Veterans – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Fri, 03 May 2019 17:57:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.1 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Veterans – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Celebrating success: The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2019 https://today.citadel.edu/south-carolina-corps-of-cadets-class-of-2019/ https://today.citadel.edu/south-carolina-corps-of-cadets-class-of-2019/#comments Tue, 30 Apr 2019 19:55:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=7700 Approximately 500 members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets (SCCC) are being awarded diplomas on May 4, and are progressing to their next step in life whether it be a career as a military officer; a job as a working professional; attending graduate, medical or law school, or serving in internships.]]>

The Citadel Class of 2019 has much to celebrate. Approximately 500 members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets (SCCC) are being awarded diplomas on May 4, and are progressing to their next step in life whether it be a career as a military officer; a job as a working professional; attending graduate, medical or law school, or serving in internships.

Additionally, the very first cadet to graduate from The Citadel with a Bachelor of Nursing degree, Cadet Abigail Koger, is part of this class.

Watch the commencement ceremony live on YouTube

The cadets will be joined in McAlister Field House by family and friends, but those who cannot attend in person can view the SCCC commencement live on YouTube. The ceremony follows three days of commencement activities that include military commissioning ceremonies, awards events and the Long Gray Line military review parade. All Corps’ commencement events and instructions can be found here.

Class of 2019 by the numbers

Cadet Graduates 512 (Legacy cadets 58)
Veteran Day Student Graduates 14
Active Military Duty Graduates 12

Military Commissions

U.S. Army 104
U.S. Air Force 34
U.S. Marine Corps 28
U.S. Navy 19
U.S. Coast Guard 1

Honors Program Graduates

19

Gender and Ethnicity

Women 52
Men 500

Caucasian 421
Black, Non-Hispanic 64
Hispanic 34
Asian or Pacific Islander 25
American Indian 2
Unknown 6

Top Home States

South Carolina 341
North Carolina 31
Georgia 27
Florida 21
Virginia 18
Maryland 11
Texas 11

Top Programs

Business Administration 145
Criminal Justice 61
Mechanical Engineering 49
Civil Engineering 48
Political Science 47
Exercise Science 33

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Study military history from almost anywhere in the world – with the experts https://today.citadel.edu/military-history-experts-online-citadel-masters-degree/ Wed, 03 Apr 2019 18:00:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=7074 American troops of the 23rd Infantry advance against German forces. National Archives photo.American troops of the 23rd Infantry advance against German forces. National Archives photo.Some of the most distinguished minds in military history today will teach students enrolled in The Citadel Graduate College’s new Master of Arts Degree in Military History.]]> American troops of the 23rd Infantry advance against German forces. National Archives photo.American troops of the 23rd Infantry advance against German forces. National Archives photo.

(Above) American troops of the 23rd Infantry advance against German forces in WWI (Photo: National Archives)

Explore the greatest military achievements and the most excruciating defeats. Learn lessons from witnessing historic military acts of courage, skill and leadership genius, as well as epic mistakes leading to war. Some of the most distinguished minds in military history today will teach students enrolled in The Citadel Graduate College’s new Master of Arts Degree in Military History. The fully online program is accepting applications now, for the courses that will begin in the fall of 2019.

“The Citadel Graduate College’s new Master of Arts Degree in Military History is designed for working people anywhere – officers in the U.S. Armed Forces, professionals in diplomacy, national defense, homeland security and intelligence, or business leaders wanting a deeper understanding of human conflict,” said David Preston, Ph.D., award-winning author/historian and director of The Citadel’s military history program. “And, who better to teach military history than The Citadel with its distinguished faculty and thousands of graduates serving in U.S. military forces right now around the world?”

Why study military history?

Smithsonian image of the Battle of Zama by Henri-Paul Motte
Smithsonian image of the Battle of Zama by Henri-Paul Motte

“The eminent historian John Keegan is entirely correct when he says that ‘the written history of the world is largely a history of warfare.’ We study war not in celebration, but in preparation for it, and in recognition of its immense costs and the profound ways that war has transformed nations and societies,” Preston said.

Dr. David Preston, Director of The Citadel Military History graduate program
Dr. David Preston, Director of The Citadel Military History graduate program

Preston, the Westvaco Professor of National Security Studies in The Citadel School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and The Citadel Department of History faculty, created the program.

“Students will examine the full range of conflicts in world history from Greece and Rome to Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as the broader ways that war is shaped by its social, cultural, economic and political contexts,” said Joelle Neulander, Ph.D., head of The Citadel Department of History.

