Support for this program is made possible by generous donors who have committed time and resources to the Charleston Gaillard Center’s Dance Initiative. FAQ.

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Citadel begins demolishing historic Capers Hall and will construct a new academic building https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-begins-demolishing-historic-capers-hall-and-will-construct-a-new-academic-building/ Fri, 18 Jun 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=24832 Demolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/StaffDemolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/StaffPhoto above: Demolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/Staff As seen in The Post and Courier, by Thomas Novelly The Citadel started demolishing its]]> Demolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/StaffDemolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/Staff

Photo above: Demolition begins on The Citadel’s Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/Staff

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Thomas Novelly

The Citadel started demolishing its largest and most historic academic buildings on campus to make space for a new, updated space to be used by cadets in 2023.

Capers Hall was built in 1949 and has housed classrooms and offices for the English, history and political science departments for generations of Citadel students. But on June 8, a demolition crane began to poke holes in the walls and rip plaster from the fortress-like white building, slowly removing it from campus one chunk at a time. 

Demolition will continue through the summer.

Citadel officials plan to build a 107,700-square-foot replacement in two years which will house classrooms, a 250-seat performing arts auditorium, an art gallery and a computer lab for the school’s Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies.

The project carries a $67 million price tag. About $15 million of that will be provided by the S.C. General Assembly, with the rest coming from state institution bonds and capital reserve funds. The Legislature also had to approve the renovation. The Citadel Foundation is also soliciting donations to offset some of the construction costs. 

Jeff Lamberson, vice president for The Citadel’s Office of Facilities and Engineering, said the seven- decade-old academic building lacked a lot of modern amenities needed for students and teachers. While he’s sad to see some of the campus history disappear, he said he’s eager for the school to provide more modern space.

“The classrooms will be much bigger and more flexible in nature,” Lamberson said. “You will be able to move around the furniture and you’ll have all types of audio and visual computer aids for students.”

Some historic elements from the old version will be repurposed for the new building. 

Concrete, masonry and stucco from demolition will be hauled off-site, crushed and recycled into the new building’s site foundation and parking area. And the distinctive iron-frame light fixtures will be used in the new offering. 

The Citadel originally sought approval from the state to do extensive renovations at Capers Hall but opted for a total rebuild after conducting a structural evaluation in 2014. Rather than spend an estimated $7 million to $8 million reinforcing those walls to meet modern international building codes, the school decided to start from scratch.

The construction of a new academic space puts a slight burden on faculty members for the upcoming school year.

Employees with Thompson Turner Construction and The Citadel watch as demolition begins on Capers Hall on June 8, 2021. Lauren Petracca/StaffLauren Petracca

Brian Jones, dean for The Citadel’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences, said some classrooms will relocate to the library, other campus buildings and even mobile trailers while the renovation is taking place.

“We’ve already transitioned the faculty, and they’re already up and running in their new spaces,” Jones said.

Capers Hall was named for two brothers, Confederate Brig. Gen. Ellison Capers and Maj. Francis W. Capers, who was superintendent of The Citadel from 1853 to 1859.

The demolition comes amid a nationwide reckoning of Confederate imagery in public spaces and in the U.S. military. Retired Marine Corps Gen. Glenn M. Walters, president of The Citadel, said in a memo last year he was “establishing a committee to further study historical figures for whom structures are named.” 

The committee’s progress on researching and identifying buildings was sidelined by COVID-19, but they will resume their duties in the fall.

Presently, there are no plans to change the name of the hall when it is rebuilt. 

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Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter follows up with 2020 Scholarship Awardees at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/women-in-defense-palmetto-chapter-follows-up-with-2020-scholarship-awardees-at-the-citadel/ Wed, 17 Mar 2021 18:16:11 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22741 Provided by Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter (WID) Pictured above (left to right): Cadets Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther, 2020 Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter  Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math]]>

Provided by Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter (WID)

Pictured above (left to right): Cadets Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther, 2020 Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter  Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Scholarship awardees

On a beautiful February day, representatives from the Women in Defense (WID) Palmetto Chapter headed to The Citadel to follow up with Cadets Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther, the awardees of the WID 2020 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Scholarship.

Layden is a senior and double majoring in Computer Science and German with minors in Cybersecurity and Fine Arts, and a member of the U.S. Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) at The Citadel. Guenther is a sophomore and is pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering and is also a member of AFROTC.

