Faculty & Staff – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Wed, 22 Jun 2022 17:36:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Faculty & Staff – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 The Citadel’s summer Executive Leadership Academy to offer two professional development opportunities https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadels-summer-executive-leadership-academy-to-offer-two-professional-development-opportunities/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 17:34:36 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32579 In July, The Citadel will host two opportunities for professionals to develop their leadership skills as they begin to progress in their careers.]]>

Limited seating available for in-person professional development sessions July

For almost 200 years, The Citadel has trained and developed principled leaders for all walks of life.

Now, in cooperation with the Center for Creative Leadership, the campus will host two opportunities for professionals to develop their leadership skills as they begin to progress in their careers.

The Executive Leadership Academy will offer attendees two proven programs from the CCL. The first, Lead 4 Success, will be held Tuesday, July 19 and Wednesday, July 20, followed by Better Conversations Everyday on Thursday, July 21.

“Regardless of a participant’s level in their organization, these two programs will offer skills necessary for successful leadership throughout their careers and their lives,” said Faith Rivers James, J.D., head of The Citadel Department of Leadership Studies and administrator of the Executive Leadership Academy. “Through the program’s in-depth training and practice, experienced facilitators will ensure that those who attend will leave with knowledge that will improve both themselves and their coworkers.”

To register for either session — or both, at a discounted rate — click here.

Lead 4 Success is a comprehensive, two-day program offering insight into four areas important for successful leadership: self-awareness, learning agility, influence and communications. To learn more about Lead 4 Success, click here.

Better Conversations Everyday is focused on improving a company through better conversations. Regardless of an organization’s size, improving conversations help drive business outcomes and create lasting change. To learn more about Better Conversations Everyday, click here.

The sessions will be facilitated by Lt. Col. Clemson Turregano, Ph.D., U.S. Army (Ret.), a professor of practice in The Citadel Department of Leadership Studies. Recently retired from CCL, Turregano leads international teams responsible for the development, design, integration, management and distribution of leadership programs around the world.

All sessions will be held at the Swain Boating Center on The Citadel campus and will run from 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Lunches will be provided.

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Change-leading Citadel researcher and professor earns accolade from SC governor https://today.citadel.edu/change-leading-citadel-researcher-and-professor-earns-accolade-from-sc-governor/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 18:43:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32551 Weinstein’s research on microplastics, especially the discovery of microscopic tire particles in coastal waters, has gained both national and international attention.]]>

John Weinstein, Ph.D., recipient of Governor’s Award for Excellence in Scientific Research

He is best known for his landmark studies assessing the sources, fate and effects of plastic and microplastic pollution along the South Carolina coast. That work is just part of what led John Weinstein, Ph.D., a professor of Biology at The Citadel, to be the 2022 recipient of the Governor’s Award for Excellence in Scientific Research at a Predominantly Undergraduate Institution.

Dr. Weinstein’s research in the last two decades has been squarely at the epicenter of environmental toxicology, providing scientific insight into some of the most pressing environmental issues that affect our coastal ecosystems.

Darin Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean for the Swain Family School of Mathematics and Science, introducing John Weinstein at the Governor’s award event on May 31, 2022

Zimmerman accompanied Weinstein to the state capitol to accept the honor from South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster.

“This award recognizes Dr. John Weinstein’s record of scientific research excellence as well as his many contributions to teaching and service. He is a highly respected scientist with an impressive record of research accomplishments. Through teaching and mentoring of students, he has expanded our state’s STEM literacy and helped to increase the visibility of its research within the national and international scientific communities,” the Governor’s proclamation read.

Why he stands out

Cadets Jerry Higgins and Douglas Karam, accompanied by Dr. John Weinstein, Biology, deploy an experiment to measure how face masks, rubber gloves and hand wipes decompose in the salt marsh behind Inouye Hall on Thursday, October 14, 2021.

Weinstein’s research on microplastics, especially the discovery of microscopic tire particles in coastal waters, has gained both national and international attention. The national media, including National Geographic, National Public Radio and the National Resources Defense Council have highlighted his research findings. Underscoring the international significance of Weinstein’s research, he was recently invited to participate in hearings at the French Senate in Paris as the Parliamentary Office for Scientific and Technological Assessment were interested in learning more about his findings.

