Department of Intelligence and Security Studies – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 09 Jun 2022 17:58:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Department of Intelligence and Security Studies – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 America’s Intelligence Community gains 85 new professionals from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets https://today.citadel.edu/americas-intelligence-community-gains-85-new-professionals-from-the-south-carolina-corps-of-cadets/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 17:58:01 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32410 Intelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelIntelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelThe Class of 2022 includes 85 cadets who studied Intelligence and Security Studies. Before graduation, some shared their career goals and advice for others considering The Citadel. ]]> Intelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelIntelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel

Photo: Intelligence and Security Studies professor Lt. Col. Michael Brady, USA (Ret.), ’90, former Director, Presidential Emergency Operations Center in the White House (2001 – 2002), leading a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel in 2019.

The Citadel ignites careers for mission-driven, global problem solvers

As the number and types of positions within the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) continue to expand, those earning degrees from The Citadel are in high demand. For decades, The Citadel has been known by America’s IC leaders as a top producer of young professionals for intelligence roles.

In 2017, The Citadel formalized this career pathway, founding the first Department of Intelligence and Security Studies and corresponding undergraduate degree in South Carolina. Now it’s one of the most in-demand majors at The Citadel. There are 18 organizations in the IC, and Citadel alumni are serving in those agencies as intelligence analysists; inspection, investigation and compliance professionals; field agents and supervisors; cybersecurity officers; business and finance experts; facilities design; set up and logistic experts; or visual information specialists, to name just some of the many intelligence job functions.

The Class of 2022 includes 85 cadets who studied Intelligence and Security Studies. Below, some of them share thoughts about their career goals along with advice for younger students considering studying intelligence at The Citadel.

Joshua Babcock, South Carolina Highway Patrol Academy
Hometown: Johnson City, New York

Joshua Babcock, The Citadel Class of 2022

As a highway patrol officer, I will provide equitable service and protection, and uphold the laws of the constitutions of the United States and the state of South Carolina in order to promote a safe and secure environment for the public.

After gaining professional experience with the South Carolina Highway Patrol, I plan on using my degree to join an intelligence organization.

I believe the best reason to attend The Citadel is that it will forge you into a better leader. It will make you more mature, confident, physically fit and will challenge you to become a better version of yourself that you may have never thought was possible.”

2nd Lt. Christian Blase, U.S. Army
Hometown: North Augusta, South Carolina

2nd Lt. Christian Blase, The Citadel Class of 2022

Preparing physically before you arrive at The Citadel for knob year is very important.

Come focused on wanting to learn and grow as a leader.

The structure you follow day to day as a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets will help if you choose to apply it to your daily life later.

2nd Lt. Gregory Chaves, U.S. Marine Corps, intelligence officer
Hometown: Los Angeles

The Citadel helped me focus on learning and thinking for myself. The friendships and experiences of cadet life help us all grow, preparing us to meet our goals.

Ensign Collin Gleco, U.S. Navy, submarine officer
Hometown: Shavertown, Pennsylvania

Collin Gleco, The Citadel Class of 2022

Double major: Spanish, Political Science, minor in Intelligence and Security Studies.

The Citadel provided the opportunity to build my leadership philosophy before being commissioned as an officer in the Navy. The ROTC programs are excellent.

In high school, I would never have believed that I would attend The Citadel, become a double major, first sergeant, company commander and an ensign in the Navy.

Jarett King, Department of Defense
Hometown: Sumter, South Carolina

When I was academically accepted to The Citadel, I was elated. I found out afterwards about the height/weight requirement for cadets and was worried that I would not be granted admission. During my senior year of high school, I reflected on what was important to me and why I wanted to attend The Citadel. That inspired me to lose 100 pounds before becoming a knob.

Attending The Citadel was probably one of the best decisions I’ve ever made in my life. The Citadel will teach you what type of follower you wish to be, what type of leader you wish to be. It will help you focus on your goals and aspirations and it will provide a sense of comradery that cannot be rivaled.

2nd Lt. Angelea Lance, U.S. Army, military intelligence officer
Hometown: Fort Worth, Texas

My goals are to stay in the Army past my scholarship obligation and fulfill my passion of serving others and my nation in the best way possible.

For those considering attending The Citadel, know that it creates a solid foundation for your future by challenging you to be the best you can be.

2nd. Lt. David McBain, U.S. Army Aviation Center, pilot
Hometown: Damascus, Maryland

The best reason to attend The Citadel is the structure of the Corps and the many requirements that teach time management, plus the focus on academics afforded to the cadets.

Phillip Quinn, Department of Defense
Hometown: Highland Park, Texas

Double major: Intelligence and Security Studies, Political Science, minor in Cybersecurity.

I selected The Citadel to push myself.

