Students – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 24 Dec 2020 05:15:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Students – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Six generations of Workmans and a wakeup https://today.citadel.edu/six-generations-of-workmans-and-a-wakeup/ Sat, 26 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20940 Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)When Billy Workman matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina.]]> Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)

By Cadet Merritt Reeves, The Citadel Class of 2022
Historic photos provided by The Citadel Archives and Museum

Photo above: Cadet-recruit William Douglas Workman V, The Citadel Class of 2024, a sixth generation Citadel cadet, poses for a portrait on campus on November 20, 2020.

When Billy Workman of Orangeburg matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina, a father-son tradition that dates all the way back to the late 19th century and his great-great-great-grandfather.

Billy’s full name: William Douglas Workman V.

In 1882, The Citadel resumed operations after closing its gates for 17 years after the Civil War. In that year, William Douglas Workman enrolled along with over a 100 other cadets. An 1886 graduate, he was the first of Billy’s ancestors to attend the college.

The second William Douglas Workman in the family line was William Douglas Workman Sr. who graduated from The Citadel in 1909 and was valedictorian of his class.

1909

William Workman Sr. was also the second, and the last, Workman to attend The Citadel before it moved from Marion Square campus to its current location on the Ashley River. Billy’s great-aunt, Dee Benedict, talked about her grandfather’s service during World War I.

 “If you look at my grandfather, he really was an absolute hero of the bunch,” said Benedict. “Back when South Carolina was in its own brigade, he led the charge and broke the back of the Germans.”

Dee Benedict, Billy Workman’s great aunt discussing William Douglas Workman Sr.

In 1935, William Douglas Workman Jr., Billy’s great-grandfather, graduated from The Citadel after holding the rank of battalion commander.

1935

In that year, the Corps numbered 89 cadets who were split into two battalions. William Workman Jr. was Benedict’s grandfather and, according to her, he served in North Africa during World War II. “After the war, he stayed in the reserves,” said Benedict, “He ran for the United States Senate against a newspaper man in Columbia and had 46% of the vote, which was amazing. There were a bunch of people who would get fired because they supported him which made it almost like a revival thing. Although he lost the race, that was the start of the Republican Party in South Carolina.”

Billy’s grandfather, William Douglas Workman III, graduated from The Citadel after serving as first sergeant in Tango Company. A 1961 graduate, he attended the college before it was integrated in 1966.

William Douglas Workman III, The Citadel Class of 1961

Billy’s father, Will (William Douglas Workman IV), who has a cotton ginning business in Orangeburg, was the last of the Workmans to attend The Citadel before the college turned co-ed. 

William Douglas Workman IV, '89
William Douglas Workman IV, ’89

He graduated in 1989 with the self-proclaimed title “centurion.” Known for his sense of humor, Will paid for this comedic streak throughout his years as a cadet with hundreds of tours. These punishments, however, hardly dimmed Will’s mischievous spirit.  According to Billy, he is still a jokester.  “He’s a pretty laid back guy,” said Billy, “but my going to The Citadel has loosened him up even more, and I can relate to him better.”

Doing what only felt natural, Billy is expected to graduate in 2024 with a Business Administration degree. After decades of forefathers who roamed the grounds of The Citadel, Billy finally joined the long line of Cadet Workmans. “Billy always had a choice on whether or not he would go to The Citadel,” said Will, “but when he decided he wanted to go for himself, it made me really proud. I was happy that the tradition wasn’t ending with me.”

William Douglas Workman V,
a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, who goes by Billy, posting for a portrait
at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on November 20, 2020.

The Workman family has seen the college through time and progress. Like Billy’s Citadel COVID-19 on campus freshman year, each generation has had difference experiences, but one thing remains constant—the lasting bond between alumni and college. With five generations before him, Billy feels a familial expectation, but he waits in earnest to fulfill this role and dreams even of continuing the legacy one day with a seventh William Douglas Workman.

Cadet Merritt Reeves is an intern in the Office of Communications and Marketing. A junior majoring in English with a Spanish minor, she has earned Gold Stars for academic excellence. After graduation, she plans to return to her home town of Columbia, South Carolina and attend law school.

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What’s Lurking in our Flood Waters? https://today.citadel.edu/whats-lurking-in-our-flood-waters/ Sat, 26 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21079 A joint research project, with Dr. John Weinstein and Dr. Claudia Rocha, is analyzing microplastics and bacteria found in tidal flood waters.]]>

As seen on WCBD – Count on 2, by Megan James

Under a microscope is a dish of flood waters from Haygood street, and graduate researcher Bonnie Ertel is picking out microplastics.

