Baker School of Business – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Fri, 05 Feb 2021 21:14:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Baker School of Business – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Citadel alum calls in Chick-fil-A manager to help a drive-thru Covid-19 vaccination clinic https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-alum-calls-in-chick-fil-a-manager-to-help-a-drive-thru-covid-19-vaccination-clinic/ Sat, 13 Feb 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21836 When a drive-thru COVID vaccine clinic left people waiting for hours, the town mayor called in a professional for help: a Chick-fil-A manager.]]>

Note: Mayor Will Haynie (photo left), a member of The Citadel Class of 1983 who earned a Business Administration degree, was elected mayor of Mount Pleasant in 2017.

As seen on CNN, by Alaa Elassar

When a South Carolina drive-thru coronavirus vaccine clinic got backed up, leaving people waiting for hours, the town mayor decided to call in a professional for help: a Chick-fil-A manager.

Local hospitals in Mount Pleasant opened the clinic on January 22 for residents eligible to receive the first shots of Covid-19 vaccine. But shortly after the drive-thru opened, the computer system handling registrations went down, causing hundreds of people to wait in heavy traffic.

That’s when Jerry Walkowiak, the manager of a nearby Chick-fil-A, stepped in to save the day.

“When I heard about it, I called Jerry and asked if he would come help us out,” Mount Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie told CNN. “After he looked it over, he said, ‘There’s your problem right there. It’s backed up because you have one person checking people in.’ Then he showed us how to do it right.”

With the help of a few additional volunteers, Walkowiak transformed the messy traffic jam into a smooth operation, reducing the hours-long wait to just 15 minutes.

More than 1,000 people received the vaccine that day, Haynie said. When everyone returns for their second dose on February 12, Walkowiak will be back to help manage the drive-thru.

“At Chick-fil-A, we’re about being the most caring company in the world, and when Mayor Haynie asked us to come over, we took a look at what was their drive-thru system,” Walkowiak told news station WCBD.

“We saw a little hiccup in their drive-thru system, and we needed some more people, so we gathered some of the wonderful Rotary volunteers and went down there and just was able to expedite the registration part.”

More than 29 million doses of Covid-19 vaccines have been administered in the United States, according to data published Saturday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

While the US still has a long way to go before the pandemic is over, Haynie hopes his town’s experience will encourage others to get vaccinated and help with vaccine efforts.

“Jerry got a phone call and dropped everything because he knows getting this vaccine out is a game changer,” Haynie said. “This is what the light at the end of the long Covid tunnel looks like.”

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The Citadel to use new technology to enhance virtual learning https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-to-use-new-technology-to-enhance-virtual-learning/ Wed, 05 Aug 2020 13:28:45 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17533 Classrooms at The Citadel are now equipped with new technology called Swivl that helps brings the in-class experience to virtual learning via Zoom.]]>

As seen on WCBD – Count on 2 by Katie Augustine

Classrooms at The Citadel are now equipped with new technology to bring the in-class experience to virtual learning.

It’s called swivl. It adds a little something extra to a traditional zoom call.

“What is does is allows us to have face-to-face classes while still practicing social distance,” said Maria Aselage, an adjunct professor in the Baker School of Business at The Citadel. “And in addition to that, it’s going to give students the experience of being a cadet on campus which is so very important to The Citadel mission.”

The technology is in a small tool called a marker. It contains a microphone. The professor carries the marker around with them and that allows the swivl to rotate and follow them wherever they walk in a classroom.

“I think that’s what makes it real special is that we can walk anywhere. To the back of the class, the front of the class. Either side of the class and the swivl’s going to follow us,” said Aselage.

One cadet at The Citadel has the opportunity to test out the new technology today with Aselage. Typically, Amanda Teague prefers face-to-face instruction, but after testing out the swivl she feels more optimistic about learning virtually.

“It’s more like an actual lecture. Whereas, during spring break, it was just the teacher’s face and it wasn’t very interactive, but just with this tool it’s going to help a lot. It’s going to keep us more engaged as well,” said Teague.

The Citadel is taking more steps to ensure a safe semester for everyone on campus. For more about Operation Fall Return 2020, click here.