Those deciding to come here must arrive knowing knowing you need to just keep your head down and enjoy the grind. You can’t make it at The Citadel alone. That’s the whole point of being in the Corps. You must work together with your classmates — that’s what makes the difference.

2nd Lt. Steven Reisinger, U.S. Marine Corps cyber officer, Quantico, Virginia
Hometown: Millerton, Pennsylvania

The Citadel sets you apart from your future competition in life. The interpersonal skills and ethics you learn from your time here transform you into the kind of leader this country so desperately needs.

And — the many friends you make here will become family for life.

Learning Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel

There are numerous ways to learn Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. There is a South Carolina Corps of Cadets program and a non-cadet online undergraduate program which includes veteran and active duty students.

There are five areas of concentration for undergraduates to select when majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. They include:

  • Business Intelligence
  • Chinese Area Studies
  • Counterterrorism
  • General Intelligence
  • Military Intelligence

There is also an option for cadets and students to use their tuition from one semester to study in Washington, D.C., through The Citadel in DC program.

The Citadel Graduate College offers a (non-cadet) Master of Arts in intelligence and Security Studies. There are close to 60 students in that program, learning online, with the options of selecting concentrations in Cybersecurity or Leadership. The Class of 2022 included 17 master’s level graduates.

For more information about Intelligence and Security Studies programs at The Citadel and how to apply, visit this webpage, email intell@citdel.edu.

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Citadel professor co-organizing conference marking 50th anniversary of Watergate https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-professor-co-organizing-conference-marking-50th-anniversary-of-watergate/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 17:28:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32471 Registration is now open for the free, online conference that will allow Watergate experts to explore some of the scandal's lingering mysteries.]]>

Photo: The Watergate Hotel complex in 1985 (Courtesy: National Archives)

Registration now open for free, online conference

The 50th anniversary of the Watergate break in, one of the most well-known political scandals in American history, will be on Friday, June 17.

The week before that, Melissa Graves, Ph.D., from The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, and Shane O’Sullivan, Ph.D., from Kingston School of Art in London, will convene a free, two-day virtual conference to reflect on the lasting impact Watergate had on American politics and culture.

The conference will be held on Thursday, June 9, and Friday, June 10, beginning at 10 a.m. on both days.

Much of Graves’s research is focused on Watergate, including a book on the FBI’s response. In Feb. 2020, she organized a historic panel, which reunited the FBI’s lead investigators for Watergate for the first time since the scandal.

“Watergate is a great example showing the importance and expertise of the intelligence community,” said Graves. “Though many Americans — and people around the world, for that matter — know of Watergate, fewer know about the fascinating stories of the case’s investigators. Through this conference, we will bring together experts who will explain the myths, the investigation, the results and much more.”

Five decades after it happened, and despite the amount written about the scandal, many mysteries from the case remain. The conference, titled “The Watergate Break-in: 50 Years Later,” will allow experts to explore some of those questions.

The surviving investigators and prosecutors still can’t understand why the burglars entered DNC headquarters in the early morning hours of June 17, 1972; or how the experienced intelligence operatives in the break-in team made such elementary mistakes, resulting in their arrests and President Nixon’s resignation two years later.

from “The Watergate Break-in: 50 Years Later” conference website

Speakers at the conference will include historians, academics, as well as Watergate prosecutors and investigators. The full program can be found here.

The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies is one of the largest and fastest-growing on campus, offering degrees to cadet and non-cadet undergraduates, as well as graduate students.

The online conference is free to attend. Click here to register.

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Advancing careers: certificates in intelligence analysis https://today.citadel.edu/advancing-careers-certificates-in-intelligence-analysis/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 17:40:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31812 woman on computerwoman on computerStudents in the Intelligence and Security Studies online program come from all over the country with a variety of backgrounds.]]> woman on computerwoman on computer

Identifying threats to the U.S.

By Barry Waldman for The Lowcountry Graduate Center

A young woman with a bachelor’s degree in the social sciences decided early in her career that what she really wanted to do was work in intelligence analysis for the federal government.

Intelligence analysis is the process by which information is collected on a potential enemy and analyzed to understand current operations, predict their behavior and determine any threats they may pose.

Courses completely online

The Citadel graduate certificate program in Intelligence Analysis is a five-course, asynchronous online program that introduces students to intelligence analysis concepts, applicable management principles, policy analysis, critical thinking and enhanced critical leadership skills necessary to successfully address security and intelligence challenges facing the United States.

By its nature, it is conducive to working professionals and military service member to pursue a graduate certificate without interrupting their careers.

As the Military College of South Carolina, The Citadel is uniquely positioned to offer this program, which serves for most students as a stepping stone to the full master’s degree program in intelligence analysis. With a certificate, a master’s degree student is nearly halfway through the curriculum.

