News Releases – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Tue, 16 Mar 2021 19:20:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png News Releases – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 School of Engineering announces three finalists for Dean https://today.citadel.edu/school-of-engineering-announces-three-finalists-for-dean/ Tue, 16 Mar 2021 18:28:53 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22703 Three finalists for the position of Dean of The School of Engineering at The CitadelThree finalists for the position of Dean of The School of Engineering at The CitadelThe search for a new dean The Citadel School of Engineering is now focused on three finalists for the position.]]> Three finalists for the position of Dean of The School of Engineering at The CitadelThree finalists for the position of Dean of The School of Engineering at The Citadel

The search for a new dean The Citadel School of Engineering is now focused on three finalists for the position. The school was one of the first five engineering programs in the nation, and is consistently ranked in the top 25 in America by U.S. News & World Report. Graduates from the schools undergraduate programs have a near 99% job placement rate within the first 6-months of graduation.

The Citadel initiated the search in December, with the announcement of the impending retirement of the current Dean, Col. Ronald W. Welch, U.S. Army (Ret.), PH.D., P.E., FASCE following the end of the 2021 academic year.

The finalists and their biographies are listed below.

Andrew Williams, Ph.D.

Andrew B. Williams, Ph.D., M.B.A., is an Associate Dean for the University of Kansas (KU) School of Engineering and the Charles E. and Mary Jane Spahr Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. In this role, he led the strategic planning, fundraising, and implementation efforts to catapult the KU IHAWKe (Indigenous, Hispanic, African American, Women, KU Engineering) Diversity & Women’s Programs to receive the highest inaugural Diversity Recognition Program Award with exemplary distinction given by the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) in 2019.

Williams’s career spans higher education and the private sector, including positions at Apple Inc., GE Medical Systems, and Allied Signal Aerospace Company. He was also a Boeing Welliver Faculty Fellow and GE Edison Engineer. Williams served as a department chair for Computer and Information Sciences at Spelman College in Atlanta, and as a research affiliate in the Human-Automation Systems Lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Williams was the John P. Raynor Distinguished Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Marquette University, where he founded and directed the Humanoid Engineering and Intelligent Robotics (HEIR) Lab.  His research and education work in artificial intelligence, autonomous robotics, and human-robot interaction has resulted in over 100 technical publications and presentations. His collaborative grant writing and fundraising efforts have resulted in approximately $29M in research and educational funding, corporate support, and private donations. He is the author of the book, “Out of the Box: Building Robots, Transforming Lives.” 

Williams serves on a National Academy of Engineering workshop committee for diversity, the ACM Education Advisory Committee, and the National GEM Consortium Alumni Advisory Board as Treasurer. He received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from KU, his M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Marquette University, his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering with an emphasis in Artificial Intelligence from KU, and his Master of Business Administration from Rockhurst University.  He was born in Fort Riley, Kansas, the son of a WWII and Korean War veteran. He is married to Anitra Williams, his wife of 28 years, and together they have three adult children.

Craig Harvey, Ph.D., P.E.

Craig M. Harvey, Ph.D., P.E., is associate dean for Academic Affairs for the Louisiana State University (LSU) College of Engineering, a professor of Industrial Engineering, and holds the institution’s F.J. Haydel, Jr. Kaiser Aluminum Professorship. Prior to his current role at LSU, he was program director for Industrial engineering.

Harvey teaches and conducts research in the area of Industrial and Human Factors Engineering. His research has ranged from investigations into engineering design process, medical product usability, health care productivity, construction safety, and control room management. Harvey’s work has been funded by the Keck Foundation, National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, Federal Aviation and Hospitals, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Louisiana Department of Economic Development, Louisiana Board of Regents, Baton Rouge Area foundation, and the National Science Foundation.

Prior to joining the academic community, Harvey was a consultant of business process reengineering for KnowledgeWar, where he worked with Whirlpool and Ford Motor Company. Before that, he was manager of business process reengineering for the Student Loan Marketing Association (SallieMae) where he was responsible for the reengineering portion of the implementation of a $55 million document imaging system.

Harvey served un the U.S. Air Force in active duty for seven years and in the reserves for 13. During his time in the Air Force, he was an Air Force Civil Engineer. Harvey has more than 790 technical publications and is a senior member of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and Human ?Factors and Ergonomics Society.

Joseph Rencis, Ph.D., P.E.

Joseph Rencis, Ph.D., P.E., is a first-generation college graduate from a working-class family in a small town in rural Northwestern New Jersey. He received an Associate of Applied Science and a Bachelor of Science in Architectural and Building Construction Engineering technology from Milwaukee School of Engineering. Rencis earned a Master of Science from Northwestern University, and a Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University in Civil Engineering.

Rencis is currently a professor of Mechanical Engineering at Cal Poly Pomona, where he previously served as dean. Prior to joining Cal Poly, Rencis was a professor of Mechanical Engineering and director of Engineering Mechanics at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He served as department head for Mechanical Engineering, and as Twenty-First Century Leadership Chair at the University of Arkansas. Rencis was the dean of Engineering and Clay N. Hixson Chair for Engineering Leadership at Tennessee Tech University.

Rencis has published over 140 journal and conference articles in boundary elements, finite elements, molecular dynamics, and engineering education. He’s earned over $8 million in research funding.

Rencis is a fellow of the ASEE, ASME, and Wessex Institute of Great Britain. He served as ASEE President and was a director of the ASEE Engineering Deans Council Executive Board. Joe was elected to serve as the chair of the ASME Mechanical Engineering Department Heads Committee and was a member of the ASME Center for Education Board of Directors. Rencis has been an ABET program evaluator and has conducted reviews of new graduate programs. He is a recipient of ASEE awards for leadership, teaching, and service.

Presentations to campus

Each finalist will provide presentation for the campus community. They will all be held in Bastin Hall 207, and on Zoom. In-person attendance will be limited due to COVID-19 precautions, thus Zoom attendance is recommended.

