Veterans – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 17 Dec 2020 15:22:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Veterans – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Citadel Intelligence and Security Studies veteran student awarded Rangel Graduate Fellowship for foreign service https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-intelligence-and-security-studies-veteran-student-awarded-rangel-graduate-fellowship-for-foreign-service/ Thu, 17 Dec 2020 15:20:22 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20594 Ashley Towers served America for eight years in the Army National Guard’s military police force. Now she will serve the nation again, this time in foreign service through the U.S.]]>

Ashley Towers served America for eight years in the Army National Guard’s military police force. Now she will serve the nation again, this time in foreign service through the U.S. Department of State.

Towers is among a group of 45 individuals recently awarded a Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Graduate Fellowship through a highly competitive, nationwide process. The program prepares “outstanding young people for careers in the Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State in which they can help formulate, represent and implement U.S. foreign policy,” according to the Rangel website.

“As a veteran student and campus leader, Ashley Towers exemplifies the very best in Citadel academics and leadership and is truly deserving of a prestigious Rangel Graduate Fellowship,” said Larry Valero, Ph.D. head of the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies for The Citadel.

Ashley Towers, seen far right, photographed with some of the members of The Citadel Veteran Student Veteran Association in front of the Howitzer cannons on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 5, 2020.

Towers currently serves as president for the The Citadel Graduate College’s Student Veteran Association.

Towers and her class of Fellows will be supported through through two years of graduate study at universities of distinction, internships, mentoring, and professional development activities. The program awards the fellowships annually.

“When I first began looking at the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Graduate Fellowship, I was immediately drawn to the opportunity of such amazing funding for graduate school, and the excitement of a career with the U.S. Foreign Service that involves travel all over the world and learning new languages,” Towers said. “But when I dug deeper into what being a Foreign Service Officer entails, I realized that it would mean much more to me – it would mean serving a greater purpose in another, very different capacity than my time spent in the military, and finding camaraderie in sharing a very important mission. To represent and promote U.S. interests and policy abroad is a great responsibility, and I am honored and grateful for the opportunity.”

The Fellowship is administered by Howard University and provides each recipient with $42,000 annually for a two year period for tuition, room, board, books and mandatory fees for completion of two-year master’s degrees.

Additionally, Towers will have a personally assigned foreign service officer mentor. She will also participate in two summer internships including working on international issues for members of Congress in Washington, D.C. and working in a U.S. Embassy or Consulate assisted with up to $20,000 for internship related expenses.

Fellows who successfully complete the Rangel Program and Foreign Service entry requirements and all security screenings will receive appointments in the State Department Foreign Service. Each Rangel Fellow who obtains a master’s degree is committed to a minimum of five years of service. 

About The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Security Studies

Intelligence and Securities Studies is one of the most popular and fastest growing academic areas of interest at The Citadel. The Citadel has trained provided highly skilled intelligence and security military officers and civilian leaders for more than 100 years.

The Citadel offers Bachelor of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies, a non-cadet degree completion program, and a minor. Additionally, The Citadel Graduate College offers a Master of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies or a Graduate Certificate in Intelligence Analysis.

In the fall of 2020 there were approximately 375 undergraduate majors, 20 minors, and 85 graduate students.

For more information on the programs, please email intell@citadel.edu.

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Atlanta attorney and humanitarian pledges $20 million to The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/atlanta-attorney-and-humanitarian-pledges-20-million-to-the-citadel/ Wed, 16 Dec 2020 19:49:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20995 William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959Class of 1959 alumnus, William Baer Endictor, announces legacy gift to support college’s academic endowment He may be retired, but Atlanta attorney William Baer Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959,]]> William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959

Class of 1959 alumnus, William Baer Endictor, announces legacy gift to support college’s academic endowment

He may be retired, but Atlanta attorney William Baer Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959, continues to make a name for himself through his extensive volunteer and charitable work.

The former assistant solicitor for the state of Georgia and Fortune 500 CEO has found a new passion in fighting food insecurity to help the less fortunate members of his community. He has taken on the cause like a new career, working tirelessly as a volunteer to support Feed the Hungry and the Atlanta Community Food Bank, along with several local hospitals.

Endictor firmly believes that charity begins at home. In addition to his extensive support of his local community, his attention has never wavered from his roots and experiences as a cadet at The Citadel, which he credits for much of his success. To make similar opportunities available for generations of cadets to come, Endictor has decided to bequeath his entire estate to his alma mater.

Recently, Endictor announced a legacy gift totaling approximately $20 million at today’s value to support the greatest needs of the college through The Citadel Foundation (TCF). This gift—among the largest TCF has ever received—is an expansion of a previous bequest of $2.5 million initially documented in 2009. 