All certificate students take the three core courses – Introduction to Intelligence, Intelligence Research and Analysis, and Intelligence Theory Application. A long list of electives provide context for the analysis techniques learned, in courses like Topics in Homeland Security, European History, Evolution of Military Leadership Thought, International Political Theory, and Russian Active Measures, to name just a sampling.

Dipping toes into academia

Larry Valero, Ph.D., head of The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, says most students complete the certificate program in two or three semesters, but they have a couple of years to do so. Many students are working professionals in mid-career who haven’t attended college for years and need to dip their toes in academia before committing to a full master’s degree program. Once they have established their ability to juggle work, family and the rigors of graduate school coursework, most go on for the full master’s.

Students in the program come from all over the country with a variety of backgrounds, Valero said. Some are serving members of the armed forces, first responders like police officers and firefighters, some work in Homeland Security. Others work in completely unrelated fields and have no intelligence background whatsoever but are interested in a career transition.

Putin and Intelligence Analysis

Events today involving Russia and its western neighbors, and the intelligence community’s need to understand Vladimir Putin’s motivations and incentives, are testament to the urgency of intelligence analysis. The future of Eastern Europe could be at stake.

“Our field is very interdisciplinary, running the gamut of politics, people, and technology,” Valero said. It is so topical and timely, there is no limit to what can be applied to the field. We offer that additional background that analysts may need to know now and in the future.”

For more information on studying Intelligence and Security Studies with The Citadel email intel@citadel.edu.

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The Citadel faculty serving as expert resources on Ukraine and many trending issues https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-faculty-serving-as-expert-resources-on-ukraine-and-many-trending-issues/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 21:17:17 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31308 Photo: Dr. Jeffrey Rogg, a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, during an interview with WCSC-TV on Wednesday, March 16. Faculty answers call to contribute from media,]]>

Photo: Dr. Jeffrey Rogg, a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, during an interview with WCSC-TV on Wednesday, March 16.

Faculty answers call to contribute from media, community

Many of those working to fulfill the mission to educate and develop principled leaders at The Citadel, regularly demonstrate their own leadership by serving as contributing experts for media reports and community interests.

Members of the college’s five schools are often called upon for their insight expertise in a variety of fields. Jeffrey Rogg, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies within the School of Humanities and Social Science is just one of many examples of the relevant and insightful expertise found on campus.

As the third week of the Russian invasion of Ukraine came to a close, Rogg spoke with WCSC-TV, the local CBS affiliate, to help viewers in the Lowcountry understand more about the war and what it could mean for the United States.

When asked about the motives behind the invasion, Rogg answered: “From Vladimir Putin’s view, he believes that the greatest tragedy to befall modern Russia was the collapse of the Soviet Union. Because of that, he’s been intent on not just restoring the Soviet Union or even the Russian Empire, but also the pride and the power of Russia.”

To see more of the coverage from Rogg’s interview with Live 5 News, click here.

“One of the many strengths of an education at The Citadel is the access to experts who can put critical global events – such as Russia’s war in Ukraine – into a wider context,” said Brian Madison Jones, Ph.D., dean of The Citadel’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences. “As the Military College of South Carolina, we’re uniquely positioned to help our cadets, students and community understand what is currently happening and what it means.”

Throughout multiple newscasts, Rogg discussed the historical context for the invasion, what a no-fly zone would entail, how the war could affect the American economy and a range of other topics.

“Within the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, professors from the Departments of Intelligence and Security Studies, Political Science and History, including military history, are studying these events in real time for use in the classroom and offering expert insight and analysis to help the next generation of leaders understand and address the great challenges of today and tomorrow,” Jones said.

Other examples of The Citadel faculty in the news

Shankar Banik, Ph.D.
Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences – Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics

South Carolina National Guard attends Cyber Boot Camp at The Citadel
DVIDS

Conference series helps Army identify U.S. infrastructure risks
The Watch

Hee Yoon Kwon, Ph.D.
Department of Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Economics – Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

The continuing supply chain saga
South Carolina Public Radio

Side effects of pipeline shutdown linger in Lowcountry
WCIV – ABC News 4

David Preston, Ph.D.
Department of History – School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Citadel professor curates new perspectives on Revolutionary War
Moultrie News

When young George Washington started a war
Smithsonian Magazine

John Weinstein, Ph.D.
Department of Biology – Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics

Tires: The plastic polluter you never thought about
National Geographic

Citadel experiment will analyze how PPE degrades in coastal environments
The Post and Courier

John Zardus, Ph.D.
Department of Biology – Zucker Family School of Science and Mathematics

Some barnacles can more around to improve feeding position
The Scientist

For information about joining the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, click here.

To learn more about non-cadet undergraduate and graduate programs offered by The Citadel, click here.