Weinstein’s current national and international grant-funded research projects include:

  • Microplastic abundance in oysters and its impact on human health (funded through a $5.7 million grant through the National Institutes of Health to establish a Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions at the University of South Carolina)
  • Pathways of Microplastic and Tire Particles through Stormwater Infrastructure (funded by the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, research being conducted with colleagues from Clemson and College of Charleston)
  • Nuisance Flooding as a Pathway for Microplastic Entry into Coastal Waters (funded through The Citadel Near Center for Climate Studies, research being conducted with colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania)
  • Occurrence and Degradation of Pandemic-Related Plastic PPE in Charleston Harbor (funded by the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium)
  • Application of Standardized Litter Assessment Methodology to Southeastern U.S. Beaches to Compare French and U.S. Plastic Debris (funded by the Global Council for Science and the Environment, research being conducted with French scientists from the Center of Documentation, Research and Experimentation on Accidental Water Pollution)
Dr. John Weinstein studies microplastics at The Citadel (Courtesy: Victoria Hansen, SC Public Radio)
Dr. John Weinstein studies microplastics at The Citadel. (Courtesy: Victoria Hansen, SC Public Radio)

Weinstein, who was recently named assistant provost for research at The Citadel, received his Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in 1991. He accepted a faculty position with the Department of Biology at The Citadel in 2000, where he has since also served in a variety of administrative roles including department chair, associate dean for accreditation and interim dean. Weinstein has established an impressive record of mentoring both undergraduate and graduate students in his research, many of whom have won presentation awards at local, national and international conferences and have gone on to successful careers in environmental science.

I can trace my interest in the field of environmental toxicology all the way back to when I was growing up in New Jersey, where my family would spend summers at the beach. Even at an early age, I used to wonder where marine debris came from and what impacts was it having on sea creatures. These early experiences fostered in me a curiosity of the natural world and an appreciation of how humans can influence natural processes. Equally important is that I thoroughly enjoy training the next generation of scientists by providing guidance and mentorship. The undergraduate and graduate students that I’ve trained in my research laboratory have been truly remarkable. The recognition that I’ve received is really a testament to their hard work and perseverance.

John Weinstein, Ph.D., Biology professor and assistant provost for research at The Citadel
Dr. John Weinstein (center with plaque) posing for a photograph at the South Carolina state capitol with his family and with the Dean of the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics, Darin Zimmerman (far right), on May 31, 2022.
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America’s Intelligence Community gains 85 new professionals from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets https://today.citadel.edu/americas-intelligence-community-gains-85-new-professionals-from-the-south-carolina-corps-of-cadets/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 17:58:01 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32410 Intelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelIntelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelThe Class of 2022 includes 85 cadets who studied Intelligence and Security Studies. Before graduation, some shared their career goals and advice for others considering The Citadel. ]]> Intelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelIntelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel

Photo: Intelligence and Security Studies professor Lt. Col. Michael Brady, USA (Ret.), ’90, former Director, Presidential Emergency Operations Center in the White House (2001 – 2002), leading a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel in 2019.

The Citadel ignites careers for mission-driven, global problem solvers

As the number and types of positions within the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) continue to expand, those earning degrees from The Citadel are in high demand. For decades, The Citadel has been known by America’s IC leaders as a top producer of young professionals for intelligence roles.

In 2017, The Citadel formalized this career pathway, founding the first Department of Intelligence and Security Studies and corresponding undergraduate degree in South Carolina. Now it’s one of the most in-demand majors at The Citadel. There are 18 organizations in the IC, and Citadel alumni are serving in those agencies as intelligence analysists; inspection, investigation and compliance professionals; field agents and supervisors; cybersecurity officers; business and finance experts; facilities design; set up and logistic experts; or visual information specialists, to name just some of the many intelligence job functions.

The Class of 2022 includes 85 cadets who studied Intelligence and Security Studies. Below, some of them share thoughts about their career goals along with advice for younger students considering studying intelligence at The Citadel.

Joshua Babcock, South Carolina Highway Patrol Academy
Hometown: Johnson City, New York

Joshua Babcock, The Citadel Class of 2022

As a highway patrol officer, I will provide equitable service and protection, and uphold the laws of the constitutions of the United States and the state of South Carolina in order to promote a safe and secure environment for the public.

After gaining professional experience with the South Carolina Highway Patrol, I plan on using my degree to join an intelligence organization.

I believe the best reason to attend The Citadel is that it will forge you into a better leader. It will make you more mature, confident, physically fit and will challenge you to become a better version of yourself that you may have never thought was possible.”