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USA Today: Soldier sneaks up on Citadel football player son https://today.citadel.edu/usa-today-soldier-sneaks-up-on-citadel-football-player-son/ Mon, 27 Jul 2020 00:23:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17363 Tereis Drayton, a rising junior majoring in Finance, received a Homecoming surprise that was arranged by The Citadel Athletics in 2019.]]>

As seen in USA Today Militarykind

USA Today’s positive news brand, Militarykind, recently reached out after seeing the 2019 Homecoming surprise for Citadel Cadet Tereis Drayton. His father, Staff Sgt. Demond Drayton, sneaked up behind his son for a homecoming surprise, arranged by The Citadel Athletics.

Drayton, a rising junior majoring in Finance, plays on the offensive line for The Citadel Football team.

Watch Drayton’s new interview with USA today about that special moment below.

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Baker School of Business professor published in National Review https://today.citadel.edu/baker-school-of-business-professor-published-in-national-review/ Mon, 13 Jul 2020 13:51:15 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17217 Richard M. Ebeling, Ph.D., is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership in the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business.]]>

Photo: Richard M. Ebeling, Ph.D., is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership in the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

As seen in the National Review by Steve H. Hanke and Richard M. Ebeling on July 1, 2020

Thomas Sowell at 90 Is More Relevant Than Ever

Thomas Sowell in a Hoover Institution interview in 2018. (Hoover Institution/via YouTube)

Yesterday, Thomas Sowell turned 90. And he is more relevant than ever. Sowell, a frequent contributor to National Review and prodigious scholar, has delivered yet another insightful and accessible book, Charter Schools and Their Enemies. It was released on his birthday — a gift from Sowell to the rest of us.

In his new book, Sowell puts primary sources and facts under the powerful microscope of his analysis. His findings are, as is often the case, inconvenient, not to say explosive, truths. Indeed, Charter Schools and Their Enemies documents how non-white students thrive in charter schools and close the performance gap with their white peers. It’s no surprise, then, that there are long waiting lists to enter charter schools. So why aren’t there more of them? Well, public schools and their teachers’ unions don’t like the competition. This, of course, traps non-white students in inferior public schools.

Just who is Thomas Sowell and why is he a larger-than-life figure in today’s world? Sowell was born on June 30, 1930, in North Carolina. He grew up in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood and served in the Marine Corps during the Korean War. He earned three economics degrees, one from Harvard (1958), one from Columbia (1959), and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago (1968). After holding down faculty positions at prestigious universities, Sowell settled at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, where he has been for the past 40 years.

As Sowell recounts in his autobiography, A Personal Odyssey (2000), he considered himself a Marxist during most of his student years. Chicago put an end to that infatuation. But Sowell’s study of classical economists included the works of Marx, and in 1985 he published Marxism: Philosophy and Economics. As anyone steeped in Marx knows, all symbols of the capitalist, exploitive past must be uprooted and destroyed before a workers’ paradise can be constructed. It turns out that Marxism is of the moment: Yes, the removal of statues and the changing of street and building names is straight out of Marx’s playbook.

But for those who find Marxism too general and abstract to be relevant for the events of today, we direct you to a treasure trove of books in which Sowell has focused his attention on the problems surrounding race and discrimination both in the United States and around the world. To name just a few of his many works specifically on this theme: Race and Economics (1975), Markets and Minorities (1981), Ethnic America: A History (1981), The Economics and Politics of Race (1983), Preferential Policies (1990), Race and Culture (1995), Migrations and Cultures (1996), Conquests and Cultures (1998), Affirmative Action Around the World (2004), Black Rednecks and White Liberals (2005), Intellectuals and Race (2013), Wealth, Poverty and Politics (2016), and Discrimination and Disparities (2018; rev. ed., 2019).

When analyzing race and discrimination, Sowell relishes going after one of his favorite targets: the intellectual elites, or as he refers to them, “the anointed.” The heart of his message is that men are not born with equal abilities. Contrary to the assertions of the anointed, Sowell argues that “empirically observable skills have always been grossly unequal.” Sowell also argues that not all cultures are equal contributors to world civilization. Indeed, he observes that “differences among racial, national and other groups range from the momentous to the mundane, whether in the United States or in other countries around the world and down through the centuries.” Sowell concludes that the world is culturally complex and filled with variety. We still have little understanding of the causes and consequences of that complexity. But markets tend to harmonize the interests of, or at least minimize the friction between, various peoples and cultures, while politics creates conflict, with advantages for some at the expense of others.