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Cybersecurity cadet mentors AFJROTC cyber team, helping lead them to #1 in SC, and now a national competition https://today.citadel.edu/cybersecurity-cadet-mentors-afjrotc-cyber-team-helping-lead-them-to-1-in-sc-and-now-a-national-competition/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 20:41:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29897 Ashley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC Cyber competition team being trained in lab by Citadel Cadet Trey StephensAshley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC Cyber competition team being trained in lab by Citadel Cadet Trey Stephens"It's really been great to have the leadership of Cadet Stephens, and now the other Citadel cadets who are engaging to help the Ashley Ridge High School cyber team continue to grow and thrive."]]> Ashley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC Cyber competition team being trained in lab by Citadel Cadet Trey StephensAshley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC Cyber competition team being trained in lab by Citadel Cadet Trey Stephens

Photo above: Citadel Cadet Trey Stevens (far left), with members of the Ashley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC cybersecurity competition team training in the high school’s lab.

Ashley Ridge High School’s JROTC Cybersecurity team competing in Maryland

A senior cadet who is a quadruple major heard about a need and stepped up to meet the challenge. Cadet Trey Stevens is majoring in Computer Science, Cybersecurity Operations, Intelligence and Security Studies, and Criminal Justice. He is studying as part of the first group of cadets with The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute, and will be working with the Department of Defense after graduating in May.

Stevens learned that Ashley Ridge High School’s Air Force JROTC (AFJROTC) wanted to start a cybersecurity team to help expand interest in the field as the country’s need for cyber defenders continues to escalate. He met with the head of the unit there and set up weekly training sessions for the students.

About eight months later, the high school’s Swampfox AFJROTC Cyber Team — that Stevens helped develop and mentors — is surpassing all expectations. The Dorchester County high schoolers earned their way to the top in South Carolina, placing first in the state’s Platinum Tier overall in the All-Service Division. Now they are competing in CyberPatriot XIV—the fourteenth season of the Air Force Association’s National Youth Cyber Defense Competition, held March 17 – 21 in Bethesda, Maryland.

“The Swampfox team could hardly believe it when they realized they qualified for the nationals,” Stevens said after receiving the brackets for the final competitors.

Stevens, along with two other Citadel cadets who will take over as mentors next year, some of the Ashley Ridge cyber team and their AFJROTC unit leader, Major Bill Clark III, a Senior Aerospace Science Instructor, are in Maryland for the event after fall competitions narrowed the field from several hundred down to 28 finalists. The team’s travel expenses are all being covered by the competition.

“The students worked incredibly hard to make getting to a national competition a reality,” said Stevens. “Not all of the team member could travel to Maryland, but most will be able to take part in the next competition for the Ashley Ridge Swampfox JROTC Cyber Team which is the Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition on April 4 in North Charleston, much closer to home.”

The students on the Ashley Ridge Swampfox JROTC Cyber Team include:

  • Russell Brady – Unit Commander
  • Caleb Huckabee – Unit Commander
  • Emma Huckabee
  • Jade Benesh
  • Mikayla Benesh
  • Jean Lim
  • Jacob Kramer
  • Lindsay Shuford
  • J’Metrius Stanley

The Ashley Ridge cyber team visited The Citadel over their holiday break, practicing inside a lab on campus to get experience in a different venue.

Citadel Cadet Trey Stevens (left) with member of the Ashley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC cybersecurity competition team and one of their upcoming mentors for 2022-23, Citadel Cadet Dalton Hazelwood, posting for a photo in December when the high school team visited The Citadel campus in Charleston, South Carolina.

The two cadets besides Stevens accompanying the Foxswamp team in Maryland, Dalton Hazelwood and George Poleski, will be taking over as mentors for the incoming students who will begin training with the Ashley Ridge AFJROTC cyber team in the fall.

“It’s really been great to have the leadership of Cadet Stevens, and now the other Citadel cadets who are engaging to help the Ashley Ridge High School cyber team continue to grow and thrive,” said Major Clark. “Our high school AFJOTC cadets look up to The Citadel cadets and see a possible path for their futures.”

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Embassy of Georgia welcomes Citadel cadets and students studying in D.C. https://today.citadel.edu/embassy-of-georgia-welcomes-citadel-cadets-and-students-studying-in-d-c/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 21:12:52 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30840 Citadel cadets and students holding The Citadel's flag with Georgian dignitaries at the Embassy of Georgia on March 2, 2022Citadel cadets and students holding The Citadel's flag with Georgian dignitaries at the Embassy of Georgia on March 2, 2022The timing for our gathering at the Embassy of Georgia was fortuitous from an educational aspect. There were numerous high level Georgian officials.]]> Citadel cadets and students holding The Citadel's flag with Georgian dignitaries at the Embassy of Georgia on March 2, 2022Citadel cadets and students holding The Citadel's flag with Georgian dignitaries at the Embassy of Georgia on March 2, 2022

Photo above: Citadel cadets and students studying away in Washington D.C. holding the college’s flag and posing for a photograph with dignitaries from Georgia, at the Embassy of Georgia, on March 2, 2022. Pictured far left is Dr. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, the director of The Citadel in D.C. program, with Tornike Nikvashvili, First Secretary for the Embassy to his right. In the center wearing glasses is Giorgi Tsikolia, Charge d’affaires of Georgia to the United States. Col. Robert Argvliani, the Defense, Military, Naval, and Air Attaché of Georgia to the United States and Canada, is wearing the military uniform.

