News Releases – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 17 Dec 2020 18:54:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png News Releases – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 All-Southern Conference Faculty and Staff Team announced https://today.citadel.edu/all-southern-conference-faculty-and-staff-team-announced/ Sat, 19 Dec 2020 13:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21133 Dr. Chip Taylor and Henry Bouton are The Citadel's newest All-Southern Conference Faculty and Staff Team members.]]>

Two representatives from each school honored on annual teams

SPARTANBURG, S.C. – The Southern Conference named its All-Southern Conference Faculty and Staff Team on Thursday, with two representatives each from all 10 member schools being recognized by the league.

While the selections were left up to each institution’s discretion, the recipients all shared the common characteristics of demonstrated service to the institution and contributions to campus life and the local community. Faculty members selected have demonstrated strong contributions to teaching, research and/or service, while staff members are being recognized for bringing out the best in others and creating conditions for success.

The faculty and staff recipients include: The Citadel’s Dr. Chip Taylor and Henry Bouton; ETSU’s Dr. Virginia Foley and Janet Stork; Furman’s Dr. Marian Strobel and Todd Duke; Mercer’s Dr. Mahkin Thitsa and Matt Brownback; UNC Greensboro’s Dr. Jeremy Bray and Amy Collins Moore; Samford’s Dr. Celeste Hill and Paige Mathis; Chattanooga’s Dr. Christine Benz Smith and Endia Butler; VMI’s Col. Timothy Hodges and Chief Michael Marshall; Western Carolina’s Dr. Kelly R. Kelley and Courtney Gauthier; and Wofford’s Dr. Anna Catllá and Lisa Lefebvre.

Dr. Chip Taylor, The Citadel

Lloyd "Chip" Taylor, Ph.D.
Lloyd “Chip” Taylor, Ph.D., professor of Psychology, The Citadel

The Citadel’s Dr. Chip Taylor is the Head of the Department of Psychology in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. For over a decade, Taylor has served as the institution’s NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative. In that capacity, he has been a tireless advocate for student athletes and for student athlete well-being. Most recently, he has led the charge to establish psychology resiliency coaches to assist student-athletes and cadets on campus. In addition, over the past two years he has served on the Executive Committee for The Center for Performance, Readiness, Resiliency, and Recovery. He serves as the chapter advisor for Chi Alpha Sigma, the national honors society for student-athletes, is a member of the SoCon Executive Committee, and is a past president of the Southern Conference. In addition to his work on various committees within the SoCon and at The Citadel, Taylor was instrumental in establishing the Fulbright Canada Research Chair in Humanities and Social Sciences which will focus on exploring concepts of leadership and ethics from a research and scholarly perspective.

Henry Bouton, director of Intramural and Extramural Sports at The Citadel

Henry Bouton, The Citadel

Henry Bouton is the Director of Intramurals and Extramural Sports at The Citadel through the Department of Health and Human Performance. He schedules, organizes and carries out the day-to-day operations of more than 20 intramural sports on campus. A 1980 graduate of The Citadel, Bouton is an ambassador for The Citadel in the way he treats members, visitors and cadets, developing relationships and treating everyone with courtesy and respect while upholding The Citadel’s Core Values of Honor, Duty and Respect. Because of the work he does in the classroom and on the field of play with cadets enrolled in the Sports Officiating class, those students develop a sense of authority that comes from knowledge acquisition; they are shown how to handle their own mistakes professionally and they are given the opportunity to practice maintaining a cool head.

Dr. Virginia Foley, ETSU

Dr. Virginia Foley is a professor in ETSU’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis and serves as program coordinator for the Administrative Endorsement master’s and doctoral programs. She has served the university in a number of leadership positions including President of the Faculty Senate and the faculty Trustee on the ETSU Board of Trustees. She serves the university on numerous committees, including the Academic Portfolio Review committee and the Institutional Review Board and is a mentor to other faculty. Her work takes her into the area schools, where she helps principals develop their leadership and professional skills. Foley has been part of the Graduate School Thesis and Dissertation Bootcamp program and can often be seen helping students from other programs in addition to working with her own students. She goes above and beyond to build community with the doctoral students in her program. Even though her program is online, her students choose to come to Johnson City throughout their program to meet with Foley and she hosts them for meals at her home. She regularly attends their events, from the Bluegrass exhibitions and music department concerts to theatre performances and sporting events.

Janet Stork, ETSU

ETSU’s Janet Stork is the Event and Project Coordinator for the College of Public Health. An ardent supporter of ETSU athletics, she has organized the College’s tailgating efforts for every football game, as well as an annual Family Day for faculty and staff and their families to attend a women’s basketball game. At the tailgating event, Stork has several posters created that show every College of Public Health student that is on a sports team, in the marching band, or is a member of the cheerleading, dance or spirit squad. Stork conceptualized and now organizes the College’s Pinning and Hooding ceremony each semester, as well as the annual Student Awards ceremony. Stork came to ETSU in April 2010 to serve as the Executive Aide in the Office of the Dean in the College of Public Health before transitioning in 2018 to her current position. In her role, she also serves as the coordinator for the Tennessee Institute of Public Health. Stork has twice earned a College of Public Health Outstanding Support Staff Award (2012, 2018) and earned individual Dean’s Recognition for Outstanding Contribution in 2011 and 2019 and group honors four times.

Dr. Marian Strobel, Furman

Dr. Marian Strobel is the William Montgomery Burnett Professor in History at Furman. The Chair of the History Department from 1999-2010, she has served on a myriad of committees at Furman and has been the recipient of the Meritorious Teaching Award and the Maiden Invitation Award for excellence in the classroom. She has also been an active participant in the First Year Seminar program and was a member of the original task force that implemented that project. Currently a Shi Sustainability Fellow, Strobel studies the history of women’s higher education and American politics after World War II, as well as African-American history. She has presented her research in sessions at such prestigious venues as the annual conferences of the Organization of American Historians, the Southern Historical Association, and the American Historical Association. She has also been a member of special teaching-based and has been part of Furman faculty foreign study trips to Canada, Jamaica, Cuba and Mexico. During numerous May terms since 2014, Strobel has co-directed a study away class on “War and Remembrance” that commemorates the centenary of World War I and travels to England, France and Belgium.

Todd Duke, Furman

Todd Duke, a member of the Furman community since 1997 and Furman’s Heller Service Corp Staff Member of the Year selection for the 2018-19 school year, serves as associate athletics director of facilities and game operations, with direct oversight and management responsibilities for all scheduled events involving Timmons Arena and athletic facilities. Before becoming a member of the Furman athletic department in 2013, he served as business manager and director of operations for Timmons Arena (1997-04) and later associate director with university conference and event services. In addition to his Furman work duties, he has served as faculty advisor to Furman’s chapter of Fellowship of Christian Athletes since 2015.

Dr. Mahkin Thitsa, Mercer

Dr. Mahkin Thitsa is an Associate Professor in the Mercer University School of Engineering, having joined the faculty in 2013 after serving as a Research Assistant Professor at Old Dominion, her alma mater. Her research interests include nonlinear systems and control theory, model-free control and data-driven control strategies. She has successfully applied control methods to photonic devices, unmanned aerial vehicles and traffic flow networks. As the director of the Cyber-physical Systems and Control Laboratory at Mercer University School of Engineering, she has mentored a large number of undergraduate students, including four who have been selected to receive a prestigious Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship. She has published numerous journal articles and conference proceedings with her undergraduate researchers as co-authors.

Matt Brownback, Mercer

Mercer’s Assistant Athletic Director for Student-Athlete Support Services, Matt Brownback joined the Bears’ athletic staff in 2013 as a graduate assistant coach for the men’s basketball program before being hired in 2015 as an Academic Coordinator of Student-Athletes. In 2016, he was promoted to Director of Student-Athlete Support Services before being promoted to his current position in 2019. His work, offering advising as well as coordinating all aspects of their academic support, serves to provide a positive experience for Mercer’s student-athletes as they negotiate their academic and athletic paths. He and his team have also played a large role in Mercer winning the SoCon’s Barrett-Bonner Award for placing the largest percentage of student-athletes on the conference academic honor roll. Mercer has earned the award each year since joining the Southern Conference.