2nd Lt. Christian Blase, U.S. Army
Hometown: North Augusta, South Carolina

2nd Lt. Christian Blase, The Citadel Class of 2022

Preparing physically before you arrive at The Citadel for knob year is very important.

Come focused on wanting to learn and grow as a leader.

The structure you follow day to day as a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets will help if you choose to apply it to your daily life later.

2nd Lt. Gregory Chaves, U.S. Marine Corps, intelligence officer
Hometown: Los Angeles

The Citadel helped me focus on learning and thinking for myself. The friendships and experiences of cadet life help us all grow, preparing us to meet our goals.

Ensign Collin Gleco, U.S. Navy, submarine officer
Hometown: Shavertown, Pennsylvania

Collin Gleco, The Citadel Class of 2022

Double major: Spanish, Political Science, minor in Intelligence and Security Studies.

The Citadel provided the opportunity to build my leadership philosophy before being commissioned as an officer in the Navy. The ROTC programs are excellent.

In high school, I would never have believed that I would attend The Citadel, become a double major, first sergeant, company commander and an ensign in the Navy.

Jarett King, Department of Defense
Hometown: Sumter, South Carolina

When I was academically accepted to The Citadel, I was elated. I found out afterwards about the height/weight requirement for cadets and was worried that I would not be granted admission. During my senior year of high school, I reflected on what was important to me and why I wanted to attend The Citadel. That inspired me to lose 100 pounds before becoming a knob.

Attending The Citadel was probably one of the best decisions I’ve ever made in my life. The Citadel will teach you what type of follower you wish to be, what type of leader you wish to be. It will help you focus on your goals and aspirations and it will provide a sense of comradery that cannot be rivaled.

2nd Lt. Angelea Lance, U.S. Army, military intelligence officer
Hometown: Fort Worth, Texas

My goals are to stay in the Army past my scholarship obligation and fulfill my passion of serving others and my nation in the best way possible.

For those considering attending The Citadel, know that it creates a solid foundation for your future by challenging you to be the best you can be.

2nd. Lt. David McBain, U.S. Army Aviation Center, pilot
Hometown: Damascus, Maryland

The best reason to attend The Citadel is the structure of the Corps and the many requirements that teach time management, plus the focus on academics afforded to the cadets.

Phillip Quinn, Department of Defense
Hometown: Highland Park, Texas

Double major: Intelligence and Security Studies, Political Science, minor in Cybersecurity.

I selected The Citadel to push myself.

Those deciding to come here must arrive knowing knowing you need to just keep your head down and enjoy the grind. You can’t make it at The Citadel alone. That’s the whole point of being in the Corps. You must work together with your classmates — that’s what makes the difference.

2nd Lt. Steven Reisinger, U.S. Marine Corps cyber officer, Quantico, Virginia
Hometown: Millerton, Pennsylvania

The Citadel sets you apart from your future competition in life. The interpersonal skills and ethics you learn from your time here transform you into the kind of leader this country so desperately needs.

And — the many friends you make here will become family for life.

Learning Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel

There are numerous ways to learn Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. There is a South Carolina Corps of Cadets program and a non-cadet online undergraduate program which includes veteran and active duty students.

There are five areas of concentration for undergraduates to select when majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. They include:

  • Business Intelligence
  • Chinese Area Studies
  • Counterterrorism
  • General Intelligence
  • Military Intelligence

There is also an option for cadets and students to use their tuition from one semester to study in Washington, D.C., through The Citadel in DC program.

The Citadel Graduate College offers a (non-cadet) Master of Arts in intelligence and Security Studies. There are close to 60 students in that program, learning online, with the options of selecting concentrations in Cybersecurity or Leadership. The Class of 2022 included 17 master’s level graduates.

For more information about Intelligence and Security Studies programs at The Citadel and how to apply, visit this webpage, email intell@citdel.edu.

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Citadel professor co-organizing conference marking 50th anniversary of Watergate https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-professor-co-organizing-conference-marking-50th-anniversary-of-watergate/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 17:28:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32471 Registration is now open for the free, online conference that will allow Watergate experts to explore some of the scandal's lingering mysteries.]]>

Photo: The Watergate Hotel complex in 1985 (Courtesy: National Archives)

Registration now open for free, online conference

The 50th anniversary of the Watergate break in, one of the most well-known political scandals in American history, will be on Friday, June 17.