WWII recruiting poster by McClelland Barclay, 1942.
WWII recruiting poster by McClelland Barclay, 1942

The Citadel Department of History and affiliated fellows from other disciplines on campus bring together acclaimed and experienced scholars in the fields of war and society and military history for this new graduate degree. Students will be led by faculty subject matter experts in areas that include:

  • The study of war, its conduct, meaning, and consequences
  • The evolution of warfare and its relationship to modern operational environments, joint warfare, civil-military relations, and strategy
  • Armed conflict at all levels of warfare: strategic, operational, and tactical
  • The political, social, economic, environmental, geographic, and cultural contexts of war
  • Analysis and application of military leadership and decision making throughout history
  • The human dimension of war and experience of combat

    Staff Sgt. Jen Brooks, with the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team, gives candy to students from the Abdul Karzai Middle School in Khandahar, Afghanistan, Sept. 14, 2004. (Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Joseph P. Collins Jr.)
    Staff Sgt. Jen Brooks, with the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team, gives candy to students from the Abdul Karzai Middle School in Khandahar, Afghanistan, Sept. 14, 2004 (Photo: Staff Sgt. Joseph P. Collins Jr.)

The Military History program consists of a 30-hour curriculum lending itself to completion in two years or less. Students may obtain either a Master of Arts Degree in Military History or both a Master of Arts Degree in Military History and a Graduate Certificate in Military Leadership at the same time.

To apply to the program or for more information, please visit this web link, or call (843) 953-5073.

Master Sgt. Darrell Shelton gives a daily situational awareness briefing during security forces guardmount Feb. 15 2007 at Balad Air Base, Iraq. Sergeant Shelton is assigned to the 332nd expeditionary Security Forces Squadron (U.S.A.F. photo)
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Citadel steps up to host memorial gathering for Vietnam veterans https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-steps-up-to-host-memorial-gathering-for-vietnam-veterans/ Thu, 21 Mar 2019 13:25:41 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=6746 Vietnam veterans group photoVietnam veterans group photoWhen the namesake ship was unable to make it to Charleston, The Citadel hosted nearly 30 Marine veterans from the Battle of Hué for their annual reunion.]]> Vietnam veterans group photoVietnam veterans group photo

Photo: Marine veterans from the Battle of Hué

The annual memorial usually takes place onboard the USS Hué City, the only U.S. Navy ship named after a battle in the Vietnam War

When the namesake ship was unable to make it to Charleston Harbor, nearly 30 Marine veterans from the Battle of Hué were left without a place to meet for their annual reunion.

Until The Citadel stepped in to help.

Col. Myron Harrington at reunion
Col. Myron Harrington at reunion

The Citadel Board of Visitors member Col. Myron Harrington is also a veteran of the Battle of Hué, which was one of the longest battles of the Vietnam War. He helped arrange for the March gathering to be hosted on campus, in the Regimental Commander’s Riverview Room.

The USS Hué City was scheduled to arrive in Charleston for the annual meeting, as well as for Charleston Navy Week. But the crew says, due to technical issues, the ship was forced to stay in its homeport in Mayport, Florida.

“The ship’s crew continues to make it happen. And we have someone here from the Marine crew who continues to make it happen, and that’s Col. Myron Harrington,” said Lt. Gen. George “Ron” Christmas, one of the veterans at the event.

CDR Chris Brown speaking at reunion
CDR Chris Brown speaking at reunion

But the lack of the ship didn’t affect the spirit of the veterans.

“The fact that USS Hué City has been with us all these years is very special. I think you can see in this room there’s a bond. We fought together, but there’s a bond, and the ship has really done a great deal,” said Lt. Gen. Christmas.

The reunion is also a strong tradition with the sailors on the Hué City. Some of the crew even came to represent the ship at this year’s reunion and memorial.

The ship’s executive officer, Commander Chris Brown, said, “The one thing I was told is the XO can’t screw up the Hué memorial. If you don’t make sure there’s a memorial and everyone gets together and is honored the way they should, you’re not doing your job right.”

Lt. Gen. Ron Christmas handing out commemorative pins
Lt. Gen. Ron Christmas handing out commemorative pins

Lt. Gen. Christmas also gave out commemorative pins to the veterans. The weekend also included a memorial in Summerall Chapel on Sunday.

CDR Brown says repairs on the USS Hué City are expected to take four more years, but should help extend the life of the ship by more than 15 years.

Col Harrington was also featured in CNN’s four-part Original Series Event, “1968” The Year That Changed America.” Additionally, Harrington has been featured in a 1981 special, “Vietnam: A Television History.”

