Veterans – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Mon, 15 Mar 2021 17:10:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Veterans – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Remembering Col. Robert S. Adden, The Citadel Class of ’44 https://today.citadel.edu/remembering-col-robert-s-adden-the-citadel-class-of-44/ Sat, 13 Mar 2021 11:00:47 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22655 Col. Bob Adden, The CitadelCol. Bob Adden, The CitadelAs seen on Jhenrystuhr.tributes.com Robert S. Adden, 98, a long time resident of Charleston, passed away peacefully on March 6, 2021 after a brief hospitalization in Reston, Virginia. Born January 1, 1923]]> Col. Bob Adden, The CitadelCol. Bob Adden, The Citadel

As seen on Jhenrystuhr.tributes.com

Robert S. Adden, 98, a long time resident of Charleston, passed away peacefully on March 6, 2021 after a brief hospitalization in Reston, Virginia. Born January 1, 1923 in Orangeburg, South Carolina to the late Mary Elizabeth Heggie Adden and John Augustus Adden. His father died months before he was born and he was raised lovingly, along with his siblings “Toots” and Jack, by his mother during the difficult Depression era.

He attended The Citadel as a member of the Class of 1944, of which the entire class was called to active duty following their Junior Year. He served as a 2nd lieutenant in World War II with the 84th Infantry Division and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with Combat V, a Purple Heart and the Combat Infantry Badge. He was severely wounded in combat in November 1944 in Prummern, Germany, attributing his life being saved by God’s hand causing his dog tags to deflect a machine gun bullet that was directed towards his heart. He was discharged from the Army in 1946.

He graduated from The Citadel in 1947 as the first honor graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. Two days later he began his teaching career at The Citadel, leaving the college only for a short time to earn his Master of Business Administration from the Wharton School of Business and his Doctor of Philosophy in Economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While at Chapel Hill he met the love of his life, Norma Sue Sligh, and they married on December 27, 1953.

He enjoyed teaching accounting and taxation. He served as the Head of the Business Administration Department at The Citadel from 1962-1982, during which time he was instrumental in launching the Master of Business Administration and the evening undergraduate programs at what is now the School of Business Administration. He retired as Professor Emeritus in 1985. The Citadel recognized his service to the school awarding him the coveted Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award in 1984; an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Humane Letters in 2008; and the School of Business Alumnus of the Year Award in 2011. He and Sue were loyal supporters of Citadel athletics, rarely missing any home football, basketball or baseball game and listening on the radio to many of the away games.

He was a faithful Lutheran who proudly donated to the church. When his older brother Jack (USMC) gave him $100 that he had won playing poker in the South Pacific during WW II, he donated the money to the Orangeburg Lutheran Church. He taught an adult Sunday School Class for more than 50 years at St. John’s Lutheran Church, served on its Vestry and was a former President of the Vestry. He was also a lifetime member of the Salvation Army Advisory Board and a member of the Charleston Rotary Club.

Surviving are his wife of 67 years, Norma Sue Sligh Adden; daughter, Carolyn Elizabeth Rose and her husband Col. Michael G. Rose (USA, Ret) of Herndon, VA; son, Robert S. Adden, Jr. and his wife Kimetha Hunt Adden of Charlotte, NC; daughter, Virginia Sue Barrett and her husband Hazle Barrett of Camden, SC; four grandchildren, Robert Anthony Adden, Daniel Spencer Adden (Kayla), Caroline Jordan Christian (Jack) and Thomas Caldwell Jordan; four great-grandchildren, Mary Caroline Christian, Eleanor Christian, John Christian and Frances Christian and many loving nieces and nephews.

“He had such a calm sweet spirit & will be missed by many. “

Remembrance by family friend Mike Wiggins

“Col. Adden was a great accounting teacher during my years at the Citadel. He was kind and caring to the cadets. His quality as a man is undisputed. He supported the Citadel in many ways after his retirement. You could see him at basketball, baseball, and football games cheering on his team. God Bless his family and many friends.”

Roy DeHaven, ’81

Leave a remembrance about Col. Adden here.

J. Henry Stuhr, Inc. Downtown Chapel is serving the family. Due to Covid-19 restrictions, a memorial service will be held at St. John’s Lutheran Church at a date to be determined.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial donations be made to The Citadel Foundation Class of 1944 Scholarship Fund, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston, SC 29409 or to St. John’s Lutheran Church, 5 Clifford St., Charleston, SC 29401.

Read more about Col. Robert “Bob” Adden in this story by The Post and Courier

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Remembering Major Gen. Arthur H. Baiden, III, U.S. Army (Ret.), The Citadel Class of 1962 https://today.citadel.edu/remembering-major-gen-arthur-h-baiden-iii-u-s-army-ret-the-citadel-class-of-1962/ Fri, 12 Mar 2021 11:34:55 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22640 Maj. Gen. Arthur Hamilton Baiden, III, U.S. Army, (Ret.) of Greenville, S.C., passed away on March 8, 2021 after living the life of a principled leader.]]>

Maj. Gen. Arthur Hamilton Baiden, III, U.S. Army, (Ret.) of Greenville, S.C., passed away on March 8, 2021 after living the life of a principled leader.

Baiden was a member of The Citadel Class of 1962 and dedicated much of his life to serving his alma matter. He was Chairman of the Board of Visitors, Vice Chairman of the Board and President of The Citadel Alumni Association during his lifetime.

Baiden earned a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering and recognition as the second honor graduate when he graduated. He accepted a commission as an officer in the Army, a career that spanned more than three decades. He then has a second, civilian career lasting almost as long.

Baiden retired from his 32-year long civilian career in 2005 as president and CEO of what was then called Potter Shackelford Construction Company in Greenville. Prior to that, he retired with the rank of major general after serving America for 35 years in active duty and the reserves.

