The President’s Report – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Wed, 19 Jun 2019 18:40:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png The President’s Report – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 The Goal of Soccer https://today.citadel.edu/the-goal-of-soccer/ Wed, 19 Jun 2019 18:40:27 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9041 Citadel Women's Soccer TeamCitadel Women's Soccer TeamAfter three years with Traquair on the sidelines, the team's record is 9-10, and the momentum for the youngest women’s soccer team in the Southern Conference is on the upswing.]]> Citadel Women's Soccer TeamCitadel Women's Soccer Team

Citadel Women’s Soccer team builds momentum

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

When head soccer coach Ciaran Traquair (pronounced Keer-in Trah-quer), who hails from Coatbridge, Scotland, near Glasglow, first arrived on campus in 2016, the team had a 1-19 record. After three years with Traquair on the sidelines, the record is 9-10, and the momentum for the youngest women’s soccer team in the Southern Conference is on the upswing.

For Traquair, building good relationships with players was critical to turning the tide.

“The kids didn’t enjoy soccer, and the program was in disarray,” he said of the program he inherited.

Traquair began recruiting.

“I told recruits, ‘You’re going to come here and change the culture.’”

And change the culture Traquair and his players did. With a 3.55, women’s soccer has the highest grade point average of the college’s 16 teams. The Bulldogs ended the 2018 season on a high note, winning a Southern Conference Tournament game for the first time in four years. Along the way, they beat the University of North Florida and East Tennessee State for the first time in program history and VMI for the first time since 2014.

“On paper, we shouldn’t have beaten those teams,” Traquair said. “But we played like we had our lives on the line, and we won.”

Cadet Kessy Bradshaw, a forward who scored seven goals of the season, including two game winners, was the first Citadel player to be named to the Southern Conference All-Freshman Team since 2014.

“We were able to go up against some great teams with some very skilled players,” said Bradshaw. Knowing that we out-worked some of them and played our hardest has given us the confidence we need to move towards the top of the conference and compete against anybody.”

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The Sleep Factor https://today.citadel.edu/the-sleep-factor/ Wed, 19 Jun 2019 18:34:27 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9036 Shaniqua Crews, who is working on her master’s degree in school psychology, began conducting research last fall on sleep and its effect on emotional well-being.]]>

Citadel Graduate College student studies effect of sleep on emotional well-being

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

Students are no strangers to sleep deprivation, but in Shaniqua Crews’s case, lack of sleep sparked an interest that led to her thesis research. Crews, who is working on her master’s degree in school psychology, began conducting research last fall on sleep and its effect on emotional well-being.

“On a campus like The Citadel, where total fitness and resilience are so important, sleep could be an even more important factor,” said the Summerville resident. “The amount of sleep you get affects your performance in so many different ways. Particularly with respect to the military, you need to be at your best and performing your best at all times. It’s an important factor to consider when you’re thinking about the total fitness of cadets or military personnel.”

Working with her advisor, psychology professor Capt. Alexandra Macdonald, Ph.D., along with exercise science professor Maj. Dan Bornstein, Ph.D., Crews gathered information on the sleep habits of cadets. Using Fitbits for a three-week period, she measured how long they were taking to fall asleep and how long they were sleeping. Through surveys, she collected data on psychological variables such as anxiety, stress and depression.

“Psychology research shows that social support—family and friends you believe care about you—helps fight against stress and anxiety,” said Crews.“The Citadel is a population that is strong on brother- and sisterhood, and social support is something that could help when dealing with stress and lack of sleep. We are planning to compare the data to that of other colleges and military personnel.”

The interdisciplinary collaboration that went into the research was an unexpected bonus for Crews.

“I am in the psychology department, and we live in our own world in Capers Hall,” she said. “I got to meet a lot of different people from many different disciplines and hear their perspectives, and it made for a well-rounded, balanced picture.”

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Military History Reconstructed https://today.citadel.edu/military-history-reconstructed/ Mon, 13 May 2019 22:08:10 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8301 Citadel Military Living History ClubCitadel Military Living History ClubMilitary Living History Society brings the battlefield to life As seen in The President’s Report 2018 On November 20, 1943, members of a heavy weapons section of the 105th Infantry waded]]> Citadel Military Living History ClubCitadel Military Living History Club

Military Living History Society brings the battlefield to life

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

On November 20, 1943, members of a heavy weapons section of the 105th Infantry waded ashore in the World War II invasion of Makin Atoll. At the time, Makin was a chain of Japanese-occupied islands in the Pacific nation of Kiribati, and the 105th Infantry Regiment of the 27th Infantry Division was an inexperienced New York Army National Guard unit that had been federalized in the war effort.

