Alumni – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 24 Dec 2020 05:15:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Alumni – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Six generations of Workmans and a wakeup https://today.citadel.edu/six-generations-of-workmans-and-a-wakeup/ Sat, 26 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20940 Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)When Billy Workman matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina.]]> Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)

By Cadet Merritt Reeves, The Citadel Class of 2022
Historic photos provided by The Citadel Archives and Museum

Photo above: Cadet-recruit William Douglas Workman V, The Citadel Class of 2024, a sixth generation Citadel cadet, poses for a portrait on campus on November 20, 2020.

When Billy Workman of Orangeburg matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina, a father-son tradition that dates all the way back to the late 19th century and his great-great-great-grandfather.

Billy’s full name: William Douglas Workman V.

In 1882, The Citadel resumed operations after closing its gates for 17 years after the Civil War. In that year, William Douglas Workman enrolled along with over a 100 other cadets. An 1886 graduate, he was the first of Billy’s ancestors to attend the college.

The second William Douglas Workman in the family line was William Douglas Workman Sr. who graduated from The Citadel in 1909 and was valedictorian of his class.

1909

William Workman Sr. was also the second, and the last, Workman to attend The Citadel before it moved from Marion Square campus to its current location on the Ashley River. Billy’s great-aunt, Dee Benedict, talked about her grandfather’s service during World War I.

 “If you look at my grandfather, he really was an absolute hero of the bunch,” said Benedict. “Back when South Carolina was in its own brigade, he led the charge and broke the back of the Germans.”

Dee Benedict, Billy Workman’s great aunt discussing William Douglas Workman Sr.

In 1935, William Douglas Workman Jr., Billy’s great-grandfather, graduated from The Citadel after holding the rank of battalion commander.

1935

In that year, the Corps numbered 89 cadets who were split into two battalions. William Workman Jr. was Benedict’s grandfather and, according to her, he served in North Africa during World War II. “After the war, he stayed in the reserves,” said Benedict, “He ran for the United States Senate against a newspaper man in Columbia and had 46% of the vote, which was amazing. There were a bunch of people who would get fired because they supported him which made it almost like a revival thing. Although he lost the race, that was the start of the Republican Party in South Carolina.”

Billy’s grandfather, William Douglas Workman III, graduated from The Citadel after serving as first sergeant in Tango Company. A 1961 graduate, he attended the college before it was integrated in 1966.

William Douglas Workman III, The Citadel Class of 1961

Billy’s father, Will (William Douglas Workman IV), who has a cotton ginning business in Orangeburg, was the last of the Workmans to attend The Citadel before the college turned co-ed. 

William Douglas Workman IV, '89
William Douglas Workman IV, ’89

He graduated in 1989 with the self-proclaimed title “centurion.” Known for his sense of humor, Will paid for this comedic streak throughout his years as a cadet with hundreds of tours. These punishments, however, hardly dimmed Will’s mischievous spirit.  According to Billy, he is still a jokester.  “He’s a pretty laid back guy,” said Billy, “but my going to The Citadel has loosened him up even more, and I can relate to him better.”

Doing what only felt natural, Billy is expected to graduate in 2024 with a Business Administration degree. After decades of forefathers who roamed the grounds of The Citadel, Billy finally joined the long line of Cadet Workmans. “Billy always had a choice on whether or not he would go to The Citadel,” said Will, “but when he decided he wanted to go for himself, it made me really proud. I was happy that the tradition wasn’t ending with me.”

William Douglas Workman V,
a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, who goes by Billy, posting for a portrait
at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on November 20, 2020.

The Workman family has seen the college through time and progress. Like Billy’s Citadel COVID-19 on campus freshman year, each generation has had difference experiences, but one thing remains constant—the lasting bond between alumni and college. With five generations before him, Billy feels a familial expectation, but he waits in earnest to fulfill this role and dreams even of continuing the legacy one day with a seventh William Douglas Workman.

Cadet Merritt Reeves is an intern in the Office of Communications and Marketing. A junior majoring in English with a Spanish minor, she has earned Gold Stars for academic excellence. After graduation, she plans to return to her home town of Columbia, South Carolina and attend law school.

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Live performances may have stopped, but The Citadel Gospel Choir has not https://today.citadel.edu/live-performances-may-have-stopped-but-the-citadel-gospel-choir-has-not/ Sat, 19 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20926 Members of The Citadel Gospel Choir gathered with safe distancing to record a variety of songs, to be played in lieu of a live performance.]]>

As the year (finally) comes to a close and we enter, what for many will be, a very strange holiday season, there are at least two ways of looking back at 2020.

One is to remember all that went wrong or what we didn’t like. But another is to feel proud of how we overcame that which could have brought us down.

There’s no way to know for sure — but it’s likely that most of the cadets who are part of The Citadel Gospel Choir will be taking the second option.

Not only did they, like the rest of The Citadel community, make it through a uniquely challenging year: the Gospel Choir also found a way, despite the pandemic, to continue sharing their faith and talents through their performances.

Instead of waiting for things to return to normal, the choir took matters into their own hands.