While in the Army, Baiden served three combat tours, one in the Dominican Republic and two in Vietnam. His awards and decorations included the Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Purple Heart and Air Medal. He was a master parachutist and ranger. In 1994, South Carolina Governor Carroll Campbell presented the Order of the Palmetto, to Baiden, the state’s highest honor, for his service as commanding general of the 120th Army Reserve Command in support of Operation Desert Storm. He subsequently served as the first Commanding General of the U.S. Army Reserve Readiness Command and as a member of the Army Reserve Forces Policy Committee at the Pentagon.

Baiden served his community as president of the Wade Hampton Sertoma Club; Chairman of the Board of Carolinas AGC, the largest construction trades organization in the Carolinas; and was vice chairman for the Board of Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County.

In addition to his degree from The Citadel, Baiden earned a Masters Degree in Civil Engineering from North Carolina State University; and in 2009 he was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Military Science from The Citadel. Additionally, Bainden graduated from the U.S. Army War College.

Baiden was married for 54 years to Jean Parsons of Fayetteville, North Carolina, who passed away on Aug. 8, 2020. She was also known for her expansive philanthropic service. Her obituary can be read here.

The Baidens are survived by a daughter, son, brother, and three granddaughters.

The Baiden family invites friends and family to leave remembrances about “Art” and Jean at this website where information about services will be posted at a later date.

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Closing the cyber workforce gap: the first Citadel Dept. of Defense Cyber Institute team at work https://today.citadel.edu/closing-the-cyber-workforce-gap-the-first-citadel-dept-of-defense-cyber-institute-team-at-work/ Wed, 10 Mar 2021 15:52:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22554 First cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber InstituteFirst cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute"I believe that through this program and the leaders who are sharing their knowledge with us, I will be more than equipped for the cybersecurity world when I graduate.]]> First cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber InstituteFirst cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute

The first group of cadets and students selected to study under the umbrella of The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute (CDCI) is hard at work, with the goal of being immediately ready to join America’s cybersecurity workforce after graduation. The cluster of future cyber warriors includes one active duty Marine student, one veteran student, and 19 cadets.

The CDCI mission is to ensure the delivery of principled leaders who are experts in cybersecurity and have the skillset and experience required to begin working for the U.S. Department of Defense as soon as they earn their degrees. The program will help expand America’s cyber capability by addressing the critical national security need for a larger cybersecurity workforce.

All of the CDCI participants are pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Cyber Operations, or a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, with a minor in Cybersecurity, or, a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with a minor in Data Science.

Among the students is Cadet Trey Stevens, a junior with a triple major in Computer Science, Cyber Operations and Intelligence and Security Studies. “I feel very fortunate that I’ve been selected to not only advance my own cyber education, but to be better prepared for the agency that I work with post-graduation so that I may perform my job as best as I can,” Stevens said. “This is a unique opportunity where professionals and experts are pouring in their knowledge in order to pave the path for future cybersecurity professionals. I’m planning on maximizing my engagement with this amazing program.”

The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute (CDCI) cadets and students being led by Lt. Col Linda Riedel, SCARNG, and Dr. Shankar Banik, professor of computer science and cyber operations, and director of CDCI and numerous other programs at The Citadel.

The Citadel and the nation’s other five Senior Military Colleges (SMC) have each received approximately $1.5 million of federal money to establish a cybersecurity institute as pilot programs on their campus. The funds are part of a $10 million Department of Defense (DOD) appropriation to the National Security Agency (NSA) for these institutes, included in the 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act.

“It is an honor to be selected for such a program,” said Cadet Jalen Singleton, a junior Computer Science major with a minor in Cybersecurity. “I am included in an extremely talented cohort that has been given access to top cybersecurity knowledge and tools. I believe that through this program and the leaders who are sharing their knowledge with us, I will be more than equipped for the cybersecurity world when I graduate.”

The Department of Defense outlined three priorities for the SMC institutes: sustain a cyber-ready workforce, enhance the nation’s cyber talent and establish a top talent management program. The Citadel is helping achieve these goals.

“Being a part of CDCI is already an amazing experience,” said Cadet Hannah Collee. She is a sophomore double-majoring in Computer Science and Cyber Operations. “There is hands-on learning and countless opportunities for growth. This program helps students get in contact with numerous businesses and internships too. I can’t wait to continue with our team.” 

The 21 cadets and students selected to participate in the college’s first CDCI cohort include:

All, Jackson A.
Collee, Hannah E.
Deans, Conor W.
Freeman, Lydia S.
Hanulcik, Avery
Jensen, William M.
Johnson, Jared M.
Lilling, Eric R.
Lindenmeyer, Andrew R.
Ling, Nathanael C.
Race, Benjamin R
Reynolds, Aaron G.
Roser, Robert G.
Ruiz, Ashley
Singleton, Jalen A.
Skibicki, Ryan
Smiles, Shiloh O.
Stevens, Trey J.
Toomer, Timothy C.
Wells, Noah M.
Whitlock, Benjamin T.

Prospective cadets and students wanting more information should email dhoward2@citadel.edu or call (843) 953-1089.

The Citadel is a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education, as named by the United States Department of National Security Agency and Homeland Security.

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Citadel Graduate College Masters in Intelligence and Security #10 in U.S. by Best Value Schools https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-graduate-college-masters-in-intelligence-and-security-10-in-u-s-by-best-value-schools/ Tue, 09 Mar 2021 17:48:08 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22490 Photo above: Citadel Graduate College students meeting with the Director of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats, on campus in 2018 As seen on BestValueSchools.org It is easy for individuals that are]]>

Photo above: Citadel Graduate College students meeting with the Director of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats, on campus in 2018

As seen on BestValueSchools.org

It is easy for individuals that are not familiar with the complex nature of security professions to assume that a security education is part of criminal justice. The truth is that there are many types of security specialists. The growing need for security professionals leads to the need for those interested in security to receive a a high-quality education, such as a masters in security degree. 

Badge for Best-Masters-in-Security

What Can I Do with a Master’s in Security Degree? 