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Baker Veterans Fellowship recipients named for the 2018-19 academic year https://today.citadel.edu/baker-veterans-fellowship-recipients-named-for-the-2018-19-academic-year/ Mon, 19 Nov 2018 19:31:20 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4865 Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship Award recipients, 2018-19Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship Award recipients, 2018-19The Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship recipients for the 2018-19 academic year include five veteran students studying through The Citadel Graduate College in a variety of undergraduate and graduate programs.]]> Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship Award recipients, 2018-19Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship Award recipients, 2018-19

(Pictured left to right: Jesse Miller, Adam Kelty, Gen. Glenn Walters, Tommy Baker, Marc Dolder, Eric Kupper and Jesse Hardee.)

The Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship recipients for the 2018-19 academic year include five veteran students studying through The Citadel Graduate College in a variety of undergraduate and graduate programs.

The five recipients include:

  • Marc Dolder, USMC, Civil and Environmental Engineering undergraduate student
  • Jesse Hardee,  Exercise Science undergraduate student
  • Adam Kelty, USN, Masters in Business Administration student
  • Eric Kupper, US Army, Computer Science graduate student
  • Jesse Miller, USN, Exercise Science undergraduate student

The fellows are provided with a $5,000 stipend for tuition and educational expenses and a semester-long internship with a supporting agency or organization, arranged through The Citadel Career Center. They may also participate in a retreat and are required to make a presentation about their experiences to the Baker Fellows Advisory Board upon completion, in addition to keeping a log of work and submitting weekly reflections. The program represents one part of The Citadel’s commitment to serving those who served America.

Tommy Baker speaks at the veterans fellowship awards banquet

Tommy Baker speaks during the veterans fellowship awards banquet

The fellowships are provided through the generosity of Tommy Baker who is a veteran, a Citadel Class of 1972 alumnus, and the namesake behind the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business at The Citadel. Baker, founder and owner of Baker Motor Company, studied business while attending the college as a veteran student, enrolling after returning from service as an enlisted Marine in 1968.

Ranked as the No. 1 Public College for Veterans in the South by U.S. News & World Report in 2017 and 2018, The Citadel offers veterans the opportunity to complete or advance their educations in an environment that understands and appreciates military service. Approximately 280 veterans currently attend The Citadel as day student undergraduates, evening undergraduates, or graduate students.

Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship applicants must be full-time students at The Citadel who are career-centered and community-minded and received honorable discharges from U.S. military services. Applications for consideration for the 2019 fellowships will be accepted August 26 – October 4, 2019.  To apply, or to learn more, please click here or visit .http://www.citadel.edu/root/tommy-baker

To learn more about how The Citadel supports continuing education for veterans, please visit this website.

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He plays Taps each day to honor veterans. And a gold ring tells the horrors of WWII. https://today.citadel.edu/he-plays-taps-each-day-to-honor-veterans-and-a-gold-ring-tells-the-horrors-of-wwii/ Sun, 11 Nov 2018 11:00:22 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4751 His father clung to one other possession, one that he had hidden away: his gold Citadel class ring.]]>

As seen in the Charlotte Observer, by Bruce Henderson.


When dark falls, the people of a Matthews neighborhood listen for the lonely military call that signals a days’ end: A bugler playing Taps.

“I keep track of what time the sun goes down, step out on my front porch and play,” said former Army Reservist Don Woodside. “If I forget to play, I get phone calls from neighbors — ‘Are you sick?’”

There are stories within the story, this Veterans Day, of Woodside’s bugling. They’re tales of loss and remembrance that begin before World War II, recount the tears shed for a father’s sacrifice and are still playing out today.

Woodside, 77, is a volunteer with Bugles Across America, which offers players to perform Taps at the funerals of military veterans. He also sometimes sits at the Mecklenburg County Vietnam Veterans Memorial, playing into the long, granite arc to magnify his horn’s sound.

 Second Lt. Milton Woodside photographed at Clark Field in the Phillipines. Courtesy of Milton Woodside Jr.
Second Lt. Milton Woodside photographed at Clark Field in the Phillipines.
Courtesy of Milton Woodside Jr.

He does this to honor all those who served, but one in particular: his late uncle, Milton Woodside, a Charlotte native and World War II fighter pilot who survived more than three brutal years as a prisoner of war in Japan.

After his 1940 graduation from The Citadel, the Charleston military college, Woodside had entered flight school with the Army Air Corps and become a pilot of P-40 Warhawks, a single-engined fighter plane. In the summer of 1941, the young second lieutenant was stationed at Clark Field in the Philippines with the 20th Pursuit Squadron.

The Japanese attacked Clark a day after they hit Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941. Most planes at the airfield were destroyed, but determined crews managed to salvage a few P-40s. Woodside was among the pilots who continued taking off from the bomb-cratered runway to fight the Japanese.

“Fill it up, I’m going back up,” Don Woodside recalls his uncle saying in recounting one mission.