Zoom links will be send to faculty and staff on the morning prior to the presentation.

  • Dr. Andrew Williams: Monday, March 22 from 1:30-2:40 p.m.
  • Dr. Craig Harvey: Tues., March 30 from 1:30-2:40 p.m.
  • Dr. Joseph Rencis, Thurs., April 1, from 1:30-2:40 p.m.

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Col. Thomas J. Gordon, U. S. Marine Corps, to be next Commandant of Cadets at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/col-thomas-j-gordon-u-s-marine-corps-to-be-next-commandant-of-cadets-at-the-citadel/ Mon, 08 Mar 2021 19:08:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22517 Colonel Thomas J. Gordon, USMC, The Citadel Class of 1991, brings a wealth of leadership, operational, and academic experience to the role]]>

The President of The Citadel has selected the college’s next Commandant of Cadets.

Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC, (Ret.) sent the following announcement to the campus community on Monday, March 8:

After an exhaustive vetting and interview process, I am pleased to announce our next Commandant of Cadets.

Colonel Thomas J. Gordon, USMC, The Citadel Class of 1991, brings a wealth of leadership, operational, and academic experience to the role. I am certain he will build on the strong foundations set by Captain Geno Paluso. We are fortunate such dynamic leaders choose to return to their Alma Mater in this critical position. The Corps will continue in good hands.

I wish to thank everyone who expressed interest in the position, particularly finalists Captain Matt Meilstrup, Colonel Mike Larsen ‘92 and Colonel Scott Nahrgang ‘96. This was not an easy choice, each had extraordinary success in their military careers, and the requisite skill and experience to be a successful commandant.

I also thank our search committee, and everyone who took time to assist in the selection process.

On behalf of the entire Citadel Family, I welcome Colonel Gordon, wife Candace, son Shane, and daughters Shannen and Shelby to campus.

The Citadel Commandant of Cadets is a vice presidential position that is responsible for the command, leadership development and oversight of the 2,300-member South Carolina Corps of Cadets and is crucial to the success of the Military College of South Carolina.

Gordon sent this statement in response to his selection:

“I am honored and humbled for the opportunity to serve The Citadel as the next Commandant of Cadets. I am grateful for the confidence Gen. Walters and the BOV have extended, and am excited to give back to the institution that has given me so much. Candace and I are looking forward to returning to Charleston and serving alongside our Citadel family. “

Col. Thomas J. Gordon, USMC

Gordon graduated from The Citadel in 1991, becoming a U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) officer. He retires from military service in May 2021 after 30 years.

Gordon is currently the Director of the Command & Staff College at Quantico, Virginia, one of the four Department of Defense professional military education colleges where he leads the development of future commanders of the joint force with graduate level education.

Previously Gordon served as the Chief of Staff to the Commandant of the Marine Corps, supporting the coordination of policy, plans, and decisions governing the manning, training, and resourcing of nearly 200,000 Marines and 13,000 civilian employees with an annual budget of $42 billion.

Examples of other his positions include serving as a Resident Fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations and as Commanding Officer for a 4,000 member organization executing world-wide combat operations that provided the communications, intelligence, electronic and cyber warfare capabilities, supporting arms integration, and liaison capabilities for the USMC. Gordon holds a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from Webster University and studied as a Fellow of International Relations and National Security with Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The search for a new commandant was initiated in November following an announcement about the retirement of the current commandant, Captain Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.), ’89, who will leave at the end of the current academic year. Paluso joined his alma mater as commandant in 2014.

Approved photo of Col Gordon
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Upcoming News from The Citadel – March 2021 https://today.citadel.edu/upcoming-news-from-the-citadel-march-2021/ Mon, 08 Mar 2021 14:25:54 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22388 A look at some of the events happening in and around The Citadel’s campus, including those honoring Women's History Month.]]>

Global Women in Leadership Day

Monday, March 8
9-11 a.m.
Virtual, via WebEx
Free, open to The Citadel community and the public

One of the first major events for Women’s History Month on campus involves a high-flying graduate from The Citadel Graduate College.

Alecia Lopez Floyd — who earned a Master’s in Business Administration in 2009 and a Master’s in Project Management in 2016 — currently works in leadership development for Boeing. Now, she’s working with her alma mater to host an event celebrating International Women’s Day.

Floyd, along with The Citadel’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Council and the Diversity Advisory Board, are hosting the event virtually on Monday, March 8 from 9 to 11 a.m.

The event will focus on self-preservation, especially during times of isolation, and will feature speakers cross the world, including:

  • Alicia Lopez Floyd – United States
  • Anu Hatti – India
  • Ilaria Sbrilli – Italy
  • Samhita Seal – India
  • Catherine Ahdjila Geffroy – France
  • Saranya Udayakumar – India
  • Agnieszka  Buczak – Poland

The women specifically address areas such as self-awareness, self-efficacy, self-promotion and self-care. The event will also include a 15-minute breakout session.

To join the session, click here.

Meeting number (access code): 144 762 0621
Meeting password: aDVDmk445DZ

First round on the 2021 Corps-Wide Speaking Competition

Monday, March 22
2-4 p.m.
Patricia McArver Public Speaking Lab
Open to cadets

Every member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets has a personal story to tell — and one of the annual traditions on campus gives them a chance to win money for speaking up.

Though the pandemic has forced some small changes to the structure, the 11th Annual Henry Dale Smith Corps-Wide Public Speaking Contest will kick off on March 22.

From 2 – 4 p.m., cadets are invited to record a five to seven minute speech in the Patricia McArver Public Speaking Lab, in Bond 367.

Competing cadets can present original speeches on topics such as:

  • A personal story that shaped their life
  • History revisited
  • The benefits of science
  • How culture has shaped them or society
  • A hobby or passion

The following round will be held the week after, where cadets will present their speeches, live, to judges. Speeches given in that round will be open for the public.