Dr. Jeremy Bray, UNCG

Dr. Jeremy Bray is the Jefferson-Pilot Excellence Professor of Economics and Interim Head of the Department of Economics in the Bryan School of Business and Economics at UNCG. Since joining UNCG in 2013, he has fostered transdisciplinary health and wellness research within the Bryan School and across the university through his leadership and mentoring of faculty and students. Bray conducts research on the economics of health behaviors and has served as principal investigator or co-investigator on numerous economic evaluations funded by federal agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. His publications have been referenced thousands of times by other researchers and have had a profound impact on public health by supporting the resource allocation decisions of federal, state and local policymakers, as well as employers, both nationally and internationally.

Amy Collins Moore, UNCG

Amy Moore is the Business Officer and Executive Assistant to the Dean in UNCG’s College of Visual and Performing Arts. In addition to these duties, she is the Affirmative Action Officer and manages Human Resource Management at the Dean’s level, which includes faculty and staff searches and personnel paperwork for faculty, staff and students. On staff at her alma mater since 2003, Moore serves on the Staff Senate and is currently on the Personal and Professional Development Committee and has been the Secretary and served on the Staff Recognition Committee in the past. She previously worked as the Executive Director for the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Central and Western North Carolina, Chapter Director for Operation Smile, and President of the Greensboro Jaycees. As a wife and mom to three daughters, she spends her free time as a Girl Scout Co-Leader and a member of the Greensboro’s Woman’s Club and is active in her daughters’ school PTSAs.

Dr. Celeste Hill, Samford

Dr. Celeste Hill is an associate professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Science, also serving as the faculty advisor of Samford’s student chapter of the National Council on Family Relations (SUNCFR) and as an advisor for underclassman. Hill, who holds four degrees from the University of Alabama, including a Ph.D. in educational psychology, currently teaches Infant and Child Development, Gerontology and the Family, and Family Life Interaction. Hill’s areas of interest include experiential education, online learning and development during late adulthood. Prior to becoming a full-time faculty member at Samford, Hill, who became certified as an online instructor and as a national peer reviewer for Quality Matters, earned the Stephen Shank Recognition for significant contribution to learner success at Capella University for the 2012 and 2013 academic years.

Paige Mathis, Samford

Paige Mathis serves as Samford’s Assistant Director of Athletics for Academics. In her eighth season, Mathis oversees the Academic Enhancement Program for Student-Athletes and is the primary academic counselor for the Bulldogs’ football program. Prior to her current role, Mathis served as the academic counselor for six sports and a tutor coordinator at Samford. Her passion for athletic academic service stems from her commitment to assisting student-athletes succeed not only on the field or court, but also in the classroom.

Dr. Christine Benz Smith, Chattanooga

Dr. Christine Benz Smith has been at Chattanooga in several capacities since 2001 and currently serves as the Director of the School of Nursing and the Chief Health Affairs Officer. Smith, who holds the rank of UC Foundation Associate Professor, is a member of the UT System COVID-19 Task Force, the UTC COVID-19 Campus Support Team, Emergency Operations Command, the Facilities Use Committee, and the Implementation Task Force and served on the Fall 2020 Task Force chairing the Campus Safety and Risk Management subcommittee. She has been awarded the Carolyn and Roger G. Brown Community Engagement Award, the UT System President’s Connect Award, the Outstanding Research and Creative Achievement Award for the College of Health, Education and Professional Studies, the Dean Stinnett Award for the College of Health Education and Professional Studies, and the Girls’ Inc. Unbought and Unbossed Award, and was named one of the ETSU College of Nursing Top 60 Alums. She also earned the Boys and Girls Club of Chattanooga Keystone Award and the Dedicated to Youth Service Award. She is an American Lung Association Woman of Distinction.

Endia Butler, Chattanooga

Endia Butler is the Student Employment Coordinator for the Financial Aid Office at Chattanooga. She is responsible for Federal Work Study, Academic Service and Job Location and Development. Butler is passionate about partnering with other departments on campus to create programs that focus on the career and personal development of underrepresented students. In 2020, Butler and Dr. Lisa Piazza, Director of the Office for Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavor, created the Undergraduate Research Training Opportunity Program Scholars, a program that provides students an opportunity to learn research methodology and work as a research assistant under a faculty mentor. Butler teaches one of the First Year Experience courses and is an active volunteer in the First-Generation Program at UTC. She received the Chancellor’s Blue Ribbon Award in April 2020 for the impact she has had on one of her first-generation mentees. Butler earned her undergraduate and master’s degrees at UTC and was selected to participate in the inaugural class of the GOLD (Graduates of the Last Decade) Leadership Academy.

Col. Timothy Hodges, VMI

Colonel Tim Hodges, who currently serves as Professor and Head of Physics and Astronomy as well as Faculty Athletics Representative for VMI Athletics, has served the Institute as a distinguished member of the VMI faculty in a teaching career that spans nearly four decades. His teaching interests are in the areas of solid mechanics, dynamics and finite element analysis. After graduating from VMI in 1980, Hodges began his teaching career on post and was instrumental in the development of VMI’s mechanical engineering program. He went on to earn a Ph. D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Virginia and continued to make a lasting impact in the Mechanical Engineering Department, where he served in many roles including department head and head of the engineering division. Hodges has received numerous awards throughout his tenure, including the Thomas Jefferson Teaching Award, the VMI Distinguished Teaching Award, the VMI Institute Achievement Medal (twice), and the Charles S. Luck, Jr. ’20 Institute Professorship. He has taught over 25 courses during his tenure and has served on numerous VMI committees and service initiatives supporting both cadet and faculty development.

Chief Michael Marshall, VMI

Chief Michael Marshall has served the last 14 years as Police Chief for the Virginia Military Institute. The 32-year public safety professional has served in and led many areas in various departments, including Patrol, Investigations, Internal Affairs, Special Operations & Dignitary Security, Emergency Preparedness and Recruiting & Training. Marshall established and administers VMI’s Game Day Safety and Security Protocols. He provides key leadership in the overall strategic direction of Central Dispatch and the overall combined locality shared agreement in supporting and improving these services. Marshall leads the important safety and security implementation to support VIP visitors to Post. During his tenure, many national and international dignitaries have been welcomed, including a U.S. President, U.S. Vice President, Secretary of State, Secretary of the Army, Secretary of Defense, and the Governor of Virginia multiple times.

Dr. Kelly R. Kelley, Western Carolina

Since 2010, Dr. Kelly R. Kelley she has served as the University Participant Program Coordinator, Consultant, and now Director. Kelley is also an Associate Professor of Inclusive/Special Education. She has published 33 book chapters and articles and presented at more than 165 conferences. Her research interests include secondary transition, independent living, and inclusive postsecondary opportunities for individuals with intellectual disability. The two-time graduate of Western Carolina, who also holds a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, recently wrote a book called Teaching, Including, and Supporting College Students with Intellectual Disabilities.

Courtney Gauthier, Western Carolina

Courtney Gauthier has served as the Associate Director of Career Integrated Learning with the Center for Career and Professional Development at Western Carolina since 2017. She has worked in the field of career development since 2006, working with career centers at both public and private institutions. Gauthier works with students to make meaning of their college experiences and helps them select majors, explore interests, identify and reach goals, and develop competitive application materials to launch successfully into their next steps. She collaborates with faculty and staff to develop workshops targeted to the needs of their students and their curriculum and is passionate about bringing career development conversations into classrooms and student meetings across campus.

Dr. Anna Catllá, Wofford

Dr. Anne Catllá is an Associate Professor of Mathematics, Coordinator of the Applied Mathematics Concentration, and Director of the Center for Innovation and Learning at Wofford, where she has been teaching since 2008. Catllá’s classes and research interests center on the application of mathematics to a variety of fields. Recently, her research has focused on social justice and looking at how districts are drawn using techniques to detect possibly gerrymandered congressional districts. In her classroom and in her work directing the Center for Innovation and Learning, Catllá seeks to create inclusive spaces that give all learners the opportunity to grow in their understanding of a topic of study and to apply that understanding to other aspects of their educational and professional lives. Catllá was the recipient of the 2014 Roger Milliken Award for the Excellence in Teaching of Science.