“I’m looking for color, shape, and also texture.”

It’s all part of the joint research project of Dr. John Weinstein and Dr. Claudia Rocha, analyzing microplastics and bacteria that are found in our sunny day, coastal flood waters from high tides.

“Our hypothesis is that as the flood water covers the street, and then ebs down into the tidal creeks, that it could be a pathway for microplastics into the coastal waterways here in Charleston,” Bonnie Ertel, Graduate Student Researcher at The Citadel, said.

Microplastics, of course, can harm organisms living in these waterways. Harmful bacteria can as well, and it can also cause an array of health problems for people.

“DHEC looks for certain types of bacteria that indicate contamination by fecal matter,” Dr. Claudia Rocha, Professor of Biology, said.

That’s what you can see here in these petri dishes. There are fecal coliforms and enterococci, which harm both human and animal health.

“We find another bacteria that you don’t hear much about and that is vibrio,” Dr. Rocha said. “Vibrios can become a concern not just for the contamination of shellfish, but because it can cause infections.”

Understanding what microplastics and bacteria are found in our waterways is ever important as our climate continues to change.

“The seas are rising, and therefore we are seeing more flooding events here in the city of Charleston,” Dr. Rocha warned.

“It’s not gonna stop anytime soon,” Ertel said. “I think it’s important to understand the whole impact, the environmental impact, this flooding has before it’s too late…. Before it’s too late.”

At the Citadel, Meteorologist Megan James, Count on 2.

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Tis the season: cadets share holiday thoughts and traditions https://today.citadel.edu/tis-the-season-cadets-share-holiday-thoughts-and-traditions/ Sat, 19 Dec 2020 17:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21150 Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019When you are kind, when you treat people with respect and show that you care about them, it goes a very long way.]]> Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019

Photo above: Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019

By Cadet Samantha Walton, Regimental Public Affairs NCO

Cadet Samantha Walton

I’m Samantha Walton. I am a junior, the Regimental Public Affairs NCO for the 2020-21 academic year, and am majoring in Political Science.

I am home in Macon, Georgia with my family for the our Winter Furlough from campus.

Christmas is a very important time for me as a Christian, as an individual, and as a member of The Citadel Gospel Choir.

I also appreciate the differences of my fellow students in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. We don’t all see this season in the same way.

As part of my role as Regimental Public Affairs NCO I work to keep cadets connected through communications and stories. This time, I asked a few cadets to share their thoughts about the holiday season after we all left campus for the break. This is what they emailed back to me.

Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu

Junior, Construction Engineering Major
Taiwan

Favorite holiday song?
My favorite holiday song is “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” because it is very jolly.

A tradition you cherish?
In Taiwan, most people don’t really celebrate Christmas as our holiday, but we do occasionally exchange gifts for fun and sharing joy.

Fondest holiday memory?
I remember when I was little, my dad came home very late once on Christmas eve, dressed up as Santa Claus, and gave me and my brothers presents. This was a special memory because we really didn’t normally celebrate Christmas. And last year I took an amazing trip to Austria.

Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019
Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019

Looking forward to?
I look forward to the decorations everywhere when in America with my host family. It is so magical to see all the lights, Christmas trees, and decorations everywhere you go. Additionally, I was looking forward to going home to Taiwan, but due to COVID-19 I am staying with my host family.

Caring for others in this challenging time?
I am helping my host family move to a new home, gathering things and delivering them for donations, and packing up.

Religious traditions?
I am not religious.

On your wish list?
A Netflix marathon!


Cadet Natalie Stewart, USMC contract

Sophomore, Psychology Major
Las Vegas, Nevada

Cadet Natalie Stewart’s Christmas tree and family dog

Favorite holiday song?
Happy Christmas by John Lennon

A tradition you cherish?
On Christmas my mom, sister and I sit in the living room together and share lots of love. We eat cookies, wear fuzzy pajamas, and spend time together.

Fondest holiday memory?
My fondest holiday memory is when I came home for Winter Furlough from my knob year. I hadn’t seen my family since I left for matriculation, since they live so far away. I remember coming home to my mom and sister, and I felt an immense rush of joy when they hugged me. 

This year we are taking extra precautions to keep my grandparents safe and ordering our gifts all online.

Looking forward to?
I am looking forward to relaxing and spending lots of time with my family and dogs. Since there isn’t much to do with COVID-19 regulations, we will all be home together this Christmas. I hope to make some cookies with my sister! 

