In The News – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:15:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png In The News – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 The Citadel holds connection to new Netflix movie starring Colin Firth, Matthew Macfadyen https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-holds-connection-to-new-netflix-movie-starring-colin-firth-matthew-macfadyen/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:15:49 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32661 A new movie features a World War II submarine which has been part of a monument on The Citadel campus for decades.]]>

As seen on WCIV – ABC News 4

new movie features a World War II submarine which has been part of a monument on The Citadel campus for decades.

The movie — Operation Mincemeat — stars Colin Firth, Matthew Macfadyen, and Kelly Macdonald. It’s based on a true story of British spies during to deceive the Nazis and alter the course of World War II.

The Seraph, a British submarine, was used on multiple missions, including Operation Mincemeat, The Citadel officials said.

The Seraph monument at The Citadel was built in the 1960s. It is the only shore installation in the U.S. where the Royal Navy ensign is permanently flown in honor of the cooperation between the U.S. and U.K.

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Money magazine ranks Citadel #1 in SC, #78 nationally https://today.citadel.edu/money-magazine-ranks-citadel-1-in-sc-78-nationally/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 21:30:50 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32604 The Citadel is ranked #1 in SC. When looking at the complete, national list, The Citadel comes in at #78, followed by Clemson at #162.]]>

Money magazine published its most recent college rankings June 21, 2022. Out of the colleges in South Carolina, The Citadel is ranked #1. When looking at the complete, national list, The Citadel comes in at #78, followed by Clemson at #162.

As seen on Money.com

Your college doesn’t have to be exclusive to be a great investment. To find the schools that combine quality and affordability while admitting at least 20% of applicants, Money analyzed dozens of data points to produce a ranking we think will be useful to applicants who are increasingly looking for more choices. Explore our list, then build your own.

Roughly three-quarters of Americans view the high cost of college as the biggest barrier to earning a degree, according to a recent survey from NORC at the University of Chicago.

That makes sense, given how college costs have climbed in recent decades. Today, deciding whether, and where, to attend college is one of the biggest financial decisions you’ll make.

To guide families in that decision, Money’s latest Best Colleges offers a practical analysis of more than 600 four-year colleges.

Data collection and analysis for the rankings were led by Money’s rankings partner, Witlytic. Money’s editorial staff, however, is solely responsible for the final ranking decisions.

Click here for the methodology behind our new 2022 rankings, first in a short version, followed by a more comprehensive one.

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Change-leading Citadel researcher and professor earns accolade from SC governor https://today.citadel.edu/change-leading-citadel-researcher-and-professor-earns-accolade-from-sc-governor/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 18:43:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32551 Weinstein’s research on microplastics, especially the discovery of microscopic tire particles in coastal waters, has gained both national and international attention.]]>

John Weinstein, Ph.D., recipient of Governor’s Award for Excellence in Scientific Research

He is best known for his landmark studies assessing the sources, fate and effects of plastic and microplastic pollution along the South Carolina coast. That work is just part of what led John Weinstein, Ph.D., a professor of Biology at The Citadel, to be the 2022 recipient of the Governor’s Award for Excellence in Scientific Research at a Predominantly Undergraduate Institution.

Dr. Weinstein’s research in the last two decades has been squarely at the epicenter of environmental toxicology, providing scientific insight into some of the most pressing environmental issues that affect our coastal ecosystems.

Darin Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean for the Swain Family School of Mathematics and Science, introducing John Weinstein at the Governor’s award event on May 31, 2022

Zimmerman accompanied Weinstein to the state capitol to accept the honor from South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster.

“This award recognizes Dr. John Weinstein’s record of scientific research excellence as well as his many contributions to teaching and service. He is a highly respected scientist with an impressive record of research accomplishments. Through teaching and mentoring of students, he has expanded our state’s STEM literacy and helped to increase the visibility of its research within the national and international scientific communities,” the Governor’s proclamation read.

Why he stands out

Cadets Jerry Higgins and Douglas Karam, accompanied by Dr. John Weinstein, Biology, deploy an experiment to measure how face masks, rubber gloves and hand wipes decompose in the salt marsh behind Inouye Hall on Thursday, October 14, 2021.

Weinstein’s research on microplastics, especially the discovery of microscopic tire particles in coastal waters, has gained both national and international attention. The national media, including National Geographic, National Public Radio and the National Resources Defense Council have highlighted his research findings. Underscoring the international significance of Weinstein’s research, he was recently invited to participate in hearings at the French Senate in Paris as the Parliamentary Office for Scientific and Technological Assessment were interested in learning more about his findings.