There are a variety of master’s in security programs available to individuals that have an interest in providing security at national and international levels. Pursuing a masters in security in the field that a person wants to enter requires selecting the right program. This helps to determine what a person can do with a master’s degree in security.

Consider a master’s degree in security studies if you want a career that focuses on security leadership, crisis management, or security analysis. Individuals that want a career in cybersecurity or homeland security often find ideal master’s in security programs that fulfill the goals or requirements for working in these fields. Do you want to focus on the security of populations or on security efforts after a disaster? Earning a master’s in security that focuses on human security is an option that leads to a rewarding career.  

The pay and job growth in security is likely a reason that some people choose to earn a master’s degree in security. The 2019 median pay was $99,730 for information security analysts, with an anticipated job growth of 31 percent through 2029. The National Security Agency (NSA) lists the entry level pay for a mid-level investigator at more than $72,000, and the pay for an NSA Forensic Analyst starting at $93,822 a year. 

Some schools allow students to complete program requirements online to accommodate the busy schedules of working professionals. Other programs require on-campus coursework and other face-to-face meetings. Exploring the best master’s in security programs allows for determining the best school and program that meets your goals and interests.

About The Citadel Master of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies: an online program offering real-world skills

DNI Coats speaking during the 2018 Intelligence and Cyber Security Conference at The Citadel
Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats, speaking during the 2018 Intelligence and Cyber Security Conference at The Citadel

The Master of Arts (MA) degree program in Intelligence and Security Studies (ISS) prepares students to enhance national security through intelligence and homeland security leadership. Best practices for intelligence collection and analysis and national security combined with current theory, research, and experience give students the background necessary to cultivate critical thinking, concise writing, and effective briefing. By introducing applicable management principles and policy analysis, the program fosters the leadership skills to successfully address security and intelligence challenges facing the United States.

Unlike traditional graduate programs that take a theoretical and conceptual track in preparing students for further academic research, The Citadel’s ISS program combines theory and practice to provide the real-world skills necessary to enter and advance in the public and private intelligence arenas.

This program is entirely online to provide maximum flexibility for students, and at the same time allow the ISS program to attract instruction from intelligence professionals located around the world. Our program is taught by internationally recognized experts, with real-world experience at agencies like the FBI, CIA, DHS and at the White House.

Citadel.edu

Learn more and find information about how to apply to The Citadel Graduate College here.

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Col. Thomas J. Gordon, U. S. Marine Corps, to be next Commandant of Cadets at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/col-thomas-j-gordon-u-s-marine-corps-to-be-next-commandant-of-cadets-at-the-citadel/ Mon, 08 Mar 2021 19:08:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22517 Colonel Thomas J. Gordon, USMC, The Citadel Class of 1991, brings a wealth of leadership, operational, and academic experience to the role]]>

The President of The Citadel has selected the college’s next Commandant of Cadets.

Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC, (Ret.) sent the following announcement to the campus community on Monday, March 8:

After an exhaustive vetting and interview process, I am pleased to announce our next Commandant of Cadets.

Colonel Thomas J. Gordon, USMC, The Citadel Class of 1991, brings a wealth of leadership, operational, and academic experience to the role. I am certain he will build on the strong foundations set by Captain Geno Paluso. We are fortunate such dynamic leaders choose to return to their Alma Mater in this critical position. The Corps will continue in good hands.

I wish to thank everyone who expressed interest in the position, particularly finalists Captain Matt Meilstrup, Colonel Mike Larsen ‘92 and Colonel Scott Nahrgang ‘96. This was not an easy choice, each had extraordinary success in their military careers, and the requisite skill and experience to be a successful commandant.

I also thank our search committee, and everyone who took time to assist in the selection process.

On behalf of the entire Citadel Family, I welcome Colonel Gordon, wife Candace, son Shane, and daughters Shannen and Shelby to campus.

The Citadel Commandant of Cadets is a vice presidential position that is responsible for the command, leadership development and oversight of the 2,300-member South Carolina Corps of Cadets and is crucial to the success of the Military College of South Carolina.

Gordon sent this statement in response to his selection:

“I am honored and humbled for the opportunity to serve The Citadel as the next Commandant of Cadets. I am grateful for the confidence Gen. Walters and the BOV have extended, and am excited to give back to the institution that has given me so much. Candace and I are looking forward to returning to Charleston and serving alongside our Citadel family. “

Col. Thomas J. Gordon, USMC

Gordon graduated from The Citadel in 1991, becoming a U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) officer. He retires from military service in May 2021 after 30 years.

Gordon is currently the Director of the Command & Staff College at Quantico, Virginia, one of the four Department of Defense professional military education colleges where he leads the development of future commanders of the joint force with graduate level education.

Previously Gordon served as the Chief of Staff to the Commandant of the Marine Corps, supporting the coordination of policy, plans, and decisions governing the manning, training, and resourcing of nearly 200,000 Marines and 13,000 civilian employees with an annual budget of $42 billion.

Examples of other his positions include serving as a Resident Fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations and as Commanding Officer for a 4,000 member organization executing world-wide combat operations that provided the communications, intelligence, electronic and cyber warfare capabilities, supporting arms integration, and liaison capabilities for the USMC. Gordon holds a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from Webster University and studied as a Fellow of International Relations and National Security with Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The search for a new commandant was initiated in November following an announcement about the retirement of the current commandant, Captain Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.), ’89, who will leave at the end of the current academic year. Paluso joined his alma mater as commandant in 2014.

Approved photo of Col Gordon
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Recognizing the women ROTC leaders helping train America’s next military officers https://today.citadel.edu/recognizing-the-women-rotc-leaders-helping-lead-americas-next-military-officers/ Tue, 02 Mar 2021 17:34:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22398 Women are -- and for decades have been -- an integral part of the team that helps the Military College of South Carolina produce so many future leaders]]>

Women’s History Month is March 1 – 31, 2021

The 40th anniversary of the formal celebration of women in the United States is March 7, 2021. According to WomensHistoryMonth.gov, Women’s History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28, which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as “Women’s History Week.”