How Endictor’s generosity will contribute to his alma mater

Endictor’s thoughtful and strategic placement of funds will provide for the greatest needs of the college and significantly augment the Academic Enhancement fund. This fund plays a critical role in securing the college’s academic excellence through TCF’s annual academic enhancement grant to The Citadel. Each year, this distribution of several million dollars from TCF to the college supports educational enrichment opportunities, scholarship support for faculty and students, program enhancements, and technology upgrades and improvements.

“In supporting the college’s strategic plan, Our Mighty Citadel 2026, this gift helps ensure The Citadel remains strong in the future,” said The Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters, USMC, Ret., ’79.  “Academic enhancement is the lifeblood of this institution, supporting our mission to educate principled leaders. By generously supporting this fund, Bill’s estate gift secures his legacy of leadership and reinforces his lifetime of service to his alma mater.”

Endictor, who lives in the Atlanta suburb of Brookhaven, Georgia, is a retired lawyer who specialized in trial work. He is a former Georgia Assistant Solicitor as well as a corporate attorney for the former E.T. Barwick Industries. Endictor advanced to the position of chief executive officer and member of the then Fortune 500 company’s board of directors. 

Why he loves The Citadel

Endictor is deeply passionate about his alma mater, made evident through his service as a member of both the President’s Advisory Committee and The Citadel Foundation Board of Directors, and as the former TCF Class Chairman for the Class of 1959.  He is a member of The Citadel Legacy Society and the Society of 1842 lifetime giving societies, as well as a Past President of The Citadel Alumni Association. In 2011, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from The Citadel.

Cadet William Baer Endictor, photographed for The Citadel’s Sphinx yearbook in 1958 while a junior

In 2009, to celebrate his 50th class reunion, Endictor documented a significant legacy gift in an effort to recognize and repay the role The Citadel played in the success he achieved in life. He named The Citadel as the sole beneficiary of his entire estate, becoming one of only a handful of donors who have done so.  In the decade since, he has seen the value of his estate grow, allowing him to substantially increase the amount of his legacy gift to The Citadel.

Modestly downplaying his own career successes, Endictor attributes the bulk of his wealth to two factors: the influence of his mother and father, and his experience as a cadet at The Citadel.

“The Citadel Foundation is the life-blood of The Citadel. Without the Foundation, Lesesne Gate would have closed decades ago,” said Endictor regarding the inspiration for his generous gift. “The leadership of The Citadel is outstanding. I have always said that the smartest thing anyone can do is to hire the right people and then get out of their way.”

TCF President and Chief Executive Officer John P. Dowd III, Ph.D., notes the significant impact this gift will have on the future of the college when the bequest is realized.  “Through his extensive professional accomplishments and volunteer service to The Citadel, Bill Endictor has demonstrated his profound commitment to the disciplined education and leader development The Citadel provides.  On behalf of The Citadel Foundation Board of Directors and staff, I am pleased to express our gratitude for Bill’s leadership and service to the college,” said Dowd.

As Endictor’s estate has grown, so has his relationship with his alma mater and The Citadel Foundation.  Over the years, TCF Director of Legacy Giving Bill Yaeger, ’83, has developed a long-standing relationship with Endictor.  “We have many alumni who are passionate about our alma mater. Mr. Endictor, as demonstrated by his activities with the college and now this gift, has put credence into that passion,” said Yaeger. “He is a friend of mine and a friend of our alma mater, and he has been great to work with.”

William B. Endictor photographed with The Citadel’s 19th president, Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Ret.), ’73

William Baer Endictor graduated from The Citadel in 1959 as a pre-med major with a Bachelor of Science degree. After starting at the Medical College of Virginia, he realized that his true interest was in law and changed his career focus. He earned his Juris Doctor from the University of South Carolina School of Law and was admitted to the bar in 1963.

A specialist in international and trial law, Mr. Endictor pursued a career distinguished by standing up for principles that are at the heart of our legal system. He successfully tried hundreds of cases in different parts of the world and also served as Assistant Solicitor for the state of Georgia. In that position, he became well known for his work combating pornography and organized crime, successfully litigating cases all the way to the nation’s highest court, the United States Supreme Court.

In the 1970s Mr. Endictor joined E.T. Barwick Industries, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of floor coverings, as general counsel. He later became president and CEO of that Fortune 500 company.

During the past four decades, Mr. Endictor has been loyal and supportive of The Citadel with his time and talents. He is past president of The Citadel Alumni Association, a founder of The Citadel Development Foundation and a former director of The Citadel Foundation. He serves as chairman for the Class of 1959 and leads The Citadel Volunteers group in Georgia. As a member of the Society of 1842, he has joined The Citadel Foundation’s most elite philanthropic circle.

