Campus Life – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 01 Oct 2020 20:54:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Campus Life – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Drilling down into the details; freshmen cadets compete in Kelly Cup 2020 https://today.citadel.edu/drilling-down-into-the-details-freshmen-cadets-compete-in-kelly-cup-2020/ Thu, 01 Oct 2020 16:15:51 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19062 One company can spend the year bragging about the quality of their military training after ten of their freshmen cadets proved best-drilled.]]>

One of the primary responsibilities for upperclassmen at The Citadel is to provide military instruction to the freshmen class. And now, one company on campus can spend the year bragging about the quality of their training.

Just before the clock on the tower of Padgett-Thomas Barracks struck 7 p.m., the cheers from Echo Company, the winner of this year’s Kelly Cup, reverberated off the walls.

One of the annual traditions at The Citadel is the drill competition. This year, under a Citadel-blue sky as clear as the knobs’ stripe-less shoulder boards, was no different.

“Even with the obstacles that COVID-19 has brought us, we were still in it to win it,” said Cadet Sergeant Aaron Daninger, Echo squad’s leader. “Every single person on the squad had a hunger to win and to be the best they could possibly be.”

The Kelly Cup usually occurs on the Saturday during Parents Weekend — but, as with most everything else in the world, the pandemic forced the college to make adjustments.

However, like every year before, each of the college’s companies chose their ten best-drilled freshmen cadets for their squad. The 21 companies participated in a preliminary competition; four of those moved onto the finals, held on Wednesday, Sept. 30.

After Echo, in order of their final scores, the other competitors were Golf, Lima and Charlie Companies.

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Thinking of you from a distance: Homecoming 2020 events regrettably cancelled https://today.citadel.edu/thinking-of-you-from-a-distance-homecoming-2020-events-regrettably-cancelled/ Wed, 30 Sep 2020 19:51:13 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=19028 The Citadel campus is seen from the air in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, August 27, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)The Citadel campus is seen from the air in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, August 27, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)For reasons of safety, the college will not hold large public events for the remainder of the semester.]]> The Citadel campus is seen from the air in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, August 27, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)The Citadel campus is seen from the air in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, August 27, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

With 54 days remaining before cadets and students depart for the semester, The Citadel continues to follow safety protocols constructed to keep the campus community healthy by reducing the spread of COVID-19. In keeping with the most current medical guidance, the college will not hold large public events for the remainder of the semester. Therefore, there will be no Homecoming 2020 campus events as originally planned for Nov. 5 – 8.

“Homecoming is a revered event for all of us, however our priority must be the health of our alumni and our campus community. We are grateful for our reunion chairs and class campaign committees who have planned special private events for their classmates, and we look forward to having them return to The Citadel as soon as conditions permit,” said Tom McAlister, Associate Vice President of Alumni Affairs.

A socially-distanced annual membership meeting of The Citadel Alumni Association will still take place in accordance with their bylaws on Friday, Nov. 6 at the Holliday Alumni Center. Notifications and updates will be sent to CAA members to ensure that all health and safety protocols, including wearing face coverings, are met. Call (843) 953-7696 with questions.

Information on future alumni activities, including virtual fall engagements, will be socialized via the Association’s website at www.citadelalumni.org.

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Lowe, The Citadel launch educational program for Civil and Construction Engineering cadets and students https://today.citadel.edu/lowe-the-citadel-launch-educational-program-for-civil-and-construction-engineering-cadets-and-students/ Sun, 27 Sep 2020 23:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18877 Citadel engineering cadets and students tour Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development companyCitadel engineering cadets and students tour Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development companyBeginning in spring 2021, Lowe’s internship program will be offered to juniors and seniors within The Citadel School of Engineering.]]> Citadel engineering cadets and students tour Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development companyCitadel engineering cadets and students tour Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development company

Photo above: Citadel engineering cadets and students tour The Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development company

On September 23, Lowe announced its partnership with The Citadel to launch a construction educational program, featuring an in-class lecture series with Lowe executives, on-site project tours and an internship program at Lowe’s Southeast regional office in Charleston for students enrolled in The Citadel School of Engineering. The program aims to provide cadets with real-world construction analysis and experiences to supplement classroom learning.

Beginning in spring 2021, Lowe’s internship program will be offered to juniors and seniors within the School of Engineering. The internship will provide participating cadets and students with real estate and construction management experiences. Interns will also work closely with Lowe senior project managers, attend construction team meetings and experience real-world construction activities with tours of active construction sites.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for these young adults to learn meaningful life skills and experience first-hand the many different components that are involved in successfully managing a multifaceted construction project,” said Mike Mansager, vice president of Lowe. Mansager adds that “through classroom lectures and in-field learning, Lowe will provide unmatched opportunities for students to learn about our local projects and take away real-world applications that will help them find great success in their careers after graduation.”