Weinstein’s current national and international grant-funded research projects include:

  • Microplastic abundance in oysters and its impact on human health (funded through a $5.7 million grant through the National Institutes of Health to establish a Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions at the University of South Carolina)
  • Pathways of Microplastic and Tire Particles through Stormwater Infrastructure (funded by the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, research being conducted with colleagues from Clemson and College of Charleston)
  • Nuisance Flooding as a Pathway for Microplastic Entry into Coastal Waters (funded through The Citadel Near Center for Climate Studies, research being conducted with colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania)
  • Occurrence and Degradation of Pandemic-Related Plastic PPE in Charleston Harbor (funded by the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium)
  • Application of Standardized Litter Assessment Methodology to Southeastern U.S. Beaches to Compare French and U.S. Plastic Debris (funded by the Global Council for Science and the Environment, research being conducted with French scientists from the Center of Documentation, Research and Experimentation on Accidental Water Pollution)
Dr. John Weinstein studies microplastics at The Citadel (Courtesy: Victoria Hansen, SC Public Radio)
Dr. John Weinstein studies microplastics at The Citadel. (Courtesy: Victoria Hansen, SC Public Radio)

Weinstein, who was recently named assistant provost for research at The Citadel, received his Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in 1991. He accepted a faculty position with the Department of Biology at The Citadel in 2000, where he has since also served in a variety of administrative roles including department chair, associate dean for accreditation and interim dean. Weinstein has established an impressive record of mentoring both undergraduate and graduate students in his research, many of whom have won presentation awards at local, national and international conferences and have gone on to successful careers in environmental science.

I can trace my interest in the field of environmental toxicology all the way back to when I was growing up in New Jersey, where my family would spend summers at the beach. Even at an early age, I used to wonder where marine debris came from and what impacts was it having on sea creatures. These early experiences fostered in me a curiosity of the natural world and an appreciation of how humans can influence natural processes. Equally important is that I thoroughly enjoy training the next generation of scientists by providing guidance and mentorship. The undergraduate and graduate students that I’ve trained in my research laboratory have been truly remarkable. The recognition that I’ve received is really a testament to their hard work and perseverance.

John Weinstein, Ph.D., Biology professor and assistant provost for research at The Citadel
Dr. John Weinstein (center with plaque) posing for a photograph at the South Carolina state capitol with his family and with the Dean of the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics, Darin Zimmerman (far right), on May 31, 2022.
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Robert Brown Named Executive Assistant Director of the Science and Technology Branch https://today.citadel.edu/robert-brown-named-executive-assistant-director-of-the-science-and-technology-branch/ Tue, 31 May 2022 19:25:32 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32467 Brown graduated from The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina. Prior to joining the FBI, he was a deputy sheriff for nine years.]]>

Note: Robert Brown graduated from The Citadel in 1992 earning a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. He was promoted to Assistant Director of the FBI’s Operational Technology Division in 2021.

From the FBI National Press Office

Director Christopher Wray has named Robert Brown as the executive assistant director of the Science and Technology Branch at FBI Headquarters in Washington. Mr. Brown most recently served as the assistant director of the Operational Technology Division.

As head of the STB, Mr. Brown will oversee the Criminal Justice Information Services, Laboratory, and Operational Technology divisions.

Mr. Brown joined the FBI as a special agent in 2002 and was assigned to the Miami Field Office to investigate organized crime. He also served on the SWAT team. In 2007, Mr. Brown moved to the Washington Field Office and served on the Attorney General’s Protective Detail.

Mr. Brown was promoted to supervisory special agent in 2009 and transferred to the Transfer Unit in the Human Resources Division at Headquarters. He later served as unit chief.

In 2011, Mr. Brown was tapped to lead the Raleigh Resident Agency of the Charlotte Field Office in North Carolina. He led investigations targeting gangs and public corruption, led the Joint Terrorism Task Force, and supervised terrorism investigations. He was promoted to assistant special agent in charge of the Columbia Field Office in South Carolina in 2014 and oversaw the FBI’s response and investigation of the Charleston church shooting in 2015.

Mr. Brown was promoted to section chief in the Criminal Investigative Division at Headquarters in 2016 and managed investigations of—and the collection of intelligence about—transnational criminal organizations based in the Western Hemisphere. In 2017, he was named deputy assistant director for the Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate. He became the special agent in charge of the Louisville Field Office in Kentucky in 2018.