Lisa Lefebvre, Wofford

Lisa Lefebvre is the director of employee wellness and medical services at Wofford. Before coming to Wofford, she worked as a nurse at AnMed, Duke University Medical Center, Spartanburg Regional Hospital, The American Red Cross, and Converse College. Lefebvre has always been a strong advocate for health and wellness on campus. Over the past nearly 10 years, she has worked with students, faculty and staff to increase fitness and wellness on campus, to stop smoking, and to increase access and availability of immunizations. Most recently, has been an important leader in the College’s COVID response team.

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Past and future meet in a plastic present https://today.citadel.edu/past-and-future-meet-in-a-plastic-present/ Fri, 18 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20593 An interdisciplinary team from The Citadel, with the Gibbes Museum, is lifting the veil that separates the artistic from the technological.]]>

An interdisciplinary team from The Citadel, working with the Gibbes Museum of Art, is lifting the veil that separates the artistic from the technological.

The Veiled Lady — a masterful marble statue created by Pietro Rossi in 1882 — is one of the most well-known pieces of art in the Gibbes.

But the photo above is not of the Veiled Lady. Not the original one, at least.

Thanks to three departments on campus, and a 3D-printer company created by a former cadet called Evolve 3D, the priceless statue can now be recreated, anywhere, for less than a dollar.

Not only that, but the 3D-printed version of the statue can be touched, something that’s attractive to the museum’s everyday visitor and especially important for visually impaired guests.

“When I first saw the iconic Veiled Lady sculpture at the Gibbes Museum, I, like many, was drawn to the stunning textures of this intricately-carved marble,” said Tiffany Silverman, director of The Citadel Fine Arts program. “At the time, as a museum educator, I wished that everyone could have access to experience this artwork in a more tactile, immediate way. Fifteen years later, the perfect combination of talented colleagues and innovative technology has, at last, made this dream possible.” 

The Citadel Fine Arts Department, the Baker School of Business Innovation Lab, The Citadel Makerspace and Evolve 3D worked together to make the project possible — and to help make art more accessible outside of a museum.

Evolve 3D has its own interdisciplinary connections to The Citadel. The business (then called the Cambrian Project) was initially created as part of the annual Baker Business Bowl, a program aimed at helping budding entrepreneurs turn their ideas into income.

Though the team didn’t win the first or second place cash prizes, Ben Scott — the founder and CEO of Evolve 3D — says they earned something more valuable.

On the company’s website, he wrote:

“Countless hours of work, every night in the library, then the garage, studying business, writing/rewriting the business plan, working/reworking financial predictions, not going out on weekends, straining personal relationships for months, and still lost. I didn’t sleep for days following, but ironically, I think we still won. The lesson learned from that failure is worth a lot more than $10,000.”

Evolve 3D also loaned one of their beta printers, named Eve, to the museum which will use it to produce more 3D prints of art.

“This innovative and interdisciplinary partnership with The Citadel has proven to be an exciting way to engage our community with art and new technology,” said Sara Arnold, the director of cultural affairs at the Gibbes Museum of Art. “Our visitors are amazed to see the 3D printer in action at the Gibbes. Bridging art and technology opens a whole new world of creativity and accessibility and we are so grateful to Tiffany Silverman and The Citadel cadets who have shared their time and expertise with us.”

As part of the collaboration, James Bezjian, Ph.D, shared his groundbreaking use of a high-resolution 3D scanner that he uses to document artifacts. Dan Hawkins brought the technology of The Citadel’s Makerspace, including 3D printers. Scott — one of Bezjian’s students — started Evolve 3D along with Fine Arts minor — and one of Silverman’s students — Ethan Warner. The Gibbes Museum, current partner of The Citadel’s Fine Arts program, was looking for ways to increase access to their collection for both virtual and in-person audiences.

To that end, and thanks to the entire team involved, a 3D print of the Veiled Lady is also currently on display, waiting to greet visitors at the Charleston Area Convention and Visitors Bureau.

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Remembering longtime Democratic Party leader, veteran and Citadel professor, Don Fowler https://today.citadel.edu/remembering-longtime-democratic-party-leader-veteran-and-citadel-professor-don-fowler/ Wed, 16 Dec 2020 23:27:16 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21043 Professor Don Fowler, The CitadelProfessor Don Fowler, The CitadelDon Fowler, a man known for his leadership of and contributions to the Democratic Party, but especially for his for generosity of time and wisdom, passed away this week at the age of 85.]]> Professor Don Fowler, The CitadelProfessor Don Fowler, The Citadel

Don Fowler, a man known for his leadership of and contributions to the Democratic Party, but especially for his for generosity of time, energy and wisdom, passed away this week at the age of 85. According to The Post & Courier he had been battling leukemia.

Fowler, a Spartanburg native, was most widely known for his positions of prominence within the Democratic Party. But many of Fowler’s political achievements were born after he served as an active duty officer in the U.S. Army, and while he served as a reservist. Fowler retired from the Army after 30 years of service in 1987. In addition, Fowler was a lifetime member of the National Association of Advancement of Colored people.

In the political realm, Fowler was Chair of the South Carolina Democratic Party from 1971- 1980, then became CEO of the Democratic National Convention in 1995 when President Bill Clinton successfully ran for a second term, followed by serving as Chair of the Democratic National Committee in 1995 and 1996. President Clinton tweeted a remembrance about Fowler today:

At The Citadel, and for much of his life at the University of South Carolina where he began teaching in 1964, he was Professor Fowler, political scientist.

“Don played major roles in The Citadel’s affairs over the last decade,” said Winfred “Bo” Moore, Ph.D., professor Emeritus, former Dean for The Citadel School of Humanities and Social Sciences. “From 2008-2012 he served as John C. West Professor of American Government and from 2012-2019 as a Distinguished Adjunct Professor in the Department of Political Science. The many courses he taught (and the personal mentorship he provided) on various aspects of American politics and government enabled our students to learn from a national leader in those fields.”

Fowler was known to frequently drive back forth to Charleston from his home in Columbia, making his work with The Citadel possible. He once remarked to this writer that his wife Carol had generously logged plenty of hours “ferrying him from Columbia to Charleston and back.”

Fowler definitely made his mark at the Military College of South Carolina.

“Additionally, from 2008-2020, Don served as a member of the Advisory Board of the School of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Thanks to him, we were able to bring to campus nationally prominent speakers who shared with our students a broad range of perspectives on national affairs. The list of those speakers included Janet Napolitano (then Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security); Frank Fahrenkopf (former Chairman of the Republican National Committee and Co-Chair of the Commission on Presidential Debates), Mike McCurry (former White House Press Secretary), Tom Cole (Deputy Minority Whip of the House Republican Caucus), James Clyburn (Majority Whip of the House Democratic Caucus), Beth Fouhy (Senior Politics Editor, NBC News), Jonathan Martin (National Political Correspondent, New York Times), and  James Roosevelt (grandson of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and co-chair of the Rules and Bylaws Committee of the Democratic National Committee).

In these (and many other) ways, Don graciously–and effectively–advocated on behalf of The Citadel and made it much easier for us successfully to pursue opportunities that likely would not otherwise have been available to us. His contributions to the advancement of our academic community are many. And he will be sorely missed by all who fortunate enough to have him as friend.

Winfred “Bo” Moore, Ph.D., professor Emeritus, former Dean for The Citadel School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Fowler is survived by his wife Carol (who also led the S.C. Democratic Party from 2007 to 2011 and is currently a National Commiteewoman, her photo on the party’s website next to Don’s), and their adult children, Donnie and Cissy.

Read more about Don Fowler and his career

The Post & Courier
Former DNC, SC Democratic Party chairman Don Fowler dies at 85

The State Newspaper
Longtime SC Democratic Party icon and professor Don Fowler has died

Associated Press
Former DNC leader, mainstay of SC politics Don Fowler dies

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Atlanta attorney and humanitarian pledges $20 million to The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/atlanta-attorney-and-humanitarian-pledges-20-million-to-the-citadel/ Wed, 16 Dec 2020 19:49:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20995 William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959Class of 1959 alumnus, William Baer Endictor, announces legacy gift to support college’s academic endowment He may be retired, but Atlanta attorney William Baer Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959,]]> William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959William B. Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959

Class of 1959 alumnus, William Baer Endictor, announces legacy gift to support college’s academic endowment

He may be retired, but Atlanta attorney William Baer Endictor, The Citadel Class of 1959, continues to make a name for himself through his extensive volunteer and charitable work.