The first-place winner will earn the title “Best Speaker in the Corps,” an award included in the college’s annual Commencement Week Awards Convocation, as well as a $500 prize. The second-place cadet will receive $300.

The speaking competition is hosted by The Patricia McArver Public Speaking Lab, where students, faculty and staff can polish their public speaking skills. From timid talkers to confident communicators, The Public Speaking Lab works one-on-one with a variety of individuals to create great presenters.

Presentations on “Climate change and its impact on international and national security”

Tuesday, March 15
6 p.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

The threat of climate change brings with it wide-ranging risks. One of those risks is to national security, not just for the United States but for the world as a whole.

That’s why The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies is focusing on climate change for its upcoming session of Emerging National Security Topics.

The presentation on March 15 will feature:

The lecture series will be streamed online at 6 p.m.

Click here to join the Zoom meeting.

The Emerging Topics Lecture Series is open to the public, and is especially designed for Citadel cadets and students, and others interested in hearing national security issues by Citadel faculty members, alongside other international experts.

The Gold Star Journal Academic Conference

Tuesday, March 30
6-7:30 p.m.
Buyer Auditorium
Free, open to Citadel cadets, students, faculty and staff

The Citadel’s premier scholarly publication, The Gold Star Journal, will celebrate its 25th anniversary during an Academic Conference on Tuesday, March 30.

The featured speakers will be the published authors from the 2021 edition of The Gold Star Journal. Authors and papers published in this year’s edition include:

  • Hannah Dion, 2022, Biology Major, “Cleopatra:  The Propagated Villain of Rome”
  • Joseph M. Field, 2021, Political Science Major, “The Importance of Military Discipline in the 17th Century Manchu Army as Seen in Dzengseo’s ‘Diary of my Service in the Army’”
  • Nick Fricchione, 2021, History Major, “German War Graves: A Tragic and Somber Reminder of Cost of War”
  • Frank Hoffman, Graduate Student, International Politics and Military Affairs Major, “Engaged Containment: A Viable Solution to the North Korea Problem”
  • Thomas Kyte, 2022, Political Science Major, One Belt and One Road Right Through Ethiopia?
  • Ashley Ruiz, 2022, Political Science and Intelligence Major, “Geopolitical Impacts of Wahhabism in the Middle East”
  • Jalen Singleton, 2022, Computer Science Major, “Cybersecurity and Cryptography: The Interrelation”
  • Shiloh Smiles, 2021, Computer Science and Cyber Operations Major, “Implications of Quantum Computing on Computational Complexity Theory”
  • Dylan R. Wood, 2023, Mechanical Engineering, “Electric Car Battery Development and Analysis”

The conference will include presentations and awards.  Free copies of the journal will be available.

This year’s edition features nine cross-disciplinary papers written by The Citadel’s best and brightest undergraduate and graduate students and many photographs taken by Citadel students.

Social distancing will be enforced, and hand sanitizer will be provided upon entry.

Registration for The Citadel Applied Physics Experience

Faculty and cadets in the department are working with high school students three times a year through The Citadel Applied Physics Experience. It’s a virtual, but still hands-on, “class” that teaches high school students about physics and expands their knowledge of the study’s practical applications.

The department is currently accepting registrations for both the spring and summer sessions, after having kicked off the program in the fall semester. Faculty and cadets in the Department of Physics will continue to hold events like this three times a year — in both semesters and during the summer.

The experience is not limited to certain high schools. Physics faculty members will send a kit, for the hands-on portion, to registered students — so anyone who can receive mail can participate. Any student can participate regardless of STEM background.

For more information on The Citadel Applied Physics Experience, click here.

To register for the spring session, click here. The deadline for this session is March 12.

To register for the summer session, click here. The deadline for this session is June 15.

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Most distinguished cadets named to fall 2020 President’s List https://today.citadel.edu/most-distinguished-cadets-named-to-fall-2020-presidents-list/ Thu, 25 Feb 2021 21:11:20 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22377 The President’s List, awarded for academic and military excellence, is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel.]]>

Photo: General Glenn Walters, UCMC (Ret.), Class of 1979, during the Gold Star and President’s List presentation on Feb. 25, 2021

The President’s List is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel. It indicates excellence in academics and military duties. The list is a combination of the Dean’s List and the Commandant’s Distinguished List and is composed of cadets who contribute the most to their companies while maintaining excellent military and academic records.

The following cadets have been recognized for their outstanding work during the fall 2020 semester:

First nameLast name
TrevorAtkins
MaryBallentine
JackBeehler
CarletonBeiliff
CharlotteBrailsford
TylerBurgess
PatrickCamatcho
BrentonCarnes
JackCasazza
AlbertCastro
JonahCharles
Yen RuChen
RyanCherrier
PatrickCherry
AlexanderClark
JoshuaCoats
HunterCongdon
GrantConner
WilliamConnor
CharlesCorte
JonathanCribb
AydenDevlin
MaximillianDonegan
JacksonDulay
DakotaDurham
MayaElassal
ChaseErvin
GraysonFree
NicholasFricchione
ZavierGebrayel
CharlesGeiger
JeremyGentle
CollinGleco
CarrettGraettinger
CodyGreen
CatherineGuenther
MitchellHamm
ThomasHammerstone
BuddyHerring
ElijahHolder
KienenHolmes
MichaelHooks
MalcolmJackson
IanJenkins
StephenKaiser-Parlette
JacobKnapp
RomanKokowsky
PatrickKrese
SamuelLittle
AveryLollis
StevenLynch
BrandonMacDonald
TriniMartinez
DavidMcBain
JakeMcPherson
JohnMichne
ZacharyMooney
JosephMurphy
GrantNorman
BrooksO'Brian
TizianaOrtega
TimothyOverend
IsaacPatterson
SamuelPoulin
RonaldPrince
MethRanaweera
WilliamRathke
StevenReisinger
KevinRevuelta
JackRose
IanSchultz
HadouSlimani
GrantSpeer
EthanStanley
JosephStilwell
BradleyStone
DanielStone
RichardStuckey
WilliamTempleton
CionnorThomas
BraxtonWeaver
JonathanWestmoreland
MadelynWojciehowski
JesseYoung
SamuelZuschlag
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Citadel Physics Department makes virtual learning into a physical reality for high school students https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-physics-department-makes-virtual-learning-into-a-physical-reality-for-high-schoolers/ Wed, 24 Feb 2021 16:33:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22171 The Physics Department offers a virtual, but still hands-on, “class” for high school students about physics and its practical applications.]]>

Photo: Physics professor Kaelyn Leake, Ph.D., leading cadets and high school students through The Citadel Applied Physics Experience.

