The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Fri, 16 Nov 2018 15:23:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 The Citadel and the Royal Navy pay tribute to submarine used during World War II https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-and-the-royal-navy-pay-tribute-to-submarine-used-during-world-war-ii/ Wed, 14 Nov 2018 15:27:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4782 "We've had the great delight and privilege of coming to Charleston for four days," said Commander William King, of the Royal Navy. "And as part of that visit, we established links with The Citadel and we've come to commemorate this old submarine that was so critical in the second world war for both of our countries."]]>

As seen on News 2, WCBD-TV (ABC), by Stetson Miller

On Veterans Day, The Citadel and the visiting officers from the Royal Navy payed tribute to a British submarine that was critical for the United States and the United Kingdom during World War II.

Navy ROTC cadets and Navy ROTC active duty professors were joined by British officers who took part in a wreath laying ceremony commemorating the submarine, the HMS Seraph.

The ceremony marked the 76th anniversary of a mission during the war called “Operation Torch” during which it carried General Mark Clark, the 12th president of The Citadel.

“We’ve had the great delight and privilege of coming to Charleston for four days,” said Commander William King, of the Royal Navy. “And as part of that visit, we established links with The Citadel and we’ve come to commemorate this old submarine that was so critical in the second world war for both of our countries.”

 

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The Weight of Gold https://today.citadel.edu/the-weight-of-gold/ Mon, 12 Nov 2018 20:00:01 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4652 During Hurricane Florence, Chad DeKold gave up his leave to help manage a shelter in North Charleston for people whose homes were threatened.]]>


Chad DeKold is still getting used to the feel of his Citadel ring on his hand. Unconsciously, he turns it around and around on his finger as he talks. The weight of the gold ring was unexpected. It is a constant reminder that he is a senior at the Military College of South Carolina and that graduation is almost within his reach. The ring is a reminder, too, of all that he has achieved to get to this point.

Judging by the last three years of DeKold’s resume, there are few opportunities that the Johns Creek, Georgia, native did not take advantage of during his cadet career. DeKold is an Army ROTC contract cadet double-majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies and International Politics and Military Affairs. A member of the Honors Program, he is also minoring in Chinese.  He studied Mandarin at a Taiwanese university as part of the Department of Defense’s Global Officer Program. He has served on the Ethics Bowl Team and was the organizational leader of The Journey, a Presbyterian student ministry. He was a member of the Cordell Airborne Ranger Society, and he is a member of the Summerall Guards, the elite precision drill platoon at The Citadel. He wears Gold Stars awarded for academic excellence, and he currently serves as commander of Second Battalion.

Yet DeKold’s proudest accomplishment is an award he received as the Hotel Company first sergeant when the company’s freshman class voted DeKold the most inspirational leader.

“I was surprised and truly honored that they chose me. That they recognized me for making an impact on that entire class truly meant a lot.”

The award has spurred DeKold to be an even better leader.

In September, just weeks before DeKold received his ring, Hurricane Florence, a Category 4 hurricane when it made landfall, threatened the Carolina Coast, giving cadets an unexpected vacation.  As DeKold was contemplating his time off, Cadet Logan Barber approached him. Barber, who had assisted with hurricane evacuation shelters in 2017, was recruiting cadets to help with some of the Red Cross shelters.

“After thinking about it, I was just humbled by the fact that his first thought was how he could help out the community of Charleston with the oncoming hurricane, and I knew that I couldn’t just sit by while our community was threatened,” said DeKold.Click To Tweet

DeKold and several other cadets gave up their hurricane leave to help manage a shelter at Creekside High School in North Charleston for people whose homes were threatened by the hurricane.

The challenge was more than anyone bargained for. The shelter was overwhelmed with 200 more people than the Red Cross had expected. The cadets quickly went to work, taking over the management of the shelter. They dealt with issues ranging from overcrowding to making sure that there were adequate supplies. They worked grueling shifts, up to 20 hours for five days, serving mothers and their children, people with disabilities and the elderly.

“Many of these people, despite the fact that their communities and their livelihoods were at stake, were optimistic, and oftentimes were willing to help us out.”

But it was the other volunteers—the freshmen cadets—who made the strongest impression on DeKold.

“These knobs were in the middle of their cadre period, one of the most rigorous times at the school, and when they had their first opportunity to leave—to potentially take a whole week off to go home to be with their friends and family—they decided instead to stay here to help out in a crowded shelter working 15 to 20-hour shifts.”

After a particularly long shift, DeKold was tired and ready to be home when he noticed one of the freshmen helping out the evacuees.

“It was 5:00 in the morning. I think I’d been up for about 26 hours…. I looked over and there was a knob, Cadet Greene—he was talking to people, laughing, serving them food. He’d gone through just as much as I had, and it was his optimism, his ability to move past that exhaustion that really put things in perspective for me.” Click To Tweet

In that moment, DeKold had come full circle. The class of cadets who had voted him the most inspirational leader was now inspiring him. And DeKold, like any good leader, recognized their sacrifice and their hard work.

Weeks later, with the weight of gold now a constant reminder of his Citadel experience, DeKold is ready to take on his next leadership challenge.

To view more student and cadet stories, visit mighty.citadel.edu.

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He plays Taps each day to honor veterans. And a gold ring tells the horrors of WWII. https://today.citadel.edu/he-plays-taps-each-day-to-honor-veterans-and-a-gold-ring-tells-the-horrors-of-wwii/ Sun, 11 Nov 2018 11:00:22 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4751 His father clung to one other possession, one that he had hidden away: his gold Citadel class ring.]]>

As seen in the Charlotte Observer, by Bruce Henderson.

When dark falls, the people of a Matthews neighborhood listen for the lonely military call that signals a days’ end: A bugler playing Taps.

“I keep track of what time the sun goes down, step out on my front porch and play,” said former Army Reservist Don Woodside. “If I forget to play, I get phone calls from neighbors — ‘Are you sick?’”

There are stories within the story, this Veterans Day, of Woodside’s bugling. They’re tales of loss and remembrance that begin before World War II, recount the tears shed for a father’s sacrifice and are still playing out today.