Seventy-five years later, in November 2018, a group of cadets from the Military Living History Society, including Cadets Porter Magnuson, Charles Hill and Cody Bailey (pictured left), traveled to Fort Morgan, Alabama, to take part in the anniversary reenactment of the Makin battle. Dressed in period reproduction uniforms, the cadets began their day on a three-mile road march to the marina where they boarded an actual World War II amphibious landing craft, known as a “Higgins boat,” to make their way to Mobile Bay. With them they carried a 35-pound machine gun, a tripod and about 1,500 rounds of blank ammunition.

“We try to expose cadets to military life of the periods they enact,” said retired Baker School of Business professor Col. William Sharbrough, Ph.D., who has served as a faculty advisor to the club since 2002. “It becomes a leadership activity. They play the roles of military leaders of their unit and interact with other military units. We help them to understand the tactics, equipment and military history.”

The club is more than just a reenactment club for the 25 or so cadets who serve as its members—it offers additional training in teamwork, weapon safety and accountability.

“It’s a leadership program, and at the same time, it’s an experiential learning program,” said physics associate professor Maj. Luke Sollit, Ph.D., who also serves as a faculty advisor for the club. “We teach military history in a manner that you just can’t get any other way. You put on the equipment, you go out there and you see how it all works together.”

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On the Top of the Order of Merit https://today.citadel.edu/on-the-top-of-the-order-of-merit/ Mon, 13 May 2019 21:42:05 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8267 Citadel Cadet Matthew Wilder Army ROTCCitadel Cadet Matthew Wilder Army ROTCCitadel cadet named #2 on U.S. Army Cadet Command’s Order of Merit List As seen in The President’s Report 2018 Cadet Matthew Wilder is working on an electrical engineering design project]]> Citadel Cadet Matthew Wilder Army ROTCCitadel Cadet Matthew Wilder Army ROTC

Citadel cadet named #2 on U.S. Army Cadet Command’s Order of Merit List

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

Cadet Matthew Wilder is working on an electrical engineering design project with three other cadets that could reinvent the current cadet accountability system.

With this system, Wilder said, “There would be no need for professors to take roll—cadets would swipe their One Cards to get into class, and enrollment lists would be computer generated.”

Matthew Wilder, ’19

The design project is just one notable accomplishment in Wilder’s impressive cadet career. In December, the Apex, N.C., native was named #2 on the U.S. Army Cadet Command’s Order of Merit List. The OML is a ranking of all senior Army contract students from across the country. Last year Robert Weigand, Citadel Class of 2018, was #7 on the list. With approximately 5,500 Army contract students nationwide, Wilder’s and Weigand’s rankings are impressive.

Wilder, who has a 3.93 grade point average and is a four-year Army ROTC Scholarship recipient, was not surprised by the news of his ranking.

“Last year I got a slot to the Sapper Leader Course, and those cadets are usually ranked highly on the OML,” Wilder said.

Sappers are combat engineers who support the front line in various ways, from clearing minefields and demolition to building bridges. Academics, physical fitness tests, extracurricular activities and ROTC participation are used to determine OML rank.

Wilder is the November Company commander and a member of the Summerall Guards, the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and The Citadel Triathlon Club, of which he served as co-captain in the 2017-2018 academic year.

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The Academic Landscape of Washington https://today.citadel.edu/the-academic-landscape-of-washington/ Mon, 13 May 2019 21:30:29 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8262 The Citadel in DC David Days 1The Citadel in DC David Days 1Citadel in D.C. summer internship program As seen in The President’s Report 2018 Gone are the days of chalk boards and dry lectures. The modern-day academic landscape is energetic, technological and]]> The Citadel in DC David Days 1The Citadel in DC David Days 1

Citadel in D.C. summer internship program

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

Gone are the days of chalk boards and dry lectures. The modern-day academic landscape is energetic, technological and experiential. Hands-on learning experiences as well as exposure to diverse locales and cultures challenge cadets and veteran students to rethink what they know and to actively participate in learning.