Much of what Sowell has to say about race is contained in his undeniably controversial Black Rednecks and White Liberals, a collection of essays. In the course of a lengthy examination of identity, culture, and its socioeconomic effects, he looks, among other issues, at what he refers to as “black ghetto culture” (something, he stresses more than once, of which “most black Americans” are not a part) and its particular language, customs, behavioral characteristics, and attitudes toward work and leisure. Sowell argues that it has been heavily influenced by earlier white southern “redneck” culture, although, as he is careful to note, this is not a matter of “simple linear extrapolation.” And indeed it is not.

Sowell traces this culture to several generations of Americans mostly descended from immigrants from “the northern borderlands of England . . . as well as from the Scottish highlands and Ulster” who arrived in the southern American colonies in the 18th century. The outstanding features of this redneck or “cracker” culture — as it was called in Great Britain before and during the emigration years — included, Sowell writes, “an aversion to work, proneness to violence, neglect of education, sexual promiscuity, improvidence, drunkenness, lack of entrepreneurship, reckless searches for excitement, lively music and dance, and a style of religious oratory marked by rhetoric, unbridled emotions, and flamboyant imagery.” It also included “touchy pride, vanity, and boastful self-dramatization.” The point to be drawn, he writes, “is that cultural differences led to striking socioeconomic differences among blacks, as they did among whites. In both races, those who lived within the redneck culture lagged far behind those who did not.”

Most of the commercial industriousness and innovation in the South in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Sowell demonstrates, were introduced by businessmen, merchants, and educators who moved there from the North, and especially New England. The culture of work, savings, personal responsibility, and forethought that flourished in the North left the southern United States lagging far behind — a contrast often remarked on by 19th-century European visitors.

Sowell’s tracing of these past differences brings us back to today. On June 5, the American Economic Association (AEA), the premier professional association for economists since its founding in 1885, issued a statement saying that it was time for officers and governance committees within the association to look into racism and racist practices and presumptions within the profession. To that end, the AEA compiled a recommended reading list on race and discrimination. Sowell is nowhere to be found on it. Neither is the late Gary Becker, former president of the AEA, who won a Nobel prize in 1992 for, among other achievements, his pathbreaking work on the economics of discrimination. This is the blinkered world we live in today.

Steve H. Hanke is a professor of applied economics at the Johns Hopkins University and a senior fellow and director of the Troubled Currencies Project at the Cato Institute. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.

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Baker School of Business earns extension for prestigious accreditation https://today.citadel.edu/baker-school-of-business-earns-extension-for-prestigious-accreditation/ Mon, 06 Jul 2020 19:38:41 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17136 The Baker School of Business is one of the 22 institutions to have extended its accreditation in business through the AACSB.]]>

The Citadel’s Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business is one of the 22 institutions to have extended its accreditation in business through the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

For more than a century, AACSB accreditation has been reserved for colleges and universities with the highest standards in business education.

“We’re pleased that AACSB continues to recognize the quality of our business programs,” said Michael R. Weeks, Ph.D., dean of the Baker School of Business. “The hard work and dedication of all of our outstanding faculty, staff and students, as well as their commitment to excellence, enabled this mark of distinction.”

Achieving accreditation is a rigorous, multiyear process. These standards require excellence in areas relating to strategic management, innovation and more.

“AACSB congratulates each institution on its achievement,” said Stephanie M. Bryant, executive vice president and chief accreditation officer of AACSB. “Every AACSB-accredited school has demonstrated a focus on excellence in all areas, including teaching, research, curricula development and student learning. The intense peer-review process exemplifies their commitment to quality business education.”

The Baker School of Business offers its students a diverse array of scholastic options through its three departments: Accounting and Finance – Management and Entrepreneurship – and Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Economics.

The Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business is named for Charleston entrepreneur and philanthropist, Tommy Baker and his wife, Victoria. Baker, founder and owner of Baker Motor Company, studied business while attending the college as a veteran student, enrolling after returning from service as an enlisted Marine in 1968.

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Former Citadel students look to make 3D printing accessible https://today.citadel.edu/former-citadel-students-look-to-make-3d-printing-accessible/ Fri, 26 Jun 2020 10:00:14 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17024 Ethan Warner and Benjamin Scott founded Evolve 3D to streamline 3D printing and make an otherwise expensive printer more affordable and accessible.]]>

Photo: Ethan Warner and Benjamin Scott, who founded Evolve 3D, were biology majors at The Citadel who participated in the Baker Business Bowl VI

As seen in The Index-Journal and Stars & Stripes, by Jonathan Limehouse

Ethan Warner and Benjamin Scott founded Evolve 3D to streamline 3D printing and make an otherwise expensive printer more affordable and accessible.