The Citadel cadets and students living and studying in Washington D.C. for the spring semester are realizing the many benefits of the program. The proximity of their studies to global leaders is one of them.

On March 2, some of the college’s cadets and students there were welcomed to the Embassy of Georgia for an opportunity to discuss current world events and, in particular, the invasion of Ukraine by Russia with senior officials from Georgia. Like Ukraine, Georgia was formerly a part of the Soviet republic.

According to a researcher with Harvard’s Program on Georgian Studies, “Georgia formally recognizes Ukraine as a vital strategic partner, and scholars Levan Kakhishvili and Alexandre Kupatadze found that since 1991 fully 39 percent of all Georgia’s bilateral agreements have been with Ukraine.”

Ukraine is represented in orange, with Georgia seen here in green.

“The timing for our gathering at the Embassy of Georgia was fortuitous from an educational aspect. There were numerous high level Georgian officials in the meeting, with the Ambassador away and closer to home due to needs related to the Russian-Ukrainian conflict,” said Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, Ph.D., The Citadel in D.C. program director and a professor of Intelligence and Security Studies.

“Senior officials from Georgia in attendance included Giorgi Tsikolia who currently serves as Charge d’affaires of Georgia to the United States. Mr. Tsikolia was appointed Deputy Chief of Mission (DCM) at the Embassy of Georgia to the United States in August 2015,” Frasir-Rahim continued.

Additionally, Tornike Nikvashvili, a career diplomat serving as a First Secretary at the Embassy covering economic issues, attended along with other Embassy representatives.

Fraser-Rahim, who arranged the meeting, says 90% of a Citadel student’s time while studying for a semester in D.C. is spent outside of the classroom, as a group. “It’s the exposure to the inner-workings of the nation’s capitol, including access to embassies, leading figures on Capitol Hill and experts in international affairs, intelligence and diplomacy that really make an impact on the cadets and students who come here.”

How does The Citadel in D.C. program work?

The full course offerings, providing nine credit hours for Political Science and Intelligence and Security Studies students can be seen here.

The tuition a cadet or student is already paying to attend The Citadel covers all living and travel expenses, other than food, for the semester in D.C. Food costs will be deducted from tuition amounts. Students in the program stay in WISH program housing, in Capitol Hill Classic Houses. There is an additional $500 program fee, not covered by tuition.

Summertime option

The Citadel in DC Summer Program is a 10-week program in Washington DC from June – August. This experience also involves living, learning and interning in DC. Cadets and students can earn up to nine academic credits — three academic and six internship credits — in the summer section. Contact studyabroad@citadel.edu for more information.

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Commander of U.S. Army Cyber Command to speak at critical infrastructure conference event at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/commander-of-u-s-army-cyber-command-to-speak-at-critical-infrastructure-conference-event-at-the-citadel/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 21:20:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29978 Headshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber CommandHeadshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber Command Attendance is open to professionals working in organizational functions responsible for infrastructure security. ]]> Headshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber CommandHeadshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber Command

AND: The Citadel selected to join Cyber Command Academic Engagement Network

Lt. Gen. Stephen G. Fogarty, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command (ARCYBER), will make a keynote address at The Citadel during the Jack Voltaic cyber conference. The conference will take place on the iconic Citadel campus in Charleston, S.C., Feb. 24 – 25, 2022.

Fogarty’s presentation begins at 9a.m., Feb. 24, preceded by comments from South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster and will be livestreamed with a link available to a registered audience, including media. The conference theme is Cyber Resiliency for Critical Infrastructure. Attendance is open to professionals working in organizational functions responsible for infrastructure security.

The Jack Voltaic project and conference series is designed to enable the Army Cyber Institute (ACI) to study incident response gaps alongside assembled partners to identify interdependencies among critical infrastructure and provide recommendations. The program provides an innovative, bottom‐up approach to critical infrastructure resilience, focusing on cities and municipalities where critical infrastructure and populations are substantial.

LTG Stephen G. Fogarty, commanding general, US Army Cyber Command, speaks to cadets in at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on March 26, 2021.

Fogarty assumed command of ARCYBER in 2018. He visited The Citadel in 2021 to speak with cadets studying cybersecurity and toured the campus. His second visit, to participate in the Jack Voltaic event, comes shortly after The Citadel was selected to join the U.S. Cyber Command (CYBERCOM) Academic Engagement Network (AEN).