At The Citadel, approximately 200 graduates accept commissions every year in all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces to become officers. Women are — and for decades have been — an integral part of the team that helps the Military College of South Carolina produce so many future leaders.

U.S. Air Force/Space Force Detachment 765

The Air Force/Space Force ROTC Detachment at The Citadel is one of the largest in the nation with more than 500 cadets. The department supports The Citadel’s mission of educating and developing principled leaders, providing select cadets with the opportunity to earn a commission in the U.S. Air Force upon graduation.

There are six women in the detachment that work as professors of military science or staff. They include:

The women of The Citadel’s Air Force ROTC detachment. (Left to right: Ms. Cheryl Oliver, Maj. Kathleen Thurber, Capt. Jessica Specht, Capt. Rachel Loomis, Capt. Julie Dewey and Capt. Heather Verner)

U.S. Army ROTC Palmetto Battalion

The Citadel’s Army ROTC detachment, known as Palmetto Battalion, is the second largest of the 275 detachments across the United States Army Cadet Command.

It is comprised of cadets from The Citadel, as well as the College of Charleston, Charleston Southern University, and the Medical University of South Carolina.

The detachment supports the U.S. Army, the Army National Guard, and the Army Reserves. There are five women in the detachment working as professors of military science or staff. They include:

  • Cpt. Laura Alvarez, professor of Military Science
  • Michelle Brown, administrative assistant
  • Sgt. Quamar Crapps
  • 1st Lt. Natalie Thompson, recruiting operations officer
The women of The Citadel Army ROTC department. (Left to right: 1st Lt. Natalie Thompson, Sgt. Quamar Crapps, Sgt. Kellin Varela and Cpt. Laura Alvarez. Not pictured: Michelle Brown)

The Citadel would like to thank all of the women working in ROTC detachments at the college for their dedication and leadership.

Women’s History Month events and resources

APPLE
Feature stories and highlights honor powerful female voices in the App Store and Apple TV app, on Apple Music and Apple Arcade, and in curated collections for Apple News, Apple Podcasts, and Apple Books. Learn more here.

Classrooms without borders: Film and Discussion about Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Free public event, with preregistration required. March 7, 2021 Film and Discussion “RBG” with Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice David Wecht, litigator Ann-Marie Ahern, and Prof. Jonathan Entin- moderated by attorney Courtney Cardin. Sign up here: https://classroomswithoutborders.org/events/rsvp.php?365

Grammy.com on Spotify
Women’s History Month playlist featuring the nominees from the 2020 Grammy Awards Show. The link to the playlist is here.

Military.com
Every March Military.com marks women’s history month by recognizing the contributions made and the glass ceilings broken each day by women in the U.S. ArmyNavyAir ForceMarine Corps and Coast Guard. Read a selection of featured stories here.

NASA
During the month of March, NASA celebrates and pays tribute to the many women who have played an essential role in shaping the history of the  Agency. From astronauts to specialists in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), as well as professionals in communications, human resources, and more, women are helping NASA fulfill its mission to explore our universe for the benefit of all. Learn more here.

Naval History and Heritage Command
On 7 March 1994, the Navy issued the first orders for women to be assigned aboard a combatant ship, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). Today, women serve in every rank from seaman to admiral and in every job from naval aviator to deep-sea diver. Read more here.

PBS.org
A collection of stories by and about women for March 2021. See the list here.

Smithsonian and National Portrait Gallery
What does a leader do? Together with educators from the National Air and Space Museum and the National Women’s History Museum, we will explore this key question in relationship to portraits of activists Sojourner Truth and Sylvia Rivera, and pilot Bessie Coleman. Register for this free event here.

Society of Women Engineers
SWE celebrates some historical figures in the field of engineering who “built American, fought for civil rights, and who were pioneers in their field.” Learn more here.

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Daily Herald: Department of Defense funds $1.465 million for cybersecurity education at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/daily-herald-department-of-defense-funds-1-465-million-for-cybersecurity-education-at-the-citadel/ Sun, 31 Jan 2021 19:00:45 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21711 The Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel CoatsThe Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats"There is a critical shortage of qualified cyber professionals within the Department of Defense, both military and civilian."]]> The Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel CoatsThe Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats

Photo above: Former Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats meets with cadets and students studying cyber security and intelligence at The Citadel in 2018.

As seen in Chicago Daily Herald

CHARLESTON, S.C., Jan. 26, 2021 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The Citadel and the nation’s five other Senior Military Colleges (SMC) are all developing aligned, Department of Defense Cybersecurity Institutes, funded by the federal government. The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute and the other SMC cyber institutes will address the critical national security need for a larger cybersecurity workforce.

The SMCs are federally appointed military colleges offering higher education combined with required military training in the form of Reserve Officers Training Corps Programs or ROTC. Unlike the Federal Services Academies such as the U.S. Air Force Academy, many graduates of SMCs go into military service, but it is not required. The Citadel is only one of two SMCs that continues to offer a full, 24/7 military structure for its on campus, undergraduate population.

Each of the SMCs was awarded approximately $1.5 million in 2020 to form pilot cyber institutes, intended to grow the number of highly trained cybersecurity professionals serving America. The funds, included in the 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act, are part of a $10 million Department of Defense appropriation to the National Security Agency (NSA) for the SMC-based institutes.

“There is a critical shortage of qualified cyber professionals within the Department of Defense, both military and civilian, “said Cyber and Computer Science professor Shankar Banik, Ph.D., a co-director of The Citadel Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies. “More than 500,000 cybersecurity jobs are open nationally. The objective of The Citadel Department of Defense Institute is to provide leaders who are experts in cybersecurity and have the skills and real world experience to join the cyber workforce immediately after graduation.

Banik says within The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute there is a new Cyber Leaders Development Program (CLDP). Each year, 20 cadets will be selected for CLDP and provided with stipends and specialized training. They can pursue a major in Cyber Operations, or a major in Computer Science, with a minor in Cybersecurity, or a major in Computer Science with a minor in Data Science.