The former assistant solicitor for the state of Georgia and Fortune 500 CEO has found a new passion in fighting food insecurity to help the less fortunate members of his community. He has taken on the cause like a new career, working tirelessly as a volunteer to support Feed the Hungry and the Atlanta Community Food Bank, along with several local hospitals.

Endictor firmly believes that charity begins at home. In addition to his extensive support of his local community, his attention has never wavered from his roots and experiences as a cadet at The Citadel, which he credits for much of his success. To make similar opportunities available for generations of cadets to come, Endictor has decided to bequeath his entire estate to his alma mater.

Recently, Endictor announced a legacy gift totaling approximately $20 million at today’s value to support the greatest needs of the college through The Citadel Foundation (TCF). This gift—among the largest TCF has ever received—is an expansion of a previous bequest of $2.5 million initially documented in 2009. 

How Endictor’s generosity will contribute to his alma mater

Endictor’s thoughtful and strategic placement of funds will provide for the greatest needs of the college and significantly augment the Academic Enhancement fund. This fund plays a critical role in securing the college’s academic excellence through TCF’s annual academic enhancement grant to The Citadel. Each year, this distribution of several million dollars from TCF to the college supports educational enrichment opportunities, scholarship support for faculty and students, program enhancements, and technology upgrades and improvements.

“In supporting the college’s strategic plan, Our Mighty Citadel 2026, this gift helps ensure The Citadel remains strong in the future,” said The Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters, USMC, Ret., ’79.  “Academic enhancement is the lifeblood of this institution, supporting our mission to educate principled leaders. By generously supporting this fund, Bill’s estate gift secures his legacy of leadership and reinforces his lifetime of service to his alma mater.”

Endictor, who lives in the Atlanta suburb of Brookhaven, Georgia, is a retired lawyer who specialized in trial work. He is a former Georgia Assistant Solicitor as well as a corporate attorney for the former E.T. Barwick Industries. Endictor advanced to the position of chief executive officer and member of the then Fortune 500 company’s board of directors. 

Why he loves The Citadel

Endictor is deeply passionate about his alma mater, made evident through his service as a member of both the President’s Advisory Committee and The Citadel Foundation Board of Directors, and as the former TCF Class Chairman for the Class of 1959.  He is a member of The Citadel Legacy Society and the Society of 1842 lifetime giving societies, as well as a Past President of The Citadel Alumni Association. In 2011, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from The Citadel.

Cadet William Baer Endictor, photographed for The Citadel’s Sphinx yearbook in 1958 while a junior

In 2009, to celebrate his 50th class reunion, Endictor documented a significant legacy gift in an effort to recognize and repay the role The Citadel played in the success he achieved in life. He named The Citadel as the sole beneficiary of his entire estate, becoming one of only a handful of donors who have done so.  In the decade since, he has seen the value of his estate grow, allowing him to substantially increase the amount of his legacy gift to The Citadel.

Modestly downplaying his own career successes, Endictor attributes the bulk of his wealth to two factors: the influence of his mother and father, and his experience as a cadet at The Citadel.

“The Citadel Foundation is the life-blood of The Citadel. Without the Foundation, Lesesne Gate would have closed decades ago,” said Endictor regarding the inspiration for his generous gift. “The leadership of The Citadel is outstanding. I have always said that the smartest thing anyone can do is to hire the right people and then get out of their way.”

TCF President and Chief Executive Officer John P. Dowd III, Ph.D., notes the significant impact this gift will have on the future of the college when the bequest is realized.  “Through his extensive professional accomplishments and volunteer service to The Citadel, Bill Endictor has demonstrated his profound commitment to the disciplined education and leader development The Citadel provides.  On behalf of The Citadel Foundation Board of Directors and staff, I am pleased to express our gratitude for Bill’s leadership and service to the college,” said Dowd.

As Endictor’s estate has grown, so has his relationship with his alma mater and The Citadel Foundation.  Over the years, TCF Director of Legacy Giving Bill Yaeger, ’83, has developed a long-standing relationship with Endictor.  “We have many alumni who are passionate about our alma mater. Mr. Endictor, as demonstrated by his activities with the college and now this gift, has put credence into that passion,” said Yaeger. “He is a friend of mine and a friend of our alma mater, and he has been great to work with.”

William B. Endictor photographed with The Citadel’s 19th president, Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Ret.), ’73

William Baer Endictor graduated from The Citadel in 1959 as a pre-med major with a Bachelor of Science degree. After starting at the Medical College of Virginia, he realized that his true interest was in law and changed his career focus. He earned his Juris Doctor from the University of South Carolina School of Law and was admitted to the bar in 1963.

A specialist in international and trial law, Mr. Endictor pursued a career distinguished by standing up for principles that are at the heart of our legal system. He successfully tried hundreds of cases in different parts of the world and also served as Assistant Solicitor for the state of Georgia. In that position, he became well known for his work combating pornography and organized crime, successfully litigating cases all the way to the nation’s highest court, the United States Supreme Court.

In the 1970s Mr. Endictor joined E.T. Barwick Industries, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of floor coverings, as general counsel. He later became president and CEO of that Fortune 500 company.

During the past four decades, Mr. Endictor has been loyal and supportive of The Citadel with his time and talents. He is past president of The Citadel Alumni Association, a founder of The Citadel Development Foundation and a former director of The Citadel Foundation. He serves as chairman for the Class of 1959 and leads The Citadel Volunteers group in Georgia. As a member of the Society of 1842, he has joined The Citadel Foundation’s most elite philanthropic circle.

Mr. Endictor has also generously supported several Atlanta charities including the Atlanta Food Bank, a Feed the Hungry organization and three hospitals.

In recognition of his leadership to his profession and his deep commitment to his alma mater, The Citadel Board of Visitors is proud to present William Baer Endictor with the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws.

From the 2011 Honorary Doctor of Laws citation from The Citadel for William Baer Endictor
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The Citadel begins search for new School of Engineering dean https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-begins-search-for-new-school-of-engineering-dean/ Mon, 14 Dec 2020 18:19:19 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20898 One of the top objectives for the person selected to lead The Citadel School of Engineering will be to develop programs and practices with clear over-arching goals, in collaboration with faculty, staff, cadets and students, to guide the school’s evolution under the Our Mighty Citadel 2026 plan]]>

Photo above: Engineering cadets participate in outdoor laboratory work February 10, 2020.

A search committee is being formed to oversee the recruiting and hiring of a new dean for The Citadel School of Engineering, ranked repeatedly in the top 25 programs nationally by U.S. News & World Report. The committee will be headed by Kevin Bower, Ph.D., associate provost for Academic Operations and professor of Civil Engineering for The Citadel.

“One of the top objectives for the person selected to lead The Citadel School of Engineering will be to develop student enrollments and practices with clear over-arching goals, in collaboration with faculty, staff, cadets and students, to guide the school’s evolution under the Our Mighty Citadel 2026 plan and beyond,” said Bower.

Col. Ronald Welch, US Army (Ret.), Ph.D., dean of The Citadel School of Engineering

The current dean, Col. Ronald W. Welch, U.S. Army (Ret.), Ph.D., P.E., FASCE, will complete the academic year. Following a sabbatical, he will serve as a professor in Civil Engineering in fall 2022.

“On June 30, 2021, Dr. Ron Welch will finish 10 successful years as the Dean of the School of Engineering. His deanship has been a very productive one for The Citadel, positioning the college as a leading engineering institution, both in South Carolina and nationally,” said Col. John Dorrian, USAF (Ret.) vice president of Communications and Marketing and spokesperson for The Citadel.

During Welch’s tenure as dean, the School of Engineering implemented new undergraduate programs in Mechanical Engineering, Construction Engineering and Computer Engineering, as well as three graduate programs. He has also developed an exceptionally talented and diverse faculty and staff.  Additionally, during his time as dean, The Citadel School of Engineering was ranked in the top 25 programs nationally by U.S. News & World Report for nine consecutive years.