Mr. Endictor has also generously supported several Atlanta charities including the Atlanta Food Bank, a Feed the Hungry organization and three hospitals.

In recognition of his leadership to his profession and his deep commitment to his alma mater, The Citadel Board of Visitors is proud to present William Baer Endictor with the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws.

From the 2011 Honorary Doctor of Laws citation from The Citadel for William Baer Endictor
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A message from The Citadel President https://today.citadel.edu/a-message-from-the-citadel-president-3/ Fri, 20 Nov 2020 21:44:48 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20340 Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our history. ]]> Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Citadel Family:

Greetings.  I hope this reaches everyone in good health.

I write today as the Corps prepares to depart on Winter Furlough after one of the most unusual periods in Citadel history. On 13 March 2020, we began Spring Break in an atmosphere of uncertainty as the threat from COVID-19 developed into a worldwide crisis.  After finishing the semester remotely, and cancelling most in-person and on-campus activities, our Citadel family faced the challenge of how best to restart, and return to as normal a routine as conditions allowed.

Our mission remains the production of principled leaders in an academically challenging environment, centered on The Citadel’s core values of Honor, Duty and Respect. This informed our pandemic objectives of consistent delivery of high-quality instruction coupled with continuing our in-person military environment and maintaining the Long Gray Line.

Core values also guided us as we contemplated reconstitution of our campus community during a time of national turbulence regarding race, and a contentious election season. Our college is unique, as these values are part of daily conversations, and take on greater importance in uncertain times.

Our faculty and staff’s efforts, innovation, and attention to detail in these past months cannot be overstated. We learned much during our partnership with the Marines, but make no mistake– the entire team performed magnificently in preparing for the return of our cadets and students.

But great planning means little without execution.  We needed the entire Citadel family to work together.

I could not be more pleased with the performance of the Corps. We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our 177-year history.  Our students, faculty, staff, and alumni showed what a united campus community can do—it’s inspiring watching everyone doing their part. The success we’ve achieved is only possible with everyone adapting and overcoming.  Congratulations and Thank You!

Challenges remain, and new ones will surely appear. We have the conditions, tools, and values in place to overcome those obstacles as they emerge. What I’ve seen since March gives me great hope and confidence we will continue our success.

These are among the many blessings we share as a community as we celebrate Thanksgiving and enter the holiday season. Gail and I send best wishes to you, your families and friends – safe travels and good health.

We look forward to seeing everyone back in January to hit the deck running for the start of the spring 2021 semester.

Good Luck and God Bless each of you.

Glenn M. Walters ‘79

General, USMC (Retired)

President

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Renowned Citadel health scientist leading new military sector for National Physical Activity Plan https://today.citadel.edu/renowned-citadel-health-scientist-leading-new-military-sector-for-national-physical-activity-plan/ Fri, 20 Nov 2020 21:06:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20022 Dr. Dan Bornstein photographed in Citadel weight room in 2018Dr. Dan Bornstein photographed in Citadel weight room in 2018CPR3 director, Dan Bornstein, Ph.D., continues work to improve fitness for national security The Citadel offers one of the only graduate degrees in America designed to meet the growing demand]]> Dr. Dan Bornstein photographed in Citadel weight room in 2018Dr. Dan Bornstein photographed in Citadel weight room in 2018

CPR3 director, Dan Bornstein, Ph.D., continues work to improve fitness for national security

The Citadel offers one of the only graduate degrees in America designed to meet the growing demand for exercise science, specifically ones trained to work with military personnel and first responders – those considered tactical athletes by occupation. It’s one of the academic programs offered through the college’s Center for Performance, Readiness, Resiliency and Recovery (CPR3).

But the Master of Science in Health, Exercise and Sport Science: Concentration in Tactical Performance and Resiliency is only one component of CPR3. There are two other tactical academic programs, also in-person training events for first responders and veterans, plus numerous supporting research efforts underway.

CPR3 training session on campus

The exercise scientist behind CPR3, and national news-making researcher into America’s declining physical fitness, Dan Bornstein, Ph.D., now has another role to contribute to his goal to build a more fit America for the sake of military readiness.

CPR3 training session with law enforcement officers in Citadel’s Dawg Pound Weight Room

In November, the Steering Committee for the National Physical Activity Plan approved adding a tenth sector, Military Settings, to the plan. Bornstein, who has served in numerous roles supporting the plan, was named to head the new sector.

