COVID-19 – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 17 Dec 2020 21:19:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png COVID-19 – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Tis the season: cadets share holiday thoughts and traditions https://today.citadel.edu/tis-the-season-cadets-share-holiday-thoughts-and-traditions/ Sat, 19 Dec 2020 17:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21150 Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019When you are kind, when you treat people with respect and show that you care about them, it goes a very long way.]]> Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019

Photo above: Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019

By Cadet Samantha Walton, Regimental Public Affairs NCO

Cadet Samantha Walton

I’m Samantha Walton. I am a junior, the Regimental Public Affairs NCO for the 2020-21 academic year, and am majoring in Political Science.

I am home in Macon, Georgia with my family for the our Winter Furlough from campus.

Christmas is a very important time for me as a Christian, as an individual, and as a member of The Citadel Gospel Choir.

I also appreciate the differences of my fellow students in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. We don’t all see this season in the same way.

As part of my role as Regimental Public Affairs NCO I work to keep cadets connected through communications and stories. This time, I asked a few cadets to share their thoughts about the holiday season after we all left campus for the break. This is what they emailed back to me.

Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu

Junior, Construction Engineering Major
Taiwan

Favorite holiday song?
My favorite holiday song is “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” because it is very jolly.

A tradition you cherish?
In Taiwan, most people don’t really celebrate Christmas as our holiday, but we do occasionally exchange gifts for fun and sharing joy.

Fondest holiday memory?
I remember when I was little, my dad came home very late once on Christmas eve, dressed up as Santa Claus, and gave me and my brothers presents. This was a special memory because we really didn’t normally celebrate Christmas. And last year I took an amazing trip to Austria.

Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019
Citadel Cadet Pei Hsuan Lu, on winter furlough in Austria in 2019

Looking forward to?
I look forward to the decorations everywhere when in America with my host family. It is so magical to see all the lights, Christmas trees, and decorations everywhere you go. Additionally, I was looking forward to going home to Taiwan, but due to COVID-19 I am staying with my host family.

Caring for others in this challenging time?
I am helping my host family move to a new home, gathering things and delivering them for donations, and packing up.

Religious traditions?
I am not religious.

On your wish list?
A Netflix marathon!


Cadet Natalie Stewart, USMC contract

Sophomore, Psychology Major
Las Vegas, Nevada

Cadet Natalie Stewart’s Christmas tree and family dog

Favorite holiday song?
Happy Christmas by John Lennon

A tradition you cherish?
On Christmas my mom, sister and I sit in the living room together and share lots of love. We eat cookies, wear fuzzy pajamas, and spend time together.

Fondest holiday memory?
My fondest holiday memory is when I came home for Winter Furlough from my knob year. I hadn’t seen my family since I left for matriculation, since they live so far away. I remember coming home to my mom and sister, and I felt an immense rush of joy when they hugged me. 

This year we are taking extra precautions to keep my grandparents safe and ordering our gifts all online.

Looking forward to?
I am looking forward to relaxing and spending lots of time with my family and dogs. Since there isn’t much to do with COVID-19 regulations, we will all be home together this Christmas. I hope to make some cookies with my sister! 

Religious traditions?
My family isn’t a specific religion, but we always express the importance of spreading kindness and acceptance in the world. 

On your wish list?
I asked for a new pair of glasses and a watch. I’ll be going into 2021 with 20/20 vision – ha!

Band Company cadet Natalie Stewart prepares supplies before knob arrivals during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel.

Caring for others in this challenging time?
I think the first thing we can do as individuals is spread kindness and love (especially in times like these). For those who are able, there are programs you can reach out to, where you can help others in need. Having open arms (6ft away of course) and recognizing each other’s individual needs can go a long way.

I went through my closet the other day, and I posted what I gathered on my neighborhood page. I was glad I found some people my age who were in need of some clothes. We also got in touch with a local church, where you can “adopt a family” and it allows you to help out a family in need. 

“Use your voice for kindness, your ears for compassion, your hands for charity, your mind for truth, and your heart for love” – Anonymous (Buddhist quote)

Jaret Sean Price

Junior, Exercise Science Major
Aiken, South Carolina

Favorite holiday song?
Little Saint Nick by the Beach Boys

A tradition you cherish?
A tradition that I cherish is that every Christmas Eve after dinner my brother, sister, and I each open an ornament given to us by my Mom and Dad to hang on the family Christmas tree. This was something my Mom did as a little girl with her parents and carried it over when I was born. I hope one day I can continue this family tradition when I have children of my own.

Fondest holiday memory?
I don’t really have a fondest holiday memory. I just enjoy being home with my family and living in the “now.” Every Christmas leaves me with a new memory, and if I were asked what I remember from a certain Christmas then I’d be able to answer with a smile.

Looking forward to?
Each year I look forward to coming home from The Citadel for Winter Furlough and walking into the house to see that my parents have put up all 25 Christmas trees. Each Christmas tree, of course, has its own theme.

The COVID-19 pandemic really isn’t changing how we celebrate the holidays. We’re wearing masks, but still celebrating.

Religious traditions?
We put up my great-grandfathers manger and Nativity Scene that he built and the figurines my great-grandmother painted.

On your wish list?
Not much, just some closes and little things.

Caring for others in this challenging time?
Every Christmas season we do a sweep of clothes that we don’t wear anymore or that are too small on my younger siblings. Those clothes are collected and are taken to the local Goodwill for people who will need them.

When you are kind, when you treat people with respect and show that you care about them, it goes a very long way. As a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets I remember people who were kind and caring towards me, who took the time out of their day to check on me. That is someone I want to be, something that I don’t ever want to steer away from; and I truly believe that all Cadets are capable to doing this.