Woodside, 77, is a volunteer with Bugles Across America, which offers players to perform Taps at the funerals of military veterans. He also sometimes sits at the Mecklenburg County Vietnam Veterans Memorial, playing into the long, granite arc to magnify his horn’s sound.

 Second Lt. Milton Woodside photographed at Clark Field in the Phillipines. Courtesy of Milton Woodside Jr.
Second Lt. Milton Woodside photographed at Clark Field in the Phillipines.
Courtesy of Milton Woodside Jr.

He does this to honor all those who served, but one in particular: his late uncle, Milton Woodside, a Charlotte native and World War II fighter pilot who survived more than three brutal years as a prisoner of war in Japan.

After his 1940 graduation from The Citadel, the Charleston military college, Woodside had entered flight school with the Army Air Corps and become a pilot of P-40 Warhawks, a single-engined fighter plane. In the summer of 1941, the young second lieutenant was stationed at Clark Field in the Philippines with the 20th Pursuit Squadron.

The Japanese attacked Clark a day after they hit Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941. Most planes at the airfield were destroyed, but determined crews managed to salvage a few P-40s. Woodside was among the pilots who continued taking off from the bomb-cratered runway to fight the Japanese.

“Fill it up, I’m going back up,” Don Woodside recalls his uncle saying in recounting one mission.

That was after the war, when Milton Woodside had returned home and become administrator of what is now Sampson Regional Medical Center in Clinton. The former pilot often returned to Charlotte to visit his parents and stayed at the Eastover home of Don Woodside’s family. That’s where young Don gleaned what little his uncle had to say about the war.

“You had to pull it out of him,” he said.

Milton Woodside, left, and his son Milton “Woody” Woodside Jr., as students at the Citadel. Courtesy of Milton Woodside Jr.
Milton Woodside, left, and his son Milton “Woody” Woodside Jr., as students at the Citadel.
Courtesy of Milton Woodside Jr.

Milton Woodside’s oldest son, M.H. “Woody” Woodside, 71, is himself a 1970 Citadel graduate who spent 22 years with the Georgia Army National Guard. Now president of the Brunswick-Golden Isles Chamber of Commerce, he regrets that he was never able to have long talks about the war with his father before his death in 1973.

Histories of combat in the Philippines flesh out his dad’s wartime experiences.

Woodside was flying without ammunition after managing to take off from Clark Field when two Japanese Zeros attacked him from behind near Manila, according to “Doomed at the Start,” a 1995 account of U.S. pursuit pilots in the Philippines. Once his plane’s instrument panel was shattered, the book said, Woodside put his plane into a steep dive and bailed out.

That happened on Dec. 10, 1941, Woody Woodside said. His father had parachuted into friendly territory.

But as Japanese ground forces closed in over the following months, the U.S. abandoned Clark Field and retreated to the southern Bataan Peninsula before surrendering in April 1942.

The forced 65-mile march up the peninsula of thousands of sick, hungry prisoners, including Woodside, became World War II lore. About 600 Americans and at least 5,000 Filipinos died on what became known as the Bataan Death March, according to Army history.

Milton Woodside’s vivid account of the march, apparently drawn from a post-war debriefing, is quoted in “Deadly Sky,” a 2016 book on American combat airmen in World War II by military historian John McManus. Japanese soldiers severely abused their prisoners, he recounted, denying them water and at one point clubbing him for hiding a small can of beans.

“Any prisoner becoming exhausted and falling out was either shot or bayoneted,” Woodside says in that telling. “An Air Corps 2d Lt. marching next to me became exhausted and could go no further. Unable to carry him, I helped him over behind some bushes to lay down. The follow-up … guard saw us and motioned for me to go on. I left the man my canteen of water and moved on. About 100 yds. on, I looked back to see the guard repeatedly bayoneting the sick man in the chest.”

An Army history says the “deliberate and arbitrary cruelty of some of the guards led to many of the deaths and immeasurably increased the suffering of those who managed to survive.”

A POW in Japan with hidden gold

Woodside was held prisoner for nearly 3 1/2 years at the Umeda prison camp in Osaka, his son said. Because of his rank as an officer — fellow prisoners fashioned crude aviator wings for him — the Japanese put him in charge of the 40 to 50 other prisoners in his hut.

woodside bible
2nd Lt. Milton Woodside listed the names of the men who served with him in the Army Air Corp’s 20th Pursuit Squadron inside the military-issue Bible he kept throughout War World II, including more than three years’ imprisonment by the Japanese. Asterisks beside the names indicate those who died. Milton Woodside Jr.

Prisoners of the Japanese endured hellish conditions. Apart from disease and starvation, an account by the Army’s Center of Military History says, prisoners “had been beaten and kicked, had been forced to bow and to obey endless petty rules invented by their captors.”

“I still have his military-issue Bible with names of all 20th Squadron folks with asterisks by them — most had asterisks, for death — that he carried with him while in prison,” Woody Woodside said.

His father clung to one other possession, one that he had hidden away: his gold Citadel class ring.

When conditions turned dire, the former POW later told his nephew, he traded it to a Japanese guard in exchange for food and water for his fellow prisoners.

In August of 1945, relatives say, Woodside also witnessed the mysterious glow on the horizon of the two U.S. atomic bombs that ended the war.

He’d spent much of his years as a prisoner digging coal in Japan. As U.S. troopers freed the prisoners after Japan’s surrender, Woodside snatched up a grim prize: the battered bugle that guards had used to wake up their prisoners each morning.

A phone call from the Philippines

In 1953, back in North Carolina after a hero’s welcome home and beginning his career in hospital administration, Milton Woodside got a surprise call one day from the Philippines.

The caller was an American who come across a Citadel ring, class of 1940, engraved inside with the initials MHW, in a pawn shop. The man had contacted The Citadel for help in identifying and locating the graduate.

The 1940 Citadel class ring that Milton Woodside traded to a Japanese guard for food and water for his imprisoned men during World War II.
Courtesy of Milton Woodside Jr

“He said, Mr. Woodside, did you have a Citadel class ring that you lost in the war? I jumped up screaming and said, how much do you want for it? He said, just give me your address” and mailed it back, Don Woodside recalled his uncle saying.

That’s how the ring came home.

Woody Woodside had lost his own Citadel ring a few years after graduating in 1970. He started wearing his late father’s ring.