The Citadel in DC David Days
David Days, ’19

In a 10-week summer program in Washington, D.C., students intern during the week with various organizations throughout the city. Weekends find them in lectures or educational outings for a course on visual perception, an interdisciplinary class that combines art appreciation with intelligence studies to teach problem-solving skills. The students visit museums and government institutions where they learn to sharpen their intelligence-gathering and communication skills.

“Instead of going to a class, we explored the city,” said Cadet Grayson Cooper, a criminal justice major. “We learned how important listening and observing are to intelligence gathering.”

Fifteen cadets and one veteran student participated in The Citadel in D.C. program in the summer of 2018. They earned nine hours of academic credit, lived in dormitories at Catholic University in the northeastern part of the city, and for a short time, got to experience life as traditional college students.

“The Citadel in D.C. program had a profound impact on me, and I am grateful for the opportunity,” said Regimental Executive Officer Cadet David Days, who interned for South Carolina Republican Senator Tim Scott. “It was a busy time with the border conflict in the news, and Senator Scott himself was helping us answer phones. I liked that we were working for people.”

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A Niche for Educators https://today.citadel.edu/a-niche-for-educators/ Mon, 13 May 2019 20:31:11 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8255 Citadel Education Doctoral ProgramCitadel Education Doctoral ProgramNew Ph.D. partnership enables Lowcountry educators to take their scholarship to the next level As seen in The President’s Report 2018 The Citadel has joined forces with Clemson, Coastal Carolina and]]> Citadel Education Doctoral ProgramCitadel Education Doctoral Program

New Ph.D. partnership enables Lowcountry educators to take their scholarship to the next level

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

The Citadel has joined forces with Clemson, Coastal Carolina and Winthrop Universities to bring a doctoral program to the Lowcountry for education professionals who want to take their scholarship to the next level. The new Doctor of Education in Education Systems Improvement Science degree offered by Clemson University, in partnership with the Consortium for Innovative Educational Practice, is geared toward students who have completed an education specialist degree from one of the four consortium institutions.

“This program is an excellent pathway for our students who have completed or are currently enrolled in our education specialist degree in educational leadership,” said Col. Larry Daniel, dean of the Zucker Family School of Education. “We have seen an increase in the number of students enrolling in our education specialist program who eventually want to continue on to doctoral study, so the program is a winning proposition for all involved.”

As students complete their coursework, they are required to form a faculty committee made up of instructors from the consortium institutions to guide them in their dissertations. The improvement science degree encourages students to focus on problems faced in their school districts or larger educational communities. Daniel expects that in their research, students will address significant problems facing South Carolina schools and offer solutions to help initiate positive outcomes.

“Prior to this degree program, there was no local face-to-face doctoral program opportunity for professionals in education,” said Daniel. “The program has really filled a niche in the Lowcountry.”
Fourteen of the 16 students in the first class have received one or more of their degrees from The Citadel.

Both the principal and assistant principal at Morningside Middle School in North Charleston are enrolled in the program.

“For me as principal, it’s opened a window into improvements in science education and helped me think about how I can help my scholars,” said Stephanie Flock. “But this is not just about changing just what goes on at Morningside, it’s about making changes that can advance education in the state of South Carolina.”

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The Maritime Network https://today.citadel.edu/the-maritime-network/ Mon, 13 May 2019 19:55:48 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8238 Citadel Student Port Club fosters cadet interest in maritime matters As seen in The President’s Report 2018 Last summer business administration major Cadet Robert Hudson managed the customs brokerage and freight]]>

Citadel Student Port Club fosters cadet interest in maritime matters

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

Last summer business administration major Cadet Robert Hudson managed the customs brokerage and freight forwarding for textiles coming from China to Savannah, Los Angeles and Houston. It was one of the seven accounts the Greenville, S.C., native managed in his internship with Rogers and Brown, a Charleston-based logistics company.

Cadets Robert Hudson and Adam Wallace
Cadets Adam Wallace and Robert Hudson at the South Carolina Port Authority in Charleston, South Carolina.

“The experience with Rogers and Brown has been invaluable,” said Hudson. “Not only was it the perfect complement to the classroom, but I’ve also been able to share so much of what I learned with the other cadets in the Student Port Club.”