Religious traditions?
My family isn’t a specific religion, but we always express the importance of spreading kindness and acceptance in the world. 

On your wish list?
I asked for a new pair of glasses and a watch. I’ll be going into 2021 with 20/20 vision – ha!

Band Company cadet Natalie Stewart prepares supplies before knob arrivals during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel.

Caring for others in this challenging time?
I think the first thing we can do as individuals is spread kindness and love (especially in times like these). For those who are able, there are programs you can reach out to, where you can help others in need. Having open arms (6ft away of course) and recognizing each other’s individual needs can go a long way.

I went through my closet the other day, and I posted what I gathered on my neighborhood page. I was glad I found some people my age who were in need of some clothes. We also got in touch with a local church, where you can “adopt a family” and it allows you to help out a family in need. 

“Use your voice for kindness, your ears for compassion, your hands for charity, your mind for truth, and your heart for love” – Anonymous (Buddhist quote)

Jaret Sean Price

Junior, Exercise Science Major
Aiken, South Carolina

Favorite holiday song?
Little Saint Nick by the Beach Boys

A tradition you cherish?
A tradition that I cherish is that every Christmas Eve after dinner my brother, sister, and I each open an ornament given to us by my Mom and Dad to hang on the family Christmas tree. This was something my Mom did as a little girl with her parents and carried it over when I was born. I hope one day I can continue this family tradition when I have children of my own.

Fondest holiday memory?
I don’t really have a fondest holiday memory. I just enjoy being home with my family and living in the “now.” Every Christmas leaves me with a new memory, and if I were asked what I remember from a certain Christmas then I’d be able to answer with a smile.

Looking forward to?
Each year I look forward to coming home from The Citadel for Winter Furlough and walking into the house to see that my parents have put up all 25 Christmas trees. Each Christmas tree, of course, has its own theme.

The COVID-19 pandemic really isn’t changing how we celebrate the holidays. We’re wearing masks, but still celebrating.

Religious traditions?
We put up my great-grandfathers manger and Nativity Scene that he built and the figurines my great-grandmother painted.

On your wish list?
Not much, just some closes and little things.

Caring for others in this challenging time?
Every Christmas season we do a sweep of clothes that we don’t wear anymore or that are too small on my younger siblings. Those clothes are collected and are taken to the local Goodwill for people who will need them.

When you are kind, when you treat people with respect and show that you care about them, it goes a very long way. As a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets I remember people who were kind and caring towards me, who took the time out of their day to check on me. That is someone I want to be, something that I don’t ever want to steer away from; and I truly believe that all Cadets are capable to doing this.

Freshmen on Matriculation Day 2020

James Hayes III
Freshman, Civil Engineering Major
Ridgeland, South Carolina

Favorite holiday song?
“This Christmas” by Donny Hathaway. We always play this song during the Christmas season.

A tradition you cherish?
A tradition I cherish is when my family goes to my grandparents’ house. We all go there and eat good food, open gifts, and have great fellowship. It’s something I look forward to every year. Unfortunately with the pandemic I don’t think we can all go be with my grandparents.

Fondest holiday memory?
My grandma’s sweet potato pie. It’s a staple during the holiday season

Looking forward to?
I’m looking forward to spending time with my family and friends. I also like to fish so I’m looking forward to that as well.

I am also looking forward to going back to campus in January, but I hope we can have more interaction with our peers, though I know the restrictions were meant to keep us from getting COVID-19. I really enjoyed the battalion cookout we had before we left for furlough. I think doing more of those throughout the year would help a lot.

On your wish list?
I would like to get a guitar and keyboard piano because I started practicing on those instruments this past semester at The Citadel. 

Caring for others in this challenging time?
We are getting gifts for people at the homeless shelters. We are also taking some of our extra clothes and jackets there for people to use this winter.

Candles line the aisle at The Citadel Christmas Candlelight services
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Live performances may have stopped, but The Citadel Gospel Choir has not https://today.citadel.edu/live-performances-may-have-stopped-but-the-citadel-gospel-choir-has-not/ Sat, 19 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20926 Members of The Citadel Gospel Choir gathered with safe distancing to record a variety of songs, to be played in lieu of a live performance.]]>

As the year (finally) comes to a close and we enter, what for many will be, a very strange holiday season, there are at least two ways of looking back at 2020.

One is to remember all that went wrong or what we didn’t like. But another is to feel proud of how we overcame that which could have brought us down.