“The National Physical Activity Plan supports promotion of physical activity in all segments of the U.S. population.  The addition of content that is specific to promotion of physical activity in military settings extends the reach of the National Plan to critical elements of the population including active duty personnel, veterans, families of military personnel and civilian employees of the military branches,” said Russell Pate, Ph.D., one of the founders of the plan, and an exercise scientist with University of South Carolina.  “Dan Bornstein is the ideal person to lead this effort because he combines a long association with the National Physical Activity Plan with his ongoing professional leadership in promoting physical activity and fitness in military groups.” 

The National Physical Activity Plan is a comprehensive set of policies, programs, and initiatives designed to increase physical activity in all segments of the U.S. population. The plan aims to foster a national culture that supports physically active lifestyles. Its ultimate purpose is to improve health, prevent disease and disability, and enhance quality of life. Bornstein is assembling a team to begin the work of developing the Military Settings portion of the plan beginning in early 2021.

Additionally, Bornstein has served in roles for the Physical Activity Alliance since its inception and he is past chair of the American Public Health Association’s Physical Activity Section. Locally he volunteers as part of the Mayor’s Wellness Council among other projects. In 2018, Bornstein led a group to Capitol Hill, providing a briefing for The National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity to call attention to how Congress, the Administration, industry, nonprofits and others within both the public and private sectors can work together to create a national way of life that supports and inspires physical activity—a linchpin for a physically, economically, and militarily stronger America.

Bornstein (third from left) with fellow panelists on Capitol Hill after Congressional briefing in 2018

Bornstein’s work has garnered national interest, with the impacts of first-of- its-kind research with U.S. Army data on impacts to national security because of a decline in the physical readiness of recruits. Other research by Bornstein and the CPR3 team includes:

  • Study with U.S. Army investigating economic impact to training-related injuries during basic combat training.
  • Upcoming study with Army ROTC investigating impact of professional Tactical Performance and Readiness training on Army Combat Fitness Test Performance.
  • Upcoming study on perceived benefits of professional tactical performance and readiness training among law enforcement SWAT team members.

From a community engagement perspective CPR3 is:

  • Providing professional psychological resiliency and recovery training to Citadel cadets
  • Engaging with Joint Base Charleston to provide professional tactical performance and readiness training on base.
  • Engaging with South Carolina National Guard to provide professional tactical performance and readiness training to Guard members

Read more about Bornstein and watch videos about related programs at The Citadel here.

CPR3 outdoor tactical training unit
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Veteran; former Naval artist’s work for The Citadel part of his legacy https://today.citadel.edu/veteran-former-naval-artists-work-for-the-citadel-part-of-his-legacy/ Wed, 11 Nov 2020 16:13:07 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20111 Artwork by Ronald Scarbough for The Citadel in 1977Artwork by Ronald Scarbough for The Citadel in 1977According to a tag on the back, it was given to donors who contributed up to a certain amount to the “Promoting the Advancement of Citadel Education."]]> Artwork by Ronald Scarbough for The Citadel in 1977Artwork by Ronald Scarbough for The Citadel in 1977

Respected veteran and former Navy artist, Ronald Scarbough, is being remembered for his artistry following his recent death.

After The Detroit News mentioned The Citadel in a story about Scarbough, the college’s archivist was able to locate a piece that appears to be his.

According to a note affixed to the back of the artwork depicting a Citadel cadet walking a bulldog mascot on campus, the piece was likely commissioned in 1977 by The Citadel Foundation.

Artwork by the late veteran and artist, Robert Scarbough, USN, commissioned by The Citadel Foundation in 1997. Courtesy of The Citadel Archives and Museum.
Artwork by the late veteran and artist, Ronald Scarbough, USN, thought to have been commissioned by The Citadel Foundation in 1977.
Courtesy of the Daniel Library, Archives and Museum at The Citadel.

“I found this print in The Citadel Museum art collection,” said Tessa Updike, archivist for the Daniel Library, Archives and Museum at The Citadel. “According to a tag on the back, it was given to donors who contributed up to a certain amount to the “Promoting the Advancement of Citadel Education” program sponsored by the Foundation, circa 1977.”

“The artist signature appears to be the same as those by Mr. Scarborough on artwork posted online,” Updike said.

An excerpt from The Detroit News

Ronald Scarbough, Detroit artist known for richly detailed drawings, dies at 74

By Charles E. Ramirez and Mark Hicks The Detroit News

Ronald Scarbough spent decades devoted to art, honing his skills to create masterpieces so richly detailed some observers were surprised he often relied on pencils.

Through his efforts, the artist strived to present to viewers vivid images reflecting life.

“It was about everyday stories,” said Carol Jenifer, a longtime friend. “Most of them had a message that told you: ‘Look at me more than once.’ “

Mr. Scarbough died Friday, Oct. 23, 2020, following a battle with cancer. He was 74.