But he’d never known its history until four years ago, when he visited his cousin Don for the Belk Bowl football game between Georgia and Louisville. The two visited Charlotte’s Louise Avenue, where Milton Woodside had grown up. For the first time, Don Woodside relayed his uncle’s tale of the lost and found ring.

“At the end of the story, I said, ‘I wonder what ever happened to that ring?’” Don Woodside said. “He said, look here — he pointed to his right hand and, boy, the tears came.”

Woody Woodside: “Don told me the story that I never knew. It makes it even more meaningful, and I’m very grateful. I guess that the greatest generation is about gone, and amazingly enough not that many talked that much about it. They went about their lives.”

Play Taps with honor and reverence

That’s the story of the gold ring. The other story, of Don Woodside and his bugling, continues each day at sunset.

At 5:25 p.m. Wednesday, dressed in Army dress blues, Woodside stepped onto his front stoop beside the flag that flies there. He lifted the bugle in his right hand and, stock still, played the haunting melody into the setting sun.

The notes came out slow and stately, and that’s for a reason. Woodside had auditioned for Bugles Across America by phone about a year ago, and almost didn’t make the cut. He played Taps too fast, his interviewer said. Try again.

“I play it with ‘honor and reverence,’ were the words I think he said,” Woodside said.

He had previously played the flugelhorn, which resembles a trumpet, during his daily Taps renditions. On Wednesday he blew another instrument for the first time.

It had arrived in a package that day from his cousin Woody: the battered old bugle his uncle had liberated from the Japanese captors in 1945.

Bruce Henderson: 704-358-5051; @bhender

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Four finalists announced for The Citadel provost and dean of the college https://today.citadel.edu/four-finalists-announced-for-the-citadel-provost-and-dean-of-the-college/ Sat, 10 Nov 2018 22:38:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4772 The CitadelThe CitadelThere are four finalists from the field of applicants who have applied to become The Citadel’s next provost and dean of the college. The position is the second highest-ranking administrative role at the college. ]]> The CitadelThe Citadel

Drs. Beatty, Burkhalter, Ryan and Selden to make campus presentations Nov. 12-15

There are four finalists from the field of applicants who have applied to become The Citadel’s next provost and dean of the college. The position is the second highest-ranking administrative role at the college. The provost and dean of the college leads the institutional strategic planning, governs the operations of the five academic schools and The Citadel Graduate College, and plans academic fundraising and development efforts.

“We want a provost who will advance our academic programs, embrace our military culture and demonstrate commitment to our mission of developing principled leaders,” said The Citadel President Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC. “The four leaders selected as finalists are accomplished educators from broad field of qualified applicants who can make outstanding contributions to the quality of our cadet and student experiences.”

The Citadel received 230 applications for the position since beginning the search in June. An interdisciplinary faculty search committee interviewed numerous applicants during several hiring stages, selecting the four finalists listed below.

Robert C. Beatty, Doctor of Business Administration

Dr. Robert Beatty
Dr. Robert Beatty

Beatty is currently the dean of Lutgert College of Business at Florida Gulf Coast University where he leads three academic units: the Lutgert College of Business, the School of Resort and Hospitality Management, and the Professional Golf Association Management Program. In addition, he oversees the operations of four university institutes and centers. Beatty has worked in other positions at Whitworth University, Miami University of Ohio and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. In addition to his university experience, Beatty worked for the Kellogg Company and Amerada Hess Corporation, and served in the U.S. Air Force for 23 years. He earned a doctorate and master’s of business administration from Mississippi State University, a master’s in computer systems management from Creighton University and a bachelor’s in computer science from Texas Christian University.

Carmen L. Burkhalter, Ph.D.

Dr. Carmen Burkhalter
Dr. Carmen Burkhalter

Burkhalter is the University of North Alabama (UNA) dean of arts and sciences. She joined UNA in 2015 to run the school, which is comprised 250 faculty, 19 departments and 10 academic centers, equaling 60 percent of the campus. Prior to becoming dean, she served as a tenured professor of communicative disorders and other leadership positions for 20 years at the University of Alabama.  She was senior associate dean for the College of Arts and Sciences from 2008 to 2013, and senior information officer for the college prior to that. Burkhalter earned a doctorate and Master of Science in Audiology from University of Alabama. She acquired a Bachelor of Arts in Audiology from Columbia College.

 

Karen Ryan, Ph.D.

Dr. Karen Ryan
Dr. Karen Ryan

Ryan served as the Stetson University dean of the college of arts and sciences from 2012 to 2017. There she managed 19 academic departments and six interdisciplinary programs. During that time, she recruited more than 50 fulltime faculty as she addressed diversity goals. Before joining Stetson she was a professor of Russian language and literature at the University of Virginia where she also served as associate dean of the arts, humanities and social sciences, and as interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Ryan earned a doctorate in Slavic languages and literatures at the University of Michigan and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Russian and Soviet Studies from Cornell University.

Sally Selden, Ph.D.

Dr. Sally Selden
Dr. Sally Selden

Selden is provost and vice president for academic affairs for the University of Lynchburg, where she has worked for 18 years. She has overseen the university’s strategic planning process and served as associate dean of academic affairs, faculty chair, MBA director, chair of management, and research director of the Doctorate of Education in Leadership Studies program. Selden earned a doctorate at the University of Georgia and an MPA and Bachelor of Arts at the University of Virginia. She holds the senior professional in human resources certification, and her primary teaching interests are in the areas of management, human resource management and leadership.

Campus presentations
On-campus presentations by each candidate will take place at 1:45 p.m., Nov. 12 to 15 in the Bond Hall 165 auditorium. Cadets, students, faculty and staff are invited to attend and to provide feedback following each presentation.

The schedule for each candidate is:

Monday, Nov. 12th           Dr. Bob Beatty

Tuesday, Nov. 13th           Dr. Carmen Burkhalter

Wednesday, Nov. 14th     Dr. Karen Ryan

Thursday, Nov. 15th          Dr. Sally Selden

The candidate chosen for this position is expected to be announced before the end of 2018. The new provost will replace Mark A. Bebensee, Ph.D., who is serving as the interim provost and has been a member of The Citadel faculty in a variety of leadership positions since 1977.