The week before that, Melissa Graves, Ph.D., from The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, and Shane O’Sullivan, Ph.D., from Kingston School of Art in London, will convene a free, two-day virtual conference to reflect on the lasting impact Watergate had on American politics and culture.

The conference will be held on Thursday, June 9, and Friday, June 10, beginning at 10 a.m. on both days.

Much of Graves’s research is focused on Watergate, including a book on the FBI’s response. In Feb. 2020, she organized a historic panel, which reunited the FBI’s lead investigators for Watergate for the first time since the scandal.

“Watergate is a great example showing the importance and expertise of the intelligence community,” said Graves. “Though many Americans — and people around the world, for that matter — know of Watergate, fewer know about the fascinating stories of the case’s investigators. Through this conference, we will bring together experts who will explain the myths, the investigation, the results and much more.”

Five decades after it happened, and despite the amount written about the scandal, many mysteries from the case remain. The conference, titled “The Watergate Break-in: 50 Years Later,” will allow experts to explore some of those questions.

The surviving investigators and prosecutors still can’t understand why the burglars entered DNC headquarters in the early morning hours of June 17, 1972; or how the experienced intelligence operatives in the break-in team made such elementary mistakes, resulting in their arrests and President Nixon’s resignation two years later.

from “The Watergate Break-in: 50 Years Later” conference website

Speakers at the conference will include historians, academics, as well as Watergate prosecutors and investigators. The full program can be found here.

The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies is one of the largest and fastest-growing on campus, offering degrees to cadet and non-cadet undergraduates, as well as graduate students.

The online conference is free to attend. Click here to register.

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Dr. Mary K. Watson named Civil Engineer Educator of the Year and Clemson Outstanding Young Alumni https://today.citadel.edu/dr-mary-k-watson-named-civil-engineer-educator-of-the-year-and-clemson-outstanding-young-alumni/ Thu, 19 May 2022 13:10:15 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32255 Dr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The CitadelDr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The Citadel"Dr. Watson is performing at the very highest level of scholarly achievement and contributing immensely to the success of The Citadel."]]> Dr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The CitadelDr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The Citadel

The Citadel School of Engineering professor continues leading in her field

A woman who began making her mark in the engineering industry almost as soon as she joined The Citadel in 2013, Mary K. Watson, Ph.D., is now the 2022 recipient of the Civil Engineer Educator of the Year Award. The award comes from the South Carolina Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). It will be presented June 10 at the S.C. Engineering and Trade Show.

Watson is an associate professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering with The Citadel School of Engineering. She was nominated for the award by the Jeff Davis, Ph.D., head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at The Citadel.

Dr. Watson is performing at the very highest level of scholarly achievement and contributing immensely to the success of the Department and School of Engineering. Furthermore, her work has far-reaching regional, national and international impact in advancing engineering educational practice and engineering student development.

Jeff Davis, Ph.D., P.E., The Citadel School of Engineering

Watson has earned more than $1 million in grant funding, supported by the National Science Foundation. She leads the college’s environmental and water resources curriculum and serves as the primary academic advisor for about 40 students in the School of Engineering College Transfer Program (CTP).

Dr. Watson, thank you profoundly for caring as you do for every student’s individual development, not just as an academic, but as an engineer, leader and person.

CTP Civil Engineering Class of 2020 graduate

Watson was also recently included in a new cohort of Outstanding Young Alumni, by Clemson University’s College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences. In addition to her new accolades, Watson has earned numerous others, some of which include:

  • Excellence in Research Award, The Citadel Provost, 2022
  • New Faculty Research Award, SE Section, American Society for Engineering Education, 2019
  • Outstanding Paper, 9th Conf. on Engineering Education for Sustainable Development, 2018
  • Best Paper Award, Multidisciplinary Division, Am. Society for Engineering Education, 2017
  • Seeley Award, Civil Engineering Division, American Society for Engineering Education, 2017
  • Best Instructional Paper, SE Section, American Society for Engineering Education, 2017, 2012
  • Young Civil Engineer of the Year, South Carolina Section, ASCE, 2016
  • New Faculty Excellence in Teaching Award, Committee on Faculty Development, ASCE, 2016
  • Outstanding New Teaching Award, SE Section, American Society for Engineering Education, 2015
  • Best Paper Award, New Engineering Educators Div., Am. Society for Engineering Education, 2015

As seen on Clemson.edu

Six honored by College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences

(From left) Craig Fallon, Rebecca Copenhaver DeLegge, Anand Gramopadhye, Robert Fjeld, Adam Kirn and Mary Katherine Watson pose for a photo at the gala celebrating the newest members of the Thomas Green Clemson Academy of Engineers and Scientists and Outstanding Young Alumni. Diana Chen, who is not pictured, was unable to attend. Photo courtesy of Clemson.edu.