“I am so pleased to partner with the Senior Military Colleges to initiate the Department of Defense Cyber Institute pilot program” said Diane M. Janosek, the commandant of NSA’s National Cryptologic School. “The Nation’s focus and investment in these six elite institutions is a key element in the expansion of the talent pipeline. These graduating cybersecurity professionals will go on to serve either on Active duty or in the National Guard or Reserves as service members in the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines or as Department of Defense civilians.”

Objectives of The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute:

1. Develop principled leaders with a cybersecurity skillset who’ll be able to join the cybersecurity workforce on “day one” after graduation
2. Establish a Cyber Lab to provide the type of training required by the Department of Defense
3. Organize cybersecurity summer camps for K-12 teachers and students, creating a pipeline for the cybersecurity workforce
4. Develop and organize cybersecurity boot camps for the South Carolina National Guard
5. Provide experiential learning opportunities to cadets through cyber competitions, internships and outreach activities
6. Encourage talented students to pursue academic programs in cybersecurity, with priority given to women and underrepresented minority students to increase the diversity in the cybersecurity workforce
7. Provide professional development opportunities for cyber faculty
8. Create cybersecurity awareness by organizing a Cybersecurity Day in the month of October (National Cybersecurity Awareness Month).

“With The Citadel’s mission laser-focused on building principled leaders, and with the significant investment by the Department of Defense, our partnership with the other Senior Military Colleges stands to return enormous gains as we prepare the next generation of outstanding graduates skilled in executing cyber defense,” said Darin T. Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean of the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics.

The Citadel has been designated as a National Center for Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education by the National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security since 2016.

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#7 in America: The Citadel Intelligence and Security Studies bachelor’s degree https://today.citadel.edu/7-in-america-the-citadel-intelligence-and-security-studies-bachelors-degree/ Sat, 23 Jan 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21549 Security degree ranking logoSecurity degree ranking logoAll programs are ranked according to their cost, potential salary, and student satisfaction, using current information from IPEDS and Niche.]]> Security degree ranking logoSecurity degree ranking logo

As seen on Securitydegreehub.com

Individuals who are interested in pursuing an intelligence analysis career need to find a degree program that will offer them the skills they need to perform at the highest possible level. National security depends on how well the intelligence analysts do their job. With that being said, intelligence analysis career opportunities are available to those who meet or exceed the expectations that have been set for them. Being able to work in this highly stressful environment requires dedication to detail and a firm resolve to protect our country from any type of threat.

A career in intelligence analysis can lead to opportunities with employment opportunities with private security agencies as well. These private security agencies formulate risk analysis strategies that are beneficial to American companies who have vested financial interests in overseas markets.

Ranking the Best Intelligence Analysis Bachelor’s Degree Programs

Students who are considering a career in intelligence analysis want to know their degree will pay off. That’s why Security Degree Hub editors focuses their rankings on accredited, reputable colleges and universities. All programs are ranked according to their cost, potential salary, and student satisfaction, using current information from IPEDS and Niche.

1. Texas A&M University

The Bush School of Government & Public Service at Texas A&M University offers a practitioner-based learning methodology with its bachelor’s degree in Intelligence as an Instrument of Statecraft. Texas A&M University’s best degrees for intelligence analysis include classes in the art of counterintelligence, national security law, terrorism in today’s world, human intelligence, and advanced analytical tradecraft, to name a few. More than 275 students have graduated from Texas A&M’s intelligence studies degree programs.

Texas A&M University (A&M) was established in 1876 as a land grant school. Texas A&M University is also a sea-grant and space-grant university with a student enrollment that nears 70,000 students – the largest student body in the nation. Texas A&M University holds the distinction of being the only institution of higher education in Texas that has three grant designations – Sea, Space, and Land.

Program: Intelligence Studies

2. James Madison University

James Madison University offers a BS in Intelligence Analysis (IA) that is considered among Virginia’s best degrees for intelligence analysis. James Madison University’s undergraduate degree in intelligence analysis requires the completion of 120 semester units by degree candidates to graduate. The IA curriculum includes 48 semester hours of foundational and core classes that offer the exploration of interdisciplinary topics in the fields of philosophy, business, technology, political science, and technology, among others. Students graduate from James Madison University’s s intelligence analysis degrees to find rewarding careers as security analysis, political analysts, economic analysts, and diplomatic analysts, among others.

James Madison University (Madison) was established as an all-women’s teacher’s school in 1908 and named to honor to honor the fourth United States president. The school’s campus in the Shenandoah Valley is home to approximately 22,550 students. James Madison University became a coeducational school in the mid 1960s.

Program: BS in Intelligence Analysis

3. Bellevue University

Bellevue University offers a BS in Intelligence and Security Studies that requires students to complete a total of 127 semester units to graduate, of which the major in intelligence requires 36 major classes plus 54 credits of electives. Bellevue University’s best degrees for intelligence analysis includes classes in ethical controversies in security & intelligence, introduction to geostrategy, essentials in strategic thought, and radical religion and political extremism, to name a few. Students can opt for a sub=specialization in comparative politics and international relations.

Bellevue University (BU) was founded in 1966 but withdrew rapid growth to become the state’s fourth-largest school in about a decade. Currently, Bellevue University’s suburban campus (and online platform) is home to about 10,250 students. Bellevue University also operates a professional center in nearby Omaha.

Program: BS in Intelligence and Security Studies

4. Arizona State University

Arizona State University offers one of Arizona’s best degrees for intelligence analysis with its Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) in Intelligence & Information Operations. Arizona State University’s baccalaureate degree in intelligence analysis Degree candidates can choose from three academic emphases – information warfare, law enforcement intelligence, and operational intelligence. Classes for ASU’s undergraduate degree in intelligence include counterintelligence, cyberwar and terror, advanced analytics for security operations, and cyber investigations & forensics, among others. Arizona State University is a designated Defense Intelligence Agency center of Excellence (IC-CAE).