There’s no way to know for sure — but it’s likely that most of the cadets who are part of The Citadel Gospel Choir will be taking the second option.

Not only did they, like the rest of The Citadel community, make it through a uniquely challenging year: the Gospel Choir also found a way, despite the pandemic, to continue sharing their faith and talents through their performances.

Instead of waiting for things to return to normal, the choir took matters into their own hands.

In early November, the devoted cadets gathered in Johnson Hagood Stadium — with safe, social distancing — to record a variety of songs. The Gospel Choir usually performs multiple times a year, both in and out of South Carolina. These recordings will be played at events where the choir cannot safely perform.

Part of the Gospel Choir tradition includes a performance at the annual, heavily attended Christmas Candlelight Service in Summerall Chapel.

A traditional Christmas Candlelight Service in Summerall Chapel

Though they were not able to perform together like they had hoped, members of the Choir still found ways to maintain one of the most valuable aspects — the kinship.

The relationships are what mean the most to Ruby Bolden, the Regimental Public Affairs Officer. Read about her experience with the Gospel Choir, starting in her knob year, below.

“The race is not given to the swift nor the strong”

I matriculated in August 2017, not knowing what to expect except a challenge. I was grouped with people I did not know and had to learn to trust very fast, which is something that I am not used to doing.

As challenge week progressed, I was introduced to a member of The Citadel Gospel Choir, and he was very warm-hearted and approachable. After that encounter, I believed that the group had to be the same.

Cadet Ruby Bolden, Regimental Public Affairs Officer

Appearing the following semester, I walked through the chapel doors being greeted upon arrival. Classmates that I recognized walking down the Avenue of Remembrance were there and some classmates that were in my company were there as well.

As I greeted everyone and they returned the greeting, I was placed in the soprano section and began to learn and sing songs that I had sung at my home church. The Gospel Choir reminded me a lot of home to the point where I almost wanted to cry.

The people were friendly, and I was comfortable in that space. I remember when I had to introduce myself, I mentioned that it felt like home and at that moment, I knew I would be in it for the long haul.

As years went on, I was able to witness the many successes that the Gospel Choir achieved. From performing in front of our peers, singing at the late Senator Hollings’ funeral to going on tour in the Spring of 2019; the Gospel Choir is one organization that has changed my life significantly.

Since COVID-19 took the world by storm, it has put a lot of things on hold for us. We could not go on tour last year and practices were cancelled for a while which put a strain on the choir’s familial aspects.

Ruby Bolden and members of The Citadel Gospel Choir on their spring tour in 2019

However, through those trying times, we stayed in contact over Zoom and other platforms to stay in touch. Now, practices are being conducted while maintaining social distancing and wearing masks.

These protocols made it hard for us to continue the familial aspects of the choir however, after the practice prayers we state this verse for Ecclesiastes 9:11, “The race is not given to the swift nor the strong, Nor bread to the wise, Nor riches to men of understanding, Nor favor to men of skill; But time and chance happen to them all.”

Simply put, adversities are given to those that are capable of enduring the challenges that comes with it. The Gospel Choir is a testament of that scripture and we will continue to be.

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Past and future meet in a plastic present https://today.citadel.edu/past-and-future-meet-in-a-plastic-present/ Fri, 18 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20593 An interdisciplinary team from The Citadel, with the Gibbes Museum, is lifting the veil that separates the artistic from the technological.]]>

An interdisciplinary team from The Citadel, working with the Gibbes Museum of Art, is lifting the veil that separates the artistic from the technological.

The Veiled Lady — a masterful marble statue created by Pietro Rossi in 1882 — is one of the most well-known pieces of art in the Gibbes.

But the photo above is not of the Veiled Lady. Not the original one, at least.

Thanks to three departments on campus, and a 3D-printer company created by a former cadet called Evolve 3D, the priceless statue can now be recreated, anywhere, for less than a dollar.

Not only that, but the 3D-printed version of the statue can be touched, something that’s attractive to the museum’s everyday visitor and especially important for visually impaired guests.

“When I first saw the iconic Veiled Lady sculpture at the Gibbes Museum, I, like many, was drawn to the stunning textures of this intricately-carved marble,” said Tiffany Silverman, director of The Citadel Fine Arts program. “At the time, as a museum educator, I wished that everyone could have access to experience this artwork in a more tactile, immediate way. Fifteen years later, the perfect combination of talented colleagues and innovative technology has, at last, made this dream possible.” 