Hudson landed the plum internship through networking opportunities with The Citadel Student Port Club, a cadet club designed to foster an interest in maritime matters. The focus of the club is on transportation, foreign trade, logistics, operations and supply chain. Hudson served as president of the club during the 2017-2018 academic year.

Cadet Adam Wallace of Lexington, S.C., who succeeded Hudson as president, feels that the club has a lot to offer cadets interested in the maritime industry.

“Charleston is an ideal place for anyone interested in the shipping industry,” said Wallace, who is also a business administration major. “The exposure and the networking access we have make this a great club.”

Currently, the club has 20 cadet members. Hudson is now president of the Supply Chain Club, which teams up with the Student Port Club to attend the Propeller Club of Charleston meetings. The Propeller Club represents all of South Carolina’s maritime shipping interests, and with more than 300 members, the club provides a great networking resource to cadets interested in pursuing a career in the maritime industry.

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Fortifying the Doors of the Internet https://today.citadel.edu/fortifying-the-doors-of-the-internet/ Mon, 13 May 2019 15:29:31 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8227 Citadel cadets stand in front of whiteboard with IOT mapCitadel cadets stand in front of whiteboard with IOT mapCitadel cadets conduct research to ensure the security of the IoT As seen in The President’s Report 2018 A laptop, a smart phone, a router, a Nest thermostat, an Echo Dot,]]> Citadel cadets stand in front of whiteboard with IOT mapCitadel cadets stand in front of whiteboard with IOT map

Citadel cadets conduct research to ensure the security of the IoT

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

A laptop, a smart phone, a router, a Nest thermostat, an Echo Dot, a smart switch, a smart bulb—they’re in homes across the country and throughout the world. And they are the subject of a research project in a Thompson Hall computer lab that three computer science majors have been working on for over a year.

Cadets John Delpizzo, Elizabeth Spoehel, and Richard Honeycutt, all cyber security minors, have been analyzing the security of the IoT for over a year.
Cadets John Delpizzo, Elizabeth Spoehel, and Richard Honeycutt, all cyber security minors, have been analyzing the security of the IoT for over a year.

Cadets John Delpizzo, Richard Honeycutt and Elizabeth Spoehel, all cyber security minors, are analyzing the IoT under the direction of faculty advisor Col. Shankar Banik, Ph.D., a professor of cyber and computer sciences. An IoT, or internet of things, is a network that is created when multiple devices connect and interact with each other.

“When you have a number of devices manufactured by different vendors, each connection—Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, ZigBee—opens a door that makes the consumer vulnerable to attack by cyber hackers,” said Banik.

Delpizzo, Honeycutt and Spoehel began the project by identifying all possible connections created by the devices—a physical layer graph (PLG). Next they created an RLG (requirement layer graph) that identified all of the requirements of the IoT user.

“The goal,” said Banik, “is to develop algorithms that will map the RLG to the PLG to ensure that the IoT is secure. The consumer may have to turn off connections that are not needed—to shut those doors—so that there are fewer access points to secure.”

Collectively, the cadet team has an impressive resume. They have scholarships and internships. They are members of the Cyber Team that participates in various cyber contests throughout the year. Delpizzo has an Air Force contract, and he serves as president of the cadet Cyber Security Club. Honeycutt has an Army contract. Spoehel is pursuing a second major in mathematics. And together the three cadets may just create a solution to the vulnerability created by the internet of things.

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From the Depths of the Marsh https://today.citadel.edu/from-the-depths-of-the-marsh/ Mon, 13 May 2019 15:14:58 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8220 The Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash ArtThe Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash ArtCitadel cadets bring awareness to plastic pollution by turning trash into art As seen in The President’s Report 2018 When Cadet Caroline Klauber, a business administration major, enrolled in a fine]]> The Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash ArtThe Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash Art

Citadel cadets bring awareness to plastic pollution by turning trash into art

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

When Cadet Caroline Klauber, a business administration major, enrolled in a fine arts class as a freshman to fill a space in her schedule, she discovered her inner artist. Klauber also learned she likes working with paints, pastels, charcoal and even trash to create her art.

Yes, trash.

Matthew Miller, '19, participates in an effort to remove trash from the marsh.
Matthew Miller, ’19, participates in an effort to remove trash from the marsh.

Last fall, Klauber, now a fine arts minor, joined a group of cadets from her drawing and digital illustration classes under the direction of Professor Rick Sargent to create a sculpture out of marsh trash for a recycled art contest.