This academic year has been far from typical for the students. We asked Layden and Guenther whether they were on track with their goals, what unique challenges they faced this year, and what advice they would offer to other women pursuing STEM majors.

Both are on track with their ambitious goals despite restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Layden plans to commission with the USAF as a cybersecurity officer upon her graduation in May from The Citadel. She was on the dean’s list in the fall semester and is the vice commander of her AFROTC wing. Guenther has continued with her internship at the Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic, where she has been able to apply fundamentals of engineering.

Campus life has new challenges such as students can’t go into each other’s rooms, and they can’t hang out with friends like they did previously. Classes have shifted to a hybrid format, adding to an already demanding year. Guenther said, “Online learning has been a major challenge. It’s difficult to sit behind a screen to learn. One day you are online, the next day you are in person.” Since many clubs have stopped meeting, Layden is no longer able to participate in Judo and choir.

Both women had advice for other females pursuing STEM majors. Guenther said, “You shouldn’t focus on what anyone says you can or can’t do.” Layden said, “A lot of times, you’re going to be the only woman in the room, and you have to own that and be proud of that. It’s going to be really intimidating at times. Remind yourself that you are here for yourself. You’re doing great things, you’re going to do a great job. Stay on track, set realistic goals, and work towards them.”

The WID Palmetto Chapter’s STEM Scholarship is an annual award for women attending South Carolina colleges or universities pursuing degrees in STEM fields. Two annual scholarships of up to $2,500 are available, one of which is reserved for a veteran/member of the military/ROTC participant. Scholarship awards are made according to financial need, academic achievement, faculty recommendation, recognition and honors, activities, and personal essay.

The WID Palmetto Chapter, based in Charleston, South Carolina, was founded March 13, 2009. Their goal is to provide networking and professional development opportunities to promote advancement and recognition of women in national defense and security, to support military service members, and to encourage partnerships between the local contractor community and Department of Defense agencies.

For more information, please email chapter officers at https://widpalmettochapter.org/contact-us/.

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Hamilton Baiden, ’91, on how Citadel experience contributed to his career success with Heritage Health Solutions, Inc. https://today.citadel.edu/heritage-health-solutions-inc-announces-new-president/ Tue, 23 Feb 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22326 Headshot of Hamilton BaidonHeadshot of Hamilton Baidon"In his elevated role, Baiden continues to lead the strategy and execution of Heritage's business development and growth while providing transparent leadership..."]]> Headshot of Hamilton BaidonHeadshot of Hamilton Baidon

Note: Hamilton Baiden graduated as a member of The Citadel Class of 1991 with a Bachelor of Arts in English Literature. He resides in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Mr. Baiden emailed these thoughts to the college after we contacted him to congratulate him and to ask what about The Citadel contributed most strongly to his professional success.

“When I look back at all the different influences in my life that have contributed to any success I might have achieved, The Citadel is definitely near the top of the list. Most people that know my personality and learn I went to The Citadel immediately ask “How the heck did you graduate from there?” Sometimes I ask the same question. At the end of the day, at 18 years of age, I needed to learn how to wrangle my energy and use it to the best of my ability. I needed to learn when to listen and when to talk. The greatest thing The Citadel taught me was how to handle all the different things that get thrown your way and solve the problems that really matter. I always look back on my four years at The Citadel with admiration and respect, and I cherish the lasting relationships that were built there.”

Hamilton Baiden, The Citadel Class of 1991, President, Heritage Health Solutions

As seen on PR Newswire

COPPELL, Texas, Feb. 22, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Heritage Health Solutions, Inc. (Heritage) has promoted Hamilton Baiden to President effective immediately. In his elevated role, Baiden continues to lead the strategy and execution of Heritage’s business development and growth while providing transparent leadership and expanding upon Heritage’s vast portfolio of services and solutions. His strategic direction and initiatives will cement Heritage’s status as one of the industry’s top Integrated Health Care Managers. Hamilton’s extensive knowledge of the industry will also lend itself to developing new healthcare solutions and services within the Heritage Health Solutions brand.

Baiden first joined Heritage in 2018 as the Executive Vice President and General Manager, where he oversaw business development and strategic planning. He is credited with adding new innovative solutions to Heritage’s already impressive suite, including Heritage CARES, a virtual substance use, suicide prevention, and mental health program, and launching a new corrections division focused on the health and wellbeing of those in confinement.

