Featured – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Mon, 19 Aug 2019 19:52:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Featured – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Baker School of Business professor weighs in on possible recession https://today.citadel.edu/baker-school-of-business-professor-weighs-in-on-possible-recession/ Mon, 19 Aug 2019 19:52:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=10143 “How this is going to play out is very difficult to tell but it can be extremely disruptive,” said Richard Ebeling, professor of economics at The Citadel.]]>

As seen on ABC News 4, by Caroline Balchunas

“There are two elements that are causing most concern and that is our trade differences with China and the circumstances with the financial markets and interest rates,” said Richard Ebeling, professor of economics at The Citadel. “How this is going to play out is very difficult to tell but it can be extremely disruptive.”

Watch the full, on-air coverage here.

This week marked the worst day for Wall Street all year and has fueled concerns the nation is headed toward another recession. Those fears have trickled to the Lowcountry.

Charleston was hit hard by the Great Recession a decade ago. It was fueled by the housing mortgage crisis, but experts say the situation is different this time around.

“There are two elements that are causing most concern and that is our trade differences with China and the circumstances with the financial markets and interest rates,” said Richard Ebeling, professor of economics at The Citadel. “How this is going to play out is very difficult to tell but it can be extremely disruptive.”

Ebeling said until the global trade issues come to fruition, it’s too soon to tell how it will all shake out, adding there’s a lot at stake in the Charleston-area, especially with the Port of Charleston.

“The trade situation particularly impacts the greater Charleston area because Charleston is a growing and important international hub for importing and exporting,” he said. “That’s what all these companies are doing here, opening manufacturing facilities, warehouses, they’re shipping their goods to other places around the country or more importantly around the world.”

Despite recession concerns, Ebeling said consumer confidence and spending is up and unemployment and inflation levels remain low.

Mount Pleasant realtor Cheryll Woods-Flowers said Charleston’s housing market is healthy. She said inventory has been down for several years, but home prices are still up, about four-percent higher than last year.

“Our market here is strong, it is absolutely still very, very strong and interest rates are certainly helping with that,” Woods-Flowers said. “This is a great time to buy a house. If you’ve never bought a house this is a perfect time because the prices are going down, which is typical this time of year.”

While the nation’s financial future bears a watchful eye, Woods-Flowers said she’s not seeing anything resembling the hallmarks of the past recession.

“I’m optimistic it’s going to be fine. I’m very optimistic that it’s not going to be what it was in 2007 through 2009,” she said. “It’s still a good time to sell because if you think there might be a recession down the road, the price you can get for your house today might be better than what you get next year, if we went into a recession.”

Ebeling recommends people seek advice from a financial adviser before making any decisions regarding the stock market or other financial funds.

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How Much Damage Will Come from this Trade War? https://today.citadel.edu/how-much-damage-will-come-from-this-trade-war/ Sat, 17 Aug 2019 10:00:45 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=10111 Opinion piece written by Richard Ebeling, Ph.D., BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.]]>

Opinion: As seen in the American Institute for Economic Research, by Richard Ebeling, Ph.D.

(Note: Richard M. Ebeling, an AIER Senior Fellow, is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.)

First, the good news: the U.S. and world economies have not imploded, so far, as fallout from the rising trade tensions between the Trump administration and Xi Jinping’s government in China. Now, the bad news: there is no certainty that this will not play itself out as a serious and damaging trade war between the two countries that might spill over into grievous harm to many other parts of the world, as well. 

From the day that Donald Trump became president, he has been telling the American people and everyone else that he believes that national economic prosperity requires seeing international trade as a zero-sum game. In his mind, the buying and selling of goods and the investing of capital across political lines on a map of the world is economic combat creating winners and losers. 

If another country gains, it means that America potentially has been made worse off. Buying foreign goods threatens jobs and business profitability within the United States. An American private enterprise investing in some other country takes away prosperity from America because a factory that could have been built in the U.S. is not. (See my articles “The Zero-Sum World of Donald Trump” and “America’s Economic Commissar of Trade.”)

Trump’s Impatience With Markets and Prices

Also, in Donald Trump’s mind market prices are considered to be economic policy tools to be used for either domestic market manipulation or international economic warfare.  The president stamps his feet and pouts on Twitter that the Federal Reserve won’t give him the lower interest rates he wants to stimulate business investment to create more of the jobs that will make American voters reelect him in 2020. He wants the same interest rate manipulation to lower the value of the dollar on the foreign exchange market so American exports will increase and foreign imports will decrease. 

The idea and understanding that interest rates are not whimsical numbers to raise and lower to serve political purposes, but market-based prices meant to reflect the supply of savings out of people’s earned incomes relative to the demand by borrowers to use the real resources that savings represents to undertake time-consuming investments that will not pay off until various moments in the future never enters Donald Trump’s head. (See my article “Interest Rates Need to Tell the Truth.”)

Nor does he seem to understand that the value of the dollar both at home and abroad as reflected on the foreign exchange market is also the result of market-based supply and demand. Governments and central banks certainly influence them based on the fiscal and monetary policies that are followed, but they, too, are not arbitrary numbers to just “fix” by edict or command in an attempt to affect buying patterns and investment flows in and between nations. 

There are real and serious consequences, both intended and unintended, when governments and their central banks try to move them about by fiat. This is no less the case when the president of the United States, by capricious “executive order,” threatens to raise or actually raises the import duties on goods entering the United States from particular designated countries that have fallen foul of Donald Trump’s good graces. 

Trump’s “Great Man” Theory of Government Power

President Trump clearly believes in and likes the political great-man theory of history. He fawns over foreign tyrants like Kim Jong-Un of North Korea, President Vladimir Putin of Russia, and, at times, President Xi of China. These are “strongmen” who possess power and control over all or much of what happens in their countries through authoritarian command. Donald Trump seems to think that this is what should be the nature of the American presidency. 