Freshmen on Matriculation Day 2020

James Hayes III
Freshman, Civil Engineering Major
Ridgeland, South Carolina

Favorite holiday song?
“This Christmas” by Donny Hathaway. We always play this song during the Christmas season.

A tradition you cherish?
A tradition I cherish is when my family goes to my grandparents’ house. We all go there and eat good food, open gifts, and have great fellowship. It’s something I look forward to every year. Unfortunately with the pandemic I don’t think we can all go be with my grandparents.

Fondest holiday memory?
My grandma’s sweet potato pie. It’s a staple during the holiday season

Looking forward to?
I’m looking forward to spending time with my family and friends. I also like to fish so I’m looking forward to that as well.

I am also looking forward to going back to campus in January, but I hope we can have more interaction with our peers, though I know the restrictions were meant to keep us from getting COVID-19. I really enjoyed the battalion cookout we had before we left for furlough. I think doing more of those throughout the year would help a lot.

On your wish list?
I would like to get a guitar and keyboard piano because I started practicing on those instruments this past semester at The Citadel. 

Caring for others in this challenging time?
We are getting gifts for people at the homeless shelters. We are also taking some of our extra clothes and jackets there for people to use this winter.

Candles line the aisle at The Citadel Christmas Candlelight services
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Citadel completes in-person fall semester https://today.citadel.edu/battle-posture-leads-to-mission-focused-fall-despite-historic-pandemic/ Thu, 10 Dec 2020 21:52:46 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20619 "We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our 177-year history."]]>

College’s mission focus overcomes pandemic

Operation Fall Return, a campus-wide effort encompassing every member of The Citadel campus community, set the conditions to accomplish the mission of completing fall semester in person, despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It is our duty to protect ourselves and others from COVID-19,” became the mantra, based on the college’s core values of honor, duty and respect.

College and Corps leadership — along with support teams — collaborated to set, adjust and maintain conditions allowing cadets, students, faculty and staff to be on campus beginning in mid-August, until the Corps started winter furlough Nov. 24 and faculty and staff depart for the holidays December 22.

Kelly Cup practice squads work on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, September 8, 2020.

There would be no break in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets’ Long Grey Line.

I write today as the Corps prepares to depart on winter furlough after one of the most unusual periods in Citadel history. I could not be more pleased with the performance of the Corps. We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our 177-year history. Our students, faculty, staff, and alumni showed what a united campus community can do—it’s inspiring watching everyone doing their part. The success we’ve achieved is only possible with everyone adapting and overcoming. 

The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.) in a letter to the campus community, November 20, 2020

Staging the base of fire

The objectives centered on the delivery of top-quality instruction coupled with continuing the in-person military training required for all cadets. The in-person training is mission critical for freshmen, who could not be recognized as members of the Corps in the spring without completing rigorous training objectives designed to develop them to assume leadership roles later in their cadet careers.

Ray Cervantes, contract manager for The Budd Group, demonstrates a backpack atomizer, which can clean an entire barracks in four hours, in Daniel Library at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, June 23, 2020.

Strict protocols were put in place for cadets and for all members of the campus community to protect the health of The Citadel family.

Examples of operational elements include the following, some of which remained in place all semester:

Freshmen socially distanced in chairs with face masks second day of challenge week Class of 2024 at The Citadel
Freshmen socially distanced in chairs with face masks second day of challenge week Class of 2024 at The Citadel

Matriculation Day, August 8

Foxtrot Company commander Alfred Gregg descends the stairs in Padgett-Thomas Barracks during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

The Matriculation Day process is usually completed in about two hours, but was stretched out to twelve to ensure social distancing.

Members of the Class of 2024 arrived on campus, said their goodbyes to their family at the curb, and had their temperatures checked before processing.

Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

Approximately 700 knobs matriculated, a class size mirroring those in non-pandemic years.

Mike Company XO Kenneth Spurlock checks with knobs to make sure they have their barbershop tickets in Padgett-Thomas Barracks during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

Class of 2024 Oath Ceremony and Challenge Week

An especially poignant Oath Ceremony was held on Summerall Field for the freshmen — with drone footage from above — showing the many people watching via livestream one of the first groups of college students safely gathered en masse since the pandemic took hold of America in the spring of 2020.

Challenge Week training was underway, with Cadre — the group of upperclassmen tasked with training the knobs — working efficiently to complete all necessary components. They also lived in the same barrack with the freshmen, reducing possible virus transmission from intermixing large groups of cadets.

Cadre lead Knobs from the Class of 2024 in Drill instruction during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, August 13, 2020.

Academics: Flexible and focused

Cadets walk along Jones Avenue at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, November 10, 2020.

Back to class for cadets and students meant alternating in person and remote class days, with many courses divided into two groups to allow for distancing in the classroom.

Led by the Office of the Provost — faculty, cadets and students leaned in, adapting to new technology for teaching and learning.

Dr. Simon Ghanat, teaches a HyFlex environmental engineering course in LeTellier course at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 25, 2020.

“We are so impressed with our faculty, cadets and students and their commitment. They continue to grow and improve within our new hybrid learning model,” said Diana Cheshire, Ph.D., director for the college’s Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching, Learning and Distance Education.

High profile academic engagements for cadets and students continued, including the Baker Business Bowl and competitions for the Citadel Cyber Security Team which “smoked the competition” in one event according to the organizer.

Dr. Cory Nance with members of The Citadel Cybersecurity Club after winning the National Cyber Range Complex “Capture the Flag” context

“The students learn a lot when they apply their skillset in a contest environment that simulates a situation from real world,” said Shankar Banik, Ph.D., professor and head of the Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences and student advisor of The Citadel Cybersecurity Club. “They won the Capture the Flag contest at the National Cyber Range Complex which was a big opportunity for our students to practice their skills in a cyber simulation based on the Department of Defense infrastructure and control systems.”

Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic hosts a “Capture the Flag” cyber competition event

Demonstration of unity and respect

Five rings on Summerall Field — made of members from The Citadel community, linked together — were a visual representation of what unites members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. In October, cadets, faculty and staff gathered, connecting themselves with spirit T-shirts, to stay safely distanced.

The event was conceived by Cadet Hayden Brown, captain of the basketball team, in response to the emotions filled, race-related activism and turmoil the nation saw for many months in 2020.

The Citadel community participates in a Unity Formation on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, October 7, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Despite all of the national attention and conversations surrounding inequities in our country, many remain apathetic. As the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, we are unified in our belief that no member of the Corps is any more important than another.

Cadet Ruby Bolden, regimental public affairs officer, reading the statement of unity on behalf of attendees

ROTC: Advancing future officers

ROTC training and labs moved along in a fashion similar to normal semesters, just in smaller, masked groups with more outdoor activities.

“I continued to be impressed by our Army ROTC Cadets at The Citadel whose performance this semester, in spite of the challenges they and all students face, has been exemplary,” said Col. John Cyrulik, professor of military science at The Citadel, in a statement. “These Army ROTC Cadets are mentally and physically tough, disciplined, and highly motivated. We have trained hard all semester to ensure we remain on-track to commission next year the largest cohort of Army officers from The Citadel since the Vietnam War.”

Senior ring celebrations

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2021 receives their class rings at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 25, 2020.

Though there was not a crowd to cheer them on, the significance of The Citadel Ring Presentation was not diminished for seniors. A livestream provided parents and loved ones the opportunity to view this cherished tradition, and the seniors were celebrated after with a private, outdoor reception.

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2021 receives their class rings during a presentation ceremony adjusted for COVID-19 conditions in McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 25, 2020.

And the juniors, less that a year away from their Ring Day, were able to be sized for their rings in late November to receive next fall.

Cadets from the Class of 2022 are sized for their senior class rings in the Holliday Alumni Center at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, November 17, 2020.

Athletics: Committed to the game

The Citadel football team travels from Charleston, South Carolina to Tampa, Florida in advance of their game against the University of South Florida on Friday, September 11, 2020.

Their commitment to their sport and their teammates meant enduring more than 30 nasal swab COVID-19 tests for each member of the Bulldogs football team — required by the NCAA — as they practiced, traveled and played a limited game schedule with one of the highlights being the game against West point. Plans are underway to play a more complete season in the spring.

The Citadel Volleyball Team poses for their team photograph with Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters ’79, USMC (Retired) in McAlister Field House in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, October 7, 2020.

The other cadet athletes playing indoor sports with contact also endured, and are enduring, numerous coronavirus tests. That isn’t discouraging the basketball team, on a five game winning streak at the time this was published.

Finding the fun

Knobs play intramural kickball on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, August 31, 2020.

To keep the campus community and the Corps energized, a number of COVID-safe activities were held.

Intramural practices and competitions were increased.

Food trucks and games were brought in on the weekends that the Corps didn’t have leave.

And G3, the college’s new bulldog, made his debut.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020.

G3 has a new house he shares with the first team of cadet handlers to hold rank positions related to caring for the beloved mascot.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

G3’s official name, Gen. Mike D. Groshon, will be familiar to many in The Citadel family and in Charleston. He was named for Coach Mike D. Groshon, Citadel Class of 1976, who passed away in 2016, after caring for several generations of mascots.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020.

Servant leadership continuum

Servant leadership looked a bit different throughout the semester, but it did not stop. There was not a traditional Leadership Day…

The Citadel Republican Society places American Flags around Summerall Field in commemoration of the 19th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, September 10, 2020.

…but there was plenty of volunteer service.

Citadel cadets led by Dr. Sarah Imam volunteer with Soldiers’ Angels to Supply Low-Income Veteran Families with Food Assistance at the Elks Lodge in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, October 9, 2020.

The Citadel Health Careers Society turned out to help veterans in need, for example, and the Krause Center of Leadership and Ethics grew its children’s reading initiative and continued organizing COVID-19 safe ways to help the college’s community partners.

Launching three major developments

1. Our Mighty Citadel 2026 strategic plan
The Citadel’s new strategic plan, Our Mighty Citadel 2026, is now in place to serve as the guideline for the college’s evolution. The Citadel Board of Visitors (BOV) voted to approve the plan in September. Academic programing, how the college interacts with the region and the community, and the campus infrastructure are at the center of the plan.

“The Citadel has played a large role in shaping Charleston and South Carolina since its creation 177 years ago, and its new strategic plan is an encouraging sign that will continue to be the case.”

The Post and Courier Editorial Staff

2. Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF, ’77, Center for Climate Studies Climate variability, risks and the advancement of solutions will be the focus of a new, interdisciplinary Center for Climate Studies being established at The Citadel. The Center’s mission will be to promote climate science through education, research, outreach and the development of public-private partnerships, according to Scott Curtis, Ph.D., recently named the Dr. John Lining Professor of Physics and director of the Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF ’77 Center for Climate Studies.

Construction progress on the Swain Boating Center at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

3. Swain Boating Center
The Swain Boating Center at The Citadel is restoring the campus water culture with some major upgrades, thanks to a generous donation from Dr. and Mrs. Christopher C. Swain, Class of 1981. New docks, a picnic pavilion and new equipment including motor and sail boats, kayaks, canoes, paddleboards and fishing gear are being used by cadets, faculty, staff and alumni.