In 2021, Mr. Brown was promoted to assistant director of the Operational Technology Division, which provides technology-based solutions to enable and enhance the FBI’s operations.

Mr. Brown graduated from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. He also earned a master’s in public administration from Norwich University. Prior to joining the FBI, he was a deputy sheriff for nine years.

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Mount Pleasant native named The Citadel Corps of Cadets Regimental Commander https://today.citadel.edu/mount-pleasant-native-named-the-citadel-corps-of-cadets-regimental-commander/ Fri, 20 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32379 Mayor Will Haynie met with The Citadel’s newest Regimental Commander of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, Brandon Johnson, Friday to congratulate him and discuss the time-honored responsibility. ]]>

As seen on the Town of Mount Pleasant newsroom

Mayor Will Haynie met with The Citadel’s newest Regimental Commander of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, Brandon Johnson, Friday to congratulate him and discuss the time-honored responsibility.

The Wando High School graduate’s new role was announced during a ceremony in Jenkins Hall on March 8.

The leadership positions in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, which make up the military component of The Citadel’s student body, are appointed by the Commandant after a series of performance reviews and increased rank throughout their academic career.

As Johnson rose through the ranks from Company Clerk his sophomore year to Battalion Sergeant Major his junior year, he developed a passion for helping cadets reach their potential. As he enters his senior year, he hopes to hone his leadership skills in his new rank.

“Cadet Johnson embodies the spirit of Mount Pleasant and he will undoubtedly carry those principles into this demanding leadership role,” said Mayor Haynie. “We couldn’t be more proud of his accomplishment and look forward to seeing the bright future he has ahead.”

In his role as Regimental Commander, holding the rank of Cadet Colonel, Johnson will lead The Citadel Corps’ five battalions and 21 companies during the 2023 academic year.

This meeting was an especially sentimental and proud moment for Mayor Haynie as he held the same position in the Corps of Cadets.

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Dr. Mary K. Watson named Civil Engineer Educator of the Year and Clemson Outstanding Young Alumni https://today.citadel.edu/dr-mary-k-watson-named-civil-engineer-educator-of-the-year-and-clemson-outstanding-young-alumni/ Thu, 19 May 2022 13:10:15 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32255 Dr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The CitadelDr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The Citadel"Dr. Watson is performing at the very highest level of scholarly achievement and contributing immensely to the success of The Citadel."]]> Dr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The CitadelDr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The Citadel

The Citadel School of Engineering professor continues leading in her field

A woman who began making her mark in the engineering industry almost as soon as she joined The Citadel in 2013, Mary K. Watson, Ph.D., is now the 2022 recipient of the Civil Engineer Educator of the Year Award. The award comes from the South Carolina Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). It will be presented June 10 at the S.C. Engineering and Trade Show.

Watson is an associate professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering with The Citadel School of Engineering. She was nominated for the award by the Jeff Davis, Ph.D., head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at The Citadel.

Dr. Watson is performing at the very highest level of scholarly achievement and contributing immensely to the success of the Department and School of Engineering. Furthermore, her work has far-reaching regional, national and international impact in advancing engineering educational practice and engineering student development.

Jeff Davis, Ph.D., P.E., The Citadel School of Engineering

Watson has earned more than $1 million in grant funding, supported by the National Science Foundation. She leads the college’s environmental and water resources curriculum and serves as the primary academic advisor for about 40 students in the School of Engineering College Transfer Program (CTP).

Dr. Watson, thank you profoundly for caring as you do for every student’s individual development, not just as an academic, but as an engineer, leader and person.

CTP Civil Engineering Class of 2020 graduate

Watson was also recently included in a new cohort of Outstanding Young Alumni, by Clemson University’s College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences. In addition to her new accolades, Watson has earned numerous others, some of which include:

  • Excellence in Research Award, The Citadel Provost, 2022
  • New Faculty Research Award, SE Section, American Society for Engineering Education, 2019
  • Outstanding Paper, 9th Conf. on Engineering Education for Sustainable Development, 2018
  • Best Paper Award, Multidisciplinary Division, Am. Society for Engineering Education, 2017
  • Seeley Award, Civil Engineering Division, American Society for Engineering Education, 2017
  • Best Instructional Paper, SE Section, American Society for Engineering Education, 2017, 2012
  • Young Civil Engineer of the Year, South Carolina Section, ASCE, 2016
  • New Faculty Excellence in Teaching Award, Committee on Faculty Development, ASCE, 2016
  • Outstanding New Teaching Award, SE Section, American Society for Engineering Education, 2015
  • Best Paper Award, New Engineering Educators Div., Am. Society for Engineering Education, 2015