Citadel dean of Engineering, Ron Welch (center) accepts award from ASCE officers in Denver
Citadel dean of Engineering, Ron Welch, Ph.D., PE. (center) accepts award from ASCE officers in Denver

In recent years, Welch was recognized for his career-long service to the American Society of Civil Engineers by being named Fellow and by being awarded the Edmund Friedman Professional Recognition award, among other accolades received for other industry leadership service.

Welch joined The Citadel in 2011 as dean of the School of Engineering. Prior to that, he was with the University of Texas at Tyler. Additionally, he was a professor at his alma mater, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, before retiring from the Army with the rank of colonel.

“The Citadel has benefitted enormously from Dean Welch’s leadership and we are grateful for his contributions,” Dorrian said.

More details on the search for Welch’s successor will be announced in the first few months of 2021.

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Citadel completes in-person fall semester https://today.citadel.edu/battle-posture-leads-to-mission-focused-fall-despite-historic-pandemic/ Thu, 10 Dec 2020 21:52:46 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20619 "We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our 177-year history."]]>

College’s mission focus overcomes pandemic

Operation Fall Return, a campus-wide effort encompassing every member of The Citadel campus community, set the conditions to accomplish the mission of completing fall semester in person, despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It is our duty to protect ourselves and others from COVID-19,” became the mantra, based on the college’s core values of honor, duty and respect.

College and Corps leadership — along with support teams — collaborated to set, adjust and maintain conditions allowing cadets, students, faculty and staff to be on campus beginning in mid-August, until the Corps started winter furlough Nov. 24 and faculty and staff depart for the holidays December 22.

Kelly Cup practice squads work on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, September 8, 2020.

There would be no break in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets’ Long Grey Line.

I write today as the Corps prepares to depart on winter furlough after one of the most unusual periods in Citadel history. I could not be more pleased with the performance of the Corps. We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our 177-year history. Our students, faculty, staff, and alumni showed what a united campus community can do—it’s inspiring watching everyone doing their part. The success we’ve achieved is only possible with everyone adapting and overcoming. 

The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.) in a letter to the campus community, November 20, 2020

Staging the base of fire

The objectives centered on the delivery of top-quality instruction coupled with continuing the in-person military training required for all cadets. The in-person training is mission critical for freshmen, who could not be recognized as members of the Corps in the spring without completing rigorous training objectives designed to develop them to assume leadership roles later in their cadet careers.

Ray Cervantes, contract manager for The Budd Group, demonstrates a backpack atomizer, which can clean an entire barracks in four hours, in Daniel Library at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, June 23, 2020.

Strict protocols were put in place for cadets and for all members of the campus community to protect the health of The Citadel family.

Examples of operational elements include the following, some of which remained in place all semester:

Freshmen socially distanced in chairs with face masks second day of challenge week Class of 2024 at The Citadel
Freshmen socially distanced in chairs with face masks second day of challenge week Class of 2024 at The Citadel

Matriculation Day, August 8

Foxtrot Company commander Alfred Gregg descends the stairs in Padgett-Thomas Barracks during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

The Matriculation Day process is usually completed in about two hours, but was stretched out to twelve to ensure social distancing.

Members of the Class of 2024 arrived on campus, said their goodbyes to their family at the curb, and had their temperatures checked before processing.

Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

Approximately 700 knobs matriculated, a class size mirroring those in non-pandemic years.

Mike Company XO Kenneth Spurlock checks with knobs to make sure they have their barbershop tickets in Padgett-Thomas Barracks during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

Class of 2024 Oath Ceremony and Challenge Week

An especially poignant Oath Ceremony was held on Summerall Field for the freshmen — with drone footage from above — showing the many people watching via livestream one of the first groups of college students safely gathered en masse since the pandemic took hold of America in the spring of 2020.

Challenge Week training was underway, with Cadre — the group of upperclassmen tasked with training the knobs — working efficiently to complete all necessary components. They also lived in the same barrack with the freshmen, reducing possible virus transmission from intermixing large groups of cadets.

Cadre lead Knobs from the Class of 2024 in Drill instruction during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, August 13, 2020.

Academics: Flexible and focused

Cadets walk along Jones Avenue at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, November 10, 2020.

Back to class for cadets and students meant alternating in person and remote class days, with many courses divided into two groups to allow for distancing in the classroom.

Led by the Office of the Provost — faculty, cadets and students leaned in, adapting to new technology for teaching and learning.

Dr. Simon Ghanat, teaches a HyFlex environmental engineering course in LeTellier course at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 25, 2020.

“We are so impressed with our faculty, cadets and students and their commitment. They continue to grow and improve within our new hybrid learning model,” said Diana Cheshire, Ph.D., director for the college’s Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching, Learning and Distance Education.

High profile academic engagements for cadets and students continued, including the Baker Business Bowl and competitions for the Citadel Cyber Security Team which “smoked the competition” in one event according to the organizer.

Dr. Cory Nance with members of The Citadel Cybersecurity Club after winning the National Cyber Range Complex “Capture the Flag” context

“The students learn a lot when they apply their skillset in a contest environment that simulates a situation from real world,” said Shankar Banik, Ph.D., professor and head of the Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences and student advisor of The Citadel Cybersecurity Club. “They won the Capture the Flag contest at the National Cyber Range Complex which was a big opportunity for our students to practice their skills in a cyber simulation based on the Department of Defense infrastructure and control systems.”

Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic hosts a “Capture the Flag” cyber competition event

Demonstration of unity and respect

Five rings on Summerall Field — made of members from The Citadel community, linked together — were a visual representation of what unites members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. In October, cadets, faculty and staff gathered, connecting themselves with spirit T-shirts, to stay safely distanced.

The event was conceived by Cadet Hayden Brown, captain of the basketball team, in response to the emotions filled, race-related activism and turmoil the nation saw for many months in 2020.

The Citadel community participates in a Unity Formation on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, October 7, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Despite all of the national attention and conversations surrounding inequities in our country, many remain apathetic. As the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, we are unified in our belief that no member of the Corps is any more important than another.

Cadet Ruby Bolden, regimental public affairs officer, reading the statement of unity on behalf of attendees

ROTC: Advancing future officers

ROTC training and labs moved along in a fashion similar to normal semesters, just in smaller, masked groups with more outdoor activities.

“I continued to be impressed by our Army ROTC Cadets at The Citadel whose performance this semester, in spite of the challenges they and all students face, has been exemplary,” said Col. John Cyrulik, professor of military science at The Citadel, in a statement. “These Army ROTC Cadets are mentally and physically tough, disciplined, and highly motivated. We have trained hard all semester to ensure we remain on-track to commission next year the largest cohort of Army officers from The Citadel since the Vietnam War.”

Senior ring celebrations

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2021 receives their class rings at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 25, 2020.

Though there was not a crowd to cheer them on, the significance of The Citadel Ring Presentation was not diminished for seniors. A livestream provided parents and loved ones the opportunity to view this cherished tradition, and the seniors were celebrated after with a private, outdoor reception.

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2021 receives their class rings during a presentation ceremony adjusted for COVID-19 conditions in McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 25, 2020.

And the juniors, less that a year away from their Ring Day, were able to be sized for their rings in late November to receive next fall.

Cadets from the Class of 2022 are sized for their senior class rings in the Holliday Alumni Center at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, November 17, 2020.

Athletics: Committed to the game

The Citadel football team travels from Charleston, South Carolina to Tampa, Florida in advance of their game against the University of South Florida on Friday, September 11, 2020.

Their commitment to their sport and their teammates meant enduring more than 30 nasal swab COVID-19 tests for each member of the Bulldogs football team — required by the NCAA — as they practiced, traveled and played a limited game schedule with one of the highlights being the game against West point. Plans are underway to play a more complete season in the spring.

The Citadel Volleyball Team poses for their team photograph with Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters ’79, USMC (Retired) in McAlister Field House in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, October 7, 2020.

The other cadet athletes playing indoor sports with contact also endured, and are enduring, numerous coronavirus tests. That isn’t discouraging the basketball team, on a five game winning streak at the time this was published.

Finding the fun

Knobs play intramural kickball on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, August 31, 2020.

To keep the campus community and the Corps energized, a number of COVID-safe activities were held.

Intramural practices and competitions were increased.