Gospel Choir stays united with virtual performance to close out semester

The Citadel Gospel Choir, directed by their dedicated leader, Momolu Cooper, ’10, records songs in Johnson Hagood Stadium’s club level at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 19, 2020.

One last, revered annual tradition of each fall semester, the Citadel Candlelight Services, cannot take place this Christmas season, but The Citadel Gospel is finding a way to bring joy to others.

The choir, a group that normally performs during the heavily attended Candlelight Services and around the city and state, didn’t let the pandemic stop them. Though their live engagements were cancelled, the devoted members of the choir gathered – with safe distancing – to record a variety of songs. The recordings will be played at events where the choir cannot safely perform.

Cadet Col. Nick Piacentini: maintaining lines of resistance to coronavirus

Almost last because that’s where he’d ask to be, but not least, is a regimental commander leading his 2,300, 18 – 21 year old classmates through their Citadel experience during an unprecedented, sweeping pandemic.

“I am extremely proud of how the cadets have really led themselves when it concerns their duty to follow our COVID-19 protection protocols to keep themselves and others safe. We have a strong team of regimental officers, staff and NCOs and everyone worked to maintain the conditions needed to keep us on campus this fall. We are striving to be an example of what ‘right’ looks like.

To me, being able to complete a face-to-face fall semester shows the kind of person a Citadel cadet is, someone with the grit needed to push through our mission together.”

Cadet Col. Nick Piacentini, Regimental Commander, South Carolina Corps of Cadets

Watch a news report with Piacentini here.

#1 for the 10th year!

And in the midst of it all, The Citadel was ranked #1 Top Public College in the South for the tenth consecutive year by U.S News & World Report.

“We want prospective students to know why The Citadel experience is superior. We encourage high school students and their parents to contact us to discuss what the college offers for their areas of interest in a specially tailored, one-on-one conference, “said Sally Selden, Ph.D., SPHR, provost and dean of The Citadel.

Fall 2020 Photo Gallery

https://www.citadel.edu/root/our-mighty-citadel/nick-piacentini?fbclid=IwAR11EMUNU79B6gT6i4MziFSJbXxL-fmGNASumryuxHd12sARNxum4tMhgiA
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No Stranger to Challenge https://today.citadel.edu/leading-the-corps-during-covid-19/ Thu, 10 Dec 2020 13:23:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21107 Nick Piacentini on leading the Corps during COVID-19Nick Piacentini on leading the Corps during COVID-19Returning to campus during the COVID-19 pandemic was the ultimate team sport, and as Regimental Commander Cadet Col. Nick Piacentini served as team captain.]]> Nick Piacentini on leading the Corps during COVID-19Nick Piacentini on leading the Corps during COVID-19

Nick Piacentini stood in formation on Summerall Field amid the other 2,300 cadets at the February 2018 parade listening to the cadet announcer read Dylan Graham’s MacArthur Award citation. Graham was the regimental commander, the top-ranking member of the Corps of Cadets, and Piacentini was an India Company freshman from Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania.

“I remember hearing his accomplishments—it was this big accumulation, but it wasn’t just his accomplishments,” said Piacentini. “Everybody spoke so highly of him. He was smart, good at PT; he had every reason in the world to brag and be cocky and have a huge head, but he was just this humble guy. And I remember thinking, ‘That’s who I want to be.’”

Last March, as the Corps prepared to depart for spring break, Piacentini waited to hear the results of the rank board selection. When all of the other selected officers received emails, Piacentini started to second guess himself, but then he was called to the commandant’s office. Accompanying the commandant, retired Navy Capt. Geno Paluso, ’89, were 2020 Regimental Commander Cadet Ben Snyder and Regimental Executive Officer Brennen Zeigler. When Zeigler reached out to shake Piacentini’s hand first, Piacentini thought he was being named to the XO position.

“He shook my hand, and when he released it, there in my palm were the three diamonds—the regimental commander’s rank,” said Piacentini.

Paluso said something about the three diamonds that has stayed with Piacentini, especially as he navigates the challenges presented by COVID. “You will earn them every single day,” Piacentini remembers him saying.

Piacentini is no stranger to challenge. A Gold Star student, a member of Junior Sword Arch and the Summerall Guards, and a Navy contract cadet, Piacentini was attracted to The Citadel because it symbolized the pursuit of perfection and attention to detail. He liked being held to standards and trying to exceed them, and he liked the challenge The Citadel presented. And in October, he learned that he had earned a coveted slot to Basic Underwater Demolition SEAL training.

“COVID presents a lot of challenges. Everything we do is constantly reassessed to determine how we can do it in a socially distant manner, with masks on and with capacity limits in mind. Everything from matriculation day to classes; everything from daily formations to meetings, chapel and mess—every operation on campus is completely different based on our reassessment of how we can do it in accordance with COVID guidelines. And it’s been great,” said Piacentini, “because we’ve been able to try different things and realize that those things actually might work better in the future. But we’ve also been able to stay calm, take a step back to reassess and reprogram ourselves to do things a different way, not just how we have traditionally always done it.”

Piacentini’s work and that of the Corps has been tremendous. He’s had to be strategic and think in innovative ways. When other colleges were forced to go online, The Citadel has been able to keep cadets on campus to hold in-person classes and learn from the pandemic.

“COVID has forced me as a leader to constantly evaluate the situation and the risks involved—what’s the right thing to do versus what’s the popular thing to do. It’s prepared me to be a better leader—to tackle situations and issues head-on and not step back or cower because I don’t know the plan, or I’m not sure what’s going to happen in the future.”

Three years ago, when Piacentini vowed to follow in Graham’s footsteps, he never envisioned doing so with a mask on, and that’s made the job even harder, but in his characteristic style, with resilience balanced by humility, Piacentini has met the challenge head on. And that’s made all the difference.