That was after the war, when Milton Woodside had returned home and become administrator of what is now Sampson Regional Medical Center in Clinton. The former pilot often returned to Charlotte to visit his parents and stayed at the Eastover home of Don Woodside’s family. That’s where young Don gleaned what little his uncle had to say about the war.

“You had to pull it out of him,” he said.

Milton Woodside, left, and his son Milton “Woody” Woodside Jr., as students at the Citadel. Courtesy of Milton Woodside Jr.
Milton Woodside, left, and his son Milton “Woody” Woodside Jr., as students at the Citadel.
Courtesy of Milton Woodside Jr.

Milton Woodside’s oldest son, M.H. “Woody” Woodside, 71, is himself a 1970 Citadel graduate who spent 22 years with the Georgia Army National Guard. Now president of the Brunswick-Golden Isles Chamber of Commerce, he regrets that he was never able to have long talks about the war with his father before his death in 1973.

Histories of combat in the Philippines flesh out his dad’s wartime experiences.

Woodside was flying without ammunition after managing to take off from Clark Field when two Japanese Zeros attacked him from behind near Manila, according to “Doomed at the Start,” a 1995 account of U.S. pursuit pilots in the Philippines. Once his plane’s instrument panel was shattered, the book said, Woodside put his plane into a steep dive and bailed out.

That happened on Dec. 10, 1941, Woody Woodside said. His father had parachuted into friendly territory.

But as Japanese ground forces closed in over the following months, the U.S. abandoned Clark Field and retreated to the southern Bataan Peninsula before surrendering in April 1942.

The forced 65-mile march up the peninsula of thousands of sick, hungry prisoners, including Woodside, became World War II lore. About 600 Americans and at least 5,000 Filipinos died on what became known as the Bataan Death March, according to Army history.

Milton Woodside’s vivid account of the march, apparently drawn from a post-war debriefing, is quoted in “Deadly Sky,” a 2016 book on American combat airmen in World War II by military historian John McManus. Japanese soldiers severely abused their prisoners, he recounted, denying them water and at one point clubbing him for hiding a small can of beans.

“Any prisoner becoming exhausted and falling out was either shot or bayoneted,” Woodside says in that telling. “An Air Corps 2d Lt. marching next to me became exhausted and could go no further. Unable to carry him, I helped him over behind some bushes to lay down. The follow-up … guard saw us and motioned for me to go on. I left the man my canteen of water and moved on. About 100 yds. on, I looked back to see the guard repeatedly bayoneting the sick man in the chest.”

An Army history says the “deliberate and arbitrary cruelty of some of the guards led to many of the deaths and immeasurably increased the suffering of those who managed to survive.”

A POW in Japan with hidden gold

Woodside was held prisoner for nearly 3 1/2 years at the Umeda prison camp in Osaka, his son said. Because of his rank as an officer — fellow prisoners fashioned crude aviator wings for him — the Japanese put him in charge of the 40 to 50 other prisoners in his hut.

woodside bible
2nd Lt. Milton Woodside listed the names of the men who served with him in the Army Air Corp’s 20th Pursuit Squadron inside the military-issue Bible he kept throughout War World II, including more than three years’ imprisonment by the Japanese. Asterisks beside the names indicate those who died. Milton Woodside Jr.

Prisoners of the Japanese endured hellish conditions. Apart from disease and starvation, an account by the Army’s Center of Military History says, prisoners “had been beaten and kicked, had been forced to bow and to obey endless petty rules invented by their captors.”

“I still have his military-issue Bible with names of all 20th Squadron folks with asterisks by them — most had asterisks, for death — that he carried with him while in prison,” Woody Woodside said.

His father clung to one other possession, one that he had hidden away: his gold Citadel class ring.

When conditions turned dire, the former POW later told his nephew, he traded it to a Japanese guard in exchange for food and water for his fellow prisoners.

In August of 1945, relatives say, Woodside also witnessed the mysterious glow on the horizon of the two U.S. atomic bombs that ended the war.

He’d spent much of his years as a prisoner digging coal in Japan. As U.S. troopers freed the prisoners after Japan’s surrender, Woodside snatched up a grim prize: the battered bugle that guards had used to wake up their prisoners each morning.

A phone call from the Philippines

In 1953, back in North Carolina after a hero’s welcome home and beginning his career in hospital administration, Milton Woodside got a surprise call one day from the Philippines.

The caller was an American who come across a Citadel ring, class of 1940, engraved inside with the initials MHW, in a pawn shop. The man had contacted The Citadel for help in identifying and locating the graduate.

The 1940 Citadel class ring that Milton Woodside traded to a Japanese guard for food and water for his imprisoned men during World War II.
Courtesy of Milton Woodside Jr

“He said, Mr. Woodside, did you have a Citadel class ring that you lost in the war? I jumped up screaming and said, how much do you want for it? He said, just give me your address” and mailed it back, Don Woodside recalled his uncle saying.