Mike Mansager, vice president of Lowe, instructing cadets and students during tour

In early September, Lowe hosted a group of Citadel cadets from professor Rebekah Burke’s Construction Engineering Materials and Methods class at the company’s construction site for The Cooper Hotel, downtown Charleston’s new full-service waterfront hotel, which broke ground in February 2020. The site tour was used to illustrate the construction process and discuss the challenges associated with building foundations for large waterfront developments.

“In talking with Mr. Mansager and the Lowe construction team, the cadets and students experienced firsthand the application and execution of technical engineering topics discussed in class,” said Burke. “As a result of this partnership between industry and academia, the students commonly described profound realizations about their career path in construction and engineering in their site visit reports and guest lecture reflections.”

Lowe is also currently hosting in-class lectures as part of a reoccurring, visiting lecture series at The Citadel School of Engineering. The most recent educational lecture, led by Mansager, focused on the topic of construction contracts. In his upcoming lectures, Mansager will discuss a variety of topics to assist cadets in better understanding how what they are learning in the classroom applies in real world applications for construction and development.

For more information about the Construction Engineering Program at The Citadel, please call (843) 953- 5083, or email sfye@citadel.edu.

Citadel engineering cadets and students tour Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development company

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My ring story: I would choose The Citadel all over again https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-i-would-choose-the-citadel-all-over-again/ Fri, 25 Sep 2020 10:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18908 Hill family pictureHill family pictureI come from a big military family of eight and it became a family tradition to attend a military college]]> Hill family pictureHill family picture

Meet Catherine Hill, Charlottesville, Virginia, ’21

Photo above: Cadet Catherine Hill is fourth from the right. “This is when my brother got married in August at The Citadel. It’s the only picture we have of all of us, my family is huge! My mother is Pamela and my father is LTC Ruston Hill. My older sister is 2nd LT Alexandra Gibbs and her husband is 1st LT Aaron Gibbs. My oldest brother is 2nd LT Russ Hill and his wife is Lauren. My fiancé is Ryan Jackson. My little sisters are Sophia and Victoria, and our youngest brother is Caleb.

Who or what inspired you to attend The Citadel?

My entire family inspired me to go to The Citadel.

I come from a big military family of eight and it became a family tradition to attend a military college. My Father, LTC Ruston Hill graduated from The Citadel in 1990, my older sister 2nd LT Alexandra Gibbs graduated from VMI in 2018 and my older brother 2nd LT Russ Hill graduated from The Citadel in 2020. When it was time to apply to college I couldn’t imagine myself going anywhere else.

The Citadel had just opened a new nursing program and I received an Army scholarship before I matriculated, I knew I wanted to come here. I have wanted to be a nurse for as long as I can remember. My mother, Pamela Hill who is a nurse, inspired me more than anyone to graduate from The Citadel with a BSN.  Without the support of my family I wouldn’t be here today.

This is me with my brother, 2nd Lt. Russ Hill taken at the annual Thanksgiving get together when I was a junior and he was a senior. My knob year, he came over to Echo and picked me up like this, then it became a tradition to take this picture in the quad each year.

What was the most difficult obstacle you conquered that made you feel you earned the honor of wearing the ring?

In short I would say that throughout my time here I have learned the importance of always doing the right thing, even when it wasn’t the popular decision to make. I can honestly say that at the end of the day, I know that I have always tried my best to do the right thing by my classmates and the knobs that I watched over while being an HA CPL, SGT, and officer.

What is inscribed on the inside of your ring and what is the significance?

Inside my ring is a Bible quote, “But even if you should suffer for what is right, you are blessed,” (1 Peter 3:14). It’s significance to me refers to the moments that were the hardest to make decisions to stand up for what is right.

Note: You might remember Cadet Catherine Hill from her freshman year. She was featured in one of the college’s first Our Mighty Citadel stories. You can watch it at the bottom of this story. Seems like it was just yesterday, Catherine. Congratulations!

What is a song that describes your emotions leading up to Ring Day/Parent’s Weekend and why that song selection?

The song that comes to my mind is “5 More Minutes” by Scotty McCreery. The song talks about time flies and how we wish we could pause and have 5 more minutes to take it all in and be in the moment.

Why do you think it is important that cadets and/or people in general understand the symbolism and weight that the ring holds?

It is important because we chose to take “the road less traveled.” Anyone who has graduated from The Citadel will tell you that it wasn’t easy. Every year brought new challenges and we had to become more resilient and better leaders.

We wear the ring” is a repeated phrase amongst Alumni. What does it mean?