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The Citadel looks to prevent spreading COVID amid holiday travel https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-looks-to-prevent-spreading-covid-amid-holiday-travel/ Mon, 23 Nov 2020 22:02:04 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20406 All year long, officials have tried to make the campus something of a bubble to keep the virus controlled.]]>

As seen on WCSC – Live 5 News, by Nick Reagan

Despite health officials pleading for people to stay home, more than 50 million could be traveling for Thanksgiving according to AAA.

Fred Roark and his family will not be traveling because of the virus.

Normally, his sister comes down from Indiana but this year the risk of spreading the disease is just too high.

“I have multiple risk factors, so consequently I have to be conscience of my own personal involvement with other people,” Roark said. “I’d like my sister to be down here because I only see her once a year, and this year it will be zero times.”

While the travel estimate is a substantial decrease from the 2019, it is still a lot of people who could potentially spread the coronavirus. However, not everyone has the option to stay where they are.

Many college campuses are shutting down between Thanksgiving and the New Year, requiring students to return home.

The Citadel is taking a slightly different approach.

All year long, officials have tried to make the campus something of a bubble to keep the virus controlled. Cadet Colonel Nicholas Piacentini is in charge of the entire cadet corps and is responsible for their success and wellbeing.

“Everyone knew this year was going to be different,” Piacentini said. “It was tough at first. It’s hard to wear a mask. It’s hard to be 6-feet apart from people, but the more and more we did it, the more it became daily routine.”

At the beginning of the year, cadets were prohibited from leaving campus for two weeks. That was to protect fellow cadets, staff and faculty. Now, before anyone leaves for the winter break the quarantine is back.

Starting last weekend, cadets were required to stay on campus and away from the general public.

“This two week period is not only to protect the campus community but also to protect our friends and family at home, because now this is bigger than just campus,” Piacentini said. “We could easily take COVID home . . . going home is what’s going to be pretty deadly or can be. By staying on campus and quarantining we are really protecting our loved ones and other people’s loved ones as well.”

The ability to restrict a student’s movement is not something most colleges can do, but then again The Citadel is not like most colleges.

“Our military structure gives us a huge advantage of implementing and enforcing policies, but what is unique about The Citadel is our peer leadership structure is exquisite here,” Piacentini said. “That’s what allows us to exceed so much. It’s each one of us looking out for each one of us to do the right thing. That has been the biggest attribute to our success.”

Click here to see the current number of COVID cases on campus.

Despite the lockdown, Piacentini is making sure there is some rest and relaxation during the closed weekends. Last weekend, food trucks were brought in and cadets could participate in a variety of activities.

This weekend there will be a cookout and the annual Thanksgiving festivities. Once cadets leave campus for Thanksgiving they will not come back until January.

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A message from The Citadel President https://today.citadel.edu/a-message-from-the-citadel-president-3/ Fri, 20 Nov 2020 21:44:48 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20340 Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our history. ]]> Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Citadel Family:

Greetings.  I hope this reaches everyone in good health.

I write today as the Corps prepares to depart on Winter Furlough after one of the most unusual periods in Citadel history. On 13 March 2020, we began Spring Break in an atmosphere of uncertainty as the threat from COVID-19 developed into a worldwide crisis.  After finishing the semester remotely, and cancelling most in-person and on-campus activities, our Citadel family faced the challenge of how best to restart, and return to as normal a routine as conditions allowed.

Our mission remains the production of principled leaders in an academically challenging environment, centered on The Citadel’s core values of Honor, Duty and Respect. This informed our pandemic objectives of consistent delivery of high-quality instruction coupled with continuing our in-person military environment and maintaining the Long Gray Line.

Core values also guided us as we contemplated reconstitution of our campus community during a time of national turbulence regarding race, and a contentious election season. Our college is unique, as these values are part of daily conversations, and take on greater importance in uncertain times.

Our faculty and staff’s efforts, innovation, and attention to detail in these past months cannot be overstated. We learned much during our partnership with the Marines, but make no mistake– the entire team performed magnificently in preparing for the return of our cadets and students.

But great planning means little without execution.  We needed the entire Citadel family to work together.

I could not be more pleased with the performance of the Corps. We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our 177-year history.  Our students, faculty, staff, and alumni showed what a united campus community can do—it’s inspiring watching everyone doing their part. The success we’ve achieved is only possible with everyone adapting and overcoming.  Congratulations and Thank You!

Challenges remain, and new ones will surely appear. We have the conditions, tools, and values in place to overcome those obstacles as they emerge. What I’ve seen since March gives me great hope and confidence we will continue our success.

These are among the many blessings we share as a community as we celebrate Thanksgiving and enter the holiday season. Gail and I send best wishes to you, your families and friends – safe travels and good health.

We look forward to seeing everyone back in January to hit the deck running for the start of the spring 2021 semester.

Good Luck and God Bless each of you.

Glenn M. Walters ‘79

General, USMC (Retired)

President

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Fall 2020: hybrid learning by the numbers https://today.citadel.edu/fall-2020-hybrid-learning-by-the-numbers/ Thu, 19 Nov 2020 14:43:04 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20217 https://www.citadel.edu/root/sschttps://www.citadel.edu/root/sscPhoto above: Dr. James Bezjian leads a Baker School of Business hybrid learning class on innovation in Bond Hall at The Citadel on October 6, 2020. From the initiation of]]> https://www.citadel.edu/root/sschttps://www.citadel.edu/root/ssc

Photo above: Dr. James Bezjian leads a Baker School of Business hybrid learning class on innovation in Bond Hall at The Citadel on October 6, 2020.