There’s a big difference between knowing the equations that explain gravitational forces and actually being hit in the head by an apple.

One is theoretical, and the other is a real-world effect of those theories.

Working to help high school students bridge the divide between physics equations and physical events: The Citadel’s Department of Physics.

Faculty and cadets in the department are working with high school students three times a year through The Citadel Applied Physics Experience. It’s a virtual, but still hands-on, “class” that teaches high school students about physics and expands their knowledge of the study’s practical applications.

“The goal of our Citadel Applied Physics Experience is to help high school students understand that physics is more than theory, through tactile experiences demonstrating real-world uses,” said Hank Yochum, Ph.D., head of the Department of Physics. “We don’t want to just tell students why physics is important — we want to demonstrate and discuss. It’s a chance to build something together, even via Zoom in the COVID environment, and to talk about how and why it works.”

Cadets help guide high school students in breakout sessions during The Citadel Applied Physics Experience

The department is currently accepting registrations for both the spring and summer sessions, after having kicked off the program in the fall semester. Faculty and cadets in the Department of Physics will continue to hold events like this three times a year — in both semesters and during the summer.

The experience is not limited to certain high schools. Physics faculty members will send a kit, for the hands-on portion, to registered students — so anyone who can receive mail can participate. Any student can participate regardless of STEM background.

Current Citadel cadets and faculty will help the high school students assemble a light-seeking, biology inspired robot that looks a lot like a bug.

The next Applied Physics Experience will be held on Saturday, April 3 from 1 to 5:30 p.m. A two-day summer session is planned for July 8-9.

The event is open to any high school sophomore, junior or senior who enjoys problem solving, science, math and hands-on projects.

The cost for all materials is $20. Space for each session is limited.

To register for the spring session, click here. The deadline for this session is March 12.

To register for the summer session, click here. The deadline for this session is June 15.

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At the Citadel, a three-step approach to keeping college-age Eagle Scouts involved https://today.citadel.edu/at-the-citadel-a-three-step-approach-to-keeping-college-age-eagle-scouts-involved/ Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:22:40 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22319 Members of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South CarolinaMembers of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South CarolinaThese Eagle Scouts take trips together, host events for local packs and troops, and complete acts of service in the community.]]> Members of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South CarolinaMembers of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South Carolina

As seen on ScoutingMagazine.org
By Bryan Wendell

Photo above: Members of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South Carolina

The saying, repeated at Eagle Scout courts of honor for generations, goes something like this: “The Eagle Scout Award isn’t the end of your journey. It’s the beginning.”

It should sound like a challenge — something to remind young people that they remain Eagle Scouts for life.

And yet, when Eagle Scouts turn 18 and are no longer youth members of the BSA, the Scouting part of their journey often does end.

They move away to attend college or start a career, effectively closing their Scouting chapter until they have kids of their own.

Ted Fienning and his colleagues at the Citadel have a plan to change that.

“As an Eagle myself, I’m very familiar with the feeling many young Scouts have that it’s, ‘get it done by 18 or you’re out!’” he says. “That’s a consistent message to our Scouts: You’re done at 18. In effect, it means that at a time when Scouts are leaving their home towns to head to college, we allow them to disappear. And we do so right when they’re at the pinnacle of training, having earned Scouting’s highest award.”

Fienning is the staff advisor for the Citadel Eagle Scout Association, or CESA — a group of 50 Eagle Scouts who attend the senior military college in Charleston, S.C. These Eagle Scouts take trips together, host events for local packs and troops, and complete acts of service in the community.

They’re led by CESA President Jackson Jenkins, an Eagle Scout from Troop 392 of the Quapaw Area Council in Arkansas and a junior political science major at the Citadel.

“It was always taught to me by my Scoutmasters — Mr. Ken, Mr. Scott, Mr. Mark and others — that giving back to the program as an adult is one of the most important things I could do,” Jenkins says. “When I learned that the Citadel had an Eagle Scout Association, I jumped at the chance to get involved with the group and stay involved with Scouting as a college student.”

Through CESA, Jenkins says he’s been able to make friends, serve others and “continue to grow both myself and other young Eagles as leaders, all while being able to have fun and fulfill that promise I made to give back to the program that gave so much to me.”

So how do they do it? How has CESA bridged the gap between youth and adult Scouting? By taking a three-pronged approach.

Members of the Citadel Eagle Scout Association in Fall 2017. (Courtesy of CESA)

1. Give them a shared purpose

Young people, especially those in college, want to make an impact. They want to know that their work matters.

For the members of CESA, that shared purpose is serving others.

“We identify an annual project or two that they can plan, serve and sink their teeth and skills into,” Fienning says.

Last year, they launched a Cub Scout Adventure Rodeo. This year, they’re hosting a Scouting University (at an actual university), as well as designing and building a trail for a nearby state park.

“We also train them on adult Scouting opportunities and connect them to packs and troops to help out where they can,” Fienning says.

Members of the Citadel Eagle Scout Association in Fall 2016. (Courtesy of CESA)

2. Remove financial barriers

CESA members pay no dues.

CESA covers all costs, including transportation to and from service events, like CESA’s “Mom & Me” and “Dad & Me” camps or support at the Coastal Carolina Council’s other Scouting events.