Food trucks and games were brought in on the weekends that the Corps didn’t have leave.

And G3, the college’s new bulldog, made his debut.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020.

G3 has a new house he shares with the first team of cadet handlers to hold rank positions related to caring for the beloved mascot.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

G3’s official name, Gen. Mike D. Groshon, will be familiar to many in The Citadel family and in Charleston. He was named for Coach Mike D. Groshon, Citadel Class of 1976, who passed away in 2016, after caring for several generations of mascots.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020.

Servant leadership continuum

Servant leadership looked a bit different throughout the semester, but it did not stop. There was not a traditional Leadership Day…

The Citadel Republican Society places American Flags around Summerall Field in commemoration of the 19th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, September 10, 2020.

…but there was plenty of volunteer service.

Citadel cadets led by Dr. Sarah Imam volunteer with Soldiers’ Angels to Supply Low-Income Veteran Families with Food Assistance at the Elks Lodge in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, October 9, 2020.

The Citadel Health Careers Society turned out to help veterans in need, for example, and the Krause Center of Leadership and Ethics grew its children’s reading initiative and continued organizing COVID-19 safe ways to help the college’s community partners.

Launching three major developments

1. Our Mighty Citadel 2026 strategic plan
The Citadel’s new strategic plan, Our Mighty Citadel 2026, is now in place to serve as the guideline for the college’s evolution. The Citadel Board of Visitors (BOV) voted to approve the plan in September. Academic programing, how the college interacts with the region and the community, and the campus infrastructure are at the center of the plan.

“The Citadel has played a large role in shaping Charleston and South Carolina since its creation 177 years ago, and its new strategic plan is an encouraging sign that will continue to be the case.”

The Post and Courier Editorial Staff

2. Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF, ’77, Center for Climate Studies Climate variability, risks and the advancement of solutions will be the focus of a new, interdisciplinary Center for Climate Studies being established at The Citadel. The Center’s mission will be to promote climate science through education, research, outreach and the development of public-private partnerships, according to Scott Curtis, Ph.D., recently named the Dr. John Lining Professor of Physics and director of the Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF ’77 Center for Climate Studies.

Construction progress on the Swain Boating Center at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

3. Swain Boating Center
The Swain Boating Center at The Citadel is restoring the campus water culture with some major upgrades, thanks to a generous donation from Dr. and Mrs. Christopher C. Swain, Class of 1981. New docks, a picnic pavilion and new equipment including motor and sail boats, kayaks, canoes, paddleboards and fishing gear are being used by cadets, faculty, staff and alumni.

Gospel Choir stays united with virtual performance to close out semester

The Citadel Gospel Choir, directed by their dedicated leader, Momolu Cooper, ’10, records songs in Johnson Hagood Stadium’s club level at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 19, 2020.

One last, revered annual tradition of each fall semester, the Citadel Candlelight Services, cannot take place this Christmas season, but The Citadel Gospel is finding a way to bring joy to others.

The choir, a group that normally performs during the heavily attended Candlelight Services and around the city and state, didn’t let the pandemic stop them. Though their live engagements were cancelled, the devoted members of the choir gathered – with safe distancing – to record a variety of songs. The recordings will be played at events where the choir cannot safely perform.

Cadet Col. Nick Piacentini: maintaining lines of resistance to coronavirus

Almost last because that’s where he’d ask to be, but not least, is a regimental commander leading his 2,300, 18 – 21 year old classmates through their Citadel experience during an unprecedented, sweeping pandemic.

“I am extremely proud of how the cadets have really led themselves when it concerns their duty to follow our COVID-19 protection protocols to keep themselves and others safe. We have a strong team of regimental officers, staff and NCOs and everyone worked to maintain the conditions needed to keep us on campus this fall. We are striving to be an example of what ‘right’ looks like.

To me, being able to complete a face-to-face fall semester shows the kind of person a Citadel cadet is, someone with the grit needed to push through our mission together.”

Cadet Col. Nick Piacentini, Regimental Commander, South Carolina Corps of Cadets

Watch a news report with Piacentini here.

#1 for the 10th year!

And in the midst of it all, The Citadel was ranked #1 Top Public College in the South for the tenth consecutive year by U.S News & World Report.

“We want prospective students to know why The Citadel experience is superior. We encourage high school students and their parents to contact us to discuss what the college offers for their areas of interest in a specially tailored, one-on-one conference, “said Sally Selden, Ph.D., SPHR, provost and dean of The Citadel.

Fall 2020 Photo Gallery

https://www.citadel.edu/root/our-mighty-citadel/nick-piacentini?fbclid=IwAR11EMUNU79B6gT6i4MziFSJbXxL-fmGNASumryuxHd12sARNxum4tMhgiA
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Citadel laundry team helping care for homeless with clean linens on cold nights https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-laundry-team-helping-care-for-homeless-with-clean-linens-on-cold-nights/ Mon, 07 Dec 2020 16:01:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20518 Christopher Jardin, the community liaison and homelessness coordinator for the City of Charleston, unloads laundry from the city’s warming centers at the Cadet Laundry at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, December 2, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Christopher Jardin, the community liaison and homelessness coordinator for the City of Charleston, unloads laundry from the city’s warming centers at the Cadet Laundry at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, December 2, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)"I think they are very proud to be able to do this kind of work to help our neighbors in the Charleston community."]]> Christopher Jardin, the community liaison and homelessness coordinator for the City of Charleston, unloads laundry from the city’s warming centers at the Cadet Laundry at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, December 2, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Christopher Jardin, the community liaison and homelessness coordinator for the City of Charleston, unloads laundry from the city’s warming centers at the Cadet Laundry at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, December 2, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Photo above: Christopher Jardin, the community liaison and homelessness coordinator for the City of Charleston, unloads laundry from the city’s warming center at the Cadet Laundry at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, December 2, 2020.

Safely operating warming shelters on cold nights is more complicated this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Most churches in Charleston that operated warming centers for the homeless on frigid nights in past years can’t this winter as they reduce possible exposures to the coronavirus for their staff and members.

However, the City of Charleston is meeting the challenge by providing one, larger warming center with COVID-19 protection protocols in place. The warming center is at the Arthur W. Christopher Community Center, located at 265 Fishburne St., across from Burke High School.

“There is tremendous need in our community, just like others, especially as many people have lost their social safety nets due to the pandemic,” said Christopher Jardin, community liaison and homelessness coordinator for the City of Charleston. “We had to find a solution to help those inadequately sheltered on cold nights.”

The warming center has 80 beds for men, women and children and opens each time the weather is predicted to drop to freezing temperatures.

Willie Green, a washman in The Citadel Cadet Laundry, prepares loads of laundry from the Charleston Warming Center for cleaning on Wednesday, December 2, 2020.

The Citadel campus is just a few blocks away, so now the campus community that prides itself on servant-leadership is helping out.

“The city’s homeless coordinator is dropping off about 200 lbs. of bed linens each morning following a cold night when the warming center is needed,” said Janice Danser, director of Laundry and Dry Cleaning Services at The Citadel.

“It’s really been a tremendous benefit to have the help of The Citadel in ensuring we have clean linens each night the center opens,” Jardin said. “It’s been very encouraging to me in this whole process to see how many people around our community are stepping in to help.”

Danser says the laundry team has really come together for this effort. “They love it. I think they are very proud to be able to do this kind of work to help our neighbors in the Charleston community.”

Laundry rock star provided tens of millions of lbs. of fresh laundry for U. S. soldiers

Janice Danser, the Citadel Director of Laundry and Dry Cleaning Services, poses for a portrait at the Cadet Laundry at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, December 2, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)
Janice Danser, director of Laundry and Dry Cleaning Services for The Citadel, poses for a portrait at the Cadet Laundry in December 2020.

Speaking of laundry, Danser, who joined The Citadel early in 2020 to direct the college’s laundry and dry cleaning services isn’t intimidated by a few hundred pounds of extra laundry a day.

Prior to joining the college, she oversaw laundry operations at Ft. Jackson for 25 years which she says averaged about 4.5 million lbs. of wash annually.

25 years
X
4,500,000 lbs. of laundry annually
=

112,500,000 lbs. (about 56 tons) of clean laundry for soldiers at Ft. Jackson

Danser oversaw the cleaning of about 5.6 million tons of laundry at Ft. Jackson during her time there. Prior to that, she managed the laundry services at Ft. Dix in New Jersey.