About The Citadel
The Citadel, with its iconic campus located in Charleston, South Carolina, offers a classic military college education for young men and women focused on leadership excellence and academic distinction. The approximately 2,300 members of the S.C. Corps of Cadets are not required to serve in the military, but about one-third of each class earn commissions to become officers in every branch of U.S. military service. Citadel alumni have served the nation, their states and their communities as principled leaders since 1842. The Citadel Graduate College, founded 50 years ago, offers 25 graduate degree programs with 22 concentration options, 25 graduate certificate programs and 10 evening undergraduate programs in the evening or online. Named Best Public College in the South by U.S. News & World Report for eight consecutive years and No. 1 Best Public College for Veterans in the South. Learn more about Our Mighty Citadel here.

 

 

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Leaving his mark on the Corps: General Glenn M. Walters Led Efforts to Develop and Retain Marines https://today.citadel.edu/leaving-his-mark-on-the-corps-general-glenn-m-walters-led-efforts-to-develop-and-retain-marines/ Thu, 08 Nov 2018 22:04:02 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4724 Gen Walters greets a Marine undergoing predeployment training at Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., May 18, 2017. (photo courtesy of Cpl Hailey D. Clay, USMC)Gen Walters greets a Marine undergoing predeployment training at Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., May 18, 2017. (photo courtesy of Cpl Hailey D. Clay, USMC)The Marine Corps’ second most senior Marine will continue to provide his leadership and the benefits of the lessons he has learned to a new generation of future Marines and other service members.]]> Gen Walters greets a Marine undergoing predeployment training at Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., May 18, 2017. (photo courtesy of Cpl Hailey D. Clay, USMC)Gen Walters greets a Marine undergoing predeployment training at Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., May 18, 2017. (photo courtesy of Cpl Hailey D. Clay, USMC)

As seen in Leatherneck, Volume 101, Issue 11
By Col. Mary H. Reinwald, USMC (Ret)

Marines leave their mark on the Corps in a variety of ways, sometimes in ways they would never have imagined. General Glenn M. Walters, the recently retired 34th Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps (ACMC), understands this better than most. A Cobra pilot who later was instrumental in establishing the MV-22 program, Gen Walters’ career has taken him far beyond the cockpit and has been marked by numerous challenges and successes.

After serving as an infantry platoon commander, the future general completed flight training and was designated a naval aviator in 1981. In addition to flying both the AH-1J and AH-1W, he later served as the first commanding officer of VMX-22. (photo courtesy of Gen Glenn M. Walters, USMC)

“If you look at my career path, I’ve been in places where things were not going right,” the ACMC said during a recent interview. In addition to his assignment in the Deputy Commandant for Aviation’s office as the head of its Requirements Branch during a time of decreasing funding, Gen Walters also served as the Deputy Commandant for Programs and Resources during the sequestration of 2013. “That was a challenge,” he said with a slight laugh.

Gen Walters speaks to the Marines of U.S. Southern Command during a town hall in Florida, June 7.
Gen Walters speaks to the Marines of U.S. Southern Command during a town hall in Florida, June 7.

His impressive career includes two tours in the infantry as a platoon commander in 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines and as the Air Officer and Operations Officer for 1st Reconnaissance Battalion. The future ACMC also commanded HMT-303 and later served as the first commander of VMX-22. He gained valuable experience in the acquisition field while serving in the office of the Undersecretary of Defense, Acquisition, Technology & Logistics, Defense System, Land Warfare and supported Operation Enduring Freedom as the commanding general of 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing in Afghanistan in 2011.

The Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen Walters, visits with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 166 aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, San Diego, Calif., Dec. 7, 2016. (photo courtesy of LCpl Nadia J. Stark, USMC)

The Task Force

It was his efforts as the head of the Marine Corps task force created in the wake of the “Marines United” scandal, however, that may have the most lasting and significant impact on the Marine Corps of today. The scandal broke in early 2017 and revealed a significant social media presence of active-duty and veteran male Marines who denigrated their female counterparts through the unauthorized sharing of photos and the posting of demeaning and degrading comments about the presence of women in the Corps. General Robert B. Neller, Commandant of the Marine Corps, created the task force to address the cultural issues in the Marine Corps which led to not only the misconduct but the acceptance and tolerance for behavior clearly not in keeping with the Marine Corps’ core values of honor, courage and commitment.

The ACMC has headed the task force since its establishment and has worked with Marines of all ranks to update training and regulations in order to send a clear message to all Marines as to what is appropriate and acceptable in the realm of social media. “While those changes address the immediate behavioral issue, we also remain committed to addressing and evolving our culture by changing the way we educate, train, and lead our Marines—we will not tolerate a lack of respect for any member of our team,” said Walters.

Gen Walters was the guest speaker at the 2018 Joint Women’s Leadership Symposium, San Diego, Calif., in June. Cpl Hailey D. Clay, USMC
Gen Walters was the guest speaker at the 2018 Joint Women’s Leadership Symposium, San Diego, Calif., in June. Cpl Hailey D. Clay, USMC

The initial meetings of the task force were especially enlightening for the four-star general. “We unpacked it all in those first couple of meetings.” Meetings that were supposed to last an hour ended up surpassing the four and a half hour mark as the ACMC ensured that everyone, from the most junior Marine present to the sergeants major and generals, had an opportunity to provide input. “We had to get it all on the table. And then once it was all on the table and all of us were exhausted, we had to sort through it. Make sense of it. Organize it. And decide what we’re going to do with it.”

In its first six months of existence, the task force was instrumental in publishing guidance on social media misconduct including a “Leaders’ Handbook and Discussion Guide” and ALMARs and other messages providing guidance to all Marines to ensure they have a clear understanding of the issue, are able to identify what constitutes misconduct, and understand what actions, both punitive and administrative, are available for the Marines who continue to engage in such behavior. Of note, 160 persons of interest (22 civilians and 138 Marines) who have engaged in the egregious conduct on social media have been identified, and numerous courts martial, nonjudicial punishments and administrative separations have been conducted through mid-2018.

“I think it’s important to recognize that our understanding of the issue has evolved over time,” said Gen Walters. “How we handle cases today is much different and more effective as a result of what occurred with “Marines United.” Moving forward, we are planning to establish a permanent structure that can address all of the factors that contribute to the negative subculture that has allowed this behavior to exist.”