“Working with trash was a first for me,” said Klauber, who plans to go to art school following graduation.

Some 20 cadets, faculty members and children spent an afternoon in the marsh picking up litter to prepare for the project, filling trash bags with bottles, cans, straws, Styrofoam and even a traffic cone that would be used to create an art piece.

“The marsh is our backyard,” said Cadet Elliott Scurry, a biology major enrolled in Sargent’s drawing class who plans to study environmental law after graduation. “There’s more than seven tons of trash out in the harbor, and projects like this bring awareness to the problem of pollution.”

With 12 trash bags brimming with trash, Sargent and the cadets put their artistic skills to the test over the next few weeks, crafting a freestanding pelican from the marsh debris.

“It was an opportunity to grow as an artist,” said Klauber. “It was a team project. We chose to make a pelican because it is native to the coast.”

The inaugural Port Royal Sound Foundation Recycled Art Contest was hosted in November to raise awareness of the plastic bag ban in Beaufort County and the importance of a clean and healthy marine environment. The cadet sculpture, named “Feeding on Plastic,” received honorable mention.

The Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash Art
The Citadel art department’s Tiffany Silverman helps Caroline Klauber, Skler Addy, and Rya Salter reposition a diving pelican the cadets were sculpting, made mostly from trash they collected from the edges of the Ashley River. Post and Courier/Wade Spees/Staff

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Restoring Compassion to Healthcare https://today.citadel.edu/restoring-compassion-to-healthcare/ Mon, 13 May 2019 15:04:11 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8193 Capt. Sarah Imam, M.D., leads a four-week study abroad program in Lithuania that was recognized as a program of distinction at the Atlantis Global Health Summit in Washington, D.CCapt. Sarah Imam, M.D., leads a four-week study abroad program in Lithuania that was recognized as a program of distinction at the Atlantis Global Health Summit in Washington, D.CThe Citadel Healthcare Study Abroad Program, led by Capt. Sarah Imam, M.D., makes health care more personal by requiring students to do more than just observe.]]> Capt. Sarah Imam, M.D., leads a four-week study abroad program in Lithuania that was recognized as a program of distinction at the Atlantis Global Health Summit in Washington, D.CCapt. Sarah Imam, M.D., leads a four-week study abroad program in Lithuania that was recognized as a program of distinction at the Atlantis Global Health Summit in Washington, D.C

Citadel health care study abroad program requires more than meets the eye

As seen in The President’s Report 2018

In today’s age of advanced medicine where doctors and health care professionals have impressive credentials, equipment is sophisticated and high tech, and facilities are cutting edge, personal narratives have become engulfed in the rapid-fire shuffle from one patient to the next, and an important part of the health care equation is being lost.

Capt. Sarah Imam, M.D., leads a four-week study abroad program in Lithuania that was recognized as a program of distinction at the Atlantis Global Health Summit in Washington, D.C
Capt. Sarah Imam, M.D., leads a four-week study abroad program in Lithuania that was recognized as a program of distinction at the Atlantis Global Health Summit in Washington, D.C

But Capt. Sarah Imam, M.D., who teaches health and human performance, is trying to make health care more personal. In a new four-week study abroad program in Lithuania that began last May, Imam requires students to do more than just observe. She requires them to reflect on what they’ve seen and write case studies.

“A student shadowing a neurosurgeon may see a case of a hemorrhage, for example. And that student may see a surgical repair. We want them to learn more than that,” said Imam, who serves on the Southern Association of Advisors for the Health Professions’ committee for diversity and inclusion. “We want to know what brought the patient to the point of treatment that the student witnesses and what the treatment plan is beyond that point. Students need to understand the whole picture and realize that they’re dealing with a living, breathing person, not just a case. And that requires compassion.”

According to Imam, study abroad allows students a greater access to patients than they might get at home because U.S. patient privacy laws restrict access. With admission to healthcare graduate programs becoming increasingly competitive, private companies that offer medical shadowing experience abroad have become commonplace.

“What makes The Citadel program different is that we give them academic credit hours and we give them much more than just a superficial shadowing experience,” said Imam. “We teach them to ask questions and to study what they are seeing. They get to know the patient and put a history with the medical case.”

The Citadel Healthcare Study Abroad Program was recognized as a program of distinction at the Atlantis Global Health Summit in Washington, D.C.

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