From the initiation of Operation Fall Return 2020 through early November — led by the Office of the Provost — faculty, cadets and students actively engaged in thousands of remote, course-related interactions:

11,130+ Online proctored exams
25,281 Zoom meetings/classes

“We are so impressed with our faculty, cadets and students and their commitment to teaching and learning,” said Diana Cheshire, Ph.D., director for the college’s Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching, Learning and Distance Education. “They continue to grow and improve within our new hybrid learning model.”

Cheshire and team provided more than 9,000 instances of training and one-on-one interactions from May – September as professors learned how to teach via the college’s new and improved remote learning platform and technologies. About 1,400 courses were converted for a hybrid learning approach (students split into two groups per class, alternating in-person and remote learning days).

“We found the grades from the spring emergency conversion to 100% remote learning encouraging. But now, with the benefit of being able to be with each other in person half of the time, combined with the upgraded remote learning technologies, we anticipate fall performance outcomes that closely mirror past semesters during normal years,” said Provost and Dean of The Citadel, Sally Selden, Ph.D.

Dr. Nahid Vesali leads a graduate-level, hybrid Project Management class in Grimsley Hall at The Citadel.

Cheshire’s team also engaged faculty, cadets and students in training on how to use the new online exam oversight, or proctoring system. “Our proctoring technology includes a browser lockdown feature and recording of students while they take their exams. These recordings are flagged and later reviewed by faculty to ensure integrity of the results.”

In addition, the wraparound support offered by a multitude of campus services including the Student Success Center are making substantial contributions. The center’s director, Col. Robert Pickering, reports more than 2,500 appointments with 1,900 different individuals this fall.

Regimental Public Affairs Officer, Cadet Ruby Bolden, Class of 2021, from Grovetown Georgia

“I can honestly say that the Student Success Center is one of the best things that this institution has to offer. I’ve used the center at some point all four of my years here and it is especially important for many cadets right now during this unusual fall,” said Cadet Ruby Bolden, regimental public affairs officer for the 2020-2021 academic year. “The center helps cadets at all levels of academic achievement. Have challenges with Math? Go there before your grades slip. Striving for a 3.5 or even a 4.0 GPA? They can help.”

Bolden encourages anyone needing an extra edge as finals approach to consider visiting the center. Cadets and students will complete the semester by taking finals remotely after Thanksgiving, returning to campus in January.

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Citadel buckling down with holiday furlough just around the corner https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-buckling-down-with-holiday-furlough-just-around-the-corner/ Fri, 13 Nov 2020 16:08:46 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20160 A portion of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in parade practice on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 5, 2020.A portion of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in parade practice on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 5, 2020.Cadets will not be granted leave before the furlough departure. They will, however, be able to enjoy food trucks, increased intramural activities and outdoor games.]]> A portion of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in parade practice on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 5, 2020.A portion of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in parade practice on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 5, 2020.

Campus community must remain disciplined about coronavirus protection protocols

Photo above: A portion of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in parade practice on Summerall Field November 5, 2020, keeping in step with the tradition for possible future parades.

The last day of classes this fall for cadets and students at The Citadel is November 24. They will take finals from home following Thanksgiving and will not return until January.

But as COVID-19 cases across America spike at record levels, The Citadel is also seeing an uptick in cases and the number of cadets and employees in quarantine or isolation, which are updated daily on the college’s website. Leadership is emphasizing that everyone must stay vigilant about continuing the college’s protection protocols.

“We are so close to successfully completing a full, in-person semester. We must stay disciplined in fulfilling our duty to protect ourselves and others, even after leaving for the long holiday,” said The Citadel Commandant of Cadets, Captain Geno Paluso.

As a precaution, cadets will not be granted leave before the furlough departure. They will, however, be able to enjoy food trucks, increased intramural activities and outdoor games at certain times over the next two weekends.

A portion of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in parade practice on Summerall Field, November 5, 2020.

Despite the pandemic, the college’s Operation Fall Return set conditions to restore on-campus living, learning and working in August. Strict COVID-19 protection protocols including mandatory face coverings, limiting cadets to only their own barracks, reducing leave for cadets, a hybrid learning model for classes and continuous, and expert disinfection of facilities assisted in keeping the on-campus experiences intact. Large crowd events — including military dress parades, Parents Weekend and Homecoming — were canceled to limit the spread of COVID-19.

Nov. 19 Virtual Town Hall

The Citadel President, Provost and Commandant will update parents on how the fall has gone and on what to expect for the spring semester return during the final Virtual Town Hall for the semester. It is scheduled for 7 p.m., November 19 and will be livestreamed on The Citadel Facebook page.

Specific details about barracks room departure protocols and storage options for the Corps will be provided to cadets by the Commandant’s Office team.

After cadets depart, the college’s expert sanitation contractor, the Budd Group, will deep clean barracks rooms and disinfect all cadet spaces, while continuing to sanitize offices and employee facilities. The college closes for winter furlough on Dec. 22 with employees returning January 4.

In January, cadets will return to live in their assigned 21 home companies, with Reconstitution taking place on a staggered schedule from January 13 – 15.

A portion of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in parade practice on Summerall Field November 5, 2020.
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Getting to know Cadet Col. Nicholas Piacentini, Regimental Commander for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets https://today.citadel.edu/getting-to-know-cadet-col-nicholas-piacentini-regimental-commander-for-the-south-carolina-corps-of-cadets/ https://today.citadel.edu/getting-to-know-cadet-col-nicholas-piacentini-regimental-commander-for-the-south-carolina-corps-of-cadets/#comments Mon, 02 Nov 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19832 Regimental Commander Nick Piacentini and Regimental public affairs NCO Samantha Walton on Summerall FieldRegimental Commander Nick Piacentini and Regimental public affairs NCO Samantha Walton on Summerall FieldRegardless of our backgrounds, what part of the nation or the world we are from, or our personal opinions, we remain unified through our core values, no matter the adversity we face.]]> Regimental Commander Nick Piacentini and Regimental public affairs NCO Samantha Walton on Summerall FieldRegimental Commander Nick Piacentini and Regimental public affairs NCO Samantha Walton on Summerall Field

Photo above: Regimental Commander Nick Piacentini and Regimental Public Affairs NCO Samantha Walton pose for a portrait on Summerall Field at The Citadel October 8, 2020.