As seen on Clemson.edu

Six honored by College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences

(From left) Craig Fallon, Rebecca Copenhaver DeLegge, Anand Gramopadhye, Robert Fjeld, Adam Kirn and Mary Katherine Watson pose for a photo at the gala celebrating the newest members of the Thomas Green Clemson Academy of Engineers and Scientists and Outstanding Young Alumni. Diana Chen, who is not pictured, was unable to attend. Photo courtesy of Clemson.edu.

Some of the most outstanding alumni and one faculty emeritus from Clemson University’s largest college gathered in downtown Greenville on Thursday to welcome three of their own into the Thomas Green Clemson Academy of Engineers and Scientists and to honor three others as Outstanding Young Alumni.

Induction to the academy is the highest honor bestowed by Clemson’s College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences. The honor recognizes alumni and special friends who have made major contributions to their professions and have brought significant distinction to the college and university.

The new members are Rebecca Copenhaver DeLegge, Craig Fallon and Robert Fjeld.

The newest crop of Outstanding Young Alumni are Diana Chen, Adam Kirn and Mary Katherine Watson. The award goes to graduates of the college who are 40 years old or younger and whose achievements have been significant to their profession or to the welfare of society.

Anand Gramopadhye, the college’s dean, thanked the night’s honorees and said each is leaving his or her unique mark on the world.

“We will always cherish the fact that your Clemson education may have had a small role to play in your success,” he said. “To paraphrase the Dalai Lama, we hope we have given you wings to fly, roots to come back and reasons to give.”

Mary Katherine Watson: Watson holds Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in biosystems engineering from Clemson. As an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at The Citadel, she has been recognized for her teaching excellence and her prowess as a researcher, developing scholarly contributions to the field of engineering education. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Watson is building regional and national programs for supporting advancement of diverse faculty and students in STEM fields.

Clemson.edu

Read the full announcement, WITH INFORMATION ON THE OTHER OUTSTANDING YOUNG ALUMNI, here.

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Thad Miller: A cut above the rest https://today.citadel.edu/thad-miller-a-cut-above-the-rest/ Sat, 14 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32243 Having worked on campus for 51 years , Thad Miller is still cutting the hair of Citadel cadets — past, present and future — among his many other loyal clients.]]>

As seen on WCBD – Count on 2, by Carolyn Murray

Thad Miller made history as The Citadel’s first Black barber in 1971, when Black and white cadets still got their hair cut by different barbers.

When he was hired, Miller recalled the higher-ups telling him he should get one thing very clear: that he would cut “the Blacks hair only.” At the time, there were only eight Black cadets at The Citadel, so Miller had a lot of free time, while white cadets lined up out the door for the white barber.

One day, a white cadet got tired of waiting. He sat down in Miller’s chair, and the white barber gave him the go-ahead. When Miller was finished, he remembers the cadet getting out of the chair and telling his friends “y’all need to try this guy, he can cut!”

51 years later, Miller is still cutting the hair of Citadel cadets, past present and future, among his many other loyal clients.

Jimmy Coaxum has been coming to the barbershop for most of his life and has built a special bond with Miller.

“Thad was more than just a barber who worked here,” Coaxum said. “We always thought of him as family.”

One of Miller’s more well-known clients is Charleston Police Chief Luther Reynolds. When Chief Reynolds was diagnosed with cancer, he turned to Miller for help through the process.

“He told me he was looking for a barber and I said ‘you don’t need to look anymore because you just found one.’ And he came over and got a haircut and he’s been coming by every two weeks ever since. And even before his surgery and what not, we would pray together and talk. We just had a privacy in here.”

Thad Miller

Savaad Miller has been coming to the barbershop his whole life, although he is still one of Miller’s newer clients compared to those who have been coming for decades. As his grandfather gives him a fresh cut, he says he might carry on the family tradition.

Whether Miller is cutting the hair of clients that feel like family, or actual family, one thing is clear: it is always a good time at the Family Barbershop.

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Advancing careers: certificates in intelligence analysis https://today.citadel.edu/advancing-careers-certificates-in-intelligence-analysis/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 17:40:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31812 woman on computerwoman on computerStudents in the Intelligence and Security Studies online program come from all over the country with a variety of backgrounds.]]> woman on computerwoman on computer

Identifying threats to the U.S.