Some of the most outstanding alumni and one faculty emeritus from Clemson University’s largest college gathered in downtown Greenville on Thursday to welcome three of their own into the Thomas Green Clemson Academy of Engineers and Scientists and to honor three others as Outstanding Young Alumni.

Induction to the academy is the highest honor bestowed by Clemson’s College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences. The honor recognizes alumni and special friends who have made major contributions to their professions and have brought significant distinction to the college and university.

The new members are Rebecca Copenhaver DeLegge, Craig Fallon and Robert Fjeld.

The newest crop of Outstanding Young Alumni are Diana Chen, Adam Kirn and Mary Katherine Watson. The award goes to graduates of the college who are 40 years old or younger and whose achievements have been significant to their profession or to the welfare of society.

Anand Gramopadhye, the college’s dean, thanked the night’s honorees and said each is leaving his or her unique mark on the world.

“We will always cherish the fact that your Clemson education may have had a small role to play in your success,” he said. “To paraphrase the Dalai Lama, we hope we have given you wings to fly, roots to come back and reasons to give.”

Mary Katherine Watson: Watson holds Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in biosystems engineering from Clemson. As an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at The Citadel, she has been recognized for her teaching excellence and her prowess as a researcher, developing scholarly contributions to the field of engineering education. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Watson is building regional and national programs for supporting advancement of diverse faculty and students in STEM fields.

Clemson.edu

Read the full announcement, WITH INFORMATION ON THE OTHER OUTSTANDING YOUNG ALUMNI, here.

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Thad Miller: A cut above the rest https://today.citadel.edu/thad-miller-a-cut-above-the-rest/ Sat, 14 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32243 Having worked on campus for 51 years , Thad Miller is still cutting the hair of Citadel cadets — past, present and future — among his many other loyal clients.]]>

As seen on WCBD – Count on 2, by Carolyn Murray

Thad Miller made history as The Citadel’s first Black barber in 1971, when Black and white cadets still got their hair cut by different barbers.

When he was hired, Miller recalled the higher-ups telling him he should get one thing very clear: that he would cut “the Blacks hair only.” At the time, there were only eight Black cadets at The Citadel, so Miller had a lot of free time, while white cadets lined up out the door for the white barber.

One day, a white cadet got tired of waiting. He sat down in Miller’s chair, and the white barber gave him the go-ahead. When Miller was finished, he remembers the cadet getting out of the chair and telling his friends “y’all need to try this guy, he can cut!”

51 years later, Miller is still cutting the hair of Citadel cadets, past present and future, among his many other loyal clients.

Jimmy Coaxum has been coming to the barbershop for most of his life and has built a special bond with Miller.

“Thad was more than just a barber who worked here,” Coaxum said. “We always thought of him as family.”

One of Miller’s more well-known clients is Charleston Police Chief Luther Reynolds. When Chief Reynolds was diagnosed with cancer, he turned to Miller for help through the process.

“He told me he was looking for a barber and I said ‘you don’t need to look anymore because you just found one.’ And he came over and got a haircut and he’s been coming by every two weeks ever since. And even before his surgery and what not, we would pray together and talk. We just had a privacy in here.”

Thad Miller

Savaad Miller has been coming to the barbershop his whole life, although he is still one of Miller’s newer clients compared to those who have been coming for decades. As his grandfather gives him a fresh cut, he says he might carry on the family tradition.

Whether Miller is cutting the hair of clients that feel like family, or actual family, one thing is clear: it is always a good time at the Family Barbershop.

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Citadel in the sky https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-in-the-sky/ Mon, 02 May 2022 19:49:16 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31909 Cadets in gear for skydiving club outing 2022Cadets in gear for skydiving club outing 2022"The feeling of elation people experience after their first jump cannot be replaced by anything else. The feeling of accomplishment is tremendous."]]> Cadets in gear for skydiving club outing 2022Cadets in gear for skydiving club outing 2022

New cadet club aims to establish parachute competition team

Photo above: Cadets Tyler Miller, James Palmer and Alex Wang during the club’s spring jump session in Georgia.