Every cadet has the opportunity to earn positions of leadership during their four years at The Citadel. Some push themselves to make it all the way to the top.

The highest position in The South Carolina Corps of Cadets (SCCC) is regimental commander, and this year it is Cadet Col. Nicholas “Nick” Piacentini. He is a Political Science major who attends The Citadel on a Navy ROTC scholarship and is expected to earn a commission to become a naval officer upon graduating.

Piacentini is from Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. The town of about 5,700, between Pittsburgh and Harrisburg, almost makes Charleston look like a major metropolitan city. At The Citadel, Piacentini is responsible for just a little under half of his hometown’s population: 2,300 cadets.

Leading the Corps is always a demanding job, but in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic, some of those demands are even more substantial. Piacentini is accountable for the health, welfare, discipline, and academic proficiency of every cadet.

Cadet Samantha Walton is the Regimental Public Affairs NCO, working to support Piacentini and other cadet leaders. Recently Walton asked Piacentini a series of questions to help others learn more about him.

SW: What does being the Regimental Commander mean to you?

NP: Obviously, it is a tremendous responsibility, but also a tremendous honor to have the duty to oversee and be held accountable for everything that happens within the Corps. I am entrusted to make the best decision for the Corps of Cadets, regardless of the popularity of that decision.

However, being the regimental commander does not define me. I am simply a cadet that fills a billet. I join a long line of people who carried out the same duties, and I am entrusted to leave things better than I found them, as all before me have done.

SW: What do you plan to accomplish this school year for the corps?

This year, I wanted to execute a Cadre period on campus, keep the SCCC on campus for the entirety of the first semester, prioritize the mental health of all cadets and keep that a priority, and hopefully return to a sense of normalcy next semester.

Although uncomfortable, the college has done everything in their power to mitigate the adversity we face. The college’s leaders setting this example have pushed me to follow suit and keep a positive outlook on the year.

We hare striving to be an example of what right looks like, and I think it is going as well as possible up to this point. Our success in continuing in-person on campus this fall is a testament to the type of person The Citadel molds, those who understand it is their duty to protect others as well as themselves.

Cadet Col. Nick Piancetini

SW: When you were a freshman, did you ever see yourself as regimental commander?

NP: Yes, as a freshman, I came to The Citadel with high expectations for myself. After being exposed to the fourth-class system, I began to understand the importance of pushing your limits. As long as you had a vision of what you wanted to achieve, you could accomplish any goal. I was awestruck by Dillon Graham, regimental commander my knob year, by the example he set and the respect he’d earned.

At an awards parade second semester, Graham earned an award based on of his service to the Corps and his accomplishments. After hearing his accomplishments listed, I continuously asked myself, why not me? If Graham accomplished that much, why could I not follow suit, or even try to do more? This became my goal and has continually pushed me to be better and better each day.

SW: What separates you from our past regimental commanders?

NP: This year, COVID-19 has presented an obstacle and enemy that cadet leadership has not faced before. This has not only been challenging for me to deal with personally, but also as a leader in the SCCC. It challenged me to disregard my doubts toward what the pandemic really was, recognize the environment we needed to operate in as a school, and continually strive to keep a positive attitude while executing this year’s campus operations.

I understand that my attitude towards this school year has a tremendous impact on how my fellow cadets approach the year. This has forced my team and I to re-think how we do normal things, to stay committed to the team effort, and execute this as perfectly as possible, with the many unknowns we face. Although it is an unusual year, our mission has not changed.

SW: What kind of leader would you describe yourself as?

NP: I do my best to be a leader who holds the line, can be trusted to do the right thing, but also someone who prioritizes their people. I also strive to be someone that influences people to set a higher standard for themselves, based off of both my actions and words. Without integrity, as a leader, you fail to have respect. Ultimately, I believe these qualities are what breed respect for someone. Respect from cadets, the people I am leading, is the most important thing to me right now.

SW: As the country continues going through uncertain times, what is your plan to keep us all unified as a group? How do you move the dialogue for the Cadets to understand that despite our differences of gender, race, religion and political affiliations it takes all of us to make up the wonderful corps of cadets?

NP: One of the best parts of this institution is the fourth-class system; the answer to this question is found within the structure of it. When entering the gates of the Citadel, you are stripped of all individuality. You become one with your classmates, and ultimately all members of the Long Grey Line when you leave. You vow to live your life according to our core values of honor, duty, and respect.

We stand in unity because we have sworn to uphold our reputation as Citadel men and women. Regardless of our backgrounds, what part of the nation or the world we are from, or our personal opinions, we remain unified through our core values, no matter the adversity we face.

SW: After you leave the Citadel, what do your future plans consist of?

NP: Upon graduation, I will commission into the U.S. Navy on 07 May. I will attend Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL training as an officer, with the goal to become a Navy SEAL. After the Navy, I would like to attend law school and either practice law or work within the government.

SW: What will you miss most about the Citadel after you leave?

NP: The people are what truly make this place something special.

You are surrounded here by people that expect more of themselves than most. I never would have thought that I would look up to others who are the same age or just a little older than I am as much as I do here.