“A lot of people right now don’t think of the 3D printer as something they can have in their home,” Warner said. “They see it as something very complicated, but we can simplify the process and bring it into the home.”

Warner, 22, and Scott, 21, were biology majors at The Citadel, and they bonded over the amount of fun they weren’t having in one of their biology classes together. Warner did not anticipate even working with 3D printers, while Scott’s uncle’s interest in 3D printing influenced him to research more about it.

“The ability to make anything with a 3D printer really amazed me,” he said.

It took Scott a while to buy a 3D printer because one can cost anywhere from $1,500 to $100,000, but he managed to get one for his 21st birthday. After a while, he decided to tinker and ultimately upgrade it because he wanted to print using different types of filaments, which are slender threadlike materials that 3D printers use to create three-dimensional objects. Filaments have separate properties that vary in abrasiveness, so 3D printers use different nozzles to print various types of filaments.

“I wanted a system where I could switch out between nozzles,” he said. “I also wanted a system where if wanted to put a laser on the 3D printer then I could, so I could do laser engraving too.”

Scott’s idea began with him duct taping a laser to the extruder head on the printer, and it would move in an XYZ direction. Since he lived with college friends last summer who smoked JUULs, he decided to laser engrave their pods for them.

“They thought it was awesome until the duct tape holding the laser failed and it started shooting around the room,” he said.

The duct tape failing might have been for the best because it led to him trying to create a system, which turned out to be a 3D printer adapter that allows him to switch between nozzles and laser engraving. The universal adapter is currently patent-pending, and it will let the 3D printer print in virtually any type of material, and they can also adjust the resolution of the print by adjusting the diameter of the extruding nozzle. When Scott returned to college after the summer, a friend of his suggested he start a company, and that’s how Evolve 3D began.

From there, Warner joined Scott and the two entered the Baker Business Bowl at The Citadel and were the youngest people ever to be accepted into the Harbor Accelerator program in Charleston. Scott credits their time in the accelerator program — they finished in third place — with teaching them the ins and outs of business and how to develop a concept and make it into something real.

“The product has kind of just evolved more and more until we are where we are today,” he said.

Their concept is now real and working, and the team’s end goal is to bring the 3D printing manufacturing process into the home. Scott said the U.S. sees a lot of reliance in China to import 3D printing parts, and it’s not necessarily because they are good parts, but it’s because they are cheap.

“I believe if you’re able to make these parts yourself then that would lessen the reliance on China,” he said. “Right now, you can print soft plastics, but the issue is getting it to the level where you’re printing abrasive plastics.”

“Right now if you wanted to print in every single type of filament then that’s going to be like 10 different printers. Instead, it would make a lot more sense if you could have one machine that can print in any material and allows you to make anything from your desktop from your house. That’s the vision.”

To make their vision a reality, Scott moved in with Warner’s family in Greenwood so they could work on their company together. Scott said it’s been cool living with Warners, and he even thinks they treat him like he’s their favorite child. Warner’s father got the two a workspace at Emerald Ink and Stitches after he spoke with the owner, Steven Riley. They initially were going to move into a little house and “rough it,” but Riley offered his old office space in the back of the shop to them.

To expand on their vision, the two hope to start a YouTube channel that will consist of tutorials and cool experiments that they believe will inspire others to get into 3D printing.

“We’re passionate about 3D printing and we want to share that passion with everyone else,” Scott said. “Hopefully we will capture the imagination of the next, or current generations, and encourage them to get into the awesome world of 3D printing.”

A select group of people that the two hope to interest are soon to be Citadel graduates because they want to do all their manufacturing in house. Scott said the beauty of being a 3D printing company is that they can print the majority of their 3D printers. All these components are designed and printed in house by them. They manufacture their own parts, assemble their own machines and test their own machines.

“Bringing that manufacturing system would probably bring a lot of jobs as we grow, so it will help Greenwood’s economy in the long run,” Warner said.

Even though they will be able to manufacture their own printers, Scott said they will need builders, customer support operators, inventors and engineers to function as a full-fledged company.

The two put in for the patent for the universal adapter two months ago, but in the meantime, they will continue to work on their printers with the anticipation of a soft launch on Sept. 1. The printer will cost about $2,750, and they hope to sell them on their website and through word of mouth.