He doesn’t like what or how much another country exports to the U.S.? Then Trump just slaps on a higher import tax to teach that country a lesson. American farmers lose business due to China cutting back on purchasing U.S. agricultural goods in retaliation for the higher tariffs on their exports? Then Trump takes import duties collected and redistributes them to farm voters whose support he needs. Trump doesn’t like the level of interest rates? He wishes he could just tell the Federal Reserve Board what rates of interest would make him happy — and impose them. The president is frustrated with the domestic and foreign investment decisions by certain American corporations? He goes about threatening them with “bad things” if they do not direct their investment capital the way he wants them to. 

How so very much like the “democratic” socialists inside and outside the Democratic Party he warns against, with his use of and wish for more presidential executive power to centrally command and control what others do with their lives and property according to “the plan” he thinks necessary for American “greatness.” Welcome to Donald Trump’s version of national(ist) socialism. 

Trump’s Progressive-Like Groupthink on Race

And how much racial groupthink comes from Donald Trump, just like the “progressive” race and gender warriors on the political “left.” The “progressive” democrats (socialist and otherwise) insistently demand that all human relationships should be seen through the prism of racial and gender identity, with victor and victims defined by skin color and sexual orientation. Only with Trump, those from “South of the Border,” with their browner epidermis, represent the plague of drug dealers, murders, and rapists. 

How fortunate America has been that those with whiter shades of skin never show such tendencies or traits! No, there are no cocaine and heroin pushers, no serial killers or sexual predators among those of Western and Northern European ancestry who make their home in America. How lucky we are that those whiter people are free from those corrupting proclivities, that the perverse, sick, and cruel sides of human beings go no more than skin deep.

The idea that individual freedom and rights should be the guidepost and the spirit of America has no place in either the “progressive” or Trump worlds. They are battling over political control of the presidency and Congress to have coercive control over which groups shall be given favors and benefits, or special treatments, compared to others. (See my article “Donald Trump the Corrupt Creation of America’s Bankrupt Politics.”)

Trump’s Personal Trade Deals and Benefits

But Trump’s groupthink is focused right now on his escalating trade war with China. It is “America” versus “China.” Either “we” win and “they” lose, or it’s the other way around. That trade, when voluntary and mutually agreed-upon, is a win-win, two-way street seems not to be in the president’s lexicon of concepts. Yet, every personal market-based private sector transaction that Donald Trump ever entered into in his whole life reflected the conception of trade that he refuses to or is unable to grasp.

Back in the 1980s, Trump hired Tony Schwartz to ghostwrite his best-selling book The Art of the Deal (1987). Trump could have produced the book through his own “domestic” production by sitting down and writing the manuscript, himself. He either did not want to, or did not know how to in the way that would satisfy an interested publisher and attract a wide reading audience. So he decided to “import” the writing services of someone outside of his own immediate household. 

Since Mr. Schwartz took the job, spent months following Trump around at home and at work, and interacted with Trump in numerous one-on-one conversations over a period of 18 months to collect the needed material for preparing the book, it can logically be inferred that they reached mutually acceptable terms of trade, that is, the fee to be paid to Mr. Schwartz for delivering the finished manuscript. Mr. Schwartz tells us that he received half of the $500,000 advance from the publisher as well as half of the royalties from sales, besides a byline on the title page. 

So why didn’t Donald Trump write his own book? Well, according to Mr. Schwartz, Trump’s attention span is too short to be focused enough to think about and write any such extended project on his own. And during that year and a half that Mr. Schwartz was constantly in Trump’s company, he “never saw a book on Trump’s desk, or elsewhere in his office, or in his apartment.” Then, again, as President Trump has mentioned more than once, when you know that you are the smartest person that you have ever met, you do not need to be reading the ideas or experiences of others. What can they tell you that you don’t already know, and much better?

So whether it was a matter of absolute advantage (either Trump hired someone to write the book or it would not have been written) or comparative advantage (he could have successfully written it and maybe better than Mr. Schwartz, but his time was just too valuable in other directions), the fact was Donald Trump saw the benefit from participating in the social system of division of labor and importing the services performed by another. Would Mr. Trump have been better off if the U.S. government told him that he could not hire anyone from another household to write the book, so if he did not do the writing, himself, he would have had to have his then wife, Ivana, write it for him? (That might have made it a far more interesting book to read!)

Trump’s Trade Deficit in Outsourcing The Art of the Deal

In addition, Donald Trump suffered a balance-of-trade deficit as a result of his transaction with Tony Schwartz. The publisher (Random House) paid Mr. Trump that half-a-million-dollar advance, and then he turned around and expended a quarter of a million dollars in paying Mr. Schwartz for working on the manuscript. 

But what did Tony Schwartz ever reciprocally buy from Donald Trump equal to $250,000? The answer: nothing. He, no doubt, got one of the free author’s copies of the book as the ghostwriter, so he did not even pay Mr. Trump back by buying a copy of the book. And there is no indication that Mr. Schwartz has ever spent money staying at a Trump hotel, playing golf at a Trump-owned fairway, or eating a famous Trump steak. 

Clearly, this was a pure foreign trade loss for poor Donald Trump — all import from and no export to Tony Schwartz. The only answer: Donald Trump should impose an import tax on any further ghostwriting that Tony Schwartz may ever do for him in the future. And Mr. Schwartz will pay it. 

But, wait! If Mr. Trump tells Mr. Schwartz that he refuses to purchase any more ghostwritten manuscripts from him unless — besides another $250,000 — there is an imposed additional $25,000 on the price to teach Mr. Schwartz a tariff lesson, isn’t Mr. Trump the one who has to pay the extra sum? 

The American Importers Pay the Tariff 

You mean the American buyer pays the import tax that the government imposes on the foreign-made good? The answer: Yes. The foreign supplier of any good sold in the United States has, invariably, incurred expenses producing and then transporting the product to American shores. The import duty is added to the price that the American import wholesalers and sellers must pay to bring the good from the arrival port to wherever they use it in other domestic manufacturing or sold more directly to the buying public as a consumer item. 