In early November, the devoted cadets gathered in Johnson Hagood Stadium — with safe, social distancing — to record a variety of songs. The Gospel Choir usually performs multiple times a year, both in and out of South Carolina. These recordings will be played at events where the choir cannot safely perform.

Part of the Gospel Choir tradition includes a performance at the annual, heavily attended Christmas Candlelight Service in Summerall Chapel.

A traditional Christmas Candlelight Service in Summerall Chapel

Though they were not able to perform together like they had hoped, members of the Choir still found ways to maintain one of the most valuable aspects — the kinship.

The relationships are what mean the most to Ruby Bolden, the Regimental Public Affairs Officer. Read about her experience with the Gospel Choir, starting in her knob year, below.

“The race is not given to the swift nor the strong”

I matriculated in August 2017, not knowing what to expect except a challenge. I was grouped with people I did not know and had to learn to trust very fast, which is something that I am not used to doing.

As challenge week progressed, I was introduced to a member of The Citadel Gospel Choir, and he was very warm-hearted and approachable. After that encounter, I believed that the group had to be the same.

Cadet Ruby Bolden, Regimental Public Affairs Officer

Appearing the following semester, I walked through the chapel doors being greeted upon arrival. Classmates that I recognized walking down the Avenue of Remembrance were there and some classmates that were in my company were there as well.

As I greeted everyone and they returned the greeting, I was placed in the soprano section and began to learn and sing songs that I had sung at my home church. The Gospel Choir reminded me a lot of home to the point where I almost wanted to cry.

The people were friendly, and I was comfortable in that space. I remember when I had to introduce myself, I mentioned that it felt like home and at that moment, I knew I would be in it for the long haul.

As years went on, I was able to witness the many successes that the Gospel Choir achieved. From performing in front of our peers, singing at the late Senator Hollings’ funeral to going on tour in the Spring of 2019; the Gospel Choir is one organization that has changed my life significantly.

Since COVID-19 took the world by storm, it has put a lot of things on hold for us. We could not go on tour last year and practices were cancelled for a while which put a strain on the choir’s familial aspects.

Ruby Bolden and members of The Citadel Gospel Choir on their spring tour in 2019

However, through those trying times, we stayed in contact over Zoom and other platforms to stay in touch. Now, practices are being conducted while maintaining social distancing and wearing masks.

These protocols made it hard for us to continue the familial aspects of the choir however, after the practice prayers we state this verse for Ecclesiastes 9:11, “The race is not given to the swift nor the strong, Nor bread to the wise, Nor riches to men of understanding, Nor favor to men of skill; But time and chance happen to them all.”

Simply put, adversities are given to those that are capable of enduring the challenges that comes with it. The Gospel Choir is a testament of that scripture and we will continue to be.

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Charleston County’s Dawson confirmed by US Senate to be new SC federal judge https://today.citadel.edu/charleston-countys-dawson-confirmed-by-us-senate-to-be-new-sc-federal-judge/ Thu, 17 Dec 2020 14:34:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21111 Dawson, 50, a 1991 graduate of The Citadel and 1997 graduate of the University of South Carolina Law School, will be the only African American male judge on the state’s federal bench. ]]>

As seen in The Charlotte Observer
By John Monk

Longtime Charleston County general counsel Joseph Dawson III was confirmed Wednesday by the U.S. Senate on a 56-39 vote as South Carolina’s newest federal judge.

Dawson, 50, a 1991 graduate of The Citadel and 1997 graduate of the University of South Carolina Law School, will be the only African American male judge on the state’s federal bench. He still will have to be formally sworn in.

Federal judges, who oversee federal civil and criminal hearings and trials, are lifetime appointments.

Dawson will likely take a significant pay cut to become a federal judge. In 2019, he was paid $421,357 by Charleston County, according to an article in The Charleston Post & Courier. As a district court judge, he will make approximately $216,000 a year.

It sometimes takes many months for a judicial candidate’s vetting to take place and his or her nomination to go through first the Senate Judiciary Committee and then the U.S. Senate.



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Atlanta attorney and humanitarian pledges $20 million to The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/atlanta-attorney-and-humanitarian-pledges-20-million-to-the-citadel/ Wed, 16 Dec 2020 19:49:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20995 William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959Class of 1959 alumnus, William Baer Endictor, announces legacy gift to support college’s academic endowment He may be retired, but Atlanta attorney William Baer Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959,]]> William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959

Class of 1959 alumnus, William Baer Endictor, announces legacy gift to support college’s academic endowment

He may be retired, but Atlanta attorney William Baer Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959, continues to make a name for himself through his extensive volunteer and charitable work.

The former assistant solicitor for the state of Georgia and Fortune 500 CEO has found a new passion in fighting food insecurity to help the less fortunate members of his community. He has taken on the cause like a new career, working tirelessly as a volunteer to support Feed the Hungry and the Atlanta Community Food Bank, along with several local hospitals.

Endictor firmly believes that charity begins at home. In addition to his extensive support of his local community, his attention has never wavered from his roots and experiences as a cadet at The Citadel, which he credits for much of his success. To make similar opportunities available for generations of cadets to come, Endictor has decided to bequeath his entire estate to his alma mater.