The Citadel Fine Arts Department, the Baker School of Business Innovation Lab, The Citadel Makerspace and Evolve 3D worked together to make the project possible — and to help make art more accessible outside of a museum.

Evolve 3D has its own interdisciplinary connections to The Citadel. The business (then called the Cambrian Project) was initially created as part of the annual Baker Business Bowl, a program aimed at helping budding entrepreneurs turn their ideas into income.

Though the team didn’t win the first or second place cash prizes, Ben Scott — the founder and CEO of Evolve 3D — says they earned something more valuable.

On the company’s website, he wrote:

“Countless hours of work, every night in the library, then the garage, studying business, writing/rewriting the business plan, working/reworking financial predictions, not going out on weekends, straining personal relationships for months, and still lost. I didn’t sleep for days following, but ironically, I think we still won. The lesson learned from that failure is worth a lot more than $10,000.”

Evolve 3D also loaned one of their beta printers, named Eve, to the museum which will use it to produce more 3D prints of art.

“This innovative and interdisciplinary partnership with The Citadel has proven to be an exciting way to engage our community with art and new technology,” said Sara Arnold, the director of cultural affairs at the Gibbes Museum of Art. “Our visitors are amazed to see the 3D printer in action at the Gibbes. Bridging art and technology opens a whole new world of creativity and accessibility and we are so grateful to Tiffany Silverman and The Citadel cadets who have shared their time and expertise with us.”

As part of the collaboration, James Bezjian, Ph.D, shared his groundbreaking use of a high-resolution 3D scanner that he uses to document artifacts. Dan Hawkins brought the technology of The Citadel’s Makerspace, including 3D printers. Scott — one of Bezjian’s students — started Evolve 3D along with Fine Arts minor — and one of Silverman’s students — Ethan Warner. The Gibbes Museum, current partner of The Citadel’s Fine Arts program, was looking for ways to increase access to their collection for both virtual and in-person audiences.

To that end, and thanks to the entire team involved, a 3D print of the Veiled Lady is also currently on display, waiting to greet visitors at the Charleston Area Convention and Visitors Bureau.

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Citadel Intelligence and Security Studies veteran student awarded Rangel Graduate Fellowship for foreign service https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-intelligence-and-security-studies-veteran-student-awarded-rangel-graduate-fellowship-for-foreign-service/ Thu, 17 Dec 2020 15:20:22 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20594 Ashley Towers served America for eight years in the Army National Guard’s military police force. Now she will serve the nation again, this time in foreign service through the U.S.]]>

Ashley Towers served America for eight years in the Army National Guard’s military police force. Now she will serve the nation again, this time in foreign service through the U.S. Department of State.

Towers is among a group of 45 individuals recently awarded a Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Graduate Fellowship through a highly competitive, nationwide process. The program prepares “outstanding young people for careers in the Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State in which they can help formulate, represent and implement U.S. foreign policy,” according to the Rangel website.

“As a veteran student and campus leader, Ashley Towers exemplifies the very best in Citadel academics and leadership and is truly deserving of a prestigious Rangel Graduate Fellowship,” said Larry Valero, Ph.D. head of the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies for The Citadel.

Ashley Towers, seen far right, photographed with some of the members of The Citadel Veteran Student Veteran Association in front of the Howitzer cannons on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 5, 2020.

Towers currently serves as president for the The Citadel Graduate College’s Student Veteran Association.

Towers and her class of Fellows will be supported through through two years of graduate study at universities of distinction, internships, mentoring, and professional development activities. The program awards the fellowships annually.

“When I first began looking at the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Graduate Fellowship, I was immediately drawn to the opportunity of such amazing funding for graduate school, and the excitement of a career with the U.S. Foreign Service that involves travel all over the world and learning new languages,” Towers said. “But when I dug deeper into what being a Foreign Service Officer entails, I realized that it would mean much more to me – it would mean serving a greater purpose in another, very different capacity than my time spent in the military, and finding camaraderie in sharing a very important mission. To represent and promote U.S. interests and policy abroad is a great responsibility, and I am honored and grateful for the opportunity.”

The Fellowship is administered by Howard University and provides each recipient with $42,000 annually for a two year period for tuition, room, board, books and mandatory fees for completion of two-year master’s degrees.

Additionally, Towers will have a personally assigned foreign service officer mentor. She will also participate in two summer internships including working on international issues for members of Congress in Washington, D.C. and working in a U.S. Embassy or Consulate assisted with up to $20,000 for internship related expenses.