Mr. Trump may boast to and assure American farmers that tens of billions of dollars have been received in additional import tax revenues on Chinese goods and they will be used to cover most or all of their losses due to diminished sales of their agricultural commodities in the Chinese market because of Beijing’s retaliatory trade restrictions. 

But it has been and will be the American buying public that pays those import taxes that are then partly redistributed at the expense of their standard of living to try to keep whole the previous financial position of segments of the American farming community. The rest is simply pocketed by Uncle Sam to defray the expenses of other things the government does as another way to pick the American taxpayers’ pockets. 

The Fallacies and Faults in Currency Manipulation

The American producing and consuming public are made no better off if the Trump administration finds a way to manipulate the value of the dollar on the foreign exchange market. Suppose that an American importer has to pay $1 to purchase 7 yuan on the foreign exchange market to acquire a Chinese product that costs 14 yuan to buy. The American importer, therefore, would have to trade $2 to have enough yuan to purchase the product from a Chinese exporter. 

But suppose that it becomes possible to pay only 75 cents for the same 7 yuan, so only $1.50 has to be traded to have enough yuan to purchase that Chinese good whose price is still 14 yuan? From the American importer’s perspective the foreign good has become less expensive to purchase. Chinese import sales in America increase. But for the Chinese importer of American exported goods, the cost of a U.S. product may, thereby, increase by 25 percent in expense to bring into China, since more yuan must be paid on the foreign exchange market to acquire one U.S. dollar.

The Trump White House insists the Chinese government has manipulated a lower foreign exchange value for the yuan to artificially stimulate exports to the U.S.  It is true that governments, individually or in consort with each other, usually decide on “bands” within which their currencies will be allowed to fluctuate in terms of each other without central bank or government monetary intervention to move a currency’s value up or down. 

So foreign exchange rates are not simply or purely free market–based. But the global foreign exchange market, on average each day, sees about $5 trillion worth of transactions. As a result, any government wishing to permanently or for a prolonged time move its currency’s value significantly lower than where the international market is setting it on a daily basis will have to inject large sums of its own currency into the foreign exchange market day after day, week after week, to have a lasting impact different from what global currency buyers and sellers think that nation’s money to be worth in international trade. 

If the Trump administration tries to play this game, and pushes the U.S. dollar down on the foreign exchange market, it will make a variety of American exports less expensive to buy for some foreign importers. But… the cost of importing foreign goods into the United States will start to go up, since, now, more dollars will have to be given to purchase the more expensive foreign-made goods. 

This will increase the cost of living for consumers across the U.S. market, and raise the cost of importing foreign resources and raw materials and other goods used in U.S. domestic manufacturing; this, too, will percolate through the stages of production over time and make American products more costly to buy both at home and in foreign markets. 

This all threatens to become what during the tariff wars of the 1930s was sometimes referred to as “beggar-thy-neighbor” policies — that is, trying to undermine the exporting sectors of other countries in the attempt to “stimulate” your own country’s domestic production and export sales. However, tit-for-tat increases in tariff barriers and reciprocal attempts to lower one’s own currency vis-a-vis that of others only weaken the international division labor, reduce the benefits and improvements in standards of living that come through global specialization and trade, and disrupt the calculating rationality of a functioning medium of exchange both within a country and in its facilitation of transactions between nations. 

Individuals Live and Trade, Not Macro Aggregates

But all Donald Trump seems to see are macroeconomic aggregates — America versus China. This is as faulty and dangerous as it is to see people in the United States only as racial, gender, or social aggregates: black or white, male or female, rich or poor. Nations are only communities of individual human beings, each of whom is a distinct person possessing various qualities, characteristics, and self-conceptions about who they are, what is important to them, and how they wish to live. 

Nations are also communities of producers and consumers, suppliers and demanders, each of whom, again, is a unique and distinct individual deciding how to earn a living, with whom best to exchange and trade, and what to buy and sell and at what terms seem the most profitable, all things considered for each one of them in their respective corners of society. 

All that Donald Trump’s trade wars with China or any other countries can do is to diminish the freedoms and standards of living of each and every American and that of many others in other lands. Trade wars can only be fought with fiscal, monetary, and interventionist regulatory policy tools that hinder and hamper the free choices of all of us, both in the domestic and international marketplaces. (See my article “Trump’s Economic Warfare Targets Innocent Bystanders.”)

This is a rather high price for all of us to pay just because the president of the United States is ignorant of basic economic reasoning, and seems to hanker to be an authoritarian leader who can get his way whenever he likes, just like those foreign dictators he seems to like to pal around with occasionally on the international stage. 

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Welcoming The Citadel Class of 2023 https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-class-of-2023/ Thu, 15 Aug 2019 19:50:32 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9869 The Oath Ceremony for The Citadel Class of 2023 will be live streamed on the college's Facebook page and on YouTube beginning at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 19. The class will stand on Summerall Field and take an oath pledging to abide by the college's core values of honor, duty and respect as future members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.]]>

Photo: Cadet recruit reports on Matriculation Day 2019

The Citadel Class of 2023 cadet recruits report to campus Saturday, August 17 between 7 – 9:30 a.m. More than 700 men and women from over 40 states and four countries check in to begin their college careers at the U.S. News & World Report #1 public college in the South.

The freshmen recruits’ processing begins at the Holiday Alumni Center where they receive their company and barrack room assignments. Then they proceed to their home barrack to pick up a set of physical training uniforms and move into their rooms with the help of parents from The Citadel Family Association.

At 10 a.m. the parents must leave the famous red and white checkered quads. The gates to each barrack close. That’s when life as the freshmen have known it becomes very different as they begin to learn about living in the college’s 24/7 military culture.

Matriculation Day inside a barrack at The Citadel

Most members of the class of 2023 were born in the year 2001. That puts them right in the center of Generation Z which is “on track to be the most diverse, best-educated generation yet,” according to Pew Research Center. These post-Millennials were born just before or after the 9/11 attacks and many witnessed their family’s financial challenges created by the Great Recession of the late 2000s.