Recently, Endictor announced a legacy gift totaling approximately $20 million at today’s value to support the greatest needs of the college through The Citadel Foundation (TCF). This gift—among the largest TCF has ever received—is an expansion of a previous bequest of $2.5 million initially documented in 2009. 

How Endictor’s generosity will contribute to his alma mater

Endictor’s thoughtful and strategic placement of funds will provide for the greatest needs of the college and significantly augment the Academic Enhancement fund. This fund plays a critical role in securing the college’s academic excellence through TCF’s annual academic enhancement grant to The Citadel. Each year, this distribution of several million dollars from TCF to the college supports educational enrichment opportunities, scholarship support for faculty and students, program enhancements, and technology upgrades and improvements.

“In supporting the college’s strategic plan, Our Mighty Citadel 2026, this gift helps ensure The Citadel remains strong in the future,” said The Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters, USMC, Ret., ’79.  “Academic enhancement is the lifeblood of this institution, supporting our mission to educate principled leaders. By generously supporting this fund, Bill’s estate gift secures his legacy of leadership and reinforces his lifetime of service to his alma mater.”

Endictor, who lives in the Atlanta suburb of Brookhaven, Georgia, is a retired lawyer who specialized in trial work. He is a former Georgia Assistant Solicitor as well as a corporate attorney for the former E.T. Barwick Industries. Endictor advanced to the position of chief executive officer and member of the then Fortune 500 company’s board of directors. 

Why he loves The Citadel

Endictor is deeply passionate about his alma mater, made evident through his service as a member of both the President’s Advisory Committee and The Citadel Foundation Board of Directors, and as the former TCF Class Chairman for the Class of 1959.  He is a member of The Citadel Legacy Society and the Society of 1842 lifetime giving societies, as well as a Past President of The Citadel Alumni Association. In 2011, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from The Citadel.

Cadet William Baer Endictor, photographed for The Citadel’s Sphinx yearbook in 1958 while a junior

In 2009, to celebrate his 50th class reunion, Endictor documented a significant legacy gift in an effort to recognize and repay the role The Citadel played in the success he achieved in life. He named The Citadel as the sole beneficiary of his entire estate, becoming one of only a handful of donors who have done so.  In the decade since, he has seen the value of his estate grow, allowing him to substantially increase the amount of his legacy gift to The Citadel.

Modestly downplaying his own career successes, Endictor attributes the bulk of his wealth to two factors: the influence of his mother and father, and his experience as a cadet at The Citadel.

“The Citadel Foundation is the life-blood of The Citadel. Without the Foundation, Lesesne Gate would have closed decades ago,” said Endictor regarding the inspiration for his generous gift. “The leadership of The Citadel is outstanding. I have always said that the smartest thing anyone can do is to hire the right people and then get out of their way.”

TCF President and Chief Executive Officer John P. Dowd III, Ph.D., notes the significant impact this gift will have on the future of the college when the bequest is realized.  “Through his extensive professional accomplishments and volunteer service to The Citadel, Bill Endictor has demonstrated his profound commitment to the disciplined education and leader development The Citadel provides.  On behalf of The Citadel Foundation Board of Directors and staff, I am pleased to express our gratitude for Bill’s leadership and service to the college,” said Dowd.

As Endictor’s estate has grown, so has his relationship with his alma mater and The Citadel Foundation.  Over the years, TCF Director of Legacy Giving Bill Yaeger, ’83, has developed a long-standing relationship with Endictor.  “We have many alumni who are passionate about our alma mater. Mr. Endictor, as demonstrated by his activities with the college and now this gift, has put credence into that passion,” said Yaeger. “He is a friend of mine and a friend of our alma mater, and he has been great to work with.”

William B. Endictor photographed with The Citadel’s 19th president, Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Ret.), ’73

William Baer Endictor graduated from The Citadel in 1959 as a pre-med major with a Bachelor of Science degree. After starting at the Medical College of Virginia, he realized that his true interest was in law and changed his career focus. He earned his Juris Doctor from the University of South Carolina School of Law and was admitted to the bar in 1963.

A specialist in international and trial law, Mr. Endictor pursued a career distinguished by standing up for principles that are at the heart of our legal system. He successfully tried hundreds of cases in different parts of the world and also served as Assistant Solicitor for the state of Georgia. In that position, he became well known for his work combating pornography and organized crime, successfully litigating cases all the way to the nation’s highest court, the United States Supreme Court.

In the 1970s Mr. Endictor joined E.T. Barwick Industries, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of floor coverings, as general counsel. He later became president and CEO of that Fortune 500 company.

During the past four decades, Mr. Endictor has been loyal and supportive of The Citadel with his time and talents. He is past president of The Citadel Alumni Association, a founder of The Citadel Development Foundation and a former director of The Citadel Foundation. He serves as chairman for the Class of 1959 and leads The Citadel Volunteers group in Georgia. As a member of the Society of 1842, he has joined The Citadel Foundation’s most elite philanthropic circle.

Mr. Endictor has also generously supported several Atlanta charities including the Atlanta Food Bank, a Feed the Hungry organization and three hospitals.

In recognition of his leadership to his profession and his deep commitment to his alma mater, The Citadel Board of Visitors is proud to present William Baer Endictor with the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws.