When they jump from a plane flying at about 14,000 feet they plunge through the air for about 60 seconds. They fall at a rate of about 17 miles an hour and when their feet touch the ground they hit hard, usually at about 13 miles per hour.

To do that solo takes coordination, precision, training and planning. And all of it is a part of the thrill of parachute jumping, according to Cadet Tyler Miller. The rising senior helped lead the formation of The Citadel Skydiving Club during the 2021-22 academic year. There are already about 70 members.

“I like jumping out of airplanes, and I wanted to create something exciting for cadets to participate in that wasn’t the norm,” said Miller.

The goals of the club are to help members work toward U.S. Parachute Association (USPA) licenses if they wish and to eventually create a competition team. “Some of us have jumped before. Some of us may jump if we are going into the military. I think as we become more and more proficient, we might be able to have a competition team,” Miller said. “As I understand it, though the federal military academies have USPC competition teams, The Citadel would be the first Senior Military College to have an active skydiving competition team.”

Members of The Citadel Skydiving Club gearing up for jumps at a facility in Georgia

Capt. Wouter Sijtsma, Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNAF), serves as the club’s advisor. Sijtsma, a pilot and jumpmaster is on his 11th year working as a liaison for the RNAF at The Citadel. He is a cadet Teaching, Advising and Coaching officer. Additionally he serves as the advisor for The Citadel Cadet Flying Club as well as the Rifle Team and soccer team.

“The ability to move beyond your comfort zone is indispensable for military people, but works in all walks of life. People have a general tendency to avoid obstacles, which holds them back from achieving great things in their life,” Sijtsma said. “Skydiving is one of the most effective ways to remove those psychological barriers. The feeling of elation people experience after their first jump cannot be replaced by anything else. The feeling of accomplishment is tremendous.”

Cadets Ryan Quinn and Mason Harwell preparing for to skydive.

The spring training and jump sessions were held in Sylvania, Georgia, with a company called JumpGeorgia Skydiving. “Right now in South Carolina there isn’t a place where we can go to get the training we need,” Miller explained.

Cadets who participated included:

  • Mason Draxton
  • Andrew Erdmann
  • Safia Karimi
  • Tyler Miller
  • James Palmer
  • Gustavo Pizza
  • Ryan Quinn
  • Alex Wang
  • Kevin Williams
Cadet Safia Karimi after a jump

Club members are learning the basics about skydiving gear and preparation, as well as the skills essential for aerial movement during a freefall. “Some members might only jump once, tandem with a jumpmaster. Others might get serious about it and want to get certified. Our club is for every cadet who wants to learn more about skydiving. We hope, that like the Cadet Flying Club, we will be able to raise funds to provide scholarships for those wanting to get licensed and possibly compete in national parachuting competitions,” Miller said.

Miller explained that the college has had a cadet parachuting club, intermittently over the years — in the 1970s and again in the 1990s. The new Citadel Skydiving Club was officially chartered as a club with the Office of Cadet Activities in February 2022.

“The first jump operations were held in March. Now we have our first batch of cadets working towards their civilian free fall certification. And we have a fully operational team of club officers,” Miller said. ” Furthermore, with our future plans for team and precision jump operations, we aim to foster leadership development through teamwork and our clear vision to be a competitive team representing The Citadel on a national stage.”

Read about members of The Citadel Class of 2022 embarking on careers in aviation here.

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The Citadel Dept. of Defense Cyber Institute cadets and faculty mentors earn two of three awards at first joint SMC event https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-dept-of-defense-cyber-institute-cadets-and-faculty-mentors-earn-two-of-three-awards-at-first-joint-smc-event/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 23:35:17 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31758 Cyberspace is a battlefield and the adversary is always out there. We need you defending our country in the cyber environment.]]>

And Citadel team places second out of ten colleges in NWIC (Atlantic) cyber defense competition

Photo above, left to right: Cadet Slaltean Frederick, Dr. Shankar Banik, and Cadets Shiloh Smiles and Jared Johnson posing with their awards at the inaugural conference on Cybersecurity Research in Undergraduate Programs held at Norwich University.

Just as The Citadel cybersecurity programs and initiatives continued to grow this academic year, cadets in the program expanded their skills and experiences through cyber defense competitions, their work with The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute, the college’s CyberCorps Scholarships for Service program and, for the seniors, planning for the next stage of their careers by accepting positions as cyber defense professionals.