Additionally, I have had countless mentors that have developed me personally and professionally. Because of the people here, I am a better person now, than I was when I came here. I have made relationships that will stand the test of time, with people that I know I can always count on to have my back and push me to never stop striving, favors I will gladly be returning to them.

Regimental Commander Nicholas Piacentini speaks with Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters ’79, USMC (Retired) during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on August 8, 2020.
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Veterans Day tribute taking place at North Charleston PAC to feature Citadel ’80 alumnus https://today.citadel.edu/veterans-day-tribute-taking-place-at-north-charleston-pac-to-feature-citadel-80-alumnus/ Thu, 29 Oct 2020 14:11:11 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19911 The event, featuring Lt. Colonel Frederick Whittle, USMC (ret), '80, will take place from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.]]>

As seen on WCIV.com

The Lowcountry’s heroes will be remembered on Nov. 11 during a tribute ceremony at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center.

The event, featuring Lt. Colonel Frederick Whittle, USMC (ret), will take place from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

“A 1980 graduate of The Citadel, Lt. Col. Whittle entered the Marine Corps in 1980 as an infantry officer and was designated as a naval aviator in 1984, flying in 36 combat missions in the 1991 Persian Gulf War. He is an Olmsted Scholar and holds a graduate degree from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He retired from the service in 2000,” a press release read.

Lt. Whittle has remained very active in the community, serving roles with the Coastal Carolina Council of the Boys Scouts of America, the Coastal Boys Council, The Exchange Club of Charleston, and the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Trident Area. He was also the past National President of The Citadel Alumni Association, his Class (Fundraising) Chairman for The Citadel Foundation, and Director of The Citadel Trust.

Mayor Keith Summey and City Council members will be at the ceremony.

Those looking to attend are asked to register ahead of time by calling 843-745-1028 or emailing cdambaugh@northcharleston.org by Nov. 4.

Face coverings will be required and social distancing will be followed.

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Citadel board votes on tuition rates for 2021-22 academic year https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-board-votes-on-tuition-rates-for-2021-22-academic-year/ Sat, 17 Oct 2020 14:37:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19483 The Citadel sealThe Citadel sealThe need for 2.5% increase was explained by the Vice President of Finance and Business as a means of continuing the college’s solid financial footing.]]> The Citadel sealThe Citadel seal

Board of Visitors approves college’s request for moderate increase

During its annual fall meeting on Sept. 16, The Citadel Board of Visitors (BOV) approved a modest tuition increase for the 2021-22 academic year. The need for 2.5% increase for cadets and for students in The Citadel Graduate College was explained by the Vice President of Finance and Business as a means of continuing the college’s solid financial footing. 

The increase is in keeping with the Higher Education Price Index (HEPI) December 2019 projection of a 2.5% increase, the latest year with figures available. HEPI is an inflation index designed to track cost drivers in higher education. For in-state upper-class cadets, all-in costs for tuition and fees will increase by $539 next year. Details about the increase for freshmen and for non-cadet students are below.

“We understand the pandemic may be causing a financial burden for some families and are controlling costs in the face of some of the unforeseen expenses of continuing to offer a transformative education and development experience during these unprecedented times,” said Col. Myron Harrington Jr., USMC (Ret.), ’60, chair for the BOV

Earlier in the month, the BOV’s Operations and Risk Management Committee voted to recommend the increase and forward it to the full board for consideration after being briefed by the finance team.

Many institutions of higher education are struggling to manage financial losses incurred with the challenges related to the coronavirus pandemic and the spring and summer campus closures. In the spring, The Citadel refunded more than $4 million in room, board and parking fees; however, the college’s conservative financial approach enabled the BOV to keep tuition flat going into the current academic year. Operation Fall Return enabled cadets and students to return to campus to receive the highest quality, in-person Citadel experience available under the safest possible conditions.

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets

The Citadel is one of the only two remaining 24/7 military institutions, aside from the federal academies. As such, when comparing college tuition rates, it is important to note that The Citadel’s fee structure is different because the costs of room and board and multiple sets of military uniforms comprise the overall “all-in” rate. This is because members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets ─ all undergraduates ─ must live in the barracks, eat most meals in the mess hall and wear uniforms while on campus. Laundry, dry cleaning and books are also included in the all-in rate, with those costs calculated as part of each cadet’s One Card/Quartermaster Account

The all-in rate does not include other items such as fees that vary according to the academic major or schedule of each cadet or student. Those major-specific fees align with the higher cost of some majors for faculty, labs, materials or programming.

The costs of attendance for the 2021-22 academic year are below. Freshman year charges are higher because of first-year uniform purchases.

All-in Cost for CadetsIn-StateOut-of-State
Upper-class$25,638$49,475
Freshmen$30,943$54,780

The Leadership Lab fee is set to increase by $29 for freshman and $25 for upperclassmen. Room and Board will increase by $185. The increases also follow the HEPI estimate.

The Citadel Graduate College

Students in The Citadel Graduate College’s on campus and online programs will also see an increase in tuition.

The Citadel Graduate College Programs
(*per credit hour)
In-StateOut-of-State
Evening Undergraduates$502$948
Graduate Students$610$1,046
Online Undergraduates$512$512
Online Graduate Students$712$712

About The Citadel Effect

The Citadel has a consistent track record of achieving some of the highest four-year graduation rates in the state of South Carolina, some of the highest rates of employment after graduation and the highest salaries ten years after entering the college. The institution was recently recognized for achieving the highest return on investment of any four-year college in South Carolina and rated in the top 5% nationally. This combination of high four-year graduation rates, high employment and high salaries helped The Citadel earn recognition as #1 Public College in the South by U.S. News & World Report for ten consecutive years.

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