Arizona State University was established in 1885 as a research institution of higher education. The multiple campuses operated by Arizona State University are home to 89,750 students. Arizona State University offers more than 700-degree options for undergraduate and graduate students through the university’s seventeen schools.

Program: Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) in Intelligence & Information Operations

5. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University offers one of the best degrees for intelligence analysis with its BS in Global Security & Intelligence Studies (GSIS). Students enrolled in Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s baccalaureate degree in intelligence offers three academic tracks from which to select – the security operations management track, the integrated security & intelligence track, and the Chinese Track where student spend a summer in China during their sophomore and junior years. This undergraduate intelligence degree program requires students to complete 122 semester credits to graduate.

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is a multi-campus institution of higher education that specializes in aerospace and aviation studies. Founded in 1926, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s campuses in Arizona and Florida serve approximately 33,550 students. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University holds the distinction of being the largest accredited school that specializes in aerospace and aviation education.

Program: BS in Global Security & Intelligence Studies

6. George Washington University

George Washington University offers one of the best degrees for intelligence analysis with its Homeland Security Bachelor’s completion program. George Washington University’s baccalaureate degree in intelligence analysis offers unique learning experiences using cutting-edge technology and training methods. Students explore the logical flow between the receipt of threats, the analysis, and the formulation of an appropriate response. Students graduate from GWU’s degree program with the skills and abilities required to successfully negotiate a career in intelligence working domestically or abroad. More than 60 percent of undergraduate students complete internships while studying at George Washington University.

George Washington University was established as Columbian College in 1821 by a congressional act. More than 27,050 students (from all fifty states and more than 125 countries) attend classes vying for degrees provided by the university’s ten colleges/schools. George Washington University has been recognized among the top schools for internship opportunities.

Program: Homeland Security Bachelor’s Completion

7. The Citadel

The Citadel offers a BA in Intelligence and Security Studies (ISS) that is among the best degrees for intelligence analysis. Students who have already complete at least 24 semester credits may apply for this completion degree program, which can be completed entirely online. Students explore the many aspects of global and national threats present to US security forces while employing tactical and strategic analysis.

The Citadel (full name The Military College of South Carolina)l was established as a senior military college in 1842 by the state’s legislative body. Citadel’s campus in Charleston is home to approximately 3,550 students. The Citadel is ranked among the best colleges for veterans. The student body at the Citadel is recognized as one of the biggest uniformed bodies in the nation.

Program: BA in Intelligence and Security Studies

8. American Military University

American Military University offers one of the best degrees for intelligence analysis that can be completed entirely online. American Military University’s BA in Intelligence Studies requires degree candidates to complete 120 semester credits, of which American Military University accepts up to 90 eligible transfer credits. AMU offers students a variety of concentrations in this undergraduate degree program in Asian Studies, Terrorism Studies, Counter and criminal Intelligence, Middle East Studies, Cyber studies, Latin America, General, Geospatial Intelligence, and Intelligence analysis, Collection and Operations. Students complete the degree with a senior seminar in intelligence studies. Students can enroll in this degree program throughout the year with available dates each month.

American Military University is a for-profit distance learning school that is owned by American Public Education Inc. The university serves approximately 46,350 students. American Military University offers online degree programs but maintains administrative offices in Charles Town, WV.

Program: BA in Intelligence Studies

9. Saint Louis University

Saint Louis University offers a BS in Security & Strategic Intelligence that is considered among the Midwest’s best degrees for intelligence analysis. Saint Louis University’s undergraduate degree in intelligence analysis offers students three academic emphases – global Corporate Security, Business Continuity, and Strategic Intelligence. Saint Louis University offers reduced tuition rates for veterans and active-duty military members. Classes for this degree from Saint Louis University include cybersecurity principles, workplace ethics, database analysis, analytics in security and intelligence, cyber threats & defense, threat, and risk assessment, and fundamentals of computer forensics.

Saint Louis University was established as a private academy in 1818. The school maintains two campuses, one in Saint Louis and another in Madrid. Saint Louis University is recognized as the oldest higher learning institution that is situated to the west of the Mississippi River.

Program: BS in Security & Strategic Intelligence

10. Sam Houston State University

Sam Houston State University offers two of the best degrees for intelligence analysis in Texas, offering both a BA or a BS in Security Studies. The primary difference between the two intelligence analysis degrees is the BA’s requirement to complete additional credit hours in a foreign language of their choice. Classes for this major in security studies include border security, introduction to cybersecurity, global terrorism, transportation security, homeland security, public health in homeland security, and water security, to name a few. This undergraduate degree from Sam Houston State University can be completed as a hybrid program or on-campus.

Sam Houston State University (Sam Houston) was established to train teachers in 1879. The college-town campus in Huntsville is home to approximate 21,150 students. Sam Houston State University is considered the third oldest of all public universities and colleges in Texas.

Program: BA or a BS in Security Studies

See the full listing here.

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Citadel Class of 2021 Commencement information and speakers https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-class-of-2021-commencement-information-and-speakers/ Tue, 19 Jan 2021 21:17:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21513 South Carolina Corps of Cadets Graduation, Corps, CadetsSouth Carolina Corps of Cadets Graduation, Corps, CadetsThe college is laying the groundwork for in-person Commencement ceremonies for the Class of 2021 graduates.]]> South Carolina Corps of Cadets Graduation, Corps, CadetsSouth Carolina Corps of Cadets Graduation, Corps, Cadets

Photo above: The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2019 Commencement

Update on Feb. 15, 2021

Corps of Cadets and Veteran/Active Duty Students ceremonies:

  • Saturday, May 8 at 9 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.
  • Cadets will be assigned to a ceremony based on their company
  • Veteran students will attend the 9 a.m. ceremony with cadets

Citadel Graduate College ceremonies:

  • Sunday, May 9 at 9 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.
  • Graduates will be assigned to a ceremony according to their degree

Original article below

This May, approximately 1,000 cadets and Citadel Graduate College students will graduate from The Citadel. The college is laying the groundwork for in-person Commencement ceremonies for both groups. Additionally, the speakers for the ceremonies are prepared to address cadets, students and their guests in person. Each graduate will be provided with electronic tickets for a limited number of guests, as the college anticipates the need for continued social distancing.