Ron Scarbough

Detroit Institute of Arts officials announced his death and offered condolences to the Detroit Fine Arts Breakfast Club, an art enthusiast group that supports the fine arts in Metro Detroit, of which Mr. Scarbough was a member.

“A successful artist who had one-man shows at the Flint Institute of Arts and the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, he also created commissioned works for the Detroit Athletic Club and the Citadel Military Academy of Charleston, South Carolina,” they said in a Facebook post. “He was also at one point a member of the DIA family, teaching studio drawing classes and giving artist demonstrations.”

Read the full article here.

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Quest for next Commandant of Cadets now underway https://today.citadel.edu/quest-for-next-commandant-of-cadets-now-underway/ Thu, 05 Nov 2020 21:24:16 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20046 Captain Geno Paluso addressing cadets in 2018 after Homecoming military dress parade on Summerall Field at The CitadelCaptain Geno Paluso addressing cadets in 2018 after Homecoming military dress parade on Summerall Field at The CitadelThe Citadel President initiated the search to identify the next Commandant of Cadets, a role that is crucial to the success of the Military College of South Carolina.]]> Captain Geno Paluso addressing cadets in 2018 after Homecoming military dress parade on Summerall Field at The CitadelCaptain Geno Paluso addressing cadets in 2018 after Homecoming military dress parade on Summerall Field at The Citadel

Captain Eugene F. Paluso, USN (Ret.), ’89, to retire as commandant after 2020-21 academic year

Photo above: Captain Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.), addressing cadets in 2018 after Homecoming military dress parade on Summerall Field at The Citadel

The Citadel is searching for the college’s next Commandant of Cadets.

The Citadel Commandant of Cadets is a vice presidential position that is responsible for the command, leadership development and oversight of the 2,300-member South Carolina Corps of Cadets. The Citadel President, General Glenn Walters, USMC (Ret.), initiated the search Nov. 2 to identify the next leader for the role that is crucial to the success of the Military College of South Carolina.

The search follows an announcement by General Walters about the upcoming retirement of current commandant, Captain Geno Paluso, at the end of the current academic year.

Since arriving in July 2014, Captain Paluso demonstrated the same professionalism, grit, energy and determination as Commandant that made him a highly successful and decorated U.S. Navy SEAL officer. He was a superlative, dynamic leader in the Fleet, and brings the same each day to his alma mater as Commandant.

Like the military, The Citadel is a learning organization, and after carefully assessing the Corps’ leadership training model, Captain Paluso began adding much-needed structure and renewed focus. He also established experiential training events including leadership reaction courses for cadre and individual classes, and cadet officer and non-commissioned officer academies. These refinements advanced The Citadel’s overall leadership development model, enhancing the ability of the Corps to lead and command the Corps. Captain Paluso’s innovations give our cadets additional tools to be strong, professional and effective leaders.

Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Retired), ’79, The Citadel President
Captain Geno Paluso, USN, (Ret.), ’89, photographed during his second semester as Commandant of Cadets in March 2015 on The Citadel campus

Paluso graduated from The Citadel in 1989 with a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics. He retired from military service in 2014 as commander of the Naval Special Warfare Group Three at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. During his 25-year military career, Paluso held leadership roles commanding special operations forces in Africa, Iraq and Afghanistan. He has led men and women in combat at all levels. His service awards include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal (2), Joint Commendation Medal (2), Navy Commendation Medal (5), Joint Achievement Medal and the Navy Achievement Medal.

Some of the position requirements for his successor as outlined in the job posting include the following:

The commandant must be able to effectively supervise a diverse staff of senior and mid-level reserve and retired officers and civilian employees. A demonstrated commitment to principled, ethical leadership and professional education is required. The commandant must have recent professional experience in the development of young leaders. The successful candidate should possess and maintain a level of physical condition that will allow participation with cadets during physical training and present the military appearance of the candidate’s respective service.

  • Extensive military background with a minimum of 20 years of service in one of the branches of the U.S. Armed Forces and attained the rank of Colonel (O-6)
  • Background in the command of military units (O-6 level) is required in order to provide the senior leadership for the Corps of Cadets.
  • Must have earned a bachelor’s degree
  • The Commandant must also have ONE of the following:
    · Experience at a Senior Military College
    · Experience at a Federal Service Academy
    · Graduated from a Senior Military College or from a Federal Service Academy

Commandant Search Committee members

  • Col. Tom Philipkosky, USAF (Ret.), ’82, senior vice president for Operations and Administration (chair)
  • Col. Pete McCoy, vice chair for The Citadel Board of Visitors
  • Faith Rivers-James, J.D., assistant provost for Leadership
  • Col. Leo Mercado, USMC (Ret.), ’79, former Commandant of Cadets
  • Jay Dowd, Ph.D., president and CEO, The Citadel Foundation

The committee intends to begin the first round of interviews early in 2021. Top candidates will be invited to make public presentations on campus which will be announced in advance by the college.