Fellows who successfully complete the Rangel Program and Foreign Service entry requirements and all security screenings will receive appointments in the State Department Foreign Service. Each Rangel Fellow who obtains a master’s degree is committed to a minimum of five years of service. 

About The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Security Studies

Intelligence and Securities Studies is one of the most popular and fastest growing academic areas of interest at The Citadel. The Citadel has trained provided highly skilled intelligence and security military officers and civilian leaders for more than 100 years.

The Citadel offers Bachelor of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies, a non-cadet degree completion program, and a minor. Additionally, The Citadel Graduate College offers a Master of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies or a Graduate Certificate in Intelligence Analysis.

In the fall of 2020 there were approximately 375 undergraduate majors, 20 minors, and 85 graduate students.

For more information on the programs, please email intell@citadel.edu.

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The Citadel Department of Athletics Announces Partnership with Roper St. Francis Healthcare https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-department-of-athletics-announces-partnership-with-roper-st-francis-healthcare/ Tue, 15 Dec 2020 19:06:35 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20914 Graphic showing Roper St. Francis Logo and Citadel Athletics logoGraphic showing Roper St. Francis Logo and Citadel Athletics logoRoper St. Francis Healthcare will be listed as one of The Citadel athletics department's first cornerstone partners and coined as the official healthcare provider fpr Bulldog athletics.]]> Graphic showing Roper St. Francis Logo and Citadel Athletics logoGraphic showing Roper St. Francis Logo and Citadel Athletics logo

As seen on Citadelsports.com

The Citadel Department of Athletics announced an extended partnership with Roper St. Francis Healthcare to make them the official health care provider for Bulldog athletics.
 
Under the agreement, the healthcare system will be listed as one of The Citadel athletics department’s first cornerstone partners and coined as the official healthcare provider for Bulldog athletics.
 
“Roper St. Francis has been a long-standing partner with The Citadel athletics and have developed strong relationships with our Sports Medicine Department over the years,” said Mike Capaccio, The Citadel director of athletics. “This partnership will help us to increase the quality of care provided for every cadet-athlete that comes to The Citadel. We would like to thank Craig Self and his team for the collaboration on this partnership and we are excited for the future.”

Through the partnership, The Citadel athletics department will work to more fully integrate Roper St. Francis Healthcare into its campus operations.
 
“As the Lowcountry’s only private, not-for-profit healthcare system with a specific focus on advancing community health, Roper St. Francis Healthcare deeply values its long-term partnership with The Citadel,” said Craig Self, vice president & chief strategy and business development officer of Roper St. Francis Healthcare. “We are excited to expand our official healthcare partnership with The Citadel in support of Bulldog athletics and look forward to continuing to collaborate with The Citadel Sports Medicine Department team as it provides health services to both The Citadel student athletes and the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.”
 
 
Roper St. Francis Healthcare cares for more Lowcountry families than any other healthcare provider in our area. Anchored by Roper Hospital, Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital, Roper St. Francis Mount Pleasant Hospital, and Roper St. Francis Berkeley Hospital, our 657-bed health system includes more than 100 facilities and doctors’ offices conveniently located throughout our region. We are Charleston’s only private, not-for-profit hospital system with a specific focus on community outreach, and our mission is “healing all people with compassion, faith and excellence.”
 
 
 

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No Stranger to Challenge https://today.citadel.edu/leading-the-corps-during-covid-19/ Thu, 10 Dec 2020 13:23:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21107 Nick Piacentini on leading the Corps during COVID-19Nick Piacentini on leading the Corps during COVID-19Returning to campus during the COVID-19 pandemic was the ultimate team sport, and as Regimental Commander Cadet Col. Nick Piacentini served as team captain.]]> Nick Piacentini on leading the Corps during COVID-19Nick Piacentini on leading the Corps during COVID-19

Nick Piacentini stood in formation on Summerall Field amid the other 2,300 cadets at the February 2018 parade listening to the cadet announcer read Dylan Graham’s MacArthur Award citation. Graham was the regimental commander, the top-ranking member of the Corps of Cadets, and Piacentini was an India Company freshman from Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania.

“I remember hearing his accomplishments—it was this big accumulation, but it wasn’t just his accomplishments,” said Piacentini. “Everybody spoke so highly of him. He was smart, good at PT; he had every reason in the world to brag and be cocky and have a huge head, but he was just this humble guy. And I remember thinking, ‘That’s who I want to be.’”