The freshmen enter college at a time when they can select from the most robust menu of academic programs available at the Citadel, the newest among them being computer engineering, finance, nursing and supply chain management. Cadet academic areas of study anticipated to be among the most popular include business administration, engineering, intelligence and security studies, cyber security, criminal justice, political science and biology.

Cadet recruits at The Citadel getting fitted for uniforms
Cadet recruits at The Citadel getting fitted for uniforms

Approximately 30% of the class of 2023 will earn commissions as military officers at graduation.

An estimated 25% will study abroad in at least one of 23 countries where The Citadel offers programs.

Watch live stream of Oath Ceremony

The Oath Ceremony for The Citadel Class of 2023 will be live streamed on the college’s Facebook page and on YouTube beginning at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 19. The class will stand on Summerall Field and take an oath pledging to abide by the college’s core values of honor, duty and respect as future members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

The cadet recruits will complete the college’s arduous Fourth Class System program March 28, 2020, when they are formally recognized as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets and participate in the Oath Renewal on the Green ceremony at Marion Square in downtown Charleston.

Media notes

Members of the media are welcome on campus Matriculation Day (with an escort from The Citadel Office of Communications and Marketing) from 7:15 – 10:00 a.m. on Saturday Aug. 17. Before arrival, please contact Zach Watson zwatson2@citadel.edu, or text or call 843-814-9410 to get parking and meeting locations.

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The Citadel comes out #1 in research about the “10 Best Value Colleges in South Carolina” https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-1-best-value-south-carolina/ Thu, 15 Aug 2019 13:28:56 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=10073 Internactive list of best value colleges in SCInternactive list of best value colleges in SCThe top three Best Value Colleges in South Carolina on Smartasset's 2019 edition are listed in this order: The Citadel, Clemson University and University of South Carolina.]]> Internactive list of best value colleges in SCInternactive list of best value colleges in SC

As seen on SmartAsset.com

Wondering where you can get a good college education for a decent price? SmartAsset’s interactive map highlights the best value schools. These are the institutions where you get the most bang for your buck.

Smartasset.com

The top three Best Value Colleges in South Carolina on Smartasset’s 2019 edition are listed in this order: The Citadel, Clemson University and University of South Carolina.

The study included tuition, student living costs and the average scholarships and grants offered to students. The Citadel is also listed at the top for the “starting salary” category at an average of $58,800 a year.

*  Smartasset notes that “where applicable, our study used in-state tuition (residents of the same state as a college, qualify for lower in-state tuition)”

Smartasset’s methodology

Earning a college degree can increase your skill set, job prospects and net worth. But with rising college costs, where you choose to get that degree from can make a big difference. SmartAsset looked at five factors to determine the best value colleges and universities: tuition, student living costs, scholarship and grant offerings, retention rate and starting salary.

To capture the true cost of attending a school, we included the tuition (using in-state tuition for public schools where applicable), student living costs (including room and board, books, supplies, transportation and other personal expenses) and the average scholarships and grants offered to students of the school.

To capture what students get in return, we looked at student retention rate (the percent of students that re-enrolled at the institution the following year) and the average starting salary.

We gave 25% weighting to starting salary, tuition and living costs. We then gave 12.5% weighting to scholarships and grants, as well as student retention rate, to come up with a ranking of schools in our analysis. With that ranking, we created an index (a sort of grading on a curve) where the number one school was assigned 100.

Smartasset.com

Detailed ranking information and an interactive map can be found here.

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Crucible-like training at Parris Island instills professional leadership in Citadel cadets https://today.citadel.edu/crucible-like-training-at-parris-island-instills-professional-leadership-responses-in-citadel-cadets/ Wed, 14 Aug 2019 13:09:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9945 Cadre training at Parris IslandCadre training at Parris Island"Nobody trains cadets to be leaders like The Citadel does, but being at Parris Island this year raised the experience for our cadre to a new level," said Capt. Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.), commandant of cadets at The Citadel.]]> Cadre training at Parris IslandCadre training at Parris Island

The cadre consists of about 500 cadets who are tasked with helping shape The Citadel’s recruits, or freshmen, into full fledged members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

Under the guidance of cadet officers, the cadre oversee almost every step a freshman takes from Matriculation Day in August until Corps Day in the spring. That’s when the recruits are formally recognized as part of the Corps.

This year, the cadre got a surprise.

Early morning arrival at Parris Island for The Citadel cadre

“They didn’t know they were going to be trained at Parris Island until about 0400 when their very long day of training began,” said Capt. Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.), commandant of cadets at The Citadel. “When you think of U.S. military training, you think of Parris Island — and it doesn’t get any tougher. There was a lot of excitement and some serious nervousness when we told the cadets that’s where we were headed.”

Citadel cadet Zachary Henriquez, junior cadres sergeant, from Staten Island, New York

“We thought Marines were going to storm the bus and start yelling as soon as we arrived at Parris Island, kind of like basic training,” said Zachary Henriquez, a junior cadre sergeant from Staten Island, New York. “Everyone was fired up.”

The Cadre Leadership Reaction Course at Parris Island is unique to The Citadel, arranged by Paluso with the assistance of the Marines and a contracted team of special forces leadership trainers. Similar training was held in years past on campus or at the beach, but this was decidedly different.

The Citadel Cadre, Parris Island, teamwork to move up and over obstacle

“Nobody trains cadets to be leaders like The Citadel does, but being at Parris Island this year raised the experience for our cadre to a new level,” Paluso added.

All day.

Five event stations.

Dozens of cadet teams working together.

A shorter version of the 50-plus hour Marine Crucible.

Citadel cadets practice close contact combat training in the octagon at Parris Island

From close contact combat with pugil sticks in the Parris Island octagon, to problem-solving the delivery of “sensitive material” over obstacles, every element of the course was constructed with purpose. Every interaction was designed to be physically, mentally and emotionally taxing.

The intent: building trust, moral courage and thoughtful, but instinctive leadership responses.