To make this work, you need an advocate who works for the college. In addition to his role as CESA advisor, Fienning is the associate director for professional leadership programs at the Citadel, meaning he has the administration’s ear.

Fienning worked with the college’s foundation to build a Citadel Eagle Scout Association Fund. The fund raised more than $6,000 in a campaign last year, which will go a long way toward meeting the group’s $1,500 annual budget for some time.

Over the years, this fund will kick out 5% of endowed funds to keep these Eagles serving in perpetuity. The fund will pay for equipment, logistics, food and more.

“Working with the college foundation really reduces the administrative burden of tracking accounts and donors, plus it lends credibility to the Eagle Scout Association and its ties to the college,” Fienning says.

Members of the Citadel Eagle Scout Association volunteered at a Cub Scout day camp in October 2019. (Courtesy of CESA)

3. Feed them

It’s a tradition as old as colleges themselves.

“College students will gather for free food,” Fienning says.

Sure enough, CESA leaders understand that food isn’t the only reason members attend meetings, but it helps. CESA cooks its meals outdoors in large batches — a delicious serving of nostalgia that makes these Eagle Scouts remember time spent in their home troops.

“Scouts bring their mess kits, and we eat well,” Fienning says.

Starting your own collegiate Eagle Scout Association

Want to start an Eagle Scout Association at your school and keep these young Eagles around the Scouting campfire?

To help CESA grow, Fienning says he worked closely with Ray Capp and the BSA Alumni Association. That’s a great place for anyone to start.

To learn more about the Citadel Eagle Scout Association, visit the group’s official Facebook page.

Jackson Jenkins, CESA president

‘One of the greatest influences on my life’

Jenkins, the CESA president and Eagle Scout, is a shining example of why we need groups like CESA.

We need to keep young people like him engaged — especially while their greatest Scouting memories are still fresh on their minds.

Jenkins has been an unofficial Scout since he was 4 and started tagging along on his older brother’s Cub Scout adventures.

The instant he could join, Jenkins did.

“Ever since then, it’s been one of the greatest influences on my life,” he says. “The Scout Oath and Law, the examples of my adult leaders, and the amazing experiences gained on so many countless days and nights of camping have shaped me into the person I am today. I am so very thankful for all of it.”

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From the Corps to the Chapel: Meet Chaplain Aaron Meadows https://today.citadel.edu/from-the-corps-to-the-chapel-meet-chaplain-aaron-meadows/ Tue, 16 Feb 2021 19:36:07 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22033 The former cadet, and current Air Force reservist, will now serve his alma mater as the Chaplain to the Corps of Cadets.]]>

“Remember Now Thy Creator in the Days of Thy Youth”

Those old words above Summerall Chapel greeted the new Chaplain to the Corps of Cadets, Aaron Meadows, a member of the Class of 2004.

The former cadet, and current Air Force reservist, will now serve his alma mater as the Chaplain to the Corps of Cadets.

Meadow’s role will involve tending to the spiritual needs of cadets, alumni, faculty and staff and also serving as a community leader, bringing religious leaders from different faiths around the city together for worship and fellowship. He also leads celebrations, such as the annual Christmas Candlelight Services, and the celebrations of the lives of the many people who request to have funeral services in the chapel.

Learn more about Ch, Lt. Col. Meadows below:

How many years have you served in the military?

I graduated from The Citadel in 2004 and accepted a commission that May — so May of this year will be 17 years in the U.S. Air Force Reserves.

Why did you join the military?

I actually grew up in a military family — a Navy family — and I applied here my junior year. I got in, and I didn’t apply anywhere else.

My family could not pay for me to come to college, so I had to have some kind of scholarship, and I ended up getting a four year Army scholarship. My sophomore year, I switched from Army to Air Force but was able to maintain the scholarship.

Why did you want to become a chaplain in the Air Force?

My junior year, when I was doing campus ministry as a cadet — I was involved here in the chapel, went to Campus Crusade, Baptist Collegiate Ministry, Charleston Wesley Foundation and several other campus ministries — God was calling me to ministry as a chaplain, so that’s when I switched. I had to go through a ton of hoops because there was no process to go from an active duty commitment to a reserve commitment at that time, and I was told it wouldn’t happen. But God just opened up a door and I was able to take a reserve commitment so I could go to seminary.

So I left The Citadel, went to seminary, and enrolled in the Chaplain Candidate Program. I became a chaplain, and I’m still an Air Force Reserve chaplain with the 315th Airlift Wing, stationed at Joint Base Charleston. Then God opened up the door for me to do campus ministry, which I’ve done with the Methodist Church for seven years. I am transitioning out of that to fully focus on my work here on campus.

Why have you stayed in the military?

I feel like God has given me the gifts and graces to do ministry in the military as a chaplain. I love caring for people, I love being able to meet people at the best of circumstances and — not that I love this part, exactly — but I also get to help people at their lowest, as well as people in the middle, too. And I get to do that from a perspective of faith.

As a Christian minister, I get to lead worship, I get to help people grow in their faith as Christians. As a chaplain I get to do this for everyone, for people of many faiths and beliefs. I get to help support others in their faiths or even those who have no faith at all. I get to be that person who’s there for them. That’s a big reason I’ve stayed in the military, but also why I wanted to do the chaplain job here at The Citadel.

What is the most defining moment of your service to date?

I think it would be all the times I was able to help multiple people — not just one person or moment. I feel like, for people who were at a low point of their life, or who’re completely lost and directionless, I was able to be a part of helping them get from where they were to where they needed to be — to a healthier place. God put me in the right place at the right time to help.

What does being an Air Force reservist mean to you?

I think that the beauty of the reserve world for me is that it lets me stay connected and be a part of the military, doing all the things I love to do there. I was initially planning on going active duty in 2010. I’d just started at a church in North Charleston that was struggling, but God started doing some really cool things, the church was growing and I thought, ‘I can’t abandon this ministry to go active duty.’ So I stayed in the Air Force Reserve.