Talent Management

Recognizing that the challenge is much broader than social media postings, Gen Walters has also overseen the establishment of the Personnel Studies and Oversight Office (PSO) whose mission is to “oversee, assess, and recommend changes to policy to optimize the ability to attract, properly assign and retain the talent necessary to achieve institutional and strategic objectives in the Marine Corps.” A key element of the PSO is listening to input from Marines throughout the Corps in order to “create an environment that emulates our Corps values” while also ensuring “all Marines and civilians are valued based on their individual excellence and commitment to war-fighting.”

According to Melissa Cohen, the director of the PSO, Gen Walters “has worked tirelessly over the last 18 months to enact positive changes and initiatives within the Marine Corps, always ensuring that Marines, Sailors, and civilians are treated with dignity and respect. He stood up the Personnel Studies and Oversight office in June 2017 to demonstrate the Marine Corps’ long-term commitment to strengthening our culture. Since that date, he has been actively engaged in paving the way for future leaders to follow suit. Gen Walters has continually emphasized the clear connection between mission readiness and recognizing the value of each team member, knowing that we are a more lethal force when we do and that it will be key to the Marine Corps’ success in the future.”

In addition, the ACMC heads the newly established Talent Management Executive Council (TMEC). The TMEC, a senior leader decision forum, “serves as the catalyst for ensuring we attract, develop and retain talented men and women.” According to Gen Walters, the TMEC is a “way to get these issues up to the senior leadership of the Marine Corps once a month. You have all the interested parties, everyone who can have a stake in the success or be an impediment, all at the table looking each other in the eye. Are we going to change this policy? How are we going to change this policy? What do we need? You can plow through a lot of these [issues] quickly.” He continued, noting that the Corps had “professionalized our talent management leadership. It will ensure the success and staying power of the initiatives and gives a venue to always do the right thing for the Marines and our institution.”

Discussions within the TMEC have ranged from officer and enlisted assignments and Defense Language Aptitude Battery testing to addressing such concerns as hiring and retaining Marines for the ever-growing cyber workforce. In addition, the TMEC has identified funds for Marines throughout the Corps to attend conferences focused on their professional development including the recent Joint Women’s Leadership Symposium held in June in San Diego with more than 200 female Marines in attendance. The ACMC served as a guest speaker for the second year in a row and personally engaged with many of the Marines as he listened to their concerns and updated them on the Corps’ efforts to combat disrespect toward female Marines and the integration of women in the combat arms military occupational specialties. “Integration is not only the right thing to do, integration is essential to winning our nation’s battles to maintain our freedom. All in an environment where only 29 percent of our population is qualified to serve,” said Gen Walters. The ACMC recognizes the changes the Corps has faced in recent years. “Diversity is an output of a culture that is inclusive so inclusion is what we should be going for,” he said. “If you are inclusive in your organization or in your society, diversity will be the natural outcome and it’ll be diverse to a level that the talent can produce,” he added. His last few years on active duty have been an education, and Gen Walters has been an eager student. “There’s this idea of unconscious bias. Not just for gender race relations but also I think it has applicability to how we teach leadership … We all have an unconscious bias of some kind. It was baked into you as a human because of where you grew up, how you grew up.” He has reached the conclusion that unconscious bias “doesn’t mean you’re crippled. Doesn’t mean you’re even an immoral person. It’s just a factor of how we all grew up differently.” He believes that good leaders are aware of others’ biases. “Understanding your own unconscious bias … If we can understand it, we will be more ethical decision makers. We will make better decisions because we know ourselves,” said Gen Walters. “When you’re the commander, if you’ve thought about this, then before you put someone’s life on the line or before you expend resources or before you move people around or manage your talent and your organization, if you understand this concept, and you apply it to your decision making, we’ll be a better Corps,” he added.

Gen. Walters is a test pilot whose contribution to the Corps’ aviation community ranged from flying the AH-1W and MV-22 to serving as an aviation staff specialist on the staff of the Undersecretary of Defense, Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics. (photo courtesy of Gen Glenn Walters)

The Citadel

The Marine Corps’ second most senior Marine will continue to provide his leadership and the benefits of the lessons he has learned to a new generation of future Marines and other service members. After his retirement ceremony in early October, Gen Walters and his wife, Gail, headed south to his alma mater, The Citadel, where he assumed the duties as the 20th president of the venerable Southern institution. “You know I’m looking forward to ending where I started … It will keep me young.”

Cadet Glenn M. Walters
Cadet Glenn M. Walters

Having spent his high school years in northern Virginia, The Citadel seemed an unexpected choice for Walters, who knew that he wanted to serve in the military. Selected as an alternate for the U.S. Naval Academy, Walters said, “If you would have asked me back then, I wouldn’t have said I was undisciplined, but I knew I needed some structure.” He continued to explore his options beginning with Virginia Military Institute, a natural choice as he spent the last few years of his childhood in Oakton, Va., followed by a visit to The Citadel where he had a wonderful first impression and his decision was made.

His father, a veteran CIA station chief, had plans for his son. “My dad wanted me to go in the Navy. I wanted to major in history and join the Marine Corps and he wanted me … to go in the Navy and be a submariner.” They compromised—Gen Walters majored in electrical engineering and joined the Marine Corps.

Like so many others, Walters was influenced by the Marines around him. “There were three people there [at the Citadel] who convinced me and they didn’t do it overtly but just by their example. One was a guy named Gunnery Sergeant Lee, who retired as Sergeant Major Lee, 13th Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps.” The two others were LtCol Spivey and Col Moss [who later retired as a brigadier general] who were the senior Marines in the NROTC unit. “Those individuals just impressed me so much. I said that’s who I want to be so even before my junior year I switched over to become a Marine officer student.”

As his days on active duty dwindled, the ACMC reflected on his time in the Corps. When asked what his favorite assignment was, he didn’t hesitate. “My favorite assignments were anytime I could lead Marines,” he said, emphatically noting that he didn’t say commanding Marines. “You can do other jobs where you can lead Marines.”

He went on to describe his best days. “When you accomplish a mission and get to be around Marines. That’s really why people stay around as long as they do because every day is a good day.”