“The hope is that we’re going to have such an awesome 3D printer that people are going to be recommending it to other people,” Scott said.

The two were also involved with MUSC and The Citadel when they printed 3D masks for health care professionals. Scott thought the whole experience highlighted a need for easily accessible 3D printing, noting that it could be lifesaving. With Evolve 3D’s printer, he said someone could make a 3D mask with the correct materials and have the best possible mask at their fingertips.

“It could potentially save your life, your kid’s life and your family’s life,” he said.

Warner thinks it is ironic how they got into 3D printing, but he said it’s a passion that they can both get behind.

“Ben and I feel the same way about this,” he said. “It doesn’t feel like work because we’re coming in, just enjoying ourselves and being productive by working on our machines. It doesn’t feel like a job, it feels more like a hobby that we’re building into an empire.”

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From Carolina to Colorado; The Citadel helps students complete their business degrees in seven states https://today.citadel.edu/from-carolina-to-colorado-the-citadel-helps-students-complete-their-business-degrees-in-seven-states/ Wed, 24 Jun 2020 13:38:37 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16983 The BSB finalized agreements with five additional two-year schools — adding to the 27 partner-institutions that the school announced in 2019. ]]>

Two-year transfer students can complete business degrees from their hometowns, online

The Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business (BSB) at The Citadel is expanding its ability to help even more students from two-year schools earn a full Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree.

The BSB finalized agreements with five additional two-year schools — adding to the 27 partner-institutions that the school announced in 2019.

The agreements enable students at the partner schools who are completing Associate in Applied Science (AAS) business degrees to be automatically accepted into the BSB at The Citadel. In addition, community and technical college graduates who are already holding an AAS in business can seamlessly transfer all credits to The Citadel.

Eligible students then complete their education and finish with a degree from The Citadel, which has one of the top-ranked, online and part-time business programs in the country. More than 100 transfer students are already studying in the BSB since the first round of agreements were finalized.

Jeremy Bennett, Ph.D., Jeremy Bennet, director of the business degree completion program at The Citadel
Jeremy Bennett, Ph.D.

“The Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business is excited to offer even more students, from even more parts of the country, the opportunity to seamlessly transfer their two-year degree into a four-year business degree from The Citadel,” said Jeremy Bennett, Ph.D., director of the college transfer program for the BSB. “It’s especially important to provide opportunities like this during the COVID-19 pandemic, since it offers students a chance to complete their degrees online, in their hometowns, without losing credit hours or money in through the normal transfer processes.”

This program is part of the College Transfer Program, which provides students with non-cadet, civilian classes. Students also have the option to choose between studying online, on campus, or both. Though the BSB has offered online education for years, the program — as well as those for the entire college — has been strengthened since the emergency transition to all remote learning in Spring 2020.

“At Tri-County, we create educational pathways that improve the economic mobility of the people living in our communities,” said Galen DeHay, Ph.D., president of Tri-County Technical College in Pendleton, South Carolina. “By partnering with The Citadel, we can help ensure our students have more opportunities to further their education, and earn a bachelor’s degree, which leads to a family-sustaining wage.”

The five new schools partnered with The Citadel are:

  • Piedmont Technical College – Greenwood, South Carolina
  • Pikes Peak Community College – Colorado Springs, Colorado
  • Spartanburg Community College – Spartanburg, South Carolina
  • Tri-County Technical College – Pendleton, South Carolina
  • Virginia Western Community College – Roanoke, Virginia

“Most of these institutions reached out themselves to establish the partnerships, after learning about our initial agreements,” said Bennett. “The Citadel will also consider working with students from technical and community colleges in other areas across the nation for this educational opportunity.”

Baker School of Business partnerships

The full list of two-year colleges that have signed agreements with The Citadel includes:

South Carolina

Aiken Technical College
Greenville Technical College
Horry Georgetown Technical College
Midlands Technical College
Northeastern Technical College
Piedmont Technical College
Spartanburg Community College
Technical College of the Lowcountry
Tri-County Technical College
Trident Technical College
Williamsburg Technical College

Georgia

Albany Technical College
Atlanta Technical College
Georgia Highlands College
Georgia Military College
Gwinnett Technical College
Lanier Technical College
Oconee Fall Line Technical College
South Georgia Technical College

North Carolina

Beaufort County Community College
Carteret Community College
Central Piedmont Community College
Isothermal Community College
Richmond Community College
Sampson Community College

Virginia

Danville Community College
Germanna Community College
Virginia Western Community College

West Virginia

Blue Ridge Community and Technical College
BridgeValley Community and Technical College

Alabama

Calhoun Community College

Colorado

Pikes Peak Community College

For more information, or to apply, please visit The Citadel’s BSBA degree completion website.