That’s how the ring came home.

Woody Woodside had lost his own Citadel ring a few years after graduating in 1970. He started wearing his late father’s ring.

But he’d never known its history until four years ago, when he visited his cousin Don for the Belk Bowl football game between Georgia and Louisville. The two visited Charlotte’s Louise Avenue, where Milton Woodside had grown up. For the first time, Don Woodside relayed his uncle’s tale of the lost and found ring.

“At the end of the story, I said, ‘I wonder what ever happened to that ring?’” Don Woodside said. “He said, look here — he pointed to his right hand and, boy, the tears came.”

Woody Woodside: “Don told me the story that I never knew. It makes it even more meaningful, and I’m very grateful. I guess that the greatest generation is about gone, and amazingly enough not that many talked that much about it. They went about their lives.”

Play Taps with honor and reverence

That’s the story of the gold ring. The other story, of Don Woodside and his bugling, continues each day at sunset.

At 5:25 p.m. Wednesday, dressed in Army dress blues, Woodside stepped onto his front stoop beside the flag that flies there. He lifted the bugle in his right hand and, stock still, played the haunting melody into the setting sun.

The notes came out slow and stately, and that’s for a reason. Woodside had auditioned for Bugles Across America by phone about a year ago, and almost didn’t make the cut. He played Taps too fast, his interviewer said. Try again.

“I play it with ‘honor and reverence,’ were the words I think he said,” Woodside said.

He had previously played the flugelhorn, which resembles a trumpet, during his daily Taps renditions. On Wednesday he blew another instrument for the first time.

It had arrived in a package that day from his cousin Woody: the battered old bugle his uncle had liberated from the Japanese captors in 1945.

 

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VFW Scholarship Helps Veteran Continue His Studies at Military College https://today.citadel.edu/vfw-scholarship-helps-veteran-continue-his-studies-at-military-college/ Thu, 01 Nov 2018 21:37:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4710 VFW Scholarship RecipientVFW Scholarship RecipientJuan Campana wants to use his Intelligence and Security Studies major to return to work in the federal government after graduation.]]> VFW Scholarship RecipientVFW Scholarship Recipient

As seen in VFW

‘As an immigrant, serving the United States of America is the most honorable duty one can have’

Juan Campana was born in Ecuador and immigrated to the United States at a young age. Entering the United States Marine Corps after September 11, 2001, he spent four years as a Combat Engineer. He served two tours in Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom and at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, N.C.

Once Campana retired from the military, he continued to work in other capacities for the United States government. Campana then enrolled into The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina and wants to use his Intelligence and Security Studies major to return to work in the federal government after graduation.

As he was receiving a free haircut at Sport Clips on Veteran’s Day, Campana heard about the VFW’s “Sport Clips Help A Hero Scholarship” for the first time. When his GI Bill was exhausted two years later, he was recommended to apply by his campus chapter of Student Veterans Association. The scholarship has made all the difference to Campana’s future.

“I cannot be more grateful and honored to receive this award. I am able to continue my studies at The Citadel. Without this, I would not be able to graduate,” he said.

After experiencing the transition from military to civilian life, Campana has advice for other service members and veterans considering pursuing education. “Don’t be afraid to take a leap of faith in leaving the military. It may be a culture shock immersing yourself into a civilian role, but higher education is a nexus to veteran/civilian transition,” he advised.

“Remember, self-improvement is the key to success and education cannot be taken away from you,” Campana concluded.

Learn more about the VFW’s “Sport Clips Help A Hero Scholarship.”

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Meet Sean Cleveland, Assistant Professor in English, Fine Arts and Communications and Assistant Director of the Center for Teaching Innovation https://today.citadel.edu/meet-sean-cleveland-assistant-professor-in-english-fine-arts-and-communications-and-assistant-director-of-the-center-for-teaching-innovation/ Tue, 02 Oct 2018 19:22:44 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=3866 Sean ClevelandSean ClevelandCleveland retired from the Army as a professor in 2017 but was not ready to leave the classroom. When a position opened up at The Citadel, he jumped on it.]]> Sean ClevelandSean Cleveland

Sean Cleveland retired from the Army as a professor in 2017 but was not ready to leave the classroom. He joined The Citadel’s Department of English, Fine Arts and Communications and the Center for Teaching Innovation to continue his passion of teaching literature and leadership to cadets and to help professors become even better teachers.

Branch:  I was in the United States Army for 27 years.