Last March, as the Corps prepared to depart for spring break, Piacentini waited to hear the results of the rank board selection. When all of the other selected officers received emails, Piacentini started to second guess himself, but then he was called to the commandant’s office. Accompanying the commandant, retired Navy Capt. Geno Paluso, ’89, were 2020 Regimental Commander Cadet Ben Snyder and Regimental Executive Officer Brennen Zeigler. When Zeigler reached out to shake Piacentini’s hand first, Piacentini thought he was being named to the XO position.

“He shook my hand, and when he released it, there in my palm were the three diamonds—the regimental commander’s rank,” said Piacentini.

Paluso said something about the three diamonds that has stayed with Piacentini, especially as he navigates the challenges presented by COVID. “You will earn them every single day,” Piacentini remembers him saying.

Piacentini is no stranger to challenge. A Gold Star student, a member of Junior Sword Arch and the Summerall Guards, and a Navy contract cadet, Piacentini was attracted to The Citadel because it symbolized the pursuit of perfection and attention to detail. He liked being held to standards and trying to exceed them, and he liked the challenge The Citadel presented. And in October, he learned that he had earned a coveted slot to Basic Underwater Demolition SEAL training.

“COVID presents a lot of challenges. Everything we do is constantly reassessed to determine how we can do it in a socially distant manner, with masks on and with capacity limits in mind. Everything from matriculation day to classes; everything from daily formations to meetings, chapel and mess—every operation on campus is completely different based on our reassessment of how we can do it in accordance with COVID guidelines. And it’s been great,” said Piacentini, “because we’ve been able to try different things and realize that those things actually might work better in the future. But we’ve also been able to stay calm, take a step back to reassess and reprogram ourselves to do things a different way, not just how we have traditionally always done it.”

Piacentini’s work and that of the Corps has been tremendous. He’s had to be strategic and think in innovative ways. When other colleges were forced to go online, The Citadel has been able to keep cadets on campus to hold in-person classes and learn from the pandemic.

“COVID has forced me as a leader to constantly evaluate the situation and the risks involved—what’s the right thing to do versus what’s the popular thing to do. It’s prepared me to be a better leader—to tackle situations and issues head-on and not step back or cower because I don’t know the plan, or I’m not sure what’s going to happen in the future.”

Three years ago, when Piacentini vowed to follow in Graham’s footsteps, he never envisioned doing so with a mask on, and that’s made the job even harder, but in his characteristic style, with resilience balanced by humility, Piacentini has met the challenge head on. And that’s made all the difference.

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Bowling for business bucks: cadets and students prepare to compete for $10,000 https://today.citadel.edu/bowling-for-business-bucks-cadets-and-students-prepare-to-compete-for-10000/ Thu, 10 Dec 2020 00:00:04 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20487 Five teams will spend their winter furlough working on a business idea that could turn into their future career -- and also a hefty check.]]>

Photo: Shawn Swartwood, director of the Baker Business Bowl, introducing the teams on Zoom before the semifinals

The final round of the Business Baker Bowl VII will be held in April

Five groups of Citadel cadets and students will spend their winter furlough and the beginning of the spring semester working on a business idea that could turn into their future career — and also a hefty check.

In early November, 9 teams — from multiple and various majors — squared off to earn a spot in the final round of the Baker Business Bowl VII. The competition was broadcast on Zoom to allow for social distancing.

In the end, the judges chose five teams to compete in the finals.

The final business ideas include: designing and building an off-road BAJA vehicle, a 3D printing filament recycler that can also convert used bottles into filament, a one-handed Xbox controller, a solar-powered dehumidifier, and an app that allows you to schedule hair stylists to visit you at home (much like Uber Eats).

The first place prize is $10,000, meant to help them start their business; the second-place team will receive $5,000. The prize money is made possible by The Citadel Class of 1989.

Each team was given five minutes to present their business ideas to a panel of business experts. After the teams pitched their ideas, the judges were given ten minutes to ask questions.

The teams that will compete in the final round of the Baker Business Bowl are:

BAJA SAE

A single-seat, all-terrain sporting vehicle — designed and constructed by the team — which is capable of being produced on a mass scale.

Team members include:

  • Zachary Adkins
  • Stephen Channell
  • Dusty Jones
  • Jeff Kidner
  • Marshall McKee
  • Tyler Nathan
  • Joseph Pham
  • Mike Sanada
  • Giselle Shapiro
  • Kenneth Spurlock
  • John Stork
  • Sara Surrett
  • Clifford Swindel
  • Phil Wellons
  • Maxwell Whalen

Extrusionaire

A device that melts down 3D printed parts and scrap, and then reforms it back into filament to be reused by a 3D printer; also allows used water bottles to be melted down into filament.