“I am honored to be asked by the Board to help lead Heritage Health Solutions forward in our mission to improve people’s lives by offering innovative solutions to the health care journey,” said Baiden. “Over the year’s we have created an organization with incredible employees that dedicate their time to the cause and who work tirelessly to make a difference.” 

Prior to joining Heritage, Baiden was Executive Vice President of Sales, Marketing, and Business Development at Avella Specialty Pharmacy (Avella), where he grew annual revenues over 1000 percent. During Baiden’s 13 years at Avella, he implemented successful sales strategies at all levels of engagement. He also served in various roles for prominent pharmaceutical sales companies, including MedImmune, Serono, and Daiichi and Sanofi. Baiden received his undergraduate degree from The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.

About Heritage Health Solutions, Inc.

Headquartered in Coppell, Texas, Heritage Health Solutions, Inc. is a premier provider of integrated health care management to correctional, public sector, and commercial entities. Heritage meets the demands of an ever-changing health care landscape by providing our clients with comprehensive, customized solutions. We manage costs, utilization, and quality, which leads to optimal health care outcomes. For more information about Heritage, please visit us at

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Medieval warfare catapults Citadel professor into history https://today.citadel.edu/medieval-warfare-catapults-citadel-professor-into-history/ Sat, 26 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20990 If he weren't such a medievalist, it would be tempting to call Citadel English professor Michael Livingston, Ph.D., a Renaissance man.]]>

If he weren’t such a medievalist, it would be tempting to call him a Renaissance man

Citadel English professor, Michael Livingston, Ph.D., covers a wide range of academic ground outside of medieval literature.

He is an award-winning historical fantasy writer who recently released his newest novel “Seaborn,” an Audible-exclusive.

He made national headlines discussing the final season of Game of Thrones.

He is a historian who published a wide-spread article claiming to have discovered the lost site of the Battle of Brunanburh.

He is a conflict analyst who regularly stars in “Contact,” a television show about the search for extraterrestrials on the Discovery and Science Channels.

Livingston’s medieval and military interests came together in another recent project of his — a book that he edited called “Medieval Warfare: A Reader.” It examines how people in the Middle Ages experienced armed conflict; the book is a collection of more than 130 primary sources that provide the voices of veterans and victims.

Michael Livingston, Ph.D.
Michael Livingston, Ph.D.

“Medieval Warfare” earned Livingston — along with Kelly DeVries, Ph.D. — their second Distinguished Book Award from the Society for Military History.

Both Livingston and DeVries also earned a Distinguished Book Award from the Society in 2017 for “The Battle of Crécy: A Casebook.” According to Livingston, they join only a handful of scholars to ever receive the award twice.

Institutionally, The Citadel’s faculty holds three of the organization’s Distinguished Book Awards; History professor David Preston, Ph.D., earned one in 2016 for “Braddock’s Defeat: The Battle of Monongahela and the Road to Revolution.”

The Society says that Distinguished Book Awards recognize the best book-length publications in English on military history copyrighted in the previous three calendar years.

As a medievalist, he is always looking to the past; but as an academic and an author, Livingston is always full-steam ahead.

Though the pandemic may affect some publication timelines, he hopes to release four books in 2021; two are historical texts, one is a Middle-English military poem and the last is “Iceborn,” the second in the Seaborn series.

Livingston is often interviewed on medieval matters due to his regular column on tor.com, a science fiction and fantasy website. He is also an award-winning writer who has published, among others, a trilogy of historical fantasy novels and multiple nonfiction books.

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Past and future meet in a plastic present https://today.citadel.edu/past-and-future-meet-in-a-plastic-present/ Fri, 18 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20593 An interdisciplinary team from The Citadel, with the Gibbes Museum, is lifting the veil that separates the artistic from the technological.]]>

An interdisciplinary team from The Citadel, working with the Gibbes Museum of Art, is lifting the veil that separates the artistic from the technological.

The Veiled Lady — a masterful marble statue created by Pietro Rossi in 1882 — is one of the most well-known pieces of art in the Gibbes.

But the photo above is not of the Veiled Lady. Not the original one, at least.