The search committee hopes to have the new commandant in position before the end of the 2020-21 academic year.

Citadel Commandant of Cadets Captain Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.), ’89 speaks to the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at McAllister Field House during the Corps on January 13, 2020.
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Veterans Day tribute taking place at North Charleston PAC to feature Citadel ’80 alumnus https://today.citadel.edu/veterans-day-tribute-taking-place-at-north-charleston-pac-to-feature-citadel-80-alumnus/ Thu, 29 Oct 2020 14:11:11 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19911 The event, featuring Lt. Colonel Frederick Whittle, USMC (ret), '80, will take place from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.]]>

As seen on WCIV.com

The Lowcountry’s heroes will be remembered on Nov. 11 during a tribute ceremony at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center.

The event, featuring Lt. Colonel Frederick Whittle, USMC (ret), will take place from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

“A 1980 graduate of The Citadel, Lt. Col. Whittle entered the Marine Corps in 1980 as an infantry officer and was designated as a naval aviator in 1984, flying in 36 combat missions in the 1991 Persian Gulf War. He is an Olmsted Scholar and holds a graduate degree from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He retired from the service in 2000,” a press release read.

Lt. Whittle has remained very active in the community, serving roles with the Coastal Carolina Council of the Boys Scouts of America, the Coastal Boys Council, The Exchange Club of Charleston, and the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Trident Area. He was also the past National President of The Citadel Alumni Association, his Class (Fundraising) Chairman for The Citadel Foundation, and Director of The Citadel Trust.

Mayor Keith Summey and City Council members will be at the ceremony.

Those looking to attend are asked to register ahead of time by calling 843-745-1028 or emailing cdambaugh@northcharleston.org by Nov. 4.

Face coverings will be required and social distancing will be followed.

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17 reasons why The Citadel School of Engineering is ranked among the top in the nation https://today.citadel.edu/17-reasons-why-the-citadel-school-of-engineering-is-ranked-among-the-top-in-the-nation/ Tue, 06 Oct 2020 20:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19106 Electrical Engineering students participate in laboratory work in Grimsley Hall in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Electrical Engineering students participate in laboratory work in Grimsley Hall in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)"Highly successful engineering alumni in leadership positions who are strikingly engaged in cadet and graduate support."]]> Electrical Engineering students participate in laboratory work in Grimsley Hall in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Electrical Engineering students participate in laboratory work in Grimsley Hall in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Photo above: mechanical engineering cadets in lab before COVID-19 in early 2020

Citadel engineering ranked the 17th best program in America by U.S. News & World Report, but why?

The Citadel School of Engineering is consistently ranked among the top 25 engineering programs in America by U.S. News & World Report. The newest list puts it at position 17.

Engineering cadets participate in laboratory work in LeTellier Hall at The Citadel instructed by Dr. Rebekah Burke, before COVID-19, in February 2020

But what makes it stand out above so many other programs? U.S. News & World Report uses a complex methodology to build the rankings based on data each college provides annually to the U.S. Department of Education. That’s important, of course. But here are 17 reasons why engineering cadets, students, faculty, staff, alumni and the campus community think The Citadel School of Engineering ranks among America’s superior programs:

  1. Full-time doctorate level, faculty instructors only – no teaching assistants
  2. Disciplined and dedicated cadets and students who are savvy about time management
  3. Hands-on learning with advanced equipment on campus for real-world engineering practice
  4. Industry-leading faculty members producing high-impact partnerships, change-leading research and publications while serving as leaders in professional associations and community STEM engagement
  5. Low student to faculty ratio with student services team, providing tailored guidance to ensure each student’s success
  6. Innovation mindset: Engineering cadets won $10,000 for their idea the Baker Business Bowl in 2019
  7. Freshmen stay, and return the next year; high freshmen retention rate
  8. Ongoing collaboration between civilian, veteran, and active duty populations of cadets, students, and faculty
  9. Consistent student success in engineering competitions
  10. They’re cool: they build robot hands to teach sign language
  11. A hearty menu of options with five undergraduate degrees, four graduate degrees (some fully online) and 14 career-enhancing graduate certificates
  12. Strong relationships with leading South Carolina engineering industry enterprises
  13. High regard for program by deans and senior faculty at peer institutions
  14. 98% job placement within 2 months of graduation
  15. Highly successful engineering alumni in leadership positions who are strikingly engaged in cadet and graduate support
  16. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering is ranked #9 in America by U.S. News & World Report, and has ranked in the top 10 numerous times
  17. Producing principled, highly-trained engineers since 1842

Louis Brems – The Citadel SY 18-19, Peyton Campbell, President’s Report, Engineering

Boost your potential: consider transferring to The Citadel to complete your engineering degree

The Citadel School of Engineering offers a non-cadet, evening program for degree transfer students who complete their first two years at Trident Technical College, or another regionally accredited institution.