From the 2011 Honorary Doctor of Laws citation from The Citadel for William Baer Endictor
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Excellence in Leadership: Lt. Sarah Zorn https://today.citadel.edu/excellence-in-leadership-lt-sarah-zorn/ Tue, 08 Dec 2020 17:19:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20611 Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Army leaders have strong intellect, physical presence, professional competence, high moral character, and serve as role models. Lt. Zorn has been recognized for her selfless care within the ‘Thunderbolt’ community.]]> Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)

As seen on DVIDSHub
Joint Base Lewis McChord, Washington
By Sgt. Casey Hustin, 17th Field Artillery Brigade

Photo above: Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade) 

JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — An Army Leader is anyone who by virtue of assumed role or assigned responsibility inspires and influences people to accomplish organizational goals— 1st. Lt. Sarah Zorn, who for the past six months has accomplished that and more within the 5th battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 17th Field Artillery Brigade, has her own idea of what makes a great Leader.

“You have to be competent; you have to be confident; you have to care—and a little common sense doesn’t hurt,” said 1st Lt. Sarah Zorn, an operations officer with Bravo Battery. “I feel like that philosophy kind of defines my leadership approach and who I want to be as a lieutenant.”

Zorn demonstrated her innate ability to pursue actions, focus thinking, and shape decisions for the greater good of the organization both in and outside the chain of command of the ‘Black Knight’ platoon.

“Lt. Zorn has filled the role as the headquarters platoon leader,” said Capt. Grayson Williams, Company Commander with B-Btry., 5th Bn., 3rd FAR. “She really just wants to see others succeed in her platoon. She just goes the extra mile to make sure that the platoon succeeds. Her ability to provide that insight and always the desire to learn has been instrumental in the success for the battery so far.”

From making history as the first female regimental commander at the Citadel for 2,300 cadets, to becoming a platoon leader of 20 soldiers, Lt. Zorn stays focused on doing the job at hand and doing it right.

“I think that transition from big picture to a little bit smaller picture really fundamentally is all the same,” said Zorn. “So—I come into work every day and I tell myself I’m just going to do the next right thing—whether it be the next right thing for soldiers, the next right thing for the battery—the next right thing for the team.”

Army leaders have strong intellect, physical presence, professional competence, high moral character, and serve as role models. Lt. Zorn has been recognized for her selfless care within the ‘Thunderbolt’ community.

“I’d like to highlight just how much genuine care she has for soldiers,” said Williams. “I know she has taken time out of her weekends to work on care packages for families with new babies in the battery. Lt. Zorn just wants to see the whole battery succeed, and really she shows this commitment as she volunteers her own time to really provide and deliver what the battery is asking for.”

Zorn said, “I would say to anyone who’s considering this or maybe anyone who is brand new and who is doubting themselves—this (the Army) is one of the most rewarding careers that you could ever have.”

The most successful Army Leaders, like Lt. Zorn, recognize that great organizations are built upon the mutual trust and confidence of our greatest assets—our people—who come together to accomplish peacetime and wartime missions—and so long as we continue to inspire leaders like Lt. Zorn to join us—we cannot fail.

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How this Air Force captain turned her late-night sketches into an activewear line https://today.citadel.edu/how-this-air-force-captain-turned-her-late-night-sketches-into-an-activewear-line/ Fri, 04 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20555 Angel Johnson -- originally from Hanahan, SC -- graduated from The Citadel in 2013 with a Bachelor of Art degree in History. ]]>

Note: Angel Johnson — originally from Hanahan, SC — graduated from The Citadel in 2013 with a Bachelor of Art degree in History. She also served as the Regimental Public Affairs Officer during her senior year.

As seen in Oprah Magazine, by Regina R. Robertson

In life, as in business, a year can make such a difference. That’s surely been the case for Angel Johnson, who launched the activewear line, ICONI, last October and received news that she’d landed on Oprah’s Favorite Things list this October. “I was in the parking lot at work, just freaking out in my car,” Johnson recalls of receiving the confirmation email.

Along with expanding her new brand, the Charleston native has quite the demanding day job, serving as a captain in the Air Force. As a child, she dreamed of being a lawyer, but after graduating from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, Johnson decided to follow her older brother, a long-time Navy man, and give military life a try.

Currently stationed in Denver, she’s traveled and lived in countries around the globe during her seven-year tenure—including Kuwait, Korea, and Afghanistan. In fact, it was during her time in Afghanistan in 2017 that a fellow service member sparked her interest in mapping out a plan for her post-military life.

“I met an Army officer who had businesses outside of the Army and I remember thinking, How does he have time to do all of this?” she says. Not only did that officer, now a good friend, teach her to manage her time more effectively, he encouraged her to look beyond the present. “I started thinking, What does the future of Angel Johnson’s life look like, not Captain Johnson’s?”

With ICONI—who’s leggings are constructed with moisture-wicking fabrics (to help the clothing dry faster) and did we mention that the waistbands don’t roll down?—Johnson is on her way to charting another course, one pair of leggings at a time. She sat down with Oprah Magazine to discuss her mission to motivate.

What inspired you to launch ICONI?

I was tired of spending $80 to $90 on leggings, then going to the gym and discovering that they were see-through. That’s the most embarrassing thing…and so frustrating.