To request the link to the livestream, please email kkeelor@citadel.edu.

Training America’s cybersecurity professionals

There are 84 academic institutions partnering with CYBERCOM in AEN, including 70 universities, 14 community colleges, nine minority-serving institutions and four military service academies, spanning 34 states and Washington, D.C.

The AEN military components include CYBERCOM Headquarters, ARCYBER, Joint Force Headquarters-Department of Defense Information Network, the Cyber National Mission Force (CNMF), Air Force Cyber Command/16th Air Force, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/10th Fleet, U.S. Marine Forces Cyberspace Command, and the U.S. Coast Guard Cyber Command. 

“(U.S.) Cyber Command’s goal for the AEN is to strengthen our relationships and communication with these participating institutions,” said David Frederick, CYBERCOM’s executive director. “This will improve and sustain our efforts to meet cyberspace educational requirements and workforce needs.”

According to a January 5 CYBERCOM release, the AEN will support and enhance four primary lines of effort (LOE): future workforce, applied cyber research, applied analytics and strategic issues. These LOEs are intended to serve as an investment in creating a robust and accessible pool of qualified cyber professionals. “With our academic partners, we can shape our cyber workforce while supporting the command’s mission,” Frederick said.

“The Citadel is proud to be included in this prestigious partnership with U.S. Cyber Command,” said The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.), ’79. “With The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute already under way, and the growing number of cybersecurity cadets and students in our programs, the college is prepared to contribute highly trained, workforce-ready cybersecurity professionals to help defend the country.”

The AEN extends partnerships to institutions through collaboration and access to CYBERCOM via scheduled events and engagements with command staff, the CNMF and the four component commands.

Frederick added that “this network will further enable us to shape and enhance cyber-focused innovation with partnerships and support the Department of Defense’s ongoing strategic dialogue on cyberspace.”

Some of the requirements for AEN selection include:

  • Cyber-related engineering programs
  • Intelligence-related programs
  • Applied analytics-related sciences programs
  • Process-related programs and certifications such as Project Management
  • Regional accreditation by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation

Read more about the matrix of cybersecurity and intelligence programs, scholarships and opportunities at The Citadel and through The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute, here.

Contact the Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences here, or apply to attend The Citadel here.

LTG Stephen G. Fogarty, commanding general, US Army Cyber Command, touring The Citadel campus in Charleston, South Carolina on March 26, 2021.
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Intelligence and Security Studies, one of The Citadel’s hottest programs, leads to in-demand careers https://today.citadel.edu/intelligence-and-security-studies-one-of-the-citadels-hottest-programs-leads-to-in-demand-careers/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 20:02:59 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29309 The FBI Watergate Panel, featuring Angelo Lano, Daniel Mahan, John Clynick, Paul Magallanes, and John Mindermann, moderated by Assistant Professor Melissa Graves, takes place during the 2020 Citadel Intelligence Ethics Conference in Mark Clark Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, February 12, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)The FBI Watergate Panel, featuring Angelo Lano, Daniel Mahan, John Clynick, Paul Magallanes, and John Mindermann, moderated by Assistant Professor Melissa Graves, takes place during the 2020 Citadel Intelligence Ethics Conference in Mark Clark Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, February 12, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)The Citadel has developed leaders for the America’s Intelligence Community since three-letter agencies like the FBI were formed.]]> The FBI Watergate Panel, featuring Angelo Lano, Daniel Mahan, John Clynick, Paul Magallanes, and John Mindermann, moderated by Assistant Professor Melissa Graves, takes place during the 2020 Citadel Intelligence Ethics Conference in Mark Clark Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, February 12, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)The FBI Watergate Panel, featuring Angelo Lano, Daniel Mahan, John Clynick, Paul Magallanes, and John Mindermann, moderated by Assistant Professor Melissa Graves, takes place during the 2020 Citadel Intelligence Ethics Conference in Mark Clark Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, February 12, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Undergraduate and graduate level programs certified by the International Association for Intelligence Education

Photo above: Dr. Melissa Graves, professor of Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel, hosts a panel on campus in 2020 featuring the original investigators from the Watergate scandal, with whom she did research for several years.

As the global theater transforms, intelligence and security professionals are in greater and greater demand, working to keep the nation safe by understanding unprecedented current events and forecasting future events.

There are hundreds of thousands of jobs for educated intelligence professionals. Including the U.S. military branches, there are 17 U.S. agencies, with close to 200,000 individuals employed by the Department of Homeland Security alone. Large corporations have growing security and intelligence functions, as do law enforcement entities in states, cities and counties across America.

Among those ranks are many intelligence experts who were educated at The Citadel. The Military College of South Carolina has developed leaders for the America’s Intelligence Community since three-letter agencies like the FBI were formed. In years past alumni studied through various degree pathways, but now cadets and students benefit from the formalized Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, the first in the state of South Carolina, launched in 2017.