Team members include:

  • Luis Garcia
  • Mateo Gomez
  • Craig Niswender
  • Benjamin Perry
  • Tiernan Van Dyke

Helping Hands Gaming

A one-handed Xbox gaming controller, with designs for both left- and right-handed users, that retains full functional capabilities like buttons and joysticks; the controller will include a wrist strap and the option to use with foot pedals.

Team members include:

  • Jordan Cavender
  • Daniel Esteban
  • Jason Flowers
  • Fuller Prickett

Solar Suck

An effective dehumidifier that exclusively uses solar power to lower utility prices and promote clean energy; it can also be used in survival situations, such as in a lifeboat, in order to collect water from the air to drink.

Team members include:

  • Cade Bennett
  • Andrew Brabazon
  • Charles Marsh
  • Joshua Valencia
  • Jack Zappendorf

Zip Clips

An app for smart phones that takes the popular model of third party delivery and applies it to the hair industry; users can order or schedule a haircut, much like they can order food or rides through Uber or Lyft.

Team members include:

  • Thomas MacDonald
  • Thomas Kyte

The Baker Business Bowl is a program aimed at helping budding entrepreneurs who have an idea for a new product or service, and the desire to turn that idea into a business. The competition is open to cadets, evening undergraduate students and graduate students.

The date of the final round, sometime in April 2021, has not yet been determined; when available, the schedule can be found here.

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Excellence in Leadership: Lt. Sarah Zorn https://today.citadel.edu/excellence-in-leadership-lt-sarah-zorn/ Tue, 08 Dec 2020 17:19:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20611 Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Army leaders have strong intellect, physical presence, professional competence, high moral character, and serve as role models. Lt. Zorn has been recognized for her selfless care within the ‘Thunderbolt’ community.]]> Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)

As seen on DVIDSHub
Joint Base Lewis McChord, Washington
By Sgt. Casey Hustin, 17th Field Artillery Brigade

Photo above: Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade) 

JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — An Army Leader is anyone who by virtue of assumed role or assigned responsibility inspires and influences people to accomplish organizational goals— 1st. Lt. Sarah Zorn, who for the past six months has accomplished that and more within the 5th battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 17th Field Artillery Brigade, has her own idea of what makes a great Leader.

“You have to be competent; you have to be confident; you have to care—and a little common sense doesn’t hurt,” said 1st Lt. Sarah Zorn, an operations officer with Bravo Battery. “I feel like that philosophy kind of defines my leadership approach and who I want to be as a lieutenant.”

Zorn demonstrated her innate ability to pursue actions, focus thinking, and shape decisions for the greater good of the organization both in and outside the chain of command of the ‘Black Knight’ platoon.

“Lt. Zorn has filled the role as the headquarters platoon leader,” said Capt. Grayson Williams, Company Commander with B-Btry., 5th Bn., 3rd FAR. “She really just wants to see others succeed in her platoon. She just goes the extra mile to make sure that the platoon succeeds. Her ability to provide that insight and always the desire to learn has been instrumental in the success for the battery so far.”

From making history as the first female regimental commander at the Citadel for 2,300 cadets, to becoming a platoon leader of 20 soldiers, Lt. Zorn stays focused on doing the job at hand and doing it right.

“I think that transition from big picture to a little bit smaller picture really fundamentally is all the same,” said Zorn. “So—I come into work every day and I tell myself I’m just going to do the next right thing—whether it be the next right thing for soldiers, the next right thing for the battery—the next right thing for the team.”

Army leaders have strong intellect, physical presence, professional competence, high moral character, and serve as role models. Lt. Zorn has been recognized for her selfless care within the ‘Thunderbolt’ community.

“I’d like to highlight just how much genuine care she has for soldiers,” said Williams. “I know she has taken time out of her weekends to work on care packages for families with new babies in the battery. Lt. Zorn just wants to see the whole battery succeed, and really she shows this commitment as she volunteers her own time to really provide and deliver what the battery is asking for.”

Zorn said, “I would say to anyone who’s considering this or maybe anyone who is brand new and who is doubting themselves—this (the Army) is one of the most rewarding careers that you could ever have.”

The most successful Army Leaders, like Lt. Zorn, recognize that great organizations are built upon the mutual trust and confidence of our greatest assets—our people—who come together to accomplish peacetime and wartime missions—and so long as we continue to inspire leaders like Lt. Zorn to join us—we cannot fail.

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