The idea came to me [while on break from her desk job] working the night shift on September 15, 2019. I started sketching out some legging ideas, then turned to my sergeant and said, “I’m going to create an activewear line.” He said, “Okay, Captain Johnson, but…right now? It’s one o’clock in the morning!”

When I told my friends the next day, they all said, “Go for it!” So, I did a bunch of research and two weeks later, I filed for the LLC for ICONI. Three weeks after that, I started working on the legging design, [researching to manufacturers, both domestically and abroad], to get [items] produced, but because of COVID, our first product wasn’t available until January 2020.

That was fast! What’s the story behind the name ICONI?

I knew I wanted the activewear to have motivational words or a motivational logo, something that would remind anyone who’s working out to keep going.

I’m a super big African-American and African history buff, and I’ve traveled to Ghana. Because I love everything about West Africa, I wanted to include some of those cultural elements in our branding. The base of the logo is a “power” button and the Ghanaian symbol stands for strength and versatility. I was looking at African countries and cities on a map and when I saw Iconi, a town on Grande Comore island in the Indian Ocean, just off the coast of Africa, I wondered if I could create an acronym that was motivational. That’s how I came up with “I Can Overcome, Nothing’s Impossible.”

Who are your customers and how did they discover ICONI?

First, it was people I knew, then my customer base grew through word-of-mouth, Instagram, and Facebook. From the beginning, I embraced them all. I responded to every, single DM and if someone sent me a photo of themselves wearing ICONI, I took the time to comment.

Just recently, I was bragging to my customers—I call them my ICONI crew!—because they helped me create a sample hoodie. I’d posted it in Instagram Stories and asked for feedback. They asked me to add thumbholes, expand the size of the hood, and helped with the colors.

I want the brand to be inclusive, so I’m making sure all of our products are available in larger sizes and working on a men’s line, too. Those are the goals for 2021.

As a new business owner, what are your thoughts on supporting Black-owned businesses this holiday season?

From my clothing to the facial products, soaps, and make-up that I use, I always try to support. It shouldn’t be a seasonal thing.

So, the holidays are quickly approaching. Which items from your line would you suggest for gifting?

I’d say the Confidence Hoodie, which my ICONI crew helped me create, and the Confidence Jogger because they’re warm, cozy, and comfortable for this season.

Speaking of the season, do you have any holiday heroes this year?

My mom is my holiday hero. She raised me and my brother as a single mother and she’s worked in the fast-food industry for 35 years. I remember the days we’d walk around downtown Charleston because we didn’t have a car and when we’d catch the bus to-and-from school. We’ve come a long way. My mom perseveres through everything in life and continues to inspire me.

Okay, last question! Do you wear fatigues to work or can you wear ICONI?

It’s fatigues, but I have thought about making a tan-colored shirt that says ICONI across the front to wear underneath!

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Gov. McMaster Names SCHP Veteran Robert Woods, a Citadel alum, to Lead S.C. Department of Public Safety https://today.citadel.edu/gov-mcmaster-names-schp-veteran-robert-woods-a-citadel-alum-to-lead-s-c-department-of-public-safety/ Thu, 03 Dec 2020 17:04:39 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20541 Robert Woods graduated from The Citadel in 1988 with a Bachelor's Degree in History and was awarded gold stars in every semester he attended.]]>

Photo: Governor Henry McMaster and Robert Woods, front right, at the nomination announcement (Courtesy: South Carolina Department of Public Safety)

As seen in Greenville Business Magazine, by David Dykes

Note: Robert Woods graduated from The Citadel in 1988 with a Bachelor’s Degree in History and was awarded gold stars in every semester he attended.

Gov. Henry McMaster nominated Robert G. Woods, IV as director of the South Carolina Department of Public Safety (SCDPS). Woods has been serving as the acting director of SCDPS since February and is a 29-year veteran of the South Carolina Highway Patrol (SCHP). 

“Nobody is better suited to lead the South Carolina Department of Public Safety than Mr. Woods,” McMaster said. “His proven ability to lead and solve complex problems through innovative policy decisions and public outreach will continue to serve South Carolina well and will help the agency maintain its status as one of the finest law enforcement agencies in the country.”

During his time as acting director, Woods has worked to increase department communication, improve employee morale, and implemented data-driven programs to create safer highways. 

Going forward, Woods plans to strengthen relationships with state and local law enforcement leaders and increase recruitment and retention efforts. 

Before being named acting director at SCDPS, Woods oversaw the Highway Patrol’s administrative support section as a Highway Patrol major. 

Before that, he served as commander of the Highway Patrol Emergency Traffic Management Unit. 

Woods is a 1988 graduate of The Citadel and holds a master’s degree in human relations and conflict management from Columbia College. He is also a graduate of the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy Leadership Institute and holds a certified public manager credential. 

“Serving as director of SCDPS was something I would have never imagined during my time with the South Carolina Highway Patrol but serving this department and my state in an interim director capacity has truly been one of the greatest privileges of my career,” Woods said. “My primary goal has been to stabilize the department and break down any barriers leading to inefficiencies so that our personnel are energized and excited about their jobs and the challenge of serving this state’s citizens with excellence.” 