A 1979 graduate of The Citadel, Gen Walters returned to Charleston, S.C., to assume the duties as the college’s 20th president.
A 1979 graduate of The Citadel, Gen Walters returned to Charleston, S.C., to assume the duties as the college’s 20th president.

After meeting thousands of Marines during his tenure as ACMC and seeing the future Marines and other servicemembers as the new president of The Citadel, the general has few worries about the future and was quick to point out that nothing keeps him up at night. “I don’t go to bed at night worrying about how we will do as a Marine Corps. I know we will succeed; we’ve always succeeded and we always will succeed.”

President Donald J. Trump greets Gen Walters and his wife, Gail, during the graduation and commissioning ceremony of the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2018, Annapolis, Md., May 25.

President Donald J. Trump greets Gen Walters and his wife, Gail, during the graduation and commissioning ceremony of the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2018, Annapolis, Md., May 25.
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Area students get chance at scholarships at college fair https://today.citadel.edu/area-students-get-chance-at-scholarships-at-college-fair/ Thu, 08 Nov 2018 20:34:07 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4667 Photo of Citadel admissions officer Teisha Neits, by Ameera StewardPhoto of Citadel admissions officer Teisha Neits, by Ameera StewardThe fair is designed to help Birmingham students who may not have access to colleges and universities.]]> Photo of Citadel admissions officer Teisha Neits, by Ameera StewardPhoto of Citadel admissions officer Teisha Neits, by Ameera Steward

As seen in Birmingham Times. By Ameera Steward

Michael Williams, a student from Bessemer City High School, was in the right place at the right time last week.

Williams was one of dozens of students who attended the eighth annual Birmingham College Scholarship & Career Fair at The Boutwell Auditorium in downtown Birmingham on Thursday, Nov. 1.

The event is hosted by the Alabama College and Career Access Program (ACCAP).

“It’s benefitting me because I can’t afford to go to school like everyone else can so I do need the scholarships that they are offering me,” said Williams.

The fair is designed to help Birmingham students who may not have access to colleges and universities.

“We wanted to do something to help the families that were here in the Birmingham area so we said let’s bring colleges that will give away scholarships to kids who are deserving,” said Frank Woodson, president of ACCAP.

Woodson said 50 universities attended the fair and would share information to 450 institutions that are part of the network.

A lot of scholarship money goes unused because officials are not able to match the student to the college and the college to the student and the fair is a way to connect colleges to the students, he said.

Many urban and rural children don’t have the money to apply to schools. “Well, today they’ll have 50 to 60 schools they can apply to without having to worry about the cost,” he added.

Woodson said the partnership with the ACCAP, Birmingham City Schools and City of Birmingham has resulted in more than $140 million in scholarships over the past eight years and “for many kids it’s a game changer.”

Some recruiters were just as excited as students.

Ivy Anderson, admissions counselor for Murray State University in Kentucky, said, “I’m just super excited that the students are here asking good questions. It’s so important, so I can tell that they’ve been prepared. They’ve come with their transcripts and letter of recommendation, which is awesome.”

Even some parents were in attendance. Rachel Ifill, mother of a Shades Valley High School senior, said, “I love this fair, just listening to them talking about the scholarships that are being offered on site. I think that . . . confirms that you are working hard and this could be the payoff for it.”

Desmond Holland, an admissions counselor at Fisk University in Tennessee, said that students who attend such fairs have an advantage because they learn about universities they didn’t know existed or considered. “To stand before someone that’s representing that institution allows them to gather more information and to be more inspired,” he said.

Debbie Counts, the director of admissions for the College of Charleston in South Carolina, said it’s always good to see a lot of students excited about higher education. “So I’m thankful that Birmingham has opened up their city to this program and allowed their students to come today,” she said.

Janina Nobles, a child development and psychology instructor for Bevill State Community College in Sumiton, Alabama, said she actually used to bring her students to the fair.

“I love that they can get the interaction one-on-one. I love that some of the universities and colleges can actually give them feedback on site, and you just get such a diverse group of students that come through. I mean you have students that are interested in your two year program or technical program, certifications, those that are interested in getting a four year degree. So it’s just kind of like this beautiful mesh of everything,” said Nobles.

This article originally appeared in The Birmingham Times.

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Oldest regimental commander at 102 to meet the youngest at homecoming https://today.citadel.edu/oldest-regimental-commander-at-102-to-meet-the-youngest-at-homecoming/ Tue, 06 Nov 2018 18:34:49 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4691 Photo by Courtney Vinopol. mbassador Marion Smoak, Citadel Class of 1938Photo by Courtney Vinopol. mbassador Marion Smoak, Citadel Class of 1938Just before this year's Homecoming Review Parade, Smoak and Cadet Col. Sarah Zorn will meet to shake hands before the Corps]]> Photo by Courtney Vinopol. mbassador Marion Smoak, Citadel Class of 1938Photo by Courtney Vinopol. mbassador Marion Smoak, Citadel Class of 1938

Photo by Courtney Vinopal

Nov 9-10 includes two homecoming parades, reunions, eagle sculpture dedication and game

The pageantry and celebrations during The Citadel Homecoming 2018 will include a meeting between the oldest living Regimental Commander of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets who is 102, and the youngest, who is 21. Ambassador Marion “Joe” Smoak, will make his way from Washington D.C. to visit campus during what would be his 80th reunion since graduating. Just before the Homecoming Review Parade, Smoak, and Cadet Col. Sarah Zorn will meet to shake hands before the Corps.

Cadet Marion Smoak, 1938

After graduating from The Citadel with an English degree, and then from the University of South Carolina School of Law, Smoak served in the U.S. Army as an officer, retiring as a Lieutenant Colonel in 1961. During those years, he was a Judge Advocate Officer in both the Pacific and European theaters during World War II. That was followed by tours with the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions during which Smoak accumulated 58 jumps earning master parachutist status.

Smoak then entered politics in South Carolina helping organize the state’s Republican Party working his way onto the national stage. From 1969-1974, he was Chief of Protocol for President Richard Nixon, retiring from the Department of State in 1974 with the grade of Ambassador. He later served as part of Ronald Regan’s campaign and transition team.