Rank: Lieutenant Colonel (Retired)

Sean Cleveland at Mosque

Current role at The Citadel: Visiting assistant professor in the Department of English, Fine Arts and Communications as well as assistant director of the Center for Teaching Innovation

How many years have you been at The Citadel? One year

Why did you join the military? I joined the Army in the Delayed Entry Program as a high school senior in 1986 and left for Basic Training two hours after graduation with $52 dollars in my pocket. I was either going to make it on my own, or I wasn’t. To realize my potential, I needed the discipline and the opportunities the Army afforded. My father had been a career Air Force NCO – and I wanted to follow in his footsteps, serving my country. I thought I would only be in for a couple of years. Two years turned in to almost three decades. I’ve been blessed to lead and serve alongside some of the finest men and women our nation has to offer.

What was the most defining moment during your service? I had a number of “defining” moments in my career – but, if pressed, I would have to say my last deployment to Afghanistan – a sort of “sabbatical’ from teaching at West Point – certainly qualifies. Assigned as the CJ5 of CJIATF-435, we transferred all detention operations to the government of Afghanistan while also stabilizing and improving the nation’s commitment to and capacity for the Rule of Law. It felt amazing, for my last deployment, to have a significant role in “ending” something I’d had a hand in starting and sustaining earlier in my career.

What does being a veteran mean you? It boggles my mind that fewer than one percent of the nation’s population serve in the military at any point in their life. There are, of course, many different ways to serve – teachers, police officers and other first responders, etc. For me, though, when I meet a fellow veteran I feel an almost instant bond – whether that person served for three years or 30. I am glad to see the nation honoring veterans – something Vietnam veterans certainly did not have upon their return. These warriors deserve our respect.

Sean Cleveland FlyingWhy did you choose to work at The Citadel? Though I was retiring from the Army as a professor at the Academy, I really was not ready to leave the classroom. I have a passion for teaching cadets – and for teaching, in general. When the opportunity arose to come to The Citadel and continue doing so, I had to jump on it. We were all set to move to Washington, D.C. for another job when the provost offered a position here. I am very thankful for the opportunity and look forward to being a part of The Citadel family for years to come, teaching literature and leadership and helping our professors become even better teachers.

What leadership qualities did you learn in the military that have helped guide you through your career/life? The concept of servant leadership is very important to me. Above everything else, we, as leaders, are servants. We serve our organizations and those whom we have the privilege and honor of leading. I like to think this ethos has defined not only my military career but, also, informs my teaching practice, as well.

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Students live, learn, and intern in Washington, DC https://today.citadel.edu/washington-dc-internships-summer-2018/ Tue, 18 Sep 2018 19:05:18 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=2823 Citadel in DC participantsCitadel in DC participantsThe Citadel in DC is a summer program where students live, learn, and intern using Washington, DC as an active classroom. Students earn nine credit hours–six hours for their internship, and three for a visual and intelligence course.]]> Citadel in DC participantsCitadel in DC participants


The Citadel in DC is a 10-week summer program where students live, learn, and intern using Washington, DC as an active classroom. The program earns students nine credit hours–six hours for their internship, and three for a visual perception course they participate in throughout the summer.

“Internships in DC are very competitive, so students have to start networking pretty aggressively during fall semester, and working with the career center and The Citadel Club of Greater Washington,” says Page Tisdale, Director of The Citadel Career Center. “Most students leave with a number of opportunities, whether to continue interning or a full time offer.”

“Getting the first thing on your resume is very difficult, but once it’s there you’re off and running.”

Darrell Smith, ’86
President and CEO of the National Waste & Recycling Association
Hosts interns for The Citadel in DC program every year

On weekends students participate in lectures and formal classes for an interdisciplinary course that focuses on how they analyze, articulate, and act upon visual information.  As part of this course, students visit museums and government institutions around the DC metro, and sharpen visual perception, intelligence gathering, and communication skills from both the fine arts and criminal justice perspectives.

The course begins with a creative and art appreciation component. Students learn to look carefully at a piece of art and interpret the information.  Then they use the same observation techniques for a situational awareness and security aspect.

“It’s the environment in and of itself,” says Ed Lugo, professor of criminal justice and former secret service agent. “We take in this city and make it into a living classroom. Listen to what is going on around you. Take that information and develop it into intelligence. The way people look, the way they smile, how wide their eyes are, whether they’re using only one half of their face to exhibit emotions–all of these things are critical in giving us information.”

Students spend the summer living in the dorms at Catholic University, experiencing life as a traditional college student and all that it entails. Social highlights included group outings to the Washington Nationals, attending the Marines Corps 8th and I parade, and more.

“It’s amazing to see studentssome from very small townscome to the city and grow,” says Tisdale.  “They grow professionally, learn how to network, and learn how to see things from a different perspective. It matures them.“


David Days, History and Spanish Major, Senator Tim Scott Office Internship

David Days
Intern for the Office of Senator Tim Scott on Capitol Hill
Class of 2019
History and Spanish major

“There are a lot of cool people in this city and that’s one thing I’m really emphasizing–the people. It really makes the internship, being able to interact with all these people from different walks of life. Pursuing a law career, being here, and interacting and developing relationships with a lot of different types of people is definitely a useful skill, and not just for law–really any career.”