Louis Brems - The Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats,
While serving as America’s Director of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats dines on campus with cadets majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies, during a break from the college’s Intelligence and Cyber Securities Conference at The Citadel in 2018.

The 380 cadet and student undergraduates majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies, and the more than 90 pursuing the master’s degree and certificates, will graduate from programs with the prestige of certification from the International Association for Intelligence Education (IAFIE).

“Certification by the IAFIE provides current and prospective cadets and students with the understanding that a third-party, comprised of top industry professionals, thoroughly reviewed The Citadel’s Intelligence and Security Studies programs and verified unanimously that they meet or exceed industry standards,” said Larry Valero, Ph.D., head of The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Security Studies.

What they said

Comments from the IAFIE panelists reviewing the Bachelor of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies included the following:

We feel the overall structure of the program provides a firm grounding in intelligence and security studies for students, while offering them opportunities to explore various avenues in the concentrations. We appreciate the way this allows students to tailor their education in ways more directly amenable to their career aspirations.

Daniel S. Gressang, Ph.D., IAFIE Certification Review Chair

A letter from the IAFIE panelists reviewing The Citadel’s (non-cadet) Master’s of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies included this:

The group was impressed with the unique and highly specialized concentrations available to MA students, including a Cybersecurity Concentration that does an excellent job of providing students with the technical foundations needed for cybersecurity practitioners. We congratulate you on your successful certification review! We hope this process also helps strengthen an already wonderful program.

Mike Landon-Murray, Ph.D., IAFIE Certification Review Chair, IAFIE Educational Practices Chair

The Citadel’s Intelligence and Security Studies degree options; study in D.C.

Intelligence and Security Studies is one of the fastest growing Corps of Cadets undergraduate programs going from zero to almost 400 in four years. There are also non-cadet options in The Citadel Graduate College’s civilian programs.

The degrees are structured to make them available to cadets and veteran day students, to working professionals studying in the evenings or online, and for those seeking graduate level studies. Additionally, Intelligence and Security Studies majors and graduate students interested in studying away for a semester can apply their tuition to studying and interning in Washington D.C.

To learn more, email intell@citadel.edu.

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Live and learn in DC with The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/live-and-learn-in-dc-with-the-citadel/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 19:46:56 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=28820 David James Hardcastle, with his skateboard, sitting in front of the national capitolDavid James Hardcastle, with his skateboard, sitting in front of the national capitol"Studying in D.C. this semester is helping me make important and meaningful connections that I otherwise would likely have not made."]]> David James Hardcastle, with his skateboard, sitting in front of the national capitolDavid James Hardcastle, with his skateboard, sitting in front of the national capitol

Photo: Cadet David Hardcastle, ’22, with his longboard at Capitol Hill

Sign up by Dec. 15 to spend springtime in DC

Living and learning in the city that runs America, for the essentially the same price you’re spending on a semester’s tuition, isn’t an opportunity that comes everyday…unless you attend The Citadel. Cadets and students majoring in Political Science or Intelligence and Security Studies, with a minimum grade point average of 2.5, are eligible for The Citadel in D.C. one-semester program.

“Studying in D.C. this semester is helping me make important and meaningful connections that I otherwise would likely have not made,” said Cadet David Hardcastle. He is an Intelligence and Security Studies major who expects to graduate in May with the Class of 2022. “I think the most compelling thing about The Citadel in D.C. experience is the independence we have here.”

Intelligence and Securities Studies professor, Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, Ph.D., who directs The Citadel in D.C. program, says 90% of a student’s time there is spent outside of the classroom, as a group. “It’s the exposure to the inner-workings of the nation’s capitol, including access to embassies, leading figures on Capitol Hill and experts in international affairs, intelligence and diplomacy that really make an impact on the cadets and students who come here for a semester.”

Hardcastle’s career goal? “My goal is simply to contribute to and help those in need. My internship here in D.C. is with Parents for Peace. There I’m learning some niche communications and problem-solving skills that are specific to the intelligence and counter-terrorism community, though I cannot reveal any more than that due to the privacy agreements related to the opportunity,” he said.

There are about 12 cadets and students studying in D.C. each semester. Every person in The Citadel in D.C. program engages in an internship aligned with their career interests, during their semester there, with the help of The Citadel Career Center.

Examples of just some of the other internship sites The Citadel in D.C. students have experienced include:

“It a phenomenal opportunity for any cadet to live amongst others in the ‘real world’ outside of The Citadel for a semester. It broadens your perspective,” Hardcastle added.

Cadet David Hardcastle, The Citadel Class of 2022, sitting outside of the townhouse where he is living during his semester in Washington, DC.

How does it work?

The full course offerings, providing 9 credit hours for Political Science and Intelligence and Security Studies students can be seen here.