By Barry Waldman for The Lowcountry Graduate Center

A young woman with a bachelor’s degree in the social sciences decided early in her career that what she really wanted to do was work in intelligence analysis for the federal government.

Intelligence analysis is the process by which information is collected on a potential enemy and analyzed to understand current operations, predict their behavior and determine any threats they may pose.

Courses completely online

The Citadel graduate certificate program in Intelligence Analysis is a five-course, asynchronous online program that introduces students to intelligence analysis concepts, applicable management principles, policy analysis, critical thinking and enhanced critical leadership skills necessary to successfully address security and intelligence challenges facing the United States.

By its nature, it is conducive to working professionals and military service member to pursue a graduate certificate without interrupting their careers.

As the Military College of South Carolina, The Citadel is uniquely positioned to offer this program, which serves for most students as a stepping stone to the full master’s degree program in intelligence analysis. With a certificate, a master’s degree student is nearly halfway through the curriculum.

All certificate students take the three core courses – Introduction to Intelligence, Intelligence Research and Analysis, and Intelligence Theory Application. A long list of electives provide context for the analysis techniques learned, in courses like Topics in Homeland Security, European History, Evolution of Military Leadership Thought, International Political Theory, and Russian Active Measures, to name just a sampling.

Dipping toes into academia

Larry Valero, Ph.D., head of The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, says most students complete the certificate program in two or three semesters, but they have a couple of years to do so. Many students are working professionals in mid-career who haven’t attended college for years and need to dip their toes in academia before committing to a full master’s degree program. Once they have established their ability to juggle work, family and the rigors of graduate school coursework, most go on for the full master’s.

Students in the program come from all over the country with a variety of backgrounds, Valero said. Some are serving members of the armed forces, first responders like police officers and firefighters, some work in Homeland Security. Others work in completely unrelated fields and have no intelligence background whatsoever but are interested in a career transition.

Putin and Intelligence Analysis

Events today involving Russia and its western neighbors, and the intelligence community’s need to understand Vladimir Putin’s motivations and incentives, are testament to the urgency of intelligence analysis. The future of Eastern Europe could be at stake.

“Our field is very interdisciplinary, running the gamut of politics, people, and technology,” Valero said. It is so topical and timely, there is no limit to what can be applied to the field. We offer that additional background that analysts may need to know now and in the future.”

For more information on studying Intelligence and Security Studies with The Citadel email intel@citadel.edu.

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The Citadel Dept. of Defense Cyber Institute cadets and faculty mentors earn two of three awards at first joint SMC event https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-dept-of-defense-cyber-institute-cadets-and-faculty-mentors-earn-two-of-three-awards-at-first-joint-smc-event/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 23:35:17 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31758 Cyberspace is a battlefield and the adversary is always out there. We need you defending our country in the cyber environment.]]>

And Citadel team places second out of ten colleges in NWIC (Atlantic) cyber defense competition

Photo above, left to right: Cadet Slaltean Frederick, Dr. Shankar Banik, and Cadets Shiloh Smiles and Jared Johnson posing with their awards at the inaugural conference on Cybersecurity Research in Undergraduate Programs held at Norwich University.

Just as The Citadel cybersecurity programs and initiatives continued to grow this academic year, cadets in the program expanded their skills and experiences through cyber defense competitions, their work with The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute, the college’s CyberCorps Scholarships for Service program and, for the seniors, planning for the next stage of their careers by accepting positions as cyber defense professionals.

A highlight of the spring semester was the first gathering of cadets from America’s six Senior Military Colleges who are participating in their school’s Department of Defense Cyber Institute. It was hosted by Norwich University in early April.

The inaugural conference on Cybersecurity Research in Undergraduate Programs (CyRUP) was a collaborative effort between the military colleges who are jointly dedicated to advancing cybersecurity research and to developing research opportunities for undergraduate students. Cadets from The Citadel, the University of North Georgia, Texas A&M, Virginia Military Institute, Virginia Tech and Norwich University, as well as professionals from U.S. Cyber Forces, gathered to learn more about current research interests and what is coming next in cybersecurity.

The Citadel earned two of the three awards presented at the conference. The Best Paper Award went to cadets Jared Johnson, Eric Lilling and their faculty mentors, Drs. Shankar Banik and Deepti Joshi, for “Efficient Phishing Detection using Email DNA.”