“The SC Department of Public Safety cannot be the DPS of 20 years ago. We must take advantage of technology, equipment and training to ensure the safety of our law enforcement and in turn the safety of the citizens and visitors to our state,” Woods said. “We must provide our law enforcement and civilian support personnel with sound training and empower our employees to lead as we tackle the challenges of 21st century policing.”

The governor’s nomination is subject to Senate approval. 

Woods, 54, is a resident of Lexington County and is married with five children. 

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Citadel School of Engineering recognizes four leaders in the profession https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-school-of-engineering-recognizes-four-leaders-in-the-profession/ Wed, 02 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18291 The Academy of Engineers honors those who have helped educate and develop principled engineering leaders to serve a global community.]]>

The Citadel School of Engineering is honoring four new industry leaders by inducting them into the Academy of Engineers. The four are being recognized for their professional successes, as well as for making a significant contribution to their community.

Every year, The Citadel School of Engineering honors engineers who have lived a life consistent with the school’s mission, which is to educate and develop principled engineering leaders to serve a global community.

“The Citadel, home to one of the country’s first five engineering education programs, has a long history of cultivating the future of engineering while also recognizing and working alongside the current leaders in the field,” said Col. Ron Welch, USA (Ret.), dean of the School of Engineering. “That’s one reason why we’re so pleased to annually induct new members – those who have succeeded in their profession and contributed to their communities – into our Academy of Engineers. Though the pandemic prevented us from giving them the in-person recognition they deserve, we couldn’t be more proud to claim these four servant-leaders.”

The academy’s 2020 inductees include the following professionals:

Richard A. Day, Citadel Class of 1977

Richard “Rick” Day is a vice president with Stantec Consulting Services Inc., a multi-disciplined engineering and planning firm with offices throughout North America and abroad. Day is a registered professional engineer in five southeastern states and has practiced civil engineering for more than 40 years. Throughout his career, he has served in a leadership role in numerous significant engineering projects. Currently he is serving as the project manager for the planning and design for the widening of I-526 in Charleston County from Paul Cantrell Blvd. to Virginia Avenue, an estimated $1.1 billion program.

Day has been active in a number of professional engineering societies throughout his career. He has served these organizations in leadership roles at the local, state and national levels. Day was awarded the Herman J. Hoose Distinguished Service Award in 2016 from the Southern District Institute of Transportation Engineers.

Donald E. Stone Jr., Citadel Class of 1980

Donald E. Stone Jr. is the chief executive officer of Dewberry, a 2,200-person engineering, architecture and construction firm with more than 50 offices nationwide. This month he is celebrating 10 years as Dewberry’s CEO and 12 years with the firm overall, which he joined as chief operating officer in 2008. He leads and implements Dewberry’s corporate and market strategies, corporate growth initiatives and has achieved company consolidation and alignment so the firm may better serve its clients. Over the past ten years, Stone has also integrated six acquisitions, adding more than 350 employees to the firm and contributing to Dewberry’s continued expansion into the Southeast and California. 

Graduating as a Distinguished Military Student, he was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant and branched to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He is a licensed professional engineer in 19 states and a member of The Society of American Military Engineers.

Robert L. Van Antwerp Jr.

Lt. Gen. Robert L. Van Antwerp Jr., USA (Ret.), known to most simply as General Van, is currently the Vice Chairman of the Flippen Group, a Texas based leadership and organizational development company that specializes in talent assessment, development and alignment. 

Van Antwerp is widely respected across industry and the military as a “leader of leaders,” embodying the traits of successful leadership throughout his long and varied career working with civilians and the military. He retired from the Army after 39 years of service and most recently served as chief of engineers and commanding general of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). He was the senior military officer overseeing a $40+ billion program including most of the nation’s civil works infrastructure and military construction on 250 Army and Air Force installations worldwide.

He is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and holds an MBA from Long Island University and an MS in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan. He is a registered professional engineer. Van Antwerp is also a former chairman of the board of Eagle Creek Renewable Energy LLC, board director at USAA, Calibre, Cardno GS, and is on several advisory boards for non-profits.

Glenn M. Walters, Citadel Class of 1979

Gen. Glenn Walters, USMC (Ret.), president of The Citadel and member of the Class of 1979, returned to lead his alma mater after serving 39 years as an officer in the Marines. Prior to his arrival, he served as the 34th Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps, the Corps’ second-highest ranking officer. As Assistant Commandant, Walters oversaw approximately 184,000 active duty and 38,000 reserve Marines and a $42 billion budget. His duties included representing the Marine Corps at the Department of Defense and leading decisions about defense policy and resourcing in alignment with the National Defense Strategy.

Upon graduating from The Citadel with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, Walters was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. After initially serving as an infantry officer, he attended flight training in Pensacola, Florida, and was designated a naval aviator in 1981. Walters later trained and served as a test pilot and was instrumental in testing systems for the AH-1W Super Cobra Attack Helicopter. He also served as the first Commander of VMX-22, the initial squadron to field the MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft for operational testing.

In April 2018, Walters was selected by The Citadel’s Board of Visitors as the 20th President of the college. He is joined by his wife, Gail. A marketing and communications professional, she eagerly embraces her role as The Citadel’s First Lady.