Citadel cadet cadre member jumps through the air in a team-building trust exercise at Parris Island
Team building training exercise at Parris Island

“You are responsible for the very intentional and very professional training of the next class. Those you train will not be in your company, which is also intentional,” Paluso said. “It should be a badge of pride over the year to watch your cadet recruits excel across campus. It will reflect your success as a leader.”

Henriquez, who serves in the South Carolina National Guard in addition to being a cadet at The Citadel, has been through basic training but believes this day was beneficial for all who participated, whether they go into the military for their career or not.

Citadel Cadre training at Parris Island

“In the end, the heat had to be the hardest thing. It was pretty brutal. But, my biggest takeaway was that good ideas can come from anyone, including people with lower rank. Also, leaders just can’t blindly run into things. We have to take a deep breath, think about a plan for the team and then execute that plan.”

“We are grateful to The Citadel Class of 1970 for endowing our ongoing cadre training initiative,” Paluso added. “Now we can go forward year after year to train these young South Carolina Corps of Cadets leaders so they can be as professional and effective as possible.”

Repelling tower at USMC Parris Island
The Citadel Cadre at Parris Island repelling tower
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Double-Edged Role of Leaders, J. Goosby Smith of The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/double-edged-role-of-leaders-j-goosby-smith-of-the-citadel/ Wed, 14 Aug 2019 10:00:56 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=10008 J. Goosby Smith, Associate Professor of Leadership at The Citadel, discusses the double-edged role leaders have and the duties that come with that.]]>

As seen on Charleston CEO

J. Goosby Smith, Associate Professor of Leadership at The Citadel, discusses the double-edged role leaders have and the duties that come with that.

View video »

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Family of Marine missing in the Sierras since February wants to resume search now that snow has melted https://today.citadel.edu/family-of-marine-missing-in-the-sierras-since-february-wants-to-resume-search-now-that-snow-has-melted/ Mon, 12 Aug 2019 20:31:44 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=10002 Lt. Matthew Kraft is seen here hiking with his mother, Roxanne Kraft in Virginia. (Courtesy: the Kraft family)Lt. Matthew Kraft is seen here hiking with his mother, Roxanne Kraft in Virginia. (Courtesy: the Kraft family)For five months Greg Kraft, his wife Roxanne and other family members have been waiting and hoping that Matthew’s body would be found.]]> Lt. Matthew Kraft is seen here hiking with his mother, Roxanne Kraft in Virginia. (Courtesy: the Kraft family)Lt. Matthew Kraft is seen here hiking with his mother, Roxanne Kraft in Virginia. (Courtesy: the Kraft family)

Photo: Lt. Matthew Kraft is seen here hiking with his mother, Roxanne Kraft in Virginia. (Courtesy of the Kraft family)

(Note: 1st Lt. Matthew Kraft is a Citadel Class of 2016 alumnus.)

As seen in the Orange County Register, by Erika Ritchie

When a massive multi-agency aerial search in the High Sierras revealed heat coming from a snow-covered location along the Sierra High Route, family members of 1st Lt. Matthew Kraft were hopeful.

The infantry Marine, a platoon leader with the 1st Battalion/7th Marines at Twentynine Palms based out of Camp Pendleton, had undertaken a two-week backcountry ski trip along the 195-mile route beginning in the Inyo Forest near Lone Pine. The trip, which started Feb. 24 was to be done over 10 days, and Kraft, 24, notified family and the Marine Corps that he expected to arrive at Bridgeport March 4 or 5.

When Kraft didn’t arrive as planned, a search began.

Thermal imaging from low-flying aircraft picked up a heat spot. But upon closer inspection, search crews found it was a hibernating bear.

“That’s when I came to grips with it,” said Greg Kraft, Matthew’s father. “It’s also the day (March 15) the Marine Corps calls the date of death.”

Following that discovery — an effort that included Marines from the Mountain Warfare Training Center in Bridgeport and 13 agencies covering an area larger than the state of Rhode Island  — was designated a limited search because of backcountry snow instability, high winds and avalanche danger.

For five months Greg Kraft, his wife Roxanne and other family members have been waiting and hoping that Matthew’s body would be found.

“We are all broken,” Greg Kraft said. “We love that kid.”

Now, with most of the snow melted and the granite rocks exposed along the remote sub-alpine terrain, they are hopeful that a renewed search might put an end to their wait.

Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks officials have handed out fliers to hikers along the Sierra High Route identifying items Kraft might have had on the hike — an Otter iPhone case, Oakley sunglasses and a Katadyn water filtration system.

“I’d hope for boots on the ground, starting from the point of origin and then following the route,” said Greg Kraft. “I don’t want to put anyone in danger and I’ve been told most of it is rock. I would love for a team to start walking the path.”

Officials believe his son is most likely somewhere in the Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks, Greg Kraft said. The first six miles of the route went through Inyo County, with the parkland next. Matthew Kraft planned to end the route in Mono County, but officials don’t think he made it that far, his father said.

Greg Kraft is also hopeful the Marine Corps might get involved in the search again. He credits the Marines for their excellence and professionalism during the week-long effort earlier this year. Then, Marines from Bridgeport searched along the route and military aircraft flew “low and slow” so Kraft, if alive, could make contact.

“The Marine Corps cannot get involved unless they’re officially asked,” he said. “I’ve expressed my desire that they be asked.”

First Lt. Cameron Edinburgh said earlier this week that the Marine Corps will not give up on recovering Kraft.

“The limited search is still ongoing but there haven’t been any substantive clues,” he said, adding that a unit of Marines from the 1st Division is on standby if they are called to go up.

If a larger search is undertaken, Andrew Skurka, a backpacking guide familiar with the Sierra High Route, said now is the time, though the terrain is exposed to intense sun and afternoon thunderstorms are possible.

“The terrain is rocky, it’s basically a huge piece of granite with trees on top,” he said. “There are granite slabs that look like huge, tilted sidewalks and there are ledge systems that are steep granite steps that could be as high as five and 10 feet each. There are also refrigerator-sized boulders that have piled up.”