“We are truly honored that Ambassador Smoak can join us at The Citadel Homecoming 2018 as a representative of the Class of 1938,” said Thomas McAlister, interim executive director for The Citadel Alumni Association. “His zest is inspiring to all of us and we wish him the best at his 80th reunion.”

Smoak, a native of Aiken, South Carolina, has homes in Washington and Palm Beach, Florida and “enjoys a daily martini” according to his family, and the Washingtonian.

The parade is at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 10 and is open to the public.

The Citadel’s new guardian to be dedicated

Original Bond Hall eagle
Original Bond Hall eagle

The original eagle often referred to as the college’s guardian sat atop Bond Hall as a sentinel overlooking campus for more than 86 years until it was removed due to deterioration caused by the elements related to a campus on the marsh.

Bond Hall Administration Building 1930
Bond Hall Administration Building 1930

The eagle was an original part of Bond Hall’s design, included in this 1930 blueprint for the building. That concrete and wire eagle was repaired repeatedly over the years until it was determined in 2012 that it was no longer salvageable.

Bond Hall eagle model and sculptor Scott Penegar
Bond Hall eagle model and sculptor Scott Penegar

The Class of 1983 raised $200,000 to have a new one made and to endow the maintenance of the new eagle. The class commissioned sculptor Scott Penegar to create the new eagle, which he developed as a model. It was then sent to a foundry for scanning and casting in bronze.

Bond Hall eagle being replaced
Bond Hall eagle being replaced

The 4 ft. by 6 ft. bronze eagle was finally hoisted into place Oct. 24.  The steel flagpole situation directly behind the eagle had also deteriorated and needed replacing. The Class of 2006 raised the funds for a new aluminum pole.

The new Bond Hall Eagle and flagpole will be dedicated during a ceremony at 10 a.m. on Saturday.

The Citadel's new Bond Hall sentinel watches over campus
The Citadel’s new Bond Hall sentinel watches over campus

Homecoming parades and Bulldogs vs. Samford

Homecoming weekend kicks off Friday, Nov. 9 with an alumni memorial service, academic open houses and a memorial parade at 5:10 p.m. On Saturday, barracks are open for visitors from 8:30 – 10 a.m. and the nationally renowned Summerall Guards precision drill troupe performs at 8:50 on Summerall Field. Kelly is the National Citadel Volunteer Recruiters Chairman.

The Citadel Alumnus of the Year, Lt. Col. Doug Kelley, U.S. Army (Ret.), a member of the Class of 1982, will be honored during the 11 a.m. parade.

Kickoff time for The Citadel Bulldogs vs. the Samford Bulldogs is at 2 p.m.

The full homecoming schedule is here.

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Citadel ’64 alumnus on Forbes’ list of 10 exceptional entrepreneurs running for Congress https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-64-alumnus-on-forbes-list-of-10-exceptional-entrepreneurs-running-for-congress/ Tue, 06 Nov 2018 17:07:03 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4681 Rabin grew up in Charleston, South Carolina, and went to school at The Citadel and then served in the Army. He began his fashion career at Bloomingdale’s before designing menswear for Givenchy, Emilio Pucci, and Oscar de la Renta.]]>

Capitalists On Capitol Hill: Meet 10 Exceptional Entrepreneurs Running For Congress In 2018

As seen on Forbes.com, by Abram Brown

Forbes analysis found that entrepreneurs make up about 16% of Congress today. Roughly 18% of House members are entrepreneurs. That figure is lower in the Senate, some 9%. 

As for the 900-plus contenders running for election on Tuesday, the analysis found 168 entrepreneurs, approximately 18% of the total. Of those 168, 60% are challengers. Ten of the most standout entrepreneurs are highlighted below.

Number 5 on the list: Citadel Class of 1964 alumnus Eliot Rabin 

Photo courtesy of Forbes.com/Getty Images
Photo courtesy of Forbes.com/Getty Images

5. Eliot Rabin
House, New York, D12
Party: Republican

In 1977, Rabin opened his first clothing store, Peter Elliot, on the Upper East Side. It soon became a Mecca for men who like blue blazers and pastel-colored shirts and later expanded to women’s and boy’s clothes. (His self-described business motto: “Quality remains long after the price is forgotten.”) Rabin grew up in Charleston, South Carolina, and went to school at The Citadel and then served in the Army. He began his fashion career at Bloomingdale’s before designing menswear for Givenchy, Emilio Pucci, and Oscar de la Renta.

See the full Forbes list here.

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Tuition rates for 2019-2020 released early to help cadets, families plan https://today.citadel.edu/tuition-rates-for-2019-2020-released-early-to-help-cadets-families-plan/ Tue, 06 Nov 2018 15:55:02 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4665 The Citadel Board of Visitors released the 2019-2020 academic year tuition rates earlier than usual, and with an increase that is lower than the projected Higher Education Price Index rate.]]>

The Citadel Board of Visitors released the 2019-2020 academic year tuition rates earlier than usual, and with an increase that is lower than the projected Higher Education Price Index rate. The Commonfund Higher Education Price Index (HEPI), an inflation index designed to track cost drivers in higher education, projects a 2.8 percent increase nationally. Tuition for both in and out-of-state cadets at The Citadel will increase 2.5 percent.

“The Board of Visitors determined that while a modest tuition increase is necessary, the on-going efforts to control costs and increase efficiency across campus support a raise of 2.5 percent, rather than the higher national projection for all institutions,” said Col. Fred L. Price, Jr., chair, The Citadel Board of Visitors. “We made the decision to set the tuition rates now to give cadets, students and their families more time to plan as they apply for financial assistance or make decisions about what college or graduate college to attend.”

The Board of Visitors and college leadership continuously assess ways to improve operational efficiency while supporting the college’s mission to educate and develop principled leaders. The Citadel is one of the only two remaining 24/7 military institutions for undergraduates, aside from the federal academies.

“The Board of Visitors is to be commended for keeping tuition as low as possible without compromising the quality of The Citadel experience,” said Gen. Glenn Walters, USMC, president of The Citadel. “The high number of applicants makes it clear that a Citadel education provides a value that resonates strongly with families across America.”