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Nova Technologies honors stalwart engineering professor; 1970 alumnus, with scholarship in his name https://today.citadel.edu/nova-technologies-honors-stalwart-engineering-professor-1970-alumnus-with-scholarship-in-his-name/ Tue, 01 Dec 2020 20:00:56 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20436 Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Johnston W. Peeples ’70 poses for a portrait at Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, December 1, 2020. Nova Technologies announced the endowment of a new scholarship in Dr. Peeples’ name to support Cadets with demonstrated financial need who are majoring in Electrical or Computer Engineering at The Citadel. The amount of the initial endowment is $500,000. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Johnston W. Peeples ’70 poses for a portrait at Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, December 1, 2020. Nova Technologies announced the endowment of a new scholarship in Dr. Peeples’ name to support Cadets with demonstrated financial need who are majoring in Electrical or Computer Engineering at The Citadel. The amount of the initial endowment is $500,000. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Peeples' devotion to all things in the realm of computer and electrical engineering, or "techno-lust" as he calls it, continues to earn him accolades. ]]> Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Johnston W. Peeples ’70 poses for a portrait at Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, December 1, 2020. Nova Technologies announced the endowment of a new scholarship in Dr. Peeples’ name to support Cadets with demonstrated financial need who are majoring in Electrical or Computer Engineering at The Citadel. The amount of the initial endowment is $500,000. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Johnston W. Peeples ’70 poses for a portrait at Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, December 1, 2020. Nova Technologies announced the endowment of a new scholarship in Dr. Peeples’ name to support Cadets with demonstrated financial need who are majoring in Electrical or Computer Engineering at The Citadel. The amount of the initial endowment is $500,000. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Dr. Johnston “John” Peeples, ’70, illuminates the way for aspiring electrical and computer engineers

After decades of innovating, leading and teaching, John Peeples, Ph.D., Citadel Class of 1970, still comes to campus energized about answering questions concerning frame relays (high-speed, packet-switched data communications), or debouncing (a circuit providing a clean transition of power output), for example.

Peeples’s devotion to all things in the realm of computer and electrical engineering, or “techno-lust” as he calls it, continues to earn him accolades.

“It’s a bit staggering, really, considering that throughout my career I’ve endeavored to stay under the radar,” Peeples, a native of Estill, South Carolina said. “Above all, I take immense pleasure watching our graduates make the world a better place.”

The most recent recognition for this professor and industry leader: the Dr. Johnston W. Peeples, ’70, Electrical and Computer Engineering Scholarship. The endowed scholarship named for Peeples was made possible because of a $500,000 gift from two fellow engineering alumni, Buddy Black ’78, CEO of Nova Technologies, and Jon Kelley, ’08, also with Nova Technologies. Kelly is one of Peeples’s former students.

Electrical and Computer Engineering professor, Dr. Johnston W. Peeples, ’70, poses for a portrait in Grimsley Hall at The Citadel December 1, 2020. Nova Technologies announced the endowment of a new scholarship in Dr. Peeples’ name to support cadets with demonstrated financial need who are majoring in Electrical or Computer Engineering at The Citadel.

“Nova Technologies is pleased to announce the endowment of a new scholarship to support cadets who are majoring in electrical or computer engineering at The Citadel and who have demonstrated financial need,” Black said in a statement. “The scholarship recognizes the long and dedicated service John Peeples has provided to students and faculty in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and to The Citadel.”

After a successful career as an engineer, including as leader for NCR Corporation, Peeples returned to his alma mater in 1999. Three years later, he was appointed to the William States Lee Professorship and named head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

Dr. Peeples, I want to say thank you on behalf of all the engineering graduates you’ve taught and mentored over the years. I distinctly remember your involvement in our freshmen labs and activities, which I can’t imagine is included on the agendas of most department heads. You took the time to directly teach your undergrads and get involved in our academic careers.

You care about your students. You made a connection. The things you’ve said to me and others has inspired us to become better engineers. This scholarship is an extension of the work you’ve already accomplished, impacting future Citadel engineers that will undoubtedly excel in global industry.”

Jon Kelley, The Citadel Class of 2008

Peeples stayed in the role as head of the department for 12 years.

“During his tenure leading the Department of Electrical and Computer engineering, John Peeples created a collegial environment where cadets and students were free to learn, and faculty were free to teach,” said Robert Barsanti, Ph.D., current head of the ECE. “He is an inspirational leader and motivating teacher.”

Barsanti listed some of Peeples’s accomplishments as ECE department head including:

  • Leading department to record enrollments
  • Bringing ECE to national prominence by serving as the president for the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Head Association for North America
  • Forming the ECE advisory board. “John brought together great minds, and industry leaders to advise the department.”
  • Revamping curriculum, including a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering program, elevating graduate outcomes

Peeples is also a legacy alumnus of The Citadel. His father was Otis B. Peeples, Sr., Class of 1938 and his brother, a retired attorney in Charleston, is Otis B. “Ben” Peeples, Jr., Class of 1967.

Peeples earned a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from The Citadel in 1970 and accepted a military commission, joining the U.S. Air Force where he served for several years before leaving to continue his education and enter private industry. He went on to the University of South Carolina where he was awarded an M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering. His CV can be viewed here.