The Best Presentation Award was earned by cadets Slateon Frederick, Jessica Roginski, Shiloh Smiles, Noah Wells and Banik, their faculty mentor. The presentation title: “Context Aware Access Control for Internet of Things (IoT) Network.”

Other cybersecurity news from The Citadel: cadet team takes 2nd place in college division at NIWC cyber defense competition

The Citadel Cybersecurity competition team during the Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic  2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition
The Citadel cybersecurity competition team posing for a photo after earning second place in the Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic 2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition

The Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic hosted the 2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition this spring. The three day event included a competition between 10 colleges. The Citadel team earned second place, just behind Clemson. The cadet participants were: Jared Johnson, Ben Race, Robert Roser, Shiloh Smiles, Trey Stevens and Noah Wells.

Additionally, The Citadel’s cybersecurity programs director, Shankar Banik, Ph.D., provided a keynote address during the three day event.

This kind of experience will give you an edge and a platform to apply your skillsets to a real-world situation. A degree is one thing, a certification is one thing, but learning in this way — how to do the critical work of hardening systems and testing your skills — is invaluable.

Cyberspace is a battlefield and the adversary is always out there. Students like you give us hope and we need you defending our country in the cyber environment.

Dr. Shankar Banik, professor and Graduate Program director of Computer Science, co-director for the Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel

Read more about the event here.

Dr. Shankar Banik, professor and Graduate Program director of Computer Science, Co-director for the Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel, speaking to high school competitors during the Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic 2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition
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The Citadel’s online programs now ranked among top 5 in America in two categories https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadels-online-programs-now-ranked-among-top-5-in-america-in-two-categories/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 19:59:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31530 College Consensus ranked The Citadel's online programs #2 in America for veterans and #5 in the nation for all students studying online.]]>

#2 in nation for veterans, #5 overall according to College Consensus

The convenient, flexible online programs offered by The Citadel are now ranked second in America for veterans by College Consensus, and #5 in the nation for all students studying online.

The college ratings website that aggregates publisher rankings and student reviews published its newest 50 Best Online Colleges for Veterans in late March.

The Top 5 Best Online Colleges for Veterans are:

  • University of Florida
  • The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina
  • University of Arizona
  • Western Carolina University
  • Saint Louis University

Additionally, that list ranks The Citadel as #18 in America for Best Colleges for Veterans, (attending in person).

The Citadel, also called the Military College of South Carolina, prides itself on its service to veterans in its mission to educate and develop principled leaders. Many members of the college’s faculty and staff are also veterans, including The Citadel President Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.), ’79.

College Consensus is one of numerous organizations to name The Citadel among the best in the nation for veterans. U.S. News & World Report, for example, has repeatedly ranked The Citadel high on its list of best options for veterans, giving the college the title of #1 Best Colleges For Veterans on their most recent list for regional universities, South.

According to College Consensus, over half a million military veterans turn to America’s colleges each year to expand their career options after service, much like Adrian Lorduy. A Navy veteran, Lorduy will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in Intelligence and Security Studies from The Citadel in May.

Adrian Lorduy, U.S. Navy veteran, business owner, Class of 2022 Intelligence and Security Studies B.A. student

Lorduy founded a company called Buenavista Information Systems about two years ago. “We are a Service Disabled, Veteran-Owned IT management and support company that services both commercial and government entities,” he said in an email when asked to describe his work.

The Citadel’s online program has allowed me to continue and excel in my academic career while simultaneously allowing me to grow my company to new heights. The Citadel has been a blessing to my family, my company and myself through its healthy combination of academic flexibility and endless resources to assure veteran success.

Adrian Lorduy, U.S. Navy veteran, business owner, Class of 2022 Intelligence and Security Studies B.A. student

The Citadel has many flexible programs to meet the needs of veteran students who want to earn undergraduate or graduate degrees. Find out more here.

#5 in America for all students attending college remotely

The recent veteran education rankings were followed on April 6 with the announcement of the College Consensus 2022 Best Online Colleges and Universities list for all students attending college remotely.

The Top 5 Best Online Colleges and Universities are:

  • University of Florida
  • California State University-Chico
  • Appalachian State University
  • Boston University
  • The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina

Read about the methodology behind the College Consensus rankings here.

Online students at any level of study attend via The Citadel Graduate College (CGC), meaning it is a civilian program and they are not a part of the Corps of Cadets. There are more than 25 undergraduate and graduate degrees, as well as graduate-level certificate programs.

Explore The Citadel’s online programs here.

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