Thanks to three departments on campus, and a 3D-printer company created by a former cadet called Evolve 3D, the priceless statue can now be recreated, anywhere, for less than a dollar.

Not only that, but the 3D-printed version of the statue can be touched, something that’s attractive to the museum’s everyday visitor and especially important for visually impaired guests.

“When I first saw the iconic Veiled Lady sculpture at the Gibbes Museum, I, like many, was drawn to the stunning textures of this intricately-carved marble,” said Tiffany Silverman, director of The Citadel Fine Arts program. “At the time, as a museum educator, I wished that everyone could have access to experience this artwork in a more tactile, immediate way. Fifteen years later, the perfect combination of talented colleagues and innovative technology has, at last, made this dream possible.” 

The Citadel Fine Arts Department, the Baker School of Business Innovation Lab, The Citadel Makerspace and Evolve 3D worked together to make the project possible — and to help make art more accessible outside of a museum.

Evolve 3D has its own interdisciplinary connections to The Citadel. The business (then called the Cambrian Project) was initially created as part of the annual Baker Business Bowl, a program aimed at helping budding entrepreneurs turn their ideas into income.

Though the team didn’t win the first or second place cash prizes, Ben Scott — the founder and CEO of Evolve 3D — says they earned something more valuable.

On the company’s website, he wrote:

“Countless hours of work, every night in the library, then the garage, studying business, writing/rewriting the business plan, working/reworking financial predictions, not going out on weekends, straining personal relationships for months, and still lost. I didn’t sleep for days following, but ironically, I think we still won. The lesson learned from that failure is worth a lot more than $10,000.”

Evolve 3D also loaned one of their beta printers, named Eve, to the museum which will use it to produce more 3D prints of art.

“This innovative and interdisciplinary partnership with The Citadel has proven to be an exciting way to engage our community with art and new technology,” said Sara Arnold, the director of cultural affairs at the Gibbes Museum of Art. “Our visitors are amazed to see the 3D printer in action at the Gibbes. Bridging art and technology opens a whole new world of creativity and accessibility and we are so grateful to Tiffany Silverman and The Citadel cadets who have shared their time and expertise with us.”

As part of the collaboration, James Bezjian, Ph.D, shared his groundbreaking use of a high-resolution 3D scanner that he uses to document artifacts. Dan Hawkins brought the technology of The Citadel’s Makerspace, including 3D printers. Scott — one of Bezjian’s students — started Evolve 3D along with Fine Arts minor — and one of Silverman’s students — Ethan Warner. The Gibbes Museum, current partner of The Citadel’s Fine Arts program, was looking for ways to increase access to their collection for both virtual and in-person audiences.

To that end, and thanks to the entire team involved, a 3D print of the Veiled Lady is also currently on display, waiting to greet visitors at the Charleston Area Convention and Visitors Bureau.

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My ring story: an active duty Marine’s journey https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-an-active-duty-marines-journey/ Thu, 24 Sep 2020 17:17:44 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18863 Staff Sergeant Lyndsay Danielle Pires, Beaufort, South Carolina, ’21Staff Sergeant Lyndsay Danielle Pires, Beaufort, South Carolina, ’21"My time here at The Citadel has been crucial to my personal leadership development."]]> Staff Sergeant Lyndsay Danielle Pires, Beaufort, South Carolina, ’21Staff Sergeant Lyndsay Danielle Pires, Beaufort, South Carolina, ’21

Meet Staff Sgt. Lyndsay Danielle Pires, MECEP, ’21, Beaufort, South Carolina

Photo above: Staff Sgt. Lyndsay Danielle Pires, Marine Enlisted Commissioning Education Program active duty student, ’21, with son JJ

Who or what inspired you to attend The Citadel?

In addition to wanting to live in the Charleston area, The Citadel appealed to me for its prestigious reputation and alumni. This institution stands out for its unique educational experience, and opportunities within the Cadet and Veteran community to lead and learn from others within your four years here.

What was the most difficult obstacle you conquered that made you feel you earned the honor of wearing the Citadel Graduate College band of gold?

Being a dual major, a single mother, and an active duty Marine is demanding, but being entrusted with the responsibility to help mentor the future military leaders of America is just as heavy. The small part I had in these young men and women’s lives makes me feel most honored to wear the ring.

In what ways has this institution impacted your life?