What it’s allowed me to do is keep that military connection. That has opened up so many doors, even getting to work here at The Citadel. I get to do military ministry and to fulfill that part that I love, as well as staying connected to the church ministry and the civilian world. It’s allowed me to stay grounded in two, often, very different worlds.

What leadership qualities did you learn in the military that have helped guide you through your career and life?

There’s an important role that’s played by the military, so I think bringing that attitude, the understanding that sometimes you have to dig in and work hard, shows how there’s something valuable about sacrificing and working hard for the benefit of the whole. So I think those things — like adversity, discipline, getting yelled at — build the military attitude that’s part of making changes and breaking down barriers.

As an alumnus, what does it mean to you to take on this position?

I think that, when I walk around meeting cadets, they see me as just some 40-year-old balding guy — until they see my ring and say, “Wait a minute, you went here,” and then there’s an instant connection. We’ve done something similar.

As a cadet, I was a cadre corporal, squad sergeant, platoon sergeant, battalion recruiting master sergeant, regimental religious officer, on the honor committee, wrestler in my knob year — all those things I did as a cadet are now how I can better relate to current cadets.

Cadets know that as a graduate, I can relate to the fact that SMIs suck, or that I understand that morning PT isn’t always fun. I feel like I can understand those things in a way that I couldn’t if I hadn’t gone here. I feel like God’s gifted and graced me to support these young men and women and help transform their lives, specifically from a spiritual and faith-based aspect, for those who choose to engage there. But also for those who don’t, I think that I have an opportunity to help them in a positive way outside of the concepts and components of faith. That brings me joy — I feel like that’s a part of how God wired me.

What do you hope to accomplish as Chaplain to the SCCC?

I really want to be a part of growing the specific chapel ministry so, on campus, kids can grow in their faith and that part of their life for those who want to. We’re part of making this campus what it should be so that all students can come, thrive and leave here as better people.

Chaplain Aaron Meadows (center) with Summerall Chapel staff members LeLa Sijtsma (left) and Geri Jones (right).
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Near Center for Climate Studies announces advisory board https://today.citadel.edu/near-center-for-climate-studies-announces-advisory-board/ Thu, 11 Feb 2021 16:31:35 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21825 Storm over the oceanStorm over the oceanNear Center for Climate Studies is now being guided by a distinguished group of advisors.]]> Storm over the oceanStorm over the ocean

The Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF, ’77, Center for Climate Studies (NCCS) was founded in 2020. The NCCS serves the cadets/students and faculty of The Citadel and citizens of South Carolina by enhancing understanding of climate and its variability, change and risks through education, research, outreach and the development of public-private partnerships.

The NCCS now has an advisory board to assist in guiding its director, staff and Fellows in the development of atmospheric and climate science curriculum, place-based research and advancement of information promoting the design of sustainable, scientifically sound, technologically feasible, economically efficient and ethically defensible climate-risk management strategies.

NCCS Advisory Board members

Kevin Cooley, ’90

Cooley directs of Office of Planning and Programming for Service Delivery, for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS). He ensures that the NWS has the capabilities needed to enable the provision of its climate, weather and water forecasts, watches and warnings to the American public and its public safety officials. Cooley oversees the planning, resourcing, development, fielding and operation of these essential mission capabilities. A primary example of such a capability is the NWS NEXRAD W88D Weather Radar used across the nation to enable effective severe weather forecasting and warning. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps for five years and in a civilian capacity for numerous military and federal government entities. Cooley’s NOAA biography can be read here. He graduated from The Citadel in 1990.

Kirstin Dow, Ph.D.

Dow is the Carolina Trustees Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina. She is a social-environmental geographer focusing on understanding climate impacts, vulnerability, and adaptation using methods involving extensive participation of stakeholders and decision-makers. Dow serves as principal investigator of the Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessments (CISA) (www.cisa.sc.edu), 1 of 11 NOAA-supported Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) teams partnering with decision makers to bridge climate science and decision making in support of climate adaptation strategies specific to water resources, coastal regions, and public health concerns in the Carolinas. Dow’s full biography can be read here.

Fred Holland, Ph.D., ’64

Holland received a B.S. from The Citadel (1964) and his M.S. (1972) and Ph.D. (1974) degrees from the University of South Carolina. He has more than 45 years of technical and management experience in environmental sciences supporting state and federal governmental agencies. Holland held positions in the environmental consulting industry (vice president, Versar Inc. 1987-1991), state government (director, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Marine Resources Research Institute 1991-2001) and federal government (director of NOAA’s Hollings Marine Laboratory and Center of Excellence for Oceans and Human Health 2001-2008). Holland also held academic positions with the College of Charleston, University of South Carolina, Medical University of South Carolina and the University of Maryland’s Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. Read more about Holland here.

Mike Johns, ’72

Johns graduated from The Citadel in 1972 with a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology. He also received a commission in the U.S. Air Force upon graduation. Johns went on to earn a Master of Science in Zoology and a Ph.D. in Marine Science from the University of South Carolina. Additionally, he earned an MBA from the University of Rhode Island. From 1976 to 1985, Johns was a principal investigator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Research Laboratory where he developed national guidance for addressing problems with chemically contaminated aquatic environments. He later worked in environmental consulting, eventually creating Windward Environmental LLC, which now has offices in three states and works to identify scientifically sound, environmentally sustainable remediation solutions for complex chemical pollution problems.