Ryan Adkins, National Waste and Recycling Association internship

Ryan Adkins
Intern for the National Waste & Recycling Association
Class of 2020
Political science major

“My favorite part of this program has been getting to meet and connect with a lot of the alumni. There’s a strong alumni network here, about 1,400.  It’s been really nice, we go to meet and greets, and work with them to recruit high school students to attend The Citadel. We’ve gone to see their work spaces and are introduced to more connections.  And I got to meet the incoming Citadel president, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, at the 8th and I parade. That was really cool.”

Roshan Joseph, Veteran Student, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) internship

Roshan Joseph
Intern for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
Veteran day student
Intelligence and security studies major

“As a part of the Air Force Reserves, I was tasked to come in during the 2017 hurricane season to help with evacuation and relief efforts.  Charleston was the hub sending out a lot of disaster relief supplies to support Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. I saw the smaller scale of sending cargo out, and saw all these airplanes leaving with cargo and coming back empty.  And then I got to come here to FEMA and see the bigger picture; the decision making and all the things that go on behind the scenes.  It helped me fully understand what really goes on, and brought things full circle.”

Cadet Tierra Price, Pyschology Major, TSA and Senator Tim Scott Internships

Tierra Price
Intern for Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the Office of Senator Tim Scott
Class of 2020
Psychology Major

“I’ve always been interested in different cultures other than mine, so one of my favorite museums in Washington DC has been the Freer|Sackler Museum, which is based on Asian culture. One thing that really stood out to me was Buddhism, meditation and the art of healing.”

Cadet Richard Greve, History Major, National Archives Internship

Richard Greve
Intern for the National Archives
Class of 2020
History Major

“As an archivist you can’t rush filing documents, so this internship has taught me patience.  I’m currently working with Vietnam War documents, and one of my greatest memories this summer was getting the opportunity to see the Vietnam War Memorial in person.  My grandfather fought in Vietnam in the United States Marine Corps and it was great to get a more open perspective and an idea of how he may have felt. Maybe in time I’ll convince him to come out here and see the monument himself.”


Where are they working?

National Waste & Recycling Association
Office of Ethnic Minority Affairs
Department of Homeland Security
Office of Senator Tim Scott
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
National Archives
Institute of World Politics
…and more!

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Fourth Generation Marine Proves He Has “The Wright Stuff” https://today.citadel.edu/fourth-generation-marine-proves-he-has-the-wright-stuff/ Fri, 07 Sep 2018 20:14:49 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=3618 The Citadel Social CardThe Citadel Social CardFor the Wright family, being a Marine is the family business. After 12 weeks of training, Pfc. Douglas Tanner Wright graduated Aug. 3.]]> The Citadel Social CardThe Citadel Social Card

As seen in Defense Visual Information Distribution Service, by Sgt. Dana Beesly

Approximately 19,000 recruits graduate each year from Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island. For the Wright family, being a Marine is the family business. After 12 weeks of training, Pfc. Douglas Tanner Wright graduated Aug. 3 and joined a family of three generations of Marines and service members before him.

Tanner wanted to follow his family’s tradition of military service as far back as he could remember. His father, grandfather, great-grandfather and great-uncle passed down Marine Corps discipline and motivation through each generation of the family.

“Ever since I was very young, I never saw a life in the civilian world,” said Wright, who his family addresses as “Tanner” to avoid confusion. “My entire life, I surrounded myself with the military. To be a part of the best of the country’s military seemed like the right path for me. I didn’t want normal.”

Wright’s family has an illustrious history of service in the armed forces. His great-grandfather Leroy Price Sr. served as a sergeant in the U.S. Army during World War I. Price Sr.’s brother, Thomas Langdon Price, was wounded in the battle for Sugar Loaf Hill on Okinawa. Price Sr.’s son, Leroy Jr., was a Purple Heart and Silver Star recipient who was wounded on Pelileu. Price Jr. married Annette McCovic, also a Marine, who served in WWII.

Tanner’s grandfather, Raymond Wright Jr., served as a gunner in 1st Marine Division, then became a drill instructor for Echo Company, the same company Tanner graduated from. Tanner’s father, Douglas Wright Sr., served in the Marine Corps Reserve for six years.

“When I went to recruit training, I didn’t understand why you tucked your shirt in, I didn’t understand why you crossed your left shoelace over your right shoelace, I was just taught that,” Douglas said. “I was taught to dress by the numbers; that was how I had to maintain my appearance. I brought my son up the same way.”