My time here at The Citadel has been crucial to my personal leadership development. Not only has college given me the necessary critical thinking skills needed to succeed moving forward as a commissioned officer, but also the exposure and training within the Navy ROTC program has allowed me to network and continue to thrive in a military environment.

When you put your ring on your finger, what memories about The Citadel will you be thinking about?

Putting the ring on is the culmination of four years of opportunity. The opportunity to develop as an individual and a Marine, the opportunity to earn a valuable education, the opportunity to spend quality time raising my son, and most importantly, the opportunity to serve next to, and learn from some of the greatest men and women this country has to offer.

Like ranks in the military, the ring is a representation of past achievements and future responsibilities. In addition to the affiliation of honor and history within this great institution, the ring symbolizes that you are an individual of commendable moral character.

You are connected to thousands of alumni, not only through your Citadel experience but through the ring. How does that make you feel?

Empowered. I’m grateful to all those who paved the way before me, and hopeful for all those who will follow.

What is inscribed on the inside of your ring and what is the significance?

Next to being a mom, being a Marine is the most meaningful work I’ve ever done. The inside of my ring says both Semper Fidelis, signifying my commitment and gratitude to the Marine Corps – and JJ, my sons name and my ultimate reason why.

SSgt Pires is a Criminal Justice and English double major and an active duty Marine enrolled in the MECEP program. She will commission as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps upon graduation.

Citadel Class of 2021 MECEP student, Staff Sgt. Lindsay Danielle Pires with her son, JJ.
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Two Citadel cadets earn Women in Defense scholarships https://today.citadel.edu/two-citadel-cadets-earn-women-in-defense-scholarships/ Fri, 28 Aug 2020 20:20:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18188 The Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter is pleased to announce Cadets Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther as the awardees of its 2020 STEM Scholarship.]]>

Note: The Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter awards two scholarships annually to women studying a STEM discipline; this year, Citadel cadets earned them both

From the Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter

The Women in Defense (WID) Palmetto Chapter is pleased to announce Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther as the awardees of its 2020 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Scholarship.

Layden is a senior at The Citadel and a Computer Science and German double major with minors in Cybersecurity and Fine Arts. She is a member of the U.S. Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). Layden is contracted through the U. S. Air Force and will be commissioned upon graduation.

Guenther is a sophomore at The Citadel. She is pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering and is a member of the U.S. Air Force ROTC.

The WID Palmetto Chapter’s STEM Scholarship is an annual award for women attending South Carolina colleges or universities pursuing degrees in STEM fields. Two annual scholarships of up to $2,500 are available, one of which is reserved for a veteran/member of the military/ROTC participant. Scholarship awards are made according to financial need, academic achievement, faculty recommendation, recognition and honors, activities, and personal essay.

The WID Palmetto Chapter, based in Charleston, S.C., was founded March 13, 2009. Their goal is to provide networking and professional development opportunities to promote advancement and recognition of women in national defense and security, to support military service members, and to encourage partnerships between the local contractor community and Department of Defense agencies.

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Citadel and College of Charleston partnering to help local English teachers https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-and-college-of-charleston-partnering-to-help-local-english-teachers/ https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-and-college-of-charleston-partnering-to-help-local-english-teachers/#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2020 02:37:57 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=15773 A competitive new program, hosted by the two institutions, will help ten high school English teachers get a free start on their Master's degrees.]]>

May 8, 2020 Update: Licia Hendriks, Ph.D., has taken over the role of Director of Graduate Studies in English for The Citadel

A competitive new program, hosted by the two institutions, will help ten high school English teachers get a free start on their Master’s degrees.

The Master of Arts program in English at The Citadel and the College of Charleston are now accepting applications for the English Education Enrichment award.

Up to ten local teachers will be awarded free tuition to enroll in the introductory course in Graduate English Studies this fall. That course will be offered in a hybrid arrangement, supplementing periodic face-to-face meetings on The Citadel campus with online instruction.

“There are many reasons why high school English teachers would want begin work on their Masters degrees, and with this award we’re trying to make it even easier to get started,” said Jim Hutchisson, director of graduate studies in English at The Citadel. “Some will want to complete their MA in English, others will want to take the course for professional development. Regardless, all students will benefit from the opportunity to explore exactly what the English program can offer them.”