When we came to The Citadel we were just 18 year old young adults who had no clue what the next 4 years were going to hold for us. Here we learned the importance of Honor, Duty, and Respect. We learned how to follow and we learned how to lead. I don’t think you will find a single senior here that will tell you that they think they are the same person they were when they matriculated. We have learned so much here and will continue to carry our Citadel legacy for the rest of our lives.

What obligations do you feel you have in the future as a member of the Long Gray Line?

I am honored to be connected to a long line of alumni that I have shared similar experiences with. You just don’t get this experience and connection with people anywhere else. If i could go back in time I would make the decision to come here all over again.

I feel that I am obligated to uphold a standard as a nurse and an officer in the Army. We didn’t go through four years of The Citadel to throw away all that we have learned while we were here. It is our job as future graduates to take what we have learned here and apply it to our daily lives as we graduate and become adults.

Hill is 2nd Battalion human affairs officer, a nursing major and will commission as an officer in the U.S. Army upon graduating.

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Where to watch the Class of 2021 Ring Presentation event https://today.citadel.edu/where-to-watch-the-class-of-2021-ring-presentation-event/ Thu, 24 Sep 2020 15:30:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18855 Hollings 1942 Ring InteriorHollings 1942 Ring InteriorParents, family and friends are invited to watch a livestream of the Ring Presentation on two of the college's social media channels]]> Hollings 1942 Ring InteriorHollings 1942 Ring Interior

Livestream Friday, Sept. 25, 5 p.m. E.T.

The seniors comprising the Class of 2021 will be celebrated with a traditional Ring Presentation Ceremony at 5 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 25, in McAlister Field House, attended by the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, Veteran and Active Duty students. Close to 550 individuals will be presented with their coveted Citadel bands of gold.

Attendance at the ceremony will be restricted to only ring-eligible seniors due to the need for social distancing to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Parents, family and friends are invited to watch a livestream of the Ring Presentation on two of the college’s social media channels. An account on those platforms is not needed to view the stream at the following links:

Watch on YouTube HERE

Watch on Facebook HERE

How to get photographs of the event

As the presentation event is restricted, the college is providing the following:

  • Professional photographers will take a picture of each cadet or student receiving a ring.
  • At no charge, cadet ring presentation photos will be available with yearbook portraits in October on the college’s intranet, Lesesne Gateway. Cadets will have access to download them. An announcement of the availability of those pictures will be made later.
  • Veteran and active duty students will receive their ring presentation photos via email, also at no cost.
  • Our photographers will also be at the chapel, the War Memorial and on the parade ground taking photos. On Saturday, those photos will be available for families to download, at no charge, here. 

Leave policy for seniors on Sept. 26 and 27

There will be no leave for any cadets following the Sept. 25 Ring Presentation.

The Commandant’s Office is granting the following leave to ring-eligible seniors: Saturday Sept. 26 from 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday Sept. 27 from 5:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Those seniors also have the option to spend Saturday night off campus.

Parents are asked to respect the college’s efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 on campus and are discouraged from entering campus Sept. 25−26 other than for the purpose of picking up a cadet who is eligible for leave.

Read more here.

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Upcoming News from The Citadel – October 2020 https://today.citadel.edu/upcoming-news-from-the-citadel-october-2020/ Thu, 24 Sep 2020 14:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18743 A look at some of the events happening in and around The Citadel’s campus, including a virtual town hall for parents and more.]]>

President’s Virtual Engagement with Parents

Thursday, October 1
7 – 8 p.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

In order to make campus operations as close to normal as possible, the President of The Citadel, Gen. Glenn Walters, USMC (Ret.), will hold a virtual town hall for parents on October 1 at 7 p.m. EST.

He will be joined by the Provost and Dean of the College, Sally Selden, Ph.D, SPHR and the Commandant of Cadets, Capt. Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.).

Parents can connect with Walters, Selden and Paluso by submitting questions via the Facebook Live link while watching the event.

This event is intended to replace the annual engagement that the president holds for cadets’ family members during Parents Weekend; all of those events had to be cancelled due to concerns surrounding COVID-19.

Emerging Topics Lecture Series about national security issues

Thursday, October 1 at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, October 20 at 4 p.m.
Thursday, October 29 at 10 a.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

Dr. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Homeland Security
Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, Ph.D., moderator for the series

The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, one of the fastest-growing programs on campus, is launching a new, virtual lecture series to cover a wide range of topics related to national security.

The Emerging Topics Lecture Series is open to the public, and is especially designed for Citadel cadets and students, and others interested in hearing national security issues by Citadel faculty members, alongside other international experts.

Due to the COVID-19 environment, the Emerging Topics Lecture Series will be held virtually, via Zoom.

The first three forums will be held on different days — and at different times — in October.