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What You Need to Know About Becoming an Accounting Major https://today.citadel.edu/what-you-need-to-know-about-becoming-an-accounting-major/ Fri, 19 Jun 2020 10:00:58 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16967 The Citadel's accounting major -- housed in the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business -- is ranked #2 in Regional Universities South.]]>

As seen in U.S. News and World Report, by Emily H. Bratcher

An accounting major gets a strong education in business administration, diving into the technical intricacies of accounting and developing other skills required in an accounting role, such as public speaking and information systems. Students looking to study accounting should be interested in numbers, the communication of financial information, corporate finance, software programs and data analytics.

What Is an Accounting Major?

Accounting majors learn how to create, maintain and audit a detailed and accurate system that displays the finances of a business or organization. They study the theory behind accounting and learn how to analyze the financial position of a firm or organization.

Depending on your program, you may earn a Bachelor of Business Administration or a Bachelor of Science in accounting. Schools may also have different names for accounting majors, such as accountancy, accounting and financial management, and accounting technology.

A completed undergraduate degree in accounting may qualify you to take the Uniform Certified Public Accountant Exam, a qualification for practicing as an accountant, though in many cases, you may need additional coursework.

Future employers highly value skills like organization, attention to detail, good time management, leadership and communication, which accounting majors may develop over the course of their degree program.

Common Coursework Accounting Majors Can Expect

Most accounting majors begin their studies with a broad liberal arts education that includes courses such as English literature, foreign language, psychology and physics. However, as they progress in their studies, accounting majors can expect to take introduction to accounting and taxation courses as well as principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. Math classes like calculus and statistics are part of the curriculum, too. More advanced courses accounting majors take include computer-based systems, operations management, business law, and theory classes for both accounting and auditing. Business communication and public speaking are often part of accounting program curriculums as well.

Many programs, like the one at the highly ranked McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas–Austin, require students to take an accounting internship for credit. This lets accounting majors gain hands-on experience in the field as well as cultivate professional contacts to help them land a job after graduation.

How to Know if This Major Is the Right Fit for You

Accounting majors should enjoy math, and they should revel in organization, as crunching numbers in a computer-based system and analyzing financial information are important parts of the job.

But accounting majors also have to communicate their findings in front of executives of an organization or business and answer questions related to their analysis. Accounting majors should be content with routine, repetitive tasks and expect long hours during tax season, which runs from January through April. Lastly, accounting majors should be honest rule-followers, as the job entails adhering to detailed regulations and tax codes.

What Can I Do With an Accounting Major?

Those interested in continuing their education can get a master’s in accounting or taxation or an MBA with a concentration in accounting. Many schools offer five-year programs where students can obtain their bachelor’s and master’s degrees together, and usually complete an internship.

After graduating and passing the CPA exam, majors can work as accountants at firms or organizations, or they can work for large auditing firms. Other options include working as personal financial advisors or financial analysts. Accounting majors can also become the chief financial officer or the vice president of finance at a business or organization.

Schools Offering an Accounting Major

Check out some schools below that offer accounting majors and find the full list of schools here that you can filter and sort.

For more information about the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business‘s accounting major, click here.

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Faculty heading into retirement with finesse after decades of leadership https://today.citadel.edu/faculty-heading-into-retirement-with-finesse-after-decades-of-leadership/ Tue, 09 Jun 2020 20:22:12 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16766 In all, 13 members of The Citadel faculty retired after the 2019-2020 academic year, but their contributions will continue to be felt on campus.]]>

In her almost three decades as a leader at The Citadel, it is unlikely that Dr. Conway Saylor ever envisioned herself dancing with her husband, Dr. Bart Saylor, on the front lawn of the college’s Krause Center building.

Conway Saylor, Ph.D., and her husband, Bart, at socially-distanced parade in honor of her retirement

But that is what they did — along with waving, laughing, cheering, and crying — as members of the campus community drove by the Saylors in decorated automobiles for a socially distanced retirement parade complete with music.