The tuition a cadet or student is already paying to attend The Citadel covers all living and travel expenses, other than food, for the semester in D.C. Food costs will be deducted from your tuition amount. Students in the program stay in WISH program housing, in Capitol Hill Classic Houses. There is an additional $500 program fee, not covered by tuition.

Muhammad Fraser-Rahim teaching in Washington, DC
The Citadel professor of Intelligence and Security Studies, Dr. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim teaching cadets and students in Washington, D.C.

Spring schedule

Those studying in DC for the spring semester will follow The Citadel’s normal 2021-22 academic calendar. You’ll move into your living quarters on Jan. 15, have a day of orientation, then begin the class schedule Jan. 19. Internships will begin after that, depending on the location. Classes end April 20, and you’ll move out April 29 or 30.

To learn more about studying with The Citadel in DC or to sign up, contact studyabroad@citadel.edu, or email the program head, Dr. Muhamamd Fraser-Rahim, at hfrasera@citadel.edu. The deadline is Dec. 15.

Summertime option

The Citadel in DC Summer Program is a 10-week program in Washington DC from June – August. This experience also involves living, learning and interning in DC. Cadets and students can earn up to 9 academic credits — 3 academic and 6 internship credits — in the summer section. Contact studyabroad@citadel.edu for more information.

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From the Coast Guard to the Corps: Meet veteran and current cadet Luke Darling https://today.citadel.edu/from-the-coast-guard-to-the-corps-meet-veteran-and-current-cadet-luke-darling/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 21:04:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=28460 "Being a veteran at The Citadel gives me the opportunity to share my experiences from my time in the military with my fellow cadets."]]>

In recognition of Veterans Day on Nov. 11, The Citadel is highlighting some of the college’s exceptional veteran students from different branches of the U.S. Armed Forces.

There are approximately 250 veterans currently studying at The Citadel, either as undergraduate or graduate students. They have the option of taking their classes as day students alongside the Corps of Cadets, as evening students with other non-cadet undergraduates or online. In addition, they are provided with multiple resources through the Veteran Student Success Center on campus.

Named #1 Best College for Veterans in the South for three years in a row, the Military College of South Carolina is honored to help our nation’s heroes advance their education.

Q&A with Cadet Luke Darling, Class of 2022

Luke Darling is a cadet veteran at The Citadel. He expects to graduate in December 2021, earning a degree in Intelligence and Security Studies with a concentration in Military Intelligence. He is currently involved with a work study through the Student Veteran Success Center while interviewing for jobs in the private sector ahead of graduation; additionally, he’s set to be married in February 2022.

Why did you enlist, and how long were you in the Coast Guard?

During my time in high school, I wanted to join the military — but I wasn’t sure which branch until I had heard about the Coast Guard, the different job opportunities and the missions they are involved in. I was not accepted into the Coast Guard Academy, but still wanted to join. I learned about how to enlist into the Coast Guard, and that’s exactly what I did after graduating from high school.

I served in the Coast Guard from August of 2014 to August of 2018, when I separated from the Coast Guard as an E-4, or Petty Officer Third Class. A week after separating, I started my education at The Citadel as a member of the Corps of Cadets.

What was your time in the military like?

It was unlike anything I had ever experienced before. Being in the military gave me a better understanding of what people who serve in the military go through each and every day. The sacrifices they make, the people they protect and the people they save — and I got to be a part of that during my time in the Coast Guard, which is something I will never forget.

What experiences from your military service helped prepare you for your education?

My experiences in the Coast Guard helped me prepare to be a student at The Citadel by teaching me the importance of seeking assistance from others when needed, knowing when to step up and take charge of a situation, and also how to organize my priorities when it came to my daily schedule.

One of my top priorities while going to college is getting good grades, earning my degree and using my degree to get a job that I can use to help support my future family.

Cadet Luke Darling with his fiancé during Parents Weekend at The Citadel

Are there any advantages to being a veteran at The Citadel?

Being a veteran at The Citadel gives me the opportunity to share my experiences from my time in the military with my fellow cadets who aspire to join the military after they graduate. As a member of the Corps of Cadets, I get to interact with the cadets each and every day, in the classroom, in battalion and outside of campus in numerous activities such as football games, band events and even sporting activities like hockey games.

What’s your favorite thing about The Citadel as a whole?

My favorite thing about being at The Citadel is the unique student body. While it is a military college, it also allows veteran students like myself the opportunity to attend such a distinguished school, where I can get a great education and use my degree to get a job like the one I am currently pursuing.

Also, day in and day out, I get to learn about why cadets want to join the military. I also get to learn more about the other veteran students, their experiences, what life was like for them in the military and what they want to do when they graduate.

Veterans interested in attending The Citadel can find information about programs and opportunities here. Additionally, information about benefits for veterans can be found here.

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