Finding Kraft could be complicated by the way the route changes in summer, Skurka said. A line that Kraft may have skied and hiked during wintertime, may not be the obvious route now. It also might depend on what actually happened to the Marine. If he was struck by an avalanche, he might be found but if he died from exposure and fell victim to the animals in the wilderness, it could be more difficult.

“It’s a needle in a haystack,” Skurka said, adding that in some past cases people weren’t found for years. “They may get lucky and a hiker could find him or they need to dedicate a huge amount of resources.”

Greg Kraft said he was unhappy when his son decided to undertake the hike because of the risk. But he said Matthew Kraft was bound and determined to do it and wanted to take advantage of getting two weeks off before pre-deployment. Matthew was an avid mountaineer and had hiked the Cohos Trail that goes from New Hampshire to Canada in 14 days. He hiked 40 peaks in the White Mountains and had plans to hike the Appalachian Trail.

“That kid was in terrific shape,” Greg Kraft said. “He was the guy to beat, his fellow Marines said.”

“During every 96-hour leave, he’d hike into the mountains,” he added. “Matt took on this hike to become a better Marine. Everything he did was to become a better leader. He wanted to become a career Marine.”

Greg Kraft said his son decided in 10th grade that he wanted to become a Marine while going to Kent School, a private college preparatory school in Connecticut. He graduated as an officer from the Citadel in 2016. Following his death, the Marine Corps posthumously promoted him to the rank of captain.

“He told me he wanted to join the Marines to surround himself with excellence,” his father said.

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American football in Turkey? It’s a thing, a former Citadel standout learned https://today.citadel.edu/american-football-in-turkey-its-a-thing-a-former-citadel-standout-learned/ Sun, 11 Aug 2019 10:00:37 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9962 Jackson, a 2017 graduate of The Citadel, is back home in Mobile, Ala., after playing a season of professional American football in Turkey. ]]>

Photo: Former Citadel standout Cam Jackson spent the last five months playing pro football in Turkey.

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Jeff Hartsell

After a five-month sojourn in Turkey, Cam Jackson returned to his Alabama hometown with an MVP award, hundreds of pictures and memories, and a fondness for künefe.

“Oh man, I wish I could describe it,” the former Citadel football standout says of the Turkish dessert pastry. “It’s like crispy on the outside, with cinnamon and sweet cheese on the inside. And on the top, it’s sprinkled with pistachio nuts.

“I’ve been searching for it since I got back, and the closest place with a good review is in Miami. That might be too far to go, even for some künefe.”

Jackson, a 2017 graduate of The Citadel, is back home in Mobile, Ala., after playing a season of professional American football in Turkey. The 6-2, 205-pounder led his team, the ODTÜ Falcons, to the championship game of the Turkish American Football League, earning MVP honors for the Falcons.

It was the experience of a lifetime, said Jackson, who starred at slotback for The Citadel teams that won Southern Conference titles in 2015 and 2016.

“I’m telling all the young guys at The Citadel, if your body allows you to play, you should definitely do it,” said Jackson, who ended his career with the second-best rushing average (7.44 yards per attempt) in school history. “It’s a great way to continue to play the game you love and experience something different.”

Jackson had originally hoped to play for a team in Germany last season, but found himself scrambling after those plans fell through last November. That’s when a coach from the ODTÜ team in Ankara, the capital city of Turkey, reached out to him.

“I wasn’t even thinking of Turkey,” Jackson said. “I didn’t even really know if they played American football there.”

Football in Turkey

Soccer and wrestling are the national sporting obsessions in Turkey, the only secular democracy in the Muslim world. American football in the country of some 83 million people dates back to 1987, when American Navy men played a pickup game against Turkish students at Bogazici University in Istanbul.

The students formed a club team, the Bogazici Sultans, and word of the new game spread to other universities. The Turkish American Football League was founded in 2005, and now includes teams such as the Koc Rams, the ITU Hornets, Bogazici Sultans, Uludag Timsahlar, Anadolu Rangers, Gazi Warriors, and the Sakarya Tatankalari.

American football leagues are also cropping up in Egypt, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates.

In Turkey, each team is limited to five “imports”, or non-Turkish players, including three Americans, Jackson said.

Former Citadel standout Cam Jackson played a game in the snow during his stint in Turkey.
Former Citadel standout Cam Jackson played a game in the snow during his stint in Turkey.

“The teams there could probably compete with Division II schools, for sure,” Jackson said. “We weren’t the best team in the league, but I felt like we were the most physical, and we played together as a team.”

Jackson’s team, the Falcons, had only two American players, including receiver Exavier Edwards from Midland University, an NAIA school in Nebraska.

“You could only have three imports on the field at one time, and most teams maxed it out,” Jackson said. “But we only had two, and we both played both ways a lot.”

Jackson played quarterback, receiver, running back, kick returner and defensive back for the Falcons, making the game-sealing interception in the victory that clinched a berth in the championship game.

Jackson said the best teams in the league drew crowds comparable to high school games in the U.S. In his second game in Turkey, the team played in the snow.

“I’d only seen snow three times in my life,” he said. “It was getting in my eyes, on my hands. It was tough, but it was a cool experience.”

Life in Turkey

Jackson lived in an apartment near the campus of OTDÜ, a university in Ankara, a city of almost 10 million people located in central Turkey. He and Edwards were roommates, along with a Turkish student who also played football.

Coaches warned Jackson that he would draw attention in Turkey, and they were right.

Citadel graduate Cam Jackson enjoying the sights in Turkey.
Citadel graduate Cam Jackson enjoying the sights in Turkey.

“The people were really friendly and open and very helpful,” he said. “But when I got there, the coaches told me people would stare at me. But it’s not a bad stare, it’s more of a curious stare.

“I definitely got a lot of that. I mean, you are tall and black, but not like African, and muscular. Those things make you stick out like a sore thumb. So people stare at you, but it’s sort of like a celebrity thing.”

And then there was the food.

“I was blown away,” Jackson said. “That’s the first thing people told me, you’ve got to try the food. And I was like, man, it doesn’t look appetizing at all. But it was probably the best food I’ve ever had in my life. All fresh, nothing processed.