“We just had to find a way to make Dr. Saylor feel special after all she has done for The Citadel. COVID-19 didn’t stop us,” said Christina Soyden Arnold, one of Saylor’s co-workers in the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics.

Saylor joined The Citadel in 1991 as professor of Psychology. She eventually became director of Service Learning for the Krause Center. In that role, she led the development of the college’s robust program that now garners 30,000 hours of volunteer service annually. Through her work building relationships and supporting more than 35 community partners, Saylor twice led The Citadel to earn the Carnegie Foundation Elective Community Engagement Classification.

Saylor with MLK Picture Award
Saylor at the 2019 MLK Picture Award

In addition to other awards and commendations, in 2019 Saylor was honored for uniting members of the community with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Picture Awards in Charleston.

“I guess I’m just one of the soldiers trying to get up every day and do my best to be part of the solutions.”

Conway Saylor, Ph.D.

Honoring all 2020 retiring faculty

In all, 13 members of The Citadel faculty retired after the 2019-2020 academic year. Though they spent their final months working remotely due to the pandemic, their departure was and will continue to be felt and their contributions, lasting.

“I am delighted to have an opportunity to recognize the significant contributions of our colleagues who are retiring,” said Sally Selden, Ph.D., provost and dean of The Citadel. “They have made impressive contributions to their academic disciplines while simultaneously teaching and supporting our cadets and students. By awarding these faculty members Emeritus status, The Citadel is conferring an honor to show our respect for a distinguished career. We are grateful for their many years of services and for their impact on The Citadel community.”

Baker School of Business

Mike Barth, Ph.D.

Mike Barth, Ph.D., joined the faculty in 2007. He taught business finance, personal finance, business analytics and risk management. Barth became chair of the Accounting & Finance Department in 2019. Prior to becoming an educator, Barth served in the U.S. Army for nine years, and in the Army Reserves for six years, and as a Senior Research Associate with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners for five years.

Ron Green, Ph.D.

Ron Green, Ph.D., was hired as dean in 2007 and served in that position for six years. During his 13-year tenure at The Citadel, he taught graduate and undergraduate level courses in strategic management, health care management, operations management, and decision science. In addition, Green served as interim dean in 2017-18.

Al Katz, Ph.D.

Al Katz, Ph.D., served as a member of the college’s business faculty for 25 years. During his tenure, he developed several classes including professional selling, relationship marketing and professional development. After being named to fill the Alvah H. Chapman, Jr. Chair in 2008, Katz received the Undergraduate Faculty of the Year Award and was appointed the adult advisor of the Honor Committee.

School of Engineering

Michael Woo, Ph.D.

Michael H. Woo, Ph.D., was a member of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at The Citadel since 1985. His specialty areas included stormwater systems design and management, and hydrology and hydraulics. He earned his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Clemson.

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Carl Jensen, Ph.D.

Dr. Carl Jensen The Citadel

Carl Jensen, Ph.D., was the founding head of the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies. He served in the Navy for five years then enjoyed a 22-year a career in the Federal Bureau of Investigation as a field agent, supervisory agent, and forensic examiner/cryptanalyst. Additionally, Jensen was the lead instructor for the FBI National Academy’s terrorism course for several years. He joined The Citadel in 2017. Jensen has authored and co-authored over 70 books, articles, book chapters, and reviews and earned numerous awards for research and as an educator.

James S. Leonard, Ph.D.

James S. Leonard, Ph.D., joined the English Department at The Citadel in 1983. He has served as a full professor since 1993, including a year as chair of the Faculty Council and ten years as department head. His specialties include American Literature and Critical Theory. He is particularly known for his work on Mark Twain — having served as Editor of the Mark Twain Circular (1987-2008), Managing Editor of The Mark Twain Annual (2004-present), and Managing Editor/Editor-at-Large of the Mark Twain Journal (2012-present). He has also served a two-year term as President of the Mark Twain Circle of America and has co-chaired the quadrennial State of Mark Twain Studies Conference.

Julie Lipovsky, Ph.D.

Dr. Julie Lipovsky, The Citadel

Julie Lipovsky, Ph.D., ABPP, retired at the end of the fall in 2019 after 26 years at The Citadel. A professor of Psychology, Lipovsky served as the first assistant provost for diversity at the college. Her legacy includes developing a Clinical-Counseling graduate program and having led the way for formalized LGBTQ support services. Additionally, Lipovsky served as the co-chair of the college’s Diversity Equity and Inclusion Council, and established and directed a National Coalition Building Institute (NCBI) chapter at the college, teaching hundreds of campus constituents leadership skills to work successfully with diverse populations by creating more inclusive environments.