Years later, Tanner was getting ready to graduate recruit training and his company was preparing for the company commander’s inspection. He didn’t realize until he was putting his service trousers on that he had been preparing his whole life for a moment like this.

“Everything I’ve done and learned throughout my life prepared me to come here,” said Tanner. ”Why the left lace goes over the right when you lace your boots. Speed, intensity, listening to the details; everything makes sense now.”

Tanner said the values he was taught growing up prepared him for the trials of training at Parris Island. Both of his parents and his little brother would train next to him at the gym, and encouraged him to maintain discipline and professionalism in every activity. With the support of his family, Tanner said he was more than ready to tackle the rigorous weeks of training, but the rifle range was an obstacle he had to tackle on his own.

“Ever since I was young, my dad would always tell me, ‘try your best not to go shooting with friends, try to make sure not to get into bad habits,’” Tanner said. “Being so unexposed to [shooting] made it pretty difficult for me to adjust. I shot expert, but the range was mentally stressful.”

Following graduation, Tanner began training at The Citadel, the Military Academy of South Carolina in Charleston, S.C. on Aug. 11. Tanner will be the first in his family to become a Marine Corps officer, a dream he has had his entire life.

Douglas said his son stayed disciplined through the pursuit of athletics when it came to preparing for recruit training. He was encouraged to participate in various team sports growing up, before discovering his passion for wrestling. He aspires to wrestle for The Citadel once he adjusts to life at college.

“The main goal of any parents is to put their children on the right track and I think my dad did that with me and I’ve done that now, with my boy,” Douglas said. “The biggest accomplishment in my life was to become a Marine. To see my son choose to follow the legacy and the lineage of our family was obviously a big step, but for him to do so well made us so much more proud.”

Raymond and Douglas know Tanner has his work cut out for him as he begins his Marine Corps career, but like any father or grandfather, they will always look out for him.

“I want to see him become the most successful person I know,” Douglas said. “He’s already achieved more than I have ever achieved by being accepted to The Citadel. I want to see him wear a Citadel ring. I want to see bars on his shoulders.”

As he ventures out on his journey to become a Citadel graduate and Marine officer, Tanner knows he has the ability to succeed and excel throughout his career, thanks to the backing of his family. His family legacy has become his passion.

“Joining the military is a feeling like nothing else in the entire world,” Said Tanner. “Knowing in your heart that this is what you intend to do, that you plan to fight for those beside you and those at home, there’s nothing like it.”

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Meet Taylor Skardon, Adjunct Professor and Head of The Citadel Parents’ Program https://today.citadel.edu/meet-taylor-skardon-adjunct-professor-and-head-of-the-citadel-parents-program/ Tue, 04 Sep 2018 17:45:08 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=3604 The Citadel Social CardThe Citadel Social CardTaylor Skardon, 1982 Citadel graduate, adjunct professor and head of The Citadel Parents' Program, discusses his pride for the college's mission.]]> The Citadel Social CardThe Citadel Social Card

Taylor Skardon served in the Navy for 30 years. The 1982 Citadel graduate and current adjunct professor and head of The Citadel Parents’ Program discusses the pride he has developed for the college’s mission in the past five years.

Taylor Skardon at Parade

Branch: I was in the Navy from 1982-2012.

Rank: Captain (06)

Current role at The Citadel: Adjunct professor and head of The Citadel Parents’ Program

How many years have you been at The Citadel? Five years

What year did you graduate from The Citadel? I graduated in 1982 and studied business administration.

Why did you join the military? I just didn’t have a passion driving me in to a certain career field my last year in college, so I thought I would join the Navy for a few years, see the world, get paid and get out when the fun stopped. It ended up being the best decision I have ever made!

Taylor Skardon RetirementWhat was the most defining moment during your service? My most defining moment of service was having the honor to command the finest ship in the Navy, the USS O’KANE (DDG 77).

What does being a veteran mean you?  Being a veteran means two things to me:

  • Veterans understand the sacrifices that our active duty forces and their families make on behalf of our country. We should be their biggest advocates.
  • Those in the military take an oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States – not the president, or congress or our way of life. I believe veterans should be leaders in calling out those whose actions are contrary to the Constitution.

Why did you choose to work at The Citadel?  When I returned to Charleston it was to be closer to family. Initially, I chose to join The Citadel because an interesting position was available and it was one that fit my skill set. Since then, I have gained a sense of pride for what The Citadel stands for, its focus on leadership and the opportunities it provides to the cadets. I’m extremely glad to be a part of the college’s mission.

What leadership qualities did you learn in the military that have helped guide you through your career/life?  Mission takes priority, but doing it well depends on the relationships and development of those with whom you work.

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