“And the fruit … I came back home and ate fruit, and it doesn’t taste the same. I think Turkey may have messed up fruit for me for the rest of my life.”

Former Citadel football player Cam Jackson loved the food during his stay in Turkey.
Former Citadel football player Cam Jackson loved the food during his stay in Turkey.

Jackson traveled with the team and on his own in Turkey, including a memorable trip to Cappadocia, an area known for its unique geological formations known as “fairy chimneys.” Early peoples dug into the soft, volcanic ash to form caves and underground cities, used as hiding places by early Christians. It’s also noted for hot-air ballooning.

“You wake up at 5 in the morning, and the sky is filled with hot-air balloons,” he said. “It’s like a moving picture. I’d put that up there with seeing the Eiffel Tower sparkle at night as two of the most amazing things I’ve seen in my life.”

Pro future

Jackson’s success in Turkey has raised his profile in international football circles, and he’s hoping to play next season in Europe.

Cam Jackson tries on a turban in Turkey.
Cam Jackson tries on a turban in Turkey.

“I definitely plan on playing again,” he said. “Being over there got me a lot of exposure, so now I’m looking at Italy, because I’d like to travel around Italy. I have heard a lot of good things about Spain, and they say Germany has the best competition.

“As long as I can keep playing the sport I love, I want to do it.”

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SC’s New Deal-era projects, murals and parks are everywhere, but a few have vanished https://today.citadel.edu/scs-new-deal-era-projects-murals-and-parks-are-everywhere-but-a-few-have-vanished/ Sat, 10 Aug 2019 10:00:50 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9904 Original Law Barracks, Citadel ArchivesOriginal Law Barracks, Citadel ArchivesKerry Taylor, Ph.D. history professor at The Citadel, recognizes that the college has the New Deal to thank for much of its campus along the Ashley River.]]> Original Law Barracks, Citadel ArchivesOriginal Law Barracks, Citadel Archives

Photo: Original Law Barracks, from The Citadel Archives

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Thomas Novelly

The historic Dock Street Theatre, known as America’s First Theater, in Charleston was the subject of a massive Federal Emergency Administration and Works Progress Administration renovation project between 1935 and 1937. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)
The historic Dock Street Theatre, known as America’s First Theater, in Charleston was the subject of a massive Federal Emergency Administration and Works Progress Administration renovation project between 1935 and 1937. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)

Hanging above the heads of customers in Kingstree’s aging post office is an 80-year-old mural depicting acres of golden rice fields.

Created in 1939 by Queens, New York-based artist Arnold Friedman, a modernist painter, the image might seem out of place to locals trying to purchase stamps.

But this mural is a survivor, one of 14 works of art that have outlasted decades of remodeling in schools and post offices across South Carolina. It’s a symbol and a relic of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal and the overwhelming economic and cultural impact its programs still have on the Palmetto State.

The Robert Mills Manor public housing project in Charleston was constructed with Public Works Administration money in 1940. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)
The Robert Mills Manor public housing project in Charleston was constructed with Public Works Administration money in 1940. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)

“It was highly successful. It was an important stimulus to the South Carolina economy,” said Robert Waller, a retired professor of history from Clemson University and an expert on the New Deal. “Most of those buildings that they built in the ’30s are still in use and still standing today.” 

It’s difficult to know the exact number of New Deal projects that were produced as a result of the estimated $42 billion spent nationwide on recovering from the Great Depression. But scholars at the University of California in Berkeley have painstakingly cataloged many buildings, parks and murals created in the United States, including more than 100 in South Carolina. 

“The total number of New Deal structures in South Carolina, either originally constructed or still standing, is unknown, and it would take a very large amount of research to get reasonably accurate numbers,” Brent McKee, a scholar with the Living New Deal project, said. “The Living New Deal has documented 130 projects, most still existing.”

The creation of Lakes Marion and Moultrie and the Santee Cooper utility that lit up the state’s countryside was a massive New Deal project. The sprawling 5,000-acre Hunting Island State Park that attracts more than a million visitors a year was created by the Civilian Conservation Corps. The McKissick Museum, located in the heart of the University of South Carolina, was built by a federal government program to serve as the school’s library before it became an establishment recognized for its renowned Southern folk life collection.

Many South Carolina residents frequent several of them a month, for leisure or business. And while not immune to development, remodeling or demolition, very few of the projects identified by Berkeley’s Living New Deal Project have vanished. 

The Old Marine Hospital predates the Robert Mills Manor public housing project in Charleston that was constructed with Public Works Administration money in 1940. The old hospital now houses the Charleston Housing Authority. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)
The Old Marine Hospital predates the Robert Mills Manor public housing project in Charleston that was constructed with Public Works Administration money in 1940. The old hospital now houses the Charleston Housing Authority. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)

Charleston’s New Deal survivors 

The financial wave caused by the stock market collapse in October 1929 hit South Carolina hard.

“South Carolina was and is impoverished, poorer than a lot of the other states,” said Kerry Taylor, an associate history professor at The Citadel. “In a way, the Roaring ’20s missed South Carolina.”

In Taylor’s book “Charleston and the Great Depression,” he looks at old City Council meeting minutes and correspondence to get the pulse of Charleston’s woes. South Carolina’s economy had experienced nearly a decade of struggle after the pesky boll weevil insect put a heavy dent in the state’s agriculture and cotton markets. The collapse of Wall Street was seemingly a nail in the coffin for some. 

Charleston’s West Point Rice Mill was being transformed in the mid 1930s into a Municipal Yacht Basin. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)
Charleston’s West Point Rice Mill was being transformed in the mid 1930s into a Municipal Yacht Basin. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)

Children in one Charleston family would devour donated potatoes “as others would eat ice cream cones,” Taylor reported. Another family was “kept alive principally on a quart of milk furnished by a dairy and two quarts of skimmed milk furnished from other sources.”