A highlight of the spring semester was the first gathering of cadets from America’s six Senior Military Colleges who are participating in their school’s Department of Defense Cyber Institute. It was hosted by Norwich University in early April.

The inaugural conference on Cybersecurity Research in Undergraduate Programs (CyRUP) was a collaborative effort between the military colleges who are jointly dedicated to advancing cybersecurity research and to developing research opportunities for undergraduate students. Cadets from The Citadel, the University of North Georgia, Texas A&M, Virginia Military Institute, Virginia Tech and Norwich University, as well as professionals from U.S. Cyber Forces, gathered to learn more about current research interests and what is coming next in cybersecurity.

The Citadel earned two of the three awards presented at the conference. The Best Paper Award went to cadets Jared Johnson, Eric Lilling and their faculty mentors, Drs. Shankar Banik and Deepti Joshi, for “Efficient Phishing Detection using Email DNA.”

The Best Presentation Award was earned by cadets Slateon Frederick, Jessica Roginski, Shiloh Smiles, Noah Wells and Banik, their faculty mentor. The presentation title: “Context Aware Access Control for Internet of Things (IoT) Network.”

Other cybersecurity news from The Citadel: cadet team takes 2nd place in college division at NIWC cyber defense competition

The Citadel Cybersecurity competition team during the Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic  2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition
The Citadel cybersecurity competition team posing for a photo after earning second place in the Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic 2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition

The Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic hosted the 2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition this spring. The three day event included a competition between 10 colleges. The Citadel team earned second place, just behind Clemson. The cadet participants were: Jared Johnson, Ben Race, Robert Roser, Shiloh Smiles, Trey Stevens and Noah Wells.

Additionally, The Citadel’s cybersecurity programs director, Shankar Banik, Ph.D., provided a keynote address during the three day event.

This kind of experience will give you an edge and a platform to apply your skillsets to a real-world situation. A degree is one thing, a certification is one thing, but learning in this way — how to do the critical work of hardening systems and testing your skills — is invaluable.

Cyberspace is a battlefield and the adversary is always out there. Students like you give us hope and we need you defending our country in the cyber environment.

Dr. Shankar Banik, professor and Graduate Program director of Computer Science, co-director for the Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel

Read more about the event here.

Dr. Shankar Banik, professor and Graduate Program director of Computer Science, Co-director for the Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel, speaking to high school competitors during the Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic 2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition
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The Citadel’s online programs now ranked among top 5 in America in two categories https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadels-online-programs-now-ranked-among-top-5-in-america-in-two-categories/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 19:59:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31530 College Consensus ranked The Citadel's online programs #2 in America for veterans and #5 in the nation for all students studying online.]]>

#2 in nation for veterans, #5 overall according to College Consensus

The convenient, flexible online programs offered by The Citadel are now ranked second in America for veterans by College Consensus, and #5 in the nation for all students studying online.

The college ratings website that aggregates publisher rankings and student reviews published its newest 50 Best Online Colleges for Veterans in late March.

The Top 5 Best Online Colleges for Veterans are:

  • University of Florida
  • The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina
  • University of Arizona
  • Western Carolina University
  • Saint Louis University

Additionally, that list ranks The Citadel as #18 in America for Best Colleges for Veterans, (attending in person).

The Citadel, also called the Military College of South Carolina, prides itself on its service to veterans in its mission to educate and develop principled leaders. Many members of the college’s faculty and staff are also veterans, including The Citadel President Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.), ’79.

College Consensus is one of numerous organizations to name The Citadel among the best in the nation for veterans. U.S. News & World Report, for example, has repeatedly ranked The Citadel high on its list of best options for veterans, giving the college the title of #1 Best Colleges For Veterans on their most recent list for regional universities, South.

According to College Consensus, over half a million military veterans turn to America’s colleges each year to expand their career options after service, much like Adrian Lorduy. A Navy veteran, Lorduy will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in Intelligence and Security Studies from The Citadel in May.

Adrian Lorduy, U.S. Navy veteran, business owner, Class of 2022 Intelligence and Security Studies B.A. student

Lorduy founded a company called Buenavista Information Systems about two years ago. “We are a Service Disabled, Veteran-Owned IT management and support company that services both commercial and government entities,” he said in an email when asked to describe his work.