“My entire career has been spent making sure service people have the clean laundry they needed, so The Citadel was the perfect next step for me at this stage of my life,” Danser said.

Ma’am, thank you for your service!

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Citadel School of Engineering recognizes four leaders in the profession https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-school-of-engineering-recognizes-four-leaders-in-the-profession/ Wed, 02 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18291 The Academy of Engineers honors those who have helped educate and develop principled engineering leaders to serve a global community.]]>

The Citadel School of Engineering is honoring four new industry leaders by inducting them into the Academy of Engineers. The four are being recognized for their professional successes, as well as for making a significant contribution to their community.

Every year, The Citadel School of Engineering honors engineers who have lived a life consistent with the school’s mission, which is to educate and develop principled engineering leaders to serve a global community.

“The Citadel, home to one of the country’s first five engineering education programs, has a long history of cultivating the future of engineering while also recognizing and working alongside the current leaders in the field,” said Col. Ron Welch, USA (Ret.), dean of the School of Engineering. “That’s one reason why we’re so pleased to annually induct new members – those who have succeeded in their profession and contributed to their communities – into our Academy of Engineers. Though the pandemic prevented us from giving them the in-person recognition they deserve, we couldn’t be more proud to claim these four servant-leaders.”

The academy’s 2020 inductees include the following professionals:

Richard A. Day, Citadel Class of 1977

Richard “Rick” Day is a vice president with Stantec Consulting Services Inc., a multi-disciplined engineering and planning firm with offices throughout North America and abroad. Day is a registered professional engineer in five southeastern states and has practiced civil engineering for more than 40 years. Throughout his career, he has served in a leadership role in numerous significant engineering projects. Currently he is serving as the project manager for the planning and design for the widening of I-526 in Charleston County from Paul Cantrell Blvd. to Virginia Avenue, an estimated $1.1 billion program.

Day has been active in a number of professional engineering societies throughout his career. He has served these organizations in leadership roles at the local, state and national levels. Day was awarded the Herman J. Hoose Distinguished Service Award in 2016 from the Southern District Institute of Transportation Engineers.

Donald E. Stone Jr., Citadel Class of 1980

Donald E. Stone Jr. is the chief executive officer of Dewberry, a 2,200-person engineering, architecture and construction firm with more than 50 offices nationwide. This month he is celebrating 10 years as Dewberry’s CEO and 12 years with the firm overall, which he joined as chief operating officer in 2008. He leads and implements Dewberry’s corporate and market strategies, corporate growth initiatives and has achieved company consolidation and alignment so the firm may better serve its clients. Over the past ten years, Stone has also integrated six acquisitions, adding more than 350 employees to the firm and contributing to Dewberry’s continued expansion into the Southeast and California. 

Graduating as a Distinguished Military Student, he was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant and branched to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He is a licensed professional engineer in 19 states and a member of The Society of American Military Engineers.

Robert L. Van Antwerp Jr.

Lt. Gen. Robert L. Van Antwerp Jr., USA (Ret.), known to most simply as General Van, is currently the Vice Chairman of the Flippen Group, a Texas based leadership and organizational development company that specializes in talent assessment, development and alignment. 

Van Antwerp is widely respected across industry and the military as a “leader of leaders,” embodying the traits of successful leadership throughout his long and varied career working with civilians and the military. He retired from the Army after 39 years of service and most recently served as chief of engineers and commanding general of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). He was the senior military officer overseeing a $40+ billion program including most of the nation’s civil works infrastructure and military construction on 250 Army and Air Force installations worldwide.

He is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and holds an MBA from Long Island University and an MS in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan. He is a registered professional engineer. Van Antwerp is also a former chairman of the board of Eagle Creek Renewable Energy LLC, board director at USAA, Calibre, Cardno GS, and is on several advisory boards for non-profits.

Glenn M. Walters, Citadel Class of 1979

Gen. Glenn Walters, USMC (Ret.), president of The Citadel and member of the Class of 1979, returned to lead his alma mater after serving 39 years as an officer in the Marines. Prior to his arrival, he served as the 34th Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps, the Corps’ second-highest ranking officer. As Assistant Commandant, Walters oversaw approximately 184,000 active duty and 38,000 reserve Marines and a $42 billion budget. His duties included representing the Marine Corps at the Department of Defense and leading decisions about defense policy and resourcing in alignment with the National Defense Strategy.

Upon graduating from The Citadel with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, Walters was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. After initially serving as an infantry officer, he attended flight training in Pensacola, Florida, and was designated a naval aviator in 1981. Walters later trained and served as a test pilot and was instrumental in testing systems for the AH-1W Super Cobra Attack Helicopter. He also served as the first Commander of VMX-22, the initial squadron to field the MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft for operational testing.

In April 2018, Walters was selected by The Citadel’s Board of Visitors as the 20th President of the college. He is joined by his wife, Gail. A marketing and communications professional, she eagerly embraces her role as The Citadel’s First Lady.

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Nova Technologies honors stalwart engineering professor; 1970 alumnus, with scholarship in his name https://today.citadel.edu/nova-technologies-honors-stalwart-engineering-professor-1970-alumnus-with-scholarship-in-his-name/ Tue, 01 Dec 2020 20:00:56 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20436 Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Johnston W. Peeples ’70 poses for a portrait at Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, December 1, 2020. Nova Technologies announced the endowment of a new scholarship in Dr. Peeples’ name to support Cadets with demonstrated financial need who are majoring in Electrical or Computer Engineering at The Citadel. The amount of the initial endowment is $500,000. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Johnston W. Peeples ’70 poses for a portrait at Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, December 1, 2020. Nova Technologies announced the endowment of a new scholarship in Dr. Peeples’ name to support Cadets with demonstrated financial need who are majoring in Electrical or Computer Engineering at The Citadel. The amount of the initial endowment is $500,000. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Peeples' devotion to all things in the realm of computer and electrical engineering, or "techno-lust" as he calls it, continues to earn him accolades. ]]> Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Johnston W. Peeples ’70 poses for a portrait at Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, December 1, 2020. Nova Technologies announced the endowment of a new scholarship in Dr. Peeples’ name to support Cadets with demonstrated financial need who are majoring in Electrical or Computer Engineering at The Citadel. The amount of the initial endowment is $500,000. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Johnston W. Peeples ’70 poses for a portrait at Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, December 1, 2020. Nova Technologies announced the endowment of a new scholarship in Dr. Peeples’ name to support Cadets with demonstrated financial need who are majoring in Electrical or Computer Engineering at The Citadel. The amount of the initial endowment is $500,000. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Dr. Johnston “John” Peeples, ’70, illuminates the way for aspiring electrical and computer engineers

After decades of innovating, leading and teaching, John Peeples, Ph.D., Citadel Class of 1970, still comes to campus energized about answering questions concerning frame relays (high-speed, packet-switched data communications), or debouncing (a circuit providing a clean transition of power output), for example.

Peeples’s devotion to all things in the realm of computer and electrical engineering, or “techno-lust” as he calls it, continues to earn him accolades.

“It’s a bit staggering, really, considering that throughout my career I’ve endeavored to stay under the radar,” Peeples, a native of Estill, South Carolina said. “Above all, I take immense pleasure watching our graduates make the world a better place.”

The most recent recognition for this professor and industry leader: the Dr. Johnston W. Peeples, ’70, Electrical and Computer Engineering Scholarship. The endowed scholarship named for Peeples was made possible because of a $500,000 gift from two fellow engineering alumni, Buddy Black ’78, CEO of Nova Technologies, and Jon Kelley, ’08, also with Nova Technologies. Kelly is one of Peeples’s former students.

Electrical and Computer Engineering professor, Dr. Johnston W. Peeples, ’70, poses for a portrait in Grimsley Hall at The Citadel December 1, 2020. Nova Technologies announced the endowment of a new scholarship in Dr. Peeples’ name to support cadets with demonstrated financial need who are majoring in Electrical or Computer Engineering at The Citadel.