Whether you ultimately want to complete an MA in English, or simply complete advanced coursework for professional development, ENGL 511 will provide an intellectually-stimulating opportunity to explore the experience of graduate study in English in the company of others who share your passion for literature and writing. 

In ENGL 511, students will explore literary texts, scholarship and criticism at the graduate level. Taking one classic American novel as an object of study, students will delve into, discuss, and practice dominant critical and theoretical approaches in the field, from psychoanalysis to postcolonial critique to deconstruction, and everything in between. Through readings, discussions, and guest speakers, ENGL 511 will also introduce students to the ways in which graduate study in English can help prepare them for advancement within their teaching careers, as well as introduce them to various other occupations and careers.

In-person class will meet 6 – 8:45 p.m. on the following Thursdays:

  • Aug. 27
  • Sept. 10
  • Sept. 24
  • Oct. 8
  • Oct. 22
  • Nov. 12
  • Dec. 3. 

Applications, which can be found here, are due June 15.

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Meet Sean Cleveland, Assistant Professor in English, Fine Arts and Communications and Assistant Director of the Center for Teaching Innovation https://today.citadel.edu/meet-sean-cleveland-assistant-professor-in-english-fine-arts-and-communications-and-assistant-director-of-the-center-for-teaching-innovation/ Tue, 02 Oct 2018 19:22:44 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=3866 Sean ClevelandSean ClevelandCleveland retired from the Army as a professor in 2017 but was not ready to leave the classroom. When a position opened up at The Citadel, he jumped on it.]]> Sean ClevelandSean Cleveland

Sean Cleveland retired from the Army as a professor in 2017 but was not ready to leave the classroom. He joined The Citadel’s Department of English, Fine Arts and Communications and the Center for Teaching Innovation to continue his passion of teaching literature and leadership to cadets and to help professors become even better teachers.

Branch:  I was in the United States Army for 27 years.

Rank: Lieutenant Colonel (Retired)

Sean Cleveland at Mosque

Current role at The Citadel: Visiting assistant professor in the Department of English, Fine Arts and Communications as well as assistant director of the Center for Teaching Innovation

How many years have you been at The Citadel? One year

Why did you join the military? I joined the Army in the Delayed Entry Program as a high school senior in 1986 and left for Basic Training two hours after graduation with $52 dollars in my pocket. I was either going to make it on my own, or I wasn’t. To realize my potential, I needed the discipline and the opportunities the Army afforded. My father had been a career Air Force NCO – and I wanted to follow in his footsteps, serving my country. I thought I would only be in for a couple of years. Two years turned in to almost three decades. I’ve been blessed to lead and serve alongside some of the finest men and women our nation has to offer.

What was the most defining moment during your service? I had a number of “defining” moments in my career – but, if pressed, I would have to say my last deployment to Afghanistan – a sort of “sabbatical’ from teaching at West Point – certainly qualifies. Assigned as the CJ5 of CJIATF-435, we transferred all detention operations to the government of Afghanistan while also stabilizing and improving the nation’s commitment to and capacity for the Rule of Law. It felt amazing, for my last deployment, to have a significant role in “ending” something I’d had a hand in starting and sustaining earlier in my career.

What does being a veteran mean you? It boggles my mind that fewer than one percent of the nation’s population serve in the military at any point in their life. There are, of course, many different ways to serve – teachers, police officers and other first responders, etc. For me, though, when I meet a fellow veteran I feel an almost instant bond – whether that person served for three years or 30. I am glad to see the nation honoring veterans – something Vietnam veterans certainly did not have upon their return. These warriors deserve our respect.

Sean Cleveland FlyingWhy did you choose to work at The Citadel? Though I was retiring from the Army as a professor at the Academy, I really was not ready to leave the classroom. I have a passion for teaching cadets – and for teaching, in general. When the opportunity arose to come to The Citadel and continue doing so, I had to jump on it. We were all set to move to Washington, D.C. for another job when the provost offered a position here. I am very thankful for the opportunity and look forward to being a part of The Citadel family for years to come, teaching literature and leadership and helping our professors become even better teachers.

What leadership qualities did you learn in the military that have helped guide you through your career/life? The concept of servant leadership is very important to me. Above everything else, we, as leaders, are servants. We serve our organizations and those whom we have the privilege and honor of leading. I like to think this ethos has defined not only my military career but, also, informs my teaching practice, as well.

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