One resident, J.C. Driggers, wrote a line to Roosevelt when he was a presidential candidate where he parodied Psalm 23: “My expenses runneth over, surely my unemployment and poverty will follow me all the days of my life And I will dwell in the house of poverty forever. Amen.”

Soon after Roosevelt’s election, he got to work on passing a multitude of economic reforms and stimulus packages. Of the 130 New Deal projects identified in the state, at least eight were in Charleston. 

What is now the Palace Apartments on upper King Street was once the former Charleston County Hall. The WPA spent $250,000 to convert the building into a multi-use facility for basketball, boxing, tennis, indoor track, concerts and dances. Professional wrestling also was held inside the building for years. 

The Planter’s Hotel on Church Street likely would have fallen into disrepair if not for a WPA project that remade it as the Dock Street Theatre. Following a $350,000 renovation, the new theater in Charleston’s French Quarter opened and remains one of the city’s most popular and iconic venues.

The College of Charleston’s Student Activities Building and Gymnasium was funded by the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works in 1938 and even featured dorm rooms for out-of-county basketball players. It later was renovated and renamed the Willard A. Silcox Physical Education and Health Center.

The Citadel Chapel was built in 1939 with funds appropriated by the S.C. State Legislature and a Public Works Administration grant. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)
The Citadel Chapel was built in 1939 with funds appropriated by the S.C. State Legislature and a Public Works Administration grant. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)

Taylor recognized that even his own university, The Citadel, has the New Deal to thank for much of its campus, which was relocated from Marion Square to its current Ashley River location just years before Roosevelt’s election.

Both the barracks and the chapel were a part of a $250,000 construction undertaking. Taylor pointed out that despite the overwhelming conservative political views from The Citadel’s student body, the campus would look completely different without one of the most progressive government projects in American history. 

“Half of The Citadel was built with New Deal money,” Taylor said. “The modern campus as we know it was the result of this democratic program. It kept this campus open.”

The original Law Barracks at the Citadel were built in 1939 with funds appropriated by the S.C. State Legislature and a Public Works Administration grant. The barracks were torn down and replaced with a new barracks in 2007. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)
The original Law Barracks at the Citadel were built in 1939 with funds appropriated by the S.C. State Legislature and a Public Works Administration grant. The barracks were torn down and replaced with a new barracks in 2007. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier)

Nature’s splendor and fading ink

Perhaps the largest impact on South Carolina was the creation of its most noteworthy state parks. 

At least 16 parks were created when the Civilian Conservation Corps began work. Waller, in his book “Relief, Recreation, Racism: Civilian Conservation Corps Creates South Carolina State Parks” details the $57 million spent and the work done by 99 CCC camps during the New Deal-era. 

Their work includes the notable beach parks at Edisto Island and Myrtle Beach. Table Rock State Park, home to one of the state’s tallest mountains, was also a part of the undertaking. 

“They tried to have a state park within 75 miles of every major population area,” Waller said. “It was a success.”

Today, there are 47 state parks in the Palmetto State, and the South Carolina Park Service has generated a record amount of revenue, $34 million for 201819, for the second year in a row. 

The creation of Santee Cooper in Moncks Corner was perhaps the most influential project of the New Deal. The utility created and distributed power from hydroelectric dams at the newly created Lakes Marion and Moultrie. 

“Santee Cooper really brought South Carolina into the 20th century,” Taylor said. “It’s impact was tremendous and ongoing in terms of developing economic stability.”

While most of South Carolina’s New Deal buildings still stand, a few others have not survived the test of time. 

The federal Public Works Administration contributed to the development of Rock Hill’s Arcade-Victoria School, which has since been demolished. The nearby Central School, Northside School and Emmett Scott High School, also New Deal projects, met the same fate.

Some murals have disappeared. Others have found new life. A painting inside the former Summerville post office, an oil-on-canvas mural of residents in Victorian garb boarding a train was painted by Bernadine Custer, managed to outlive the civic building. The building itself is being turned into a creative hub with exhibits, private studio spaces, classrooms and an outdoor stage. 

The former post office hopes to be a home for future, civic-minded painters and emerging artists.

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The Citadel making it easier for business majors at 2-year schools to get a 4-year diploma https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-making-it-easier-for-business-majors-at-2-year-schools-to-get-a-4-year-diploma/ Fri, 09 Aug 2019 10:00:24 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9885 The Citadel is looking to expand enrollment in its business administration major under new transfer agreements with two-year colleges around the Southeast.]]>

Photo: Students attending classes through the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

As seen in The Post and Courier, by John McDermott

The Citadel is looking to expand enrollment in its business administration major under new transfer agreements with two-year colleges around the Southeast.

The partnerships will allow eligible students from 27 other public schools to earn a four-year bachelor’s degree from the Charleston military college.

The agreements include colleges in six southern states. They allow qualifying students who are pursuing or have already earned an associate’s degree in business automatic acceptance into the Baker School of Business. Their credits will be transferred “seamlessly,” according to a written statement from The Citadel on Monday.

The participants will be enrolled in civilian classes separate from the Corps of Cadets. They can study online, on campus or both.

“We are excited to support the advancement of business students … through these agreements,” said Jeremy Bennet, director of the degree completion program at The Citadel. “Our program is designed to meet the needs of those students while allowing them to stay in their communities. Students in these two-year programs will have shown the dedication needed to complete their associate degrees. Now, they won’t have to sacrifice credits when transferring to The Citadel.”

The new offering includes “a transfer course equivalency table” that spells out which specific classes students must complete in order to make the transition to the four-year business administration program.

Eight South Carolina schools are making the four-year diploma option available, including Trident Technical College in the Charleston region.

The others around the state are Aiken Technical College, Greenville Technical College, Horry Georgetown Technical College, Midlands Technical College, Northeastern Technical College, Technical College of the Lowcountry and Williamsburg Technical College.

Two-year schools in Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia also are participating.

“The best educational pathways in our state result from partnerships, and our agreement with The Citadel is a perfect example,” said Jermaine Whirl, vice president of learning and workforce development at Greenville Tech.

Information about the cost was not immediately available.

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