“We surveyed last year’s graduates to ask what the two most important factors of Commencement were to them. Overwhelmingly the answers were to graduate alongside their classmates and to have their parents/family present,” said The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters. “This year, with more time to plan than we had last spring, we are thrilled to be able to make that happen.”

Current plans call for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets (SCCC) Class of 2021 to be divided into two groups for two separate, on-campus ceremonies that will be held on Saturday, May 8 in McAlister Field House.

The Citadel Graduate College students will also be divided into two segments for two ceremonies in McAlister Field House. Those events will take place on Sunday, May 9.

Only clear bags will be allowed inside the stadium; metal detection and scanning walk-through entrances will be in place.

The ceremonies will all be livestreamed for extended family members, as well as those unable to attend in person due to pandemic-related conditions or an inability to travel.

“We expect that about 60 days before graduation weekend we can provide finalized details based on the evolution of the pandemic. That is when we’ll know if other commencement-related activities, such as the Long Gray Line parade and awards ceremonies, can be held.” said Kevin Bower, Ph.D., associate provost for Academic Operations and Civil Engineering professor.

South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2021 commencement speaker

The Citadel Commandant of Cadets, Captain Eugene “Geno” Paluso, USN (Ret.), ’89, will address the SCCC Class of 2021. Paluso will retire from the position of commandant on June 30, 2021.

Paluso was born and raised in Washington, Pennsylvania. He attended college at The Citadel where he earned a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics in 1989. He began his military career in the Navy after being commissioned an ensign upon graduation and reported for duty as a student at Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) training in Coronado, California where he graduated with Class 164 in 1990. He went on to serve as a U.S. Navy SEAL officer for more than 25 years. He retired from the Navy in July 2014, joining his alma mater as Commandant of Cadets.

During his career, Paluso held leadership roles commanding special operations forces in the Balkans, Africa, Iraq and Afghanistan. He has led men and women in combat at all levels. Paluso has a Master’s of Military Science from the U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College as well as a Master’s of Science in National Security Strategy Resourcing from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. His service awards include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal (2), Joint Commendation Medal (2), Navy Commendation Medal (5), Joint Achievement Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, as well as numerous other service awards and commendations.

The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2021 Commencement Speaker

Norman Seabrooks, The Citadel Class of 1973, will address The Citadel Graduate College’s graduates. Seabrooks returned to campus to speak to cadets in 2010 about how his Citadel experience shaped and motivated him to succeed in his career; now he will return once again to speak about The Citadel and his career experiences.

Seabrooks was the first African American to play football for the Bulldogs. He entered The Citadel at a tumultuous time in the nation’s history. The Vietnam War raged on in Southeast Asia while anti-war protests caused unrest at home, and the Civil Rights movement experienced some of its darkest moments with the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Throughout the South, the civil rights movement was marked by violence, unrest and the struggle for equal rights. At The Citadel, African American students also struggled at what was then an all-male and predominantly white military college in the South.

The first African American cadet, Charles Foster, graduated in 1970, — one year before Seabrooks enrolled. Amid the challenges of the times, Seabrooks distinguished himself on the gridiron. A three-year starter on the football team he earned first-team All-Southern Conference recognition in 1972 and he served as team co-captain while playing for coach Red Parker. He was inducted into The Citadel Athletics Hall of Fame in 1994. A Dean’s List history major who obtained the rank of cadet first lieutenant, Seabrooks graduated in 1973 and went on to a successful career in the health insurance industry with Aetna Inc., where he was Pacific Northwest Market President for the company. He retired as one of the top 100 employees at the Fortune 500 company with 35,000 employees.

Seabrooks grew up in Pahokee, Florida. He lives in Seattle. 

Personal graduation page for each member of The Class of 2021

A popular feature the college provided for graduates in 2020 will also be provided to the Class of 2021.

Just before graduation weekend, every graduate can log on to a commencement website to view their own graduation page, created just for them. The graduates can share their pages easily on social media platforms. Some of the features will include a photo, video and messaging center for loved ones to share their congratulations, plus a recording of the ceremony to watch at will. Details on how to upload videos and greetings will be shared at a future date.

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Remembering Air Florida Flight 90 hero, Arland Williams Jr., Citadel Class of 1957 https://today.citadel.edu/remembering-air-florida-flight-90-hero-arland-williams-jr-citadel-class-of-1957/ Tue, 12 Jan 2021 21:08:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21265 Painted portrait of Arland D. Williams Jr. Citadel Class of 1957 on The Citadel campusPainted portrait of Arland D. Williams Jr. Citadel Class of 1957 on The Citadel campusFor months...we knew him only as the unknown hero. When the challenge came, Arland D. Williams Jr., Class of 1957, was ready.]]> Painted portrait of Arland D. Williams Jr. Citadel Class of 1957 on The Citadel campusPainted portrait of Arland D. Williams Jr. Citadel Class of 1957 on The Citadel campus

The story behind “the man who passed the rope” saving the lives of his fellow passengers 38 years ago

On January 13, 1982, Arland Dean Williams Jr. boarded Air Florida Flight 90 not knowing it would be his last flight, the last day of his life and that he would be declared a hero by the President of the United States.

Williams graduated from The Citadel in 1957, an Oscar Company sergeant and Business Administration major who loved intermural sports and was known by his high school nickname of “Chub.”

A native of Illinois, Williams served in the military for two years after graduating and went on to become a Federal Reserve Bank examiner.

But severe winter weather caused Air Florida Flight 90 to crash into the icy, 30-feet deep Potomac River as it was nearing Washington D.C. According to historic records, the impact killed 73 of the 79 passengers. Williams was one of six who initially survived, helping the other five escape the sinking wreckage.