South Carolina residents have flexible and affordable guaranteed access  to the non-cadet, evening undergraduate degree options after meeting minimum admissions requirements. The college’s 2+2 Transfer Program will save a South Carolina resident an average of more than $20,000 over the course of 4-years, when compared with the costs of completing a 4-year degree at a public university.

Applicants will work with Citadel admissions advisors to complete a 2-year associates degree, which includes engineering prerequisites (with at least a 2.0 GPA), at a regionally accredited college and then transfer to The Citadel to earn a Bachelors of Science in one of 5 engineering disciplines

For more information, email transfer@citadel.edu or call (843) 953-5089.

Engineering faculty and cadets lead K-12 competitions during Storm The Citadel 2018

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Remembering Col. J. W. Bradin,’58: His life of service to America and his alma mater https://today.citadel.edu/remembering-col-j-w-bradin58-his-life-of-service-to-america-and-his-alma-matter/ Fri, 25 Sep 2020 15:09:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18928 On four occasions he was awarded America's third highest military combat medal, the Silver Star, for gallantry in action.]]>

Photo above: Col. J.W. Bradin, USA (Ret.) The Citadel Commandant of Cadets, 1984. Courtesy of The Citadel Archives.

On four occasions he was awarded America’s third highest military combat medal, the Silver Star, for gallantry in action. And among his other commendations: the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism.

For his service to his country, and his many other professional accomplishments and deeds, Col. J.W. Bradin, USA (Ret.), Citadel Class of 1958, is being remembered as a leader who personified the college’s core values of honor, duty, and respect. Bradin passed away in September of 2020, at the age of 85.

Click to read full citation

In addition to his service to America, outlined in his obituary below, Bradin served The Citadel as a Professor of Military Science while still on active duty, and later, as Commandant of Cadets from 1982-84, followed by service as a member of The Citadel Board of Visitors.

Photo of Col. J.W. Bradin, USA, taken in 1981 while he was a Professor of Military Science and head of AROTC at The Citadel. Courtesy of The Citadel Archives

His full obituary, as seen in The Post & Courier, is below.

SUN CITY, FL – It is with great sadness that we announce the peaceful passing of James W. Bradin, 85, Colonel, U.S. Army Retired. The family was able to be with him in his final moments and we now reflect on his life. Jim was born in Pinehurst, North Carolina, the son of Benjamin M. Bradin and Anna Bower Bradin.

He moved to post-war Berlin with his parents as a young child, where, among many other adventures, Jim was the first American dependent to become an Eagle Scout in Germany. This led to him taking an active role in the Boy Scouts for many, many years. As Jim grew into a rebellious teenager, his parents thought it best to send him to the Carlisle Military Academy in Bamberg, South Carolina. During his time at Carlisle, he met a girl from Orangeburg (SC) who would forever change his life. Upon graduation from Carlisle, he enrolled in The Citadel, in Charleston, South Carolina.

Jim loved The Citadel and the military program, but he was having a little too much fun and found it difficult to fit in time for studying. In 1958 — by the grace of God –Jim graduated from The Citadel with a degree in history and was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. Thankfully, he was, by now, well adapted to wearing the limited wardrobe of uniforms! During his time at The Citadel, he began to date that lovely young girl from Orangeburg, our mother, Jervey Gramling. In June of 1958, Jim made the best decision of his life when he married Jervey and they began a journey that would last for 62 years. In his words, “She is a saint. God blessed me so, by talking that lady into sharing my wild and wooly life.”

Over the next 30 years, Jim and Jervey moved to military bases all over the US, as well as Germany. In 1980, as fate would have it, Jim returned to The Citadel. He was assigned as the PMS, Professor of Military Science, followed by Commandant of Cadets. He would later serve on the Board of Visitors. Jim dedicated himself to his military career, but also made time for his family and community. He enjoyed sailing and camping with the family – dragging them along even when they did not want to go…he always encouraged his children to challenge themselves.

Throughout his career, Jim was awarded 4 Silver Stars, 2 Bronze Stars with V device, the Distinguished Flying Cross, 22 Air Medals, the Purple Heart, 2 Meritorious Service Medals, and 2 Legions of Merit.