David Johnston

Johnston is a lawyer, advisor and businessman, with over thirty-five years of experience working with a broad range of private, non-profit and government organizations. He is the founder and CEO of Hamilton Advisors, LLC, a South Carolina-based company that advises organizations and their leadership on domestic and international challenges and solutions involving community resilience, collaboration and finance, with a special focus on water-related issues. Hamilton collaborates with organizations globally to achieve results for its client and their initiatives. Johnston has been a partner in major law firms and has served as corporate counsel for a number of public and private companies. His legal work focuses on complex corporate, securities, finance and environmental matters. Additionally, Johnston is chairman of the steering committee for the Charleston Resilience Network, and serves on the board of directors of the South Carolina Aquarium, the Medical University of South Carolina Neuroscience Advisory Board and Elements of Genius, Inc, Advisory Board.

Susan Lovelace, Ph.D.

Lovelace is the executive director for the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium. Her primary duties include administration of the agency and identifying the strategic directions for Consortium funded research, education and communication. She shepherds a multi-disciplinary staff as they work with researchers, businesses, communities and organizations to sustain, appreciate and wisely use the ecosystem services of our coastal area while understanding and responding to the challenges and opportunities of changes in climate and land use. Previously she was the Consortium’s assistant director for development and extension. Prior to this, she was manager of the Human Dimensions Research Program at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Hollings Marine Laboratory. Lovelace earned a Ph.D. in coastal resource management at East Carolina University, a B.S. in science education also at East Carolina University and a B.S. in Zoology at North Carolina State University. Read more about Lovelace here.

Hope Mizzell, Ph.D.

Mizzell has served as the South Carolina State Climatologist since 2003 and Supervisor for the South Carolina Flood Mitigation Program since 2014. The South Carolina Flood Mitigation Program is South Carolina’s coordinating agency for the National Flood Insurance Program. Hope’s responsibilities as State Climatologist include providing climatic information and meteorological interpretations, certifying climate records, overseeing the State’s Drought Response Program, providing emergency weather support, and conducting applied research to improve decision making activities. Dr. Mizzell has authored or co-authored studies on topics ranging from extreme rainfall, flooding, drought, and climate trends and variability. She began her career in 1992 as a Climatologist for the Southeast Regional Climate Center before advancing to Assistant State Climatologist for the South Carolina State Climate Office in 1995. She is the Past President of the American Association of State Climatologists. She received her Ph.D. focused on Climatology from the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina in 2008.

Geoff Scott, Ph.D.

Scott received his Bachelor of Science in Biology from Wofford College, and his Master of Science and Ph.D. in Marine Science from the University of South Carolina. He is currently a clinical professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. Scott is also director of the NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions housed in the Arnold School of Public Health with collaborating universities including the College of Charleston, The Citadel, Baylor University, Rutgers University and the University of Maryland. Some of Scott’s decades of research experience includes assessing impacts of the Ixtoc Well Blowout in the Gulf of Mexico; investigating hazardous waste sites, oil spills and Vibrio cholerae outbreaks in the Gulf of Mexico; assessing the impacts of agricultural pesticides, synthetic fuels and urban NPS runoff on coastal ecosystems; and measuring the health of coastal ecosystems and evaluating the impacts of changing landscape ecology from urbanization on ecosystem and human health.

Fellows of the Near Center for Climate Studies

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Reinvigorating The Citadel Bulldogs Athletic Brand https://today.citadel.edu/reinvigorating-the-citadel-bulldogs-athletic-brand/ Sat, 06 Feb 2021 00:00:33 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21902 This spring, the college is inviting our campus community to help enliven our Bulldogs athletics brand to create the uniformity across all sports.]]>

When glancing back over the decades, Bulldogs fans will remember many different looks for our beloved mascot, the evolving logos, names and colors. The legacy of The Citadel Bulldogs athletics brand encompasses nearly 120 years and, although we have long been the Bulldogs, we are working to create consistency in our athletic brand. 

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This spring, the college is inviting our campus community to help enliven our Bulldogs athletics brand to create the uniformity across all sports that The Citadel’s fans expect.

“We want our athletic branding to reflect thoughts, observations and spirit of every segment of The Citadel community—cadets, students, faculty, staff, donors, alumni and fans,” said Col. John Dorrian, USAF (Ret.), vice president for The Citadel Office of Communications and Marketing. “So we have created ways for every fan to get involved.”

How to participate

Citadel soccer teamm 2005
2005 Soccer Team

The effort will develop a comprehensive logo system to include a consistent color palette, Bulldog images, standard athletic lettering and uniform number sets.

Members of The Citadel community are encouraged to participate in the project in two ways:

  1. Listening Sessions. Share your thoughts in listening sessions with key stakeholder groups during the month of February. Those interested in participating should fill out the online form here. NOTE: Listening sessions are smaller in size, so not everyone will be able to participate.
  2. Input. Anyone can provide input on the project via The Citadel website here.

“Our end goal for this project is to achieve a comprehensive visual identity system for The Citadel Bulldogs that is distinctive, emotive, adaptable and enduring,” said Stanton Adams, The Citadel’s creative director. “Every comment will be considered, and we expect to present the assets to the Board of Visitors in time for them to be in use next year.”

Adams will serve as project manager and lead the initiative in partnership with the Department of Athletics and Joe Bosack & Company.

“The Bulldog is one of the most popular athletic mascots for collegiate sports teams,” Adams said. “That’s why this project is so important—The Citadel Bulldog will be distinctive to our college and reflect the ethos of our teams and their fans.”

The Citadel will work closely with Follett Higher Education, the vendor that manages The Citadel Bookstore and officially licensed merchandise to have plenty of quality athletic gear in stock once The Citadel Bulldog logos are complete.

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Four finalists announced in search for new Commandant of Cadets https://today.citadel.edu/four-finalists-announced-in-search-for-new-commandant-of-cadets/ Fri, 05 Feb 2021 21:34:23 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21932 The Citadel Commandant of Cadets is responsible for the command, leadership development and oversight of the 2,300-member Corps of Cadets.]]>

Finalists to make presentations on campus

There are four finalists in The Citadel’s search for the next Commandant of Cadets.