The Citadel’s online program has allowed me to continue and excel in my academic career while simultaneously allowing me to grow my company to new heights. The Citadel has been a blessing to my family, my company and myself through its healthy combination of academic flexibility and endless resources to assure veteran success.

Adrian Lorduy, U.S. Navy veteran, business owner, Class of 2022 Intelligence and Security Studies B.A. student

The Citadel has many flexible programs to meet the needs of veteran students who want to earn undergraduate or graduate degrees. Find out more here.

#5 in America for all students attending college remotely

The recent veteran education rankings were followed on April 6 with the announcement of the College Consensus 2022 Best Online Colleges and Universities list for all students attending college remotely.

The Top 5 Best Online Colleges and Universities are:

  • University of Florida
  • California State University-Chico
  • Appalachian State University
  • Boston University
  • The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina

Read about the methodology behind the College Consensus rankings here.

Online students at any level of study attend via The Citadel Graduate College (CGC), meaning it is a civilian program and they are not a part of the Corps of Cadets. There are more than 25 undergraduate and graduate degrees, as well as graduate-level certificate programs.

Explore The Citadel’s online programs here.

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The Citadel faculty serving as expert resources on Ukraine and many trending issues https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-faculty-serving-as-expert-resources-on-ukraine-and-many-trending-issues/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 21:17:17 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31308 Photo: Dr. Jeffrey Rogg, a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, during an interview with WCSC-TV on Wednesday, March 16. Faculty answers call to contribute from media,]]>

Photo: Dr. Jeffrey Rogg, a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, during an interview with WCSC-TV on Wednesday, March 16.

Faculty answers call to contribute from media, community

Many of those working to fulfill the mission to educate and develop principled leaders at The Citadel, regularly demonstrate their own leadership by serving as contributing experts for media reports and community interests.

Members of the college’s five schools are often called upon for their insight expertise in a variety of fields. Jeffrey Rogg, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies within the School of Humanities and Social Science is just one of many examples of the relevant and insightful expertise found on campus.

As the third week of the Russian invasion of Ukraine came to a close, Rogg spoke with WCSC-TV, the local CBS affiliate, to help viewers in the Lowcountry understand more about the war and what it could mean for the United States.

When asked about the motives behind the invasion, Rogg answered: “From Vladimir Putin’s view, he believes that the greatest tragedy to befall modern Russia was the collapse of the Soviet Union. Because of that, he’s been intent on not just restoring the Soviet Union or even the Russian Empire, but also the pride and the power of Russia.”

To see more of the coverage from Rogg’s interview with Live 5 News, click here.

“One of the many strengths of an education at The Citadel is the access to experts who can put critical global events – such as Russia’s war in Ukraine – into a wider context,” said Brian Madison Jones, Ph.D., dean of The Citadel’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences. “As the Military College of South Carolina, we’re uniquely positioned to help our cadets, students and community understand what is currently happening and what it means.”

Throughout multiple newscasts, Rogg discussed the historical context for the invasion, what a no-fly zone would entail, how the war could affect the American economy and a range of other topics.

“Within the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, professors from the Departments of Intelligence and Security Studies, Political Science and History, including military history, are studying these events in real time for use in the classroom and offering expert insight and analysis to help the next generation of leaders understand and address the great challenges of today and tomorrow,” Jones said.

Other examples of The Citadel faculty in the news

Shankar Banik, Ph.D.
Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences – Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics

South Carolina National Guard attends Cyber Boot Camp at The Citadel
DVIDS

Conference series helps Army identify U.S. infrastructure risks
The Watch

Hee Yoon Kwon, Ph.D.
Department of Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Economics – Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

The continuing supply chain saga
South Carolina Public Radio

Side effects of pipeline shutdown linger in Lowcountry
WCIV – ABC News 4

David Preston, Ph.D.
Department of History – School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Citadel professor curates new perspectives on Revolutionary War
Moultrie News

When young George Washington started a war
Smithsonian Magazine

John Weinstein, Ph.D.
Department of Biology – Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics

Tires: The plastic polluter you never thought about
National Geographic

Citadel experiment will analyze how PPE degrades in coastal environments
The Post and Courier

John Zardus, Ph.D.
Department of Biology – Zucker Family School of Science and Mathematics

Some barnacles can more around to improve feeding position
The Scientist

For information about joining the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, click here.

To learn more about non-cadet undergraduate and graduate programs offered by The Citadel, click here.

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