On 14 September 2020, Jim Bradin was given his final assignment to Fiddler’s Green, where he was reunited with his fellow cavalrymen. His service to his family and nation was one of total commitment – he never did anything halfway.

He was an avid boater, military historian, and published author. He is survived by his wife, Jervey, his three children, James Bradin (Regina), Jr., Stuart Bradin (Kelly), and Michelle Holtzclaw (James), 6 grandchildren, and 1 great-grandchild. Jim will be cremated and, upon the passing of Jervey, they will be buried together in the Beaufort National Cemetery.

Cadet James W. Bradin, The Citadel Class of 1958
Courtesy of The Citadel Archives

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Meet Ashley Towers, incoming president of the Student Veteran Association https://today.citadel.edu/meet-ashley-towers-incoming-president-of-the-student-veteran-association/ Thu, 02 Jul 2020 20:17:11 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17092 The Citadel Student Veterans Association is a student-governed organization that assists veteran students enrolled at the Military College of South Carolina]]>

The Citadel Student Veterans Association (SVA) is a student-governed organization, made up of veterans from all branches of the U.S. armed services, that assists veteran students enrolled at the Military College of South Carolina.

The SVA works to serve as points-of-contact and mentors for veterans on campus. Members also help guide students on the college’s traditions, policies and procedures. In addition to giving guided tours, members are active participants in extracurricular sports and campus clubs while also giving back to the community by participating in volunteer work through the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics.

Ashley Towers, a veteran day student majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies, will lead the SVA in the 2020-2021 academic year. Learn more about her, and her plans for the SVA, below.

First, tell us a little bit about yourself?

I grew up in a very small town in upstate New York and after completing an AS in Criminal Justice: Police Science. I knew I wanted to continue with education, but I also needed to get out to do something of service and see more of the world. My younger brother decided he wanted to speak with a National Guard recruiter, and we both committed to enlisting that day.

What was your time in the National Guard like?

I served for eight years in the New York Army National Guard’s military police. I deployed to Iraq and Guantanamo Bay and responded to Hurricane Sandy. I was an E-5 sergeant when I finished my term. 

What does it mean to you to be a veteran at The Citadel?

I’ve attended college at other institutions, and I have never received the type of faculty and staff support as I have at The Citadel. The history, the prestige and the name recognition of The Citadel is really impressive. Through Citadel alumni, career fairs, networking, events and other veteran students, I have been provided some amazing opportunities to connect with people I look up to and strive to reach their level of professional success. I really couldn’t imagine enjoying and succeeding in my academic career path had I chosen anywhere else.

Why did you want to serve as president of the SVA this year?

I wanted to be more involved with the SVA. Other commitments during previous semesters kept me from being as active as I would have liked to be, and I felt in the upcoming semester that I could commit the time and effort to serve on behalf of my fellow veterans and the amazing faculty and staff that support us. My decision to put my name in the running was solidified when I received messages from other veterans supporting me for president— to me that’s a big thing.

What kinds of things do you want to do to improve the veteran experience on campus?

I hope to continue the path that previous Citadel SVA presidents have laid in advocating for and enhancing the veteran experience — they’ve done some great work in creating an understanding of what and who the veteran student body is on campus. I’d like to foster growth of interaction between cadets and veterans. Luke Darling, SVA vice president, had a great idea last semester to offer cadets who have commissioned an introduction to a veteran to talk about what to expect or just to talk about the service in general. It would be great to see a luncheon or a fun event held between veterans and cadets. Most of all, the veterans on campus have already served our country and in that service, upheld the values and ethics The Citadel seeks to instill in cadets, and I want to promote a veteran experience where our veterans are included, acknowledged and appreciated.

What extracurricular activities are you involved in other than the SVA?

Currently, I am conducting research with Dr. Jordana Navarro. Next semester I will also be serving as the president of The Citadel’s chapter of Omicron Delta Kappa national leadership honor society. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has disrupted one of my favorite extracurricular activities for the foreseeable future—travel! Last year I participated in the study abroad programs to Georgia and Estonia, and additionally traveled to England, the Czech Republic, Finland and Scotland. I just had to postpone until next year a trip I had scheduled for traveling to Grenada in August. I’ve been keeping busy during the quarantine with my Peloton bike that, luckily, I had decided to purchase only a few weeks before the virus set in. 

Ranked as the No. 1 College for Veterans in the South by U.S. News & World Report in 2019 and 2020, The Citadel offers veterans the opportunity to complete or advance their educations in an environment where military service is understood and appreciated. Approximately 240 veterans currently attend The Citadel as day-student undergraduates, evening undergraduates or graduate students.

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