“Nova Technologies is pleased to announce the endowment of a new scholarship to support cadets who are majoring in electrical or computer engineering at The Citadel and who have demonstrated financial need,” Black said in a statement. “The scholarship recognizes the long and dedicated service John Peeples has provided to students and faculty in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and to The Citadel.”

After a successful career as an engineer, including as leader for NCR Corporation, Peeples returned to his alma mater in 1999. Three years later, he was appointed to the William States Lee Professorship and named head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

Dr. Peeples, I want to say thank you on behalf of all the engineering graduates you’ve taught and mentored over the years. I distinctly remember your involvement in our freshmen labs and activities, which I can’t imagine is included on the agendas of most department heads. You took the time to directly teach your undergrads and get involved in our academic careers.

You care about your students. You made a connection. The things you’ve said to me and others has inspired us to become better engineers. This scholarship is an extension of the work you’ve already accomplished, impacting future Citadel engineers that will undoubtedly excel in global industry.”

Jon Kelley, The Citadel Class of 2008

Peeples stayed in the role as head of the department for 12 years.

“During his tenure leading the Department of Electrical and Computer engineering, John Peeples created a collegial environment where cadets and students were free to learn, and faculty were free to teach,” said Robert Barsanti, Ph.D., current head of the ECE. “He is an inspirational leader and motivating teacher.”

Barsanti listed some of Peeples’s accomplishments as ECE department head including:

  • Leading department to record enrollments
  • Bringing ECE to national prominence by serving as the president for the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Head Association for North America
  • Forming the ECE advisory board. “John brought together great minds, and industry leaders to advise the department.”
  • Revamping curriculum, including a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering program, elevating graduate outcomes

Peeples is also a legacy alumnus of The Citadel. His father was Otis B. Peeples, Sr., Class of 1938 and his brother, a retired attorney in Charleston, is Otis B. “Ben” Peeples, Jr., Class of 1967.

Peeples earned a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from The Citadel in 1970 and accepted a military commission, joining the U.S. Air Force where he served for several years before leaving to continue his education and enter private industry. He went on to the University of South Carolina where he was awarded an M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering. His CV can be viewed here.

Peeples still teaches a full schedule of courses.

The Citadel Foundation is processing the donation to arrange for a possible first recipient in the next year.

“My wife (Nancy) summed this up by reminding me that I attended The Citadel on a full scholarship sponsored by Daniel Construction Company. It is not just great, but also appropriate that now because of Nova Technologies, Buddy Black and Jon Kelly, the Johnston W. Peeples Scholarship can serve future generations,” Peeples wrote in a letter thanking the scholarship donors.

Peeples’s big bang hit list

Peeples speaking at ECEDHA
Peeples speaking at ECEDHA

Here is a look at some of Peeples’s many honors and awards.

Robert M. Janowiak Outstanding Leadership and Service Award
One of the electrical engineering industry’s top awards, 2019, provided by the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Heads Association  (ECEDHA). Peeples, his wife, children and grandchildren were flown to Arizona where he accepted the award.

Some of his additional accolades include:

  • Engineer of the Year, Charleston Engineers Joint Council, 2020
  • Distinguished lecturer, Santee Cooper Engineering Seminar, Summers 2013 – 2018
  • Lawton-Ellis Teaching Award, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2014-15
  • Distinguished lecturer, Georgia Tech, Auburn and Florida International University, various years, 2004 – 2014
  • Summer Faculty Research Fellow, Office of Naval Research, 2012
  • NSF-ECEDHA Energy and Power Summer Program Fellow, 2011
  • NCR R&D Award for Outstanding Technical Achievement, 1981
  • US Patent #5,359,170 Apparatus for Bonding External Leads of an Integrated Circuit
  • US Patent #6,054,676 Method and Apparatus for Cooling An Integrated Circuit Device

Peeples’ letter of gratitude

After learning about the endowed scholarship in his name, Peeples sent this letter to the grantors:


Dr. John Peeples with his family in 2018. (Left to right) Son, Dr. Dale Peeples, wife Jennifer and son Simon, John, wife Nancy “Bouy,” daughter Hope Lant, her husband Todd and their daughters Sullivan and Zoe. 

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Renowned Citadel health scientist leading new military sector for National Physical Activity Plan https://today.citadel.edu/renowned-citadel-health-scientist-leading-new-military-sector-for-national-physical-activity-plan/ Fri, 20 Nov 2020 21:06:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20022 Dr. Dan Bornstein photographed in Citadel weight room in 2018Dr. Dan Bornstein photographed in Citadel weight room in 2018CPR3 director, Dan Bornstein, Ph.D., continues work to improve fitness for national security The Citadel offers one of the only graduate degrees in America designed to meet the growing demand]]> Dr. Dan Bornstein photographed in Citadel weight room in 2018Dr. Dan Bornstein photographed in Citadel weight room in 2018

CPR3 director, Dan Bornstein, Ph.D., continues work to improve fitness for national security

The Citadel offers one of the only graduate degrees in America designed to meet the growing demand for exercise science, specifically ones trained to work with military personnel and first responders – those considered tactical athletes by occupation. It’s one of the academic programs offered through the college’s Center for Performance, Readiness, Resiliency and Recovery (CPR3).

But the Master of Science in Health, Exercise and Sport Science: Concentration in Tactical Performance and Resiliency is only one component of CPR3. There are two other tactical academic programs, also in-person training events for first responders and veterans, plus numerous supporting research efforts underway.

CPR3 training session on campus

The exercise scientist behind CPR3, and national news-making researcher into America’s declining physical fitness, Dan Bornstein, Ph.D., now has another role to contribute to his goal to build a more fit America for the sake of military readiness.

CPR3 training session with law enforcement officers in Citadel’s Dawg Pound Weight Room

In November, the Steering Committee for the National Physical Activity Plan approved adding a tenth sector, Military Settings, to the plan. Bornstein, who has served in numerous roles supporting the plan, was named to head the new sector.

“The National Physical Activity Plan supports promotion of physical activity in all segments of the U.S. population.  The addition of content that is specific to promotion of physical activity in military settings extends the reach of the National Plan to critical elements of the population including active duty personnel, veterans, families of military personnel and civilian employees of the military branches,” said Russell Pate, Ph.D., one of the founders of the plan, and an exercise scientist with University of South Carolina.  “Dan Bornstein is the ideal person to lead this effort because he combines a long association with the National Physical Activity Plan with his ongoing professional leadership in promoting physical activity and fitness in military groups.” 

The National Physical Activity Plan is a comprehensive set of policies, programs, and initiatives designed to increase physical activity in all segments of the U.S. population. The plan aims to foster a national culture that supports physically active lifestyles. Its ultimate purpose is to improve health, prevent disease and disability, and enhance quality of life. Bornstein is assembling a team to begin the work of developing the Military Settings portion of the plan beginning in early 2021.

Additionally, Bornstein has served in roles for the Physical Activity Alliance since its inception and he is past chair of the American Public Health Association’s Physical Activity Section. Locally he volunteers as part of the Mayor’s Wellness Council among other projects. In 2018, Bornstein led a group to Capitol Hill, providing a briefing for The National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity to call attention to how Congress, the Administration, industry, nonprofits and others within both the public and private sectors can work together to create a national way of life that supports and inspires physical activity—a linchpin for a physically, economically, and militarily stronger America.

Bornstein (third from left) with fellow panelists on Capitol Hill after Congressional briefing in 2018

Bornstein’s work has garnered national interest, with the impacts of first-of- its-kind research with U.S. Army data on impacts to national security because of a decline in the physical readiness of recruits. Other research by Bornstein and the CPR3 team includes:

  • Study with U.S. Army investigating economic impact to training-related injuries during basic combat training.
  • Upcoming study with Army ROTC investigating impact of professional Tactical Performance and Readiness training on Army Combat Fitness Test Performance.
  • Upcoming study on perceived benefits of professional tactical performance and readiness training among law enforcement SWAT team members.

From a community engagement perspective CPR3 is:

  • Providing professional psychological resiliency and recovery training to Citadel cadets
  • Engaging with Joint Base Charleston to provide professional tactical performance and readiness training on base.
  • Engaging with South Carolina National Guard to provide professional tactical performance and readiness training to Guard members

Read more about Bornstein and watch videos about related programs at The Citadel here.

CPR3 outdoor tactical training unit
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