When comparing college tuition rates it is important to note that The Citadel’s fee structure is different because the costs of room and board and multiple sets of military uniforms comprise the overall “all-in” rate. This is because members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets─ the undergraduate population─ must live in the barracks, eat all meals in the mess hall, and wear uniforms while on campus. Laundry, dry-cleaning and books are also included in the all-in rate, with those costs calculated as part of each cadet’s Quartermaster Account. The all-in rate does not include other items such as lab fees that vary according to the academic major or schedule of each cadet or student.

The costs of attendance for the 2019-20 academic year are below. Freshman year charges are higher because of first-year uniform purchases.

All-in Cost for Cadets In-State Out-of-State
Upper-class $25,055 (+617) $48,089 (+1,179)
Freshmen $30,265 (+602) $53,299 (+1,164)

The Board of Visitors also approved an increase of 2.5 percent for Evening Undergraduate Program students managed by The Citadel Graduate College. That represents a raise of about $12 per hour for instate and $23 a credit hour for out of state Evening Undergraduate Program students. Graduate level students in on campus and online programs will not see an increase.

Citadel Graduate College Programs (*per credit hour) In-State Out-of-State
Evening Undergraduates $497 (+12) $925 (+23)
Graduate Students $595 (no increase) $1,020 (no increase)
Online Undergraduates $500 (no increase) $500 (no increase)
Online Graduate Students $695 (no increase) $695 (no increase)

Many of The Citadel’s programs are supported through the generosity of alumni and donors, as funding from the State of South Carolina currently provides only about 7 percent of the college’s operating budget. Still, the cadet and student experiences continue to evolve, and outcomes continue to surpass national averages supported by increased academic offerings and alumni salary rates. The Citadel is the #1 Public College in the South as ranked by U.S. News & World Report for the eighth consecutive year based on such criteria.

 

 

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Plastic scraps from Charleston Harbor make for trashy art https://today.citadel.edu/plastic-scraps-from-charleston-harbor-make-for-trashy-art/ Mon, 05 Nov 2018 18:45:37 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4658 The Citadel Trash ArtThe Citadel Trash ArtA group of cadets from The Citadel have entered a diving pelican sculpture in the Port Royal Sound Foundation Recycled Art Contest, to be judged against other schools and groups for a potential $2,000 in prizes.]]> The Citadel Trash ArtThe Citadel Trash Art

As seen in The Post and Courier by Bo Petersen

Some 7 tons of plastic or rubber litter float in Charleston Harbor at any given time, everything from tire shreds to drink bottles.

This past weekend, pieces from five bags of harbor junk compete for cash prizes near Hilton Head Island.

A group of cadets from The Citadel have entered a diving pelican sculpture in the Port Royal Sound Foundation Recycled Art Contest, to be judged against other schools and groups for a potential $2,000 in prizes.

It’s an unusual extension of research by cadets under physiology professor John Weinstein. He estimated the tonnage of plastic pollution in the harbor and is studying its sources and consumption by marine creatures.

Cadets under Fine Arts professor Rick Sargent partnered with biology students on the art project.

They’ll be bringing their best to the contest. The pelican’s neck is fashioned from the skin of an orange traffic cone. Its head is a clump of plastic bags with bottle caps for eyes. Its wings are crushed beer cans. It appears to be diving to feed in water made from plastic.

Floating on the “water” are a plastic fast food tray, pairs of water shoes, an old whiskey bottle, a warped LP with a gold ball in its center hole and a section of car tire tread.

All of that came from bags of litter the cadets collected — within an hour — from the Ashley River marsh near campus.

Earlier in the week, a group of the 10 or so cadets who have had their hands in the artwork leaned over the table in their camouflage uniforms, putting the last pieces together. They looked like MASH surgeons.

The Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash Art
The Citadel art department’s Tiffany Silverman helps Caroline Klauber, Skler Addy, and Rya Salter reposition a diving pelican the cadets were sculpting, made mostly from trash they collected from the edges of the Ashley River. Wade Spees/Staff

“I was surprised to see how well the materials came together to create the pelican. It’s actually turning out pretty good,” said cadet Skylar Cooper.

Sargent saw the project as a means to teach how art can have function as well as form, along with a conservation lesson. If they win a prize, the money will be used to provide art supplies for elementary and middle school students at an educational summer camp run by The Citadel.

The effort is both trendy and timely.

Recycled plastics have become a popular art form, pushed by anti-plastic pollution groups and adopted by a number of leading artists.

More commercial uses are being found for the material. South Carolina businesses are turning recycled plastic into a variety of products, including carpet, car parts, furniture stuffing and sprinkler heads.

Meanwhile, more municipalities are banning single-use plastic bags because of the amount of litter and dangers of its consumption by wildlife.

The city of Isle of Palms in 2015 became the first in the state to pass an ordinance banning businesses from offering the bags to customers. Folly Beach followed suit about a year later, adding foam containers to its ban. Other municipalities have now approved bans. Charleston City Council will vote Nov. 13 on a ban.

Some restaurants have begun doing away with plastic straws.

All that is taking place against a bill in the Statehouse waiting for the Senate’s session in January, a bill that would make the Legislature the only government body that can restrict the use of bags, or “auxiliary containers” in its language.

The Citadel Trash Art Shoe
This shoe was going to be attached to the base to support a diving pelican that Citadel cadets were sculpting, mostly from trash they collected from the edges of the Ashley River. Wade Spees/Staff

Supporters said any limitations would hurt the business sector and the bans do not get to the nub of the problem, which is litter. Opponents said the measure was an attempt to take away local government control over anti-pollution efforts, and that the plastics industry is seeking preferential treatment in the Statehouse.

The measure passed the House in the spring by a 3 to 2 margin.

Roughly 37,500 tons of plastics were recycled in the state in 2016-17. That’s up from about 24,000 tons five years earlier, according to the state’s environmental agency.

But that’s still a fraction of the tons trashed. About six billion plastic bottles end up in landfills annually across the two Carolinas.

Weinstein couldn’t help a wry smile as he watched the “fruits” of his research sculpted.

“It’s conserving by cleaning it up, but it’s also raising awareness of not only the global problem but our own backyard problem,” he said. “And it’s better than having it sit in the marsh.”

Seanna Adcox contributed to this report.

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