What happened to “the man in the water” in the words of a witness

Photo: U.S. Parks Service photo of the Florida Flight 90 rescue effort on the Potomac River

A video just removed from YouTube this week included a description of how the rescue played out, told by chopper rescue crew member Gene Windsor. The narrator and Windsor describe how five of the survivors were pulled out the the water by rope, one at a time.

(Narrator) The helicopter team attempted one final rescue. The the sixth survivor, Arland D. Williams has been in the wreckage since the plane crashed. If you look closely you can see his hands in these dramatic pictures.

(Windsor) He said he couldn’t get out, that he was pinned, that his seatbelt had him or somethings was holding him there.

Photo: Windsor standing on rung of the rescue chopper, pulling a survivor from the water. U.S. Parks Service photo of the Florida Flight 90 rescue effort on the Potomac River

(Narrator) Williams was handed the rope, and three times he “unselfishly passed it on to someone else.

(Windsor) It took great courage to pass it off, and I wanted repay his courage.

(Narrator) Arland Williams had survived the crash, but drowned before he could be rescued.

(Winsdor) When the mission was over I called my wife and I said there was a sixth man. And I told her we couldn’t rescue him. And with that the tears flowed.

As seen in The Washington Post: Mystery Hero Of Air Crash Is Identified

By John Burgess and Washington Post Staff Writer David Hoffman

June 7, 1983

President Reagan announced yesterday that a 46-year-old bank examiner from Atlanta was the “mystery hero” of last year’s Air Florida crash — the man who passed a lifeline to others before drowning in the ice-covered Potomac River.

The president disclosed that a Coast Guard investigation determined that Arland D. Williams Jr., an employee of the Federal Reserve system, “was the hero who gave his life that others might live.

“You can live with tremendous pride. . . ,” Reagan told Williams’ parents and his two children as he posthumously awarded Williams the Coast Guard’s Gold Lifesaving Medal at a ceremony in the Oval Office.

Read the complete article here.

More on President Ronald Regan’s remembrance of Williams in 1993 in Charleston

Below is an excerpt of Reagan’s 60-minute commence address to the South Carolina Corps of Cadets’ Class of 1993. Then the 40th President of the United States, Mr. Reagan paid tribute to Williams by recognizing him as an example of courage others should follow.

But for me, there is one name that will always come to mind whenever I think of The Citadel and the Corps of Cadets. It is a name that appears in no military histories; its owner won no glory on the field of battle.

No, his moment of truth came not in combat, but on a snow-driven, peacetime day in the nation’s capital in January of 1982. That is the day that the civilian airliner, on which he was a passenger, crashed into a Washington bridge, then plunged into the rough waters of the icy Potomac.

… News cameramen, watching helplessly, recorded the scene as the man in the water repeatedly handed the rope to the others, refusing to save himself until the first one, then two, then three and four and finally five of his fellow passengers had been rescued. But when the helicopter returned for one final trip, the trip that would rescue the man who passed the rope, it was too late. He had slipped at last beneath the waves with the sinking wreckage –the only one of 79 fatalities in the disaster who lost his life after the accident itself.

For months thereafter, we knew him only as the “unknown hero.” And then an exhaustive Coast Guard investigation conclusively established his identity. Many of you here today know his name well, as I do, for his portrait now hangs with honor –as it indeed should –on this very campus: the campus where he once walked, as you have, through the Summerall Gate and along the Avenue of Remembrance. He was a young first classman with a crisp uniform and a confident stride on a bright spring morning, full of hopes and plans for the future. He never dreamed that his life’s supreme challenge would come in its final moments, some 25 years later, in the bone-chilling waters of an ice-strewn river and surrounded by others who desperately needed help.

But when the challenge came, he was ready.

His name was Arland D. Williams, Jr., The Citadel Class of 1957. He brought honor to his alma mater, and honor to his nation. I was never more proud as President than on that day in June 1983 when his parents and his children joined me in the Oval Office, for then I was able, on behalf of the nation, to pay posthumous honor to him.

I have spoken of Arland Williams today in part to honor him anew in your presence, here at this special institution that helped mold his character. It is the same institution that has now put its final imprint on you, the graduating seniors of its 150th year.

Ronald Wilson Reagan, 40th President of the United States of America

Read the full transcript of President Ronald Regan’s speech to the South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 1993 in The Citadel Digital Archives here, or watch the speech on C-SPAN.com here.

How The Citadel continues to honor Arland D. Williams Jr.

The Citadel continues to honor Williams in three ways.

His portrait is still displayed on campus, in the Department of Psychology office. In addition, every three years a professor in the department is selected for the Arland D. Williams Jr. Professorship in Heroism. The Class of 1957 endowed this professorship, which provides a stipend for research each of the three years a professor serves in Williams’s name. In 2021 it is Alexandra Macdonald, Ph.D.

And, the Arland D. Williams Jr. Society, formed in 2000, is managed by The Citadel Alumni Association to honor other Citadel alumni who perform acts of extreme heroism. The criteria states that nominees must have “made significant contributions while acting in the noblest, bravest and laudable manner while placing the well-being of others before themselves.” Examples of those inducted into the Society include David Goff, ’78, for saving the life of a man on a bridge while on duty for the Richland County Sheriff’s Department, and Tom Hall, ’89, for saving a person trapped in a car in rising flood waters in 2015 along with the help of his family.

More information about the Society can be obtained, or nominations sent, to info@citadelalumni.org.

The Arland D. Williams Jr. Bridge, Washington, D.C.

The Arland D. Williams Jr. Memorial Bridge on the Potomac River now houses an art project in it’s historic Light Tender’s House. Also known as the 14th Street Bridge, the former drawbridge once served as the entry gateway to Washington D.C.
Photo courtesy of WAMU.org.

Listen to, or read a story about the art project and the bridge’s history here.

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