Bo Moore, Ph.D.

Winfred “Bo” Moore, Ph.D., retires after serving as dean for the School of Humanities and Social Sciences since 2008. After serving in the U.S. Army Signal Corps, Moore joined the faculty of The Citadel in 1976, rising through its ranks as a professor and department head, then finally as dean 12 years ago.

“Dean Moore’s leadership has been an immense asset to The Citadel. He was instrumental in launching initiatives that led to the development of a multitude of new programs including American Government & Public Policy, Oral History, Fine Arts, Overseas Studies, Diversity Education, and Intelligence & Security Studies,” Selden said.

P. Michael Politano, Ph.D.

P. Michael Politano, Ph.D., ABPP, joined The Citadel as a professor of Psychology in 1991. He is a certified school psychologist and a licensed clinical psychologist with Board Certification in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. He directed The Citadel Graduate College Program in School Psychology and served as interim department head two times.

Swain School of Science and Mathematics

Charles Groetsch, Ph.D.

Charles Groetsch, Ph.D., joined The Citadel in 2006 as the founding dean of the School of Science and Mathematics, now called the Swain School of Science and Mathematics. During his career, he served as editor or co-editor of nine academic journals concentrated in mathematics. He was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and recipient of the Mathematical Association of America’s George Póyla Award.

Lyle McAfee, Ph.D.

Lyle McAfee, Ph.D., joined The Citadel as a professor of Chemistry in 1988. He taught general chemistry, in organic chemistry and scientific research.

John I. Moore Jr., Ph.D.

Louis Brems – The Citadel SY 18-19, John Moore, Android App Development, Classroom

John Moore, Ph.D., a former department head for the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, joined The Citadel in 1976 and taught for six years, leaving to work in software engineering and web technologies. He returned to the college in 2003, leading the department for a decade. Moore taught a variety of courses in mathematics and computer science including Data Structures and Algorithms, Compiler Design and Object-Oriented Design Patterns.

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Forbes recognizes Mount Pleasant’s Carolyn Hash, CGC alumna, as a top wealth advisor https://today.citadel.edu/forbes-recognizes-mount-pleasants-carolyn-hash-cgc-alumna-as-a-top-wealth-advisor/ Mon, 08 Jun 2020 14:39:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16747 Carolyn Hash proudly holds a degree from the University of South Carolina and an Master of Business Administration from the Citadel.]]>

As seen in the Moultrie News

Mount Pleasant resident Carolyn Hash, senior vice president of Investments for Bridgeside Investment Group, was recently named one of the Top Women Wealth Advisors in the nation by Forbes. She joins a number of other Raymond James-affiliated advisors who also recently received this distinction.

The much anticipated 2020 Forbes/SHOOK Top Women Wealth Advisors list is comprised of the country’s premier performing women advisors. The list, developed by SHOOK Research, is based on both in-person and telephone due diligence meetings that measure critical factors including quality of practice, industry experience, compliance record, assets under management and revenue.

Hash is a long respected Certified Financial Planner (CFP) as well as a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst (CDFA). She proudly holds a degree from the University of South Carolina and an MBA from the Citadel. She has been committed to helping her clients make sound financial decisions for over three decades. In 2011 Hash, along with her now-retired partner Roy Seay, brought their practice to Raymond James. 

“Although I measure my success most through the satisfaction of the great women, men and families that I am privileged to serve, it is very gratifying to earn recognition on this respected list. I certainly never take for granted that I get to do what I love,” Hash explained. “It is even more satisfying now working, side by side, with my daughter, Lauren Liles, who joined our firm in 2018.”

“With more than 30 years in the financial services industry, Carolyn is an experienced advisor who has continued to grow her business by truly putting her clients first,” said Tash Elwyn, president and CEO of Raymond James & Associates. “It is my distinct pleasure to congratulate her on this prestigious and well-deserved recognition. We’re very grateful to have her a part of the Raymond James family.”

View the 2020 Forbes/SHOOK Top Women Wealth Advisors list at forbes.com/top-women-advisors. For more information about Bridgeside Investment Group of Raymond James and Associates, headquartered in Mount Pleasant visit bridgesideinvestmentgroup.com.

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