The Citadel Commandant of Cadets is a vice presidential position that is responsible for the command, leadership development and oversight of the 2,300-member South Carolina Corps of Cadets and is crucial to the success of the Military College of South Carolina.

The finalists include:

Col. Thomas J. Gordon, U.S. Marine Corps

Col Tom Gordon headshot

Gordon graduated from The Citadel in 1991, becoming a U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) officer. He retires from military service in May 2021 after 30 years. Gordon is currently the Director of the Command & Staff College at Quantico, Virginia, one of the four Department of Defense Professional Military Education Colleges where he leads the development of future commanders of the joint force with graduate level education. Previously he served as the Chief of Staff to the Commandant of the Marine Corps, supporting the coordination of policy, plans, and decisions governing the manning, training, and resourcing of nearly 200,000 Marines and 13,000 civilian employees with an annual budget of $42 billion. Examples of other positions include serving as a Resident Fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations and as Commanding Officer for a 4,000 member organization executing world-wide combat operations that provided the communications, intelligence, electronic and cyber warfare capabilities, supporting arms integration, and liaison capabilities for the USMC. Gordon holds a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from Webster University and studied as a Fellow of International Relations and National Security with Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Col. Michael McDonald Larsen, U.S. Army

Col. Michael McDonald Larsen, U.S. Army

Larsen graduated from The Citadel in 1992 and has served in the U.S. Army as an active duty Infantry Officer for 28 years. Larsen is currently Deputy Commanding Officer for the U.S. Army Training Center at Fort Jackson where he is second in command over the Basic Combat Training of 50,000 soldiers annually (1,000 weekly during the coronavirus pandemic). Prior to that, he was Chief of Staff, U.S. Army Africa, supervising 20 colonels and their directorates with responsibility to respond to contingencies and security cooperation activities in 53 countries on the African continent. Larsen also spent time as a Garrison Commander in the Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Island, where operations included a $4 billion test range and leading the community of 2,000 military service people and civilian contractor workers there. Larsen was the Brigade Operations Officer and Battalion Executive Officer for 1st Brigade 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, with combat service in Iraq. In addition to a Bachelor of Arts in History from The Citadel, Larsen holds a Master’s of National Security and Strategic Students from the U.S. Naval War College, and a Master’s of Military Art and Science from the School for Advanced Military Studies at Fort Leavenworth.

Capt. M. T. Meilstrup, U.S. Coast Guard

Meilstrup graduated from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Academy in 1992 and continues to serve the USCG. He is currently Senior Manager, Logistics and Business Operations for the USCG, directing enterprise-level logistics policy, procedures and integrated assessments and business operations for the nearly $2 billion directorate. Meilstrup spent 18 years aboard ships and, thus far, 11 years in command roles. For four years he commanded the Coast Guard’s three-masted EAGLE sail-training ship leading over 2,000 officer trainees through 80 different ports and on four trans-Atlantic voyages. Other assignments included serving as Senior Manager/Adviser in the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and as Chief, External Affairs and Heritage for the USCG. In addition to earning a Bachelor of Science in Marine Sciences from the USCG Academy, Meilstrup holds three master’s degrees: one in Strategic Studies from U.S. Marine Corps University, a Master of International Public Policy from Johns Hopkins University SAIS, and a Master of Business Administration from Regis University.

Col. Scott Nahrgang, U.S. Air Force

Nahrgang graduated from The Citadel in 1996 and became an officer in the U.S. Air Force (USAF). He continues to serve almost 25 years after his commission. Nahrgang is currently Chief of Command and Control, Electronic Warfare and Global Integrated Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Strategic Plans and Programs, at the USAF headquarters in the Pentagon. Previously, he led intelligence operations as group commander at Beale AFB for the 548 ISR Group, a 24/7 combat mission entity. Earlier, Nahrgang commanded the Department of Defense’s largest multi-service intelligence training unit, composed of 375 instructors teaching 6,400 joint-service students each year. He was deployed as the executive officer to the Secretary of Defense Representative in Europe and Defense Advisor to the U.S. Ambassador to NATO, and the Defense Intelligence Policy Advisor for the U.S. Mission to NATO. In addition to a Bachelor’s Degree in English from The Citadel, Nahrgang holds a Masters of Aeronautical Science from Embry-Riddle University and a Government Affairs Institute Legislative Studies Certificate from Georgetown University.

About the search

The search was initiated in November following an announcement by The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters about the upcoming retirement of current commandant, Captain Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.), ‘89, at the end of the current academic year.

Some of the position requirements include:

  • Extensive military background with a minimum of 20 years of service in one of the branches of the U.S. Armed Forces and attained the rank of Colonel (O-6)
  • Background in the command of military units (O-6 level) is required in order to provide the senior leadership for the Corps of Cadets
  • The Commandant must also have ONE of the following:
    · Experience at a Senior Military College
    · Experience at a Federal Service Academy
    · Graduated from a Senior Military College or from a Federal Service Academy

The Commandant Search Committee members are as follows:

  • Col. Tom Philipkosky, USAF (Ret.), ’82, senior vice president for Operations and Administration (chair)
  • Col. Pete McCoy, vice chair for The Citadel Board of Visitors
  • Faith Rivers-James, J.D., assistant provost for Leadership
  • Col. Leo Mercado, USMC (Ret.), ’79, former Commandant of Cadets
  • Jay Dowd, Ph.D., president and CEO, The Citadel Foundation

Presentation dates

The finalists will provide presentations on campus at noon on these dates:

  • Col. Tom Gordon – February 22
  • Capt. Matt Meilstrup – February 24
  • Col. Mike Larsen – February 26
  • Col. Scott Nahrgang – March 1

The presentations will take place in the Bond Hall 165 auditorium, with very limited, socially-distanced seating on a first come, first served basis. The presentations will also be shown live via Zoom. The link will be provided to the campus community prior to each presentation via email and advertised via The Citadel’s social media accounts. Zoom participants will be able to send in questions via Zoom’s chat function.

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