Peeples still teaches a full schedule of courses.

The Citadel Foundation is processing the donation to arrange for a possible first recipient in the next year.

“My wife (Nancy) summed this up by reminding me that I attended The Citadel on a full scholarship sponsored by Daniel Construction Company. It is not just great, but also appropriate that now because of Nova Technologies, Buddy Black and Jon Kelly, the Johnston W. Peeples Scholarship can serve future generations,” Peeples wrote in a letter thanking the scholarship donors.

Peeples’s big bang hit list

Peeples speaking at ECEDHA
Peeples speaking at ECEDHA

Here is a look at some of Peeples’s many honors and awards.

Robert M. Janowiak Outstanding Leadership and Service Award
One of the electrical engineering industry’s top awards, 2019, provided by the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Heads Association  (ECEDHA). Peeples, his wife, children and grandchildren were flown to Arizona where he accepted the award.

Some of his additional accolades include:

  • Engineer of the Year, Charleston Engineers Joint Council, 2020
  • Distinguished lecturer, Santee Cooper Engineering Seminar, Summers 2013 – 2018
  • Lawton-Ellis Teaching Award, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2014-15
  • Distinguished lecturer, Georgia Tech, Auburn and Florida International University, various years, 2004 – 2014
  • Summer Faculty Research Fellow, Office of Naval Research, 2012
  • NSF-ECEDHA Energy and Power Summer Program Fellow, 2011
  • NCR R&D Award for Outstanding Technical Achievement, 1981
  • US Patent #5,359,170 Apparatus for Bonding External Leads of an Integrated Circuit
  • US Patent #6,054,676 Method and Apparatus for Cooling An Integrated Circuit Device

Peeples’ letter of gratitude

After learning about the endowed scholarship in his name, Peeples sent this letter to the grantors:


Dr. John Peeples with his family in 2018. (Left to right) Son, Dr. Dale Peeples, wife Jennifer and son Simon, John, wife Nancy “Bouy,” daughter Hope Lant, her husband Todd and their daughters Sullivan and Zoe. 

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Citadel ’02 alumna selected for American Red Cross board of directors in Illinois https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-02-alumna-selected-for-american-red-cross-board-of-directors-in-illinois/ Mon, 30 Nov 2020 15:27:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20419 Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002Note: Ragan Freitag Pattison graduated from The Citadel in 2002 with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. She went on to earn a Juris Doctor, Law from Mississippi College]]> Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002

Note: Ragan Freitag Pattison graduated from The Citadel in 2002 with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. She went on to earn a Juris Doctor, Law from Mississippi College School of Law in 2008. Photo courtesy of America Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley website.

As seen in The Herald-News

ROMEOVILLE – The American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley on Friday announced the appointment of Ragan Freitag Pattison to the organization’s board of directors. Board members are chosen based on their commitment to the Red Cross mission as well as their individual expertise, experience and willingness to serve the needs of the board. 

Pattison is the director of state and local government market for Wight & Co. She was one of the first women to graduate The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, earning her bachelor’s degree in political science with a concentration in American government. 

After graduating The Citadel, Pattison returned home and began her early civic career serving as alderwoman for the city of Wilmington.

During that time, she worked for former U.S. Rep. Jerry Weller, R-Streator, handling constituent concerns and legislative matters within the district.

In 2005, she entered Mississippi College School of Law in Jackson, Mississippi.

During her time in law school, she served on the committee for the law school chapter for Habitat for Humanity, where they raised money and built new homes for the victims of Hurricane Katrina.

Pattison graduated from law school in 2008, and that year, she also was admitted to practice law in Illinois. Pattison had a successful career practicing criminal defense, family law and governmental law with Kavanagh Grumley & Gorbold LLC. Currently, she is a licensed attorney with Gwendolyn J. Sterk and the Family Law Group P.C. 

While practicing law, Pattison ran and successfully won two elections, serving as a Will County Board member and commissioner for the Forest Preserve of Will County. Pattison served as chairwoman of the Will County Capital Committee, where she began working with Wight & Co. She continued working with Wight & Co. as she transitioned into the chief of staff role for the Will County Board. 

Pattison’s relationship with Wight & Co. was instrumental as the Will County Courthouse project began to kick off, sparking a series of capital projects for Will County. 

“The Red Cross does its best work because local people volunteer their time to help their community,” said Brian McDaniel, executive director of the American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley.

“Pattison is a talented leader who makes an impact every day. She has a strong commitment to the Red Cross mission, and we are fortunate to have her join the chapter board. Without board members like Ragan, backed by the organizations she works with, we wouldn’t have as strong of an organization as we do.” 

Brian McDaniel, executive director of the American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley

The American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley always is welcoming new board members. Those interested in volunteering as a board member or community volunteer leader should contact McDaniel at 815-370-6729 or brian.mcdaniel2@redcross.org.

The American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley serves more than 1 million people in five counties in northern Illinois, including Kankakee, Will, Grundy, Kendall and La Salle.

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families.

The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For information, visit www.redcross.org/ILRiver or follow on Twitter @RedCrossIL. 

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