The lecture names, panelists and Zoom links can all be found here.

Thinking of pursuing a Master’s degree? Join a virtual information session for prospective graduate students interested in an MBA, Project Management or Leadership Studies degree

Wednesday, October 7 at 6 p.m.
Monday, October 28 at 11 a.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

With the pandemic changing how prospective students find the right degree program, The Citadel Graduate College is hoping to make things easier. The college will be hosting multiple virtual information sessions for prospective students. The sessions on Wednesday, October 7, and Monday, October 28, will be focused on The Citadel’s MBA, M.S. in Project Management and M.S. in Leadership programs.

The information sessions are program-specific, with representatives from the three departments, to better address questions from anyone attending.

The presentation will focus on the flexible course options available through the graduate college, as well as information on the application and admissions process. There will be an interactive Q&A session at the end of the session.

To register for the October 7 session, click here.
To register for the October 28 session, click here.

Citadel team helping with Soldiers’ Angels Food Drive

Friday, October 9
8 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Elks Lodge; 1113 Sam Rittenberg Blvd, Charleston, S.C.
Free, open to the public

The Citadel community always looks for opportunities to give back to those who served and sacrificed for their country. That’s why The Citadel Health Careers Society will be volunteering with Soldiers’ Angels, working to supply low-income veteran families with food assistance.

The event will be held outside, regardless of weather.

Cadets and students can sign up to volunteer on GivePulse. Credit will be given for travel time along with the time given for service and will be considered healthcare community service hours.

Soldiers’ Angles has a global network of volunteers — representing all 50 states and 12 countries abroad — who work tirelessly to ensure that those who serve or have served are supported, uplifted and remembered through a variety of support programs.

Contact Dr. Sarah A. Imam at imams1@citadel.edu or Dr. Kimbo Yee at kyee@citadel.edu for further information. 

From the football field to restaurant franchise ownership, Bulldogs talk entrepreneurship

Tuesday, October 13
8 – 9 a.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, pre-registration required, open to the public

They started as Bulldog football players, and now they’re co-owners of a Zaxby’s franchise.

Through the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Speakers Series, The Citadel community and the public can hear from former quarterback Duran Lawson. He is a member of the Class of 2008 who graduated with a degree in Business Administration. His business partner, Andre Roberts, Class of 2009, currently plays for the Buffalo Bills.

In the virtual webinar, Lawson will discuss franchises as a business opportunity, how to build partnerships and more. Additionally, he will discuss how The Citadel experience, both on and off the field, prepared him for this opportunity.

“It was not foreign to me to have long days, and this is very important when you launch your business,” said Duran. “Second — what was the secret sauce between the both of us and the basis of our partnership — we were both military brats, came through sports together, we have similar values and share similar desired outcomes. We knew what we wanted in a business.”

To register for the webinar, click here.

Thinking of pursing a Master’s degree? Join a virtual information session about graduate degrees in Intelligence and Security Studies, International Politics, Military History or Social Science degrees

Wednesday, October 21
11 a.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

With the pandemic changing how prospective students find the right degree program, The Citadel Graduate College is hoping to make things easier. The college will be hosting multiple virtual information sessions for prospective students. The session on Wednesday, October 21 will be focused on The Citadel’s Intelligence and Security Studies, M.A. in International Politics, M.A. in Military History and Social Science programs.

The information sessions are program-specific, with representatives from the all of the departments, to better address questions from anyone attending.

For more information about this information session, please contact The Citadel Graduate College at cgc@citadel.edu.

New Citadel physics and leader to speak at Exchange Club luncheon

Wednesday, October 28
12:30 p.m.
Halls Chop House; 434 King St, Charleston, SC
Open to members of the Exchange Club and their guests

One of the newest professors in the Physics Department, Scott Curtis, Ph.D., will speak to the Exchange Club of Charleston about the climate of water in the city — specifically, how trends in flooding and extreme precipitation affect the city, and how those issues can be addressed.

Scott Curtis, Ph.D., on the roof of Grimsley Hall at The Citadel

Curtis, who will serve as the John Lining Professor of Physics, joins The Citadel as the director for the new Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., ’77, Center for Climate Studies. The center is under development, and was recently named for Near, who passed away in March of 2020, an alumnus, veteran and physics professor.

Curtis has authored more than 150 books, book chapters, peer-reviewed journal articles and scientific white papers for presentations. He is engaged frequently to speak around the nation on issues including climate change, coastal water hazards and flooding. Curtis has participated as an editor for five scientific journals.

The Exchange Club is an all volunteer, national service organization for men and women who want to serve their community, develop leadership skills and enjoy new friendships. Exchange is made up of nearly 1,000 clubs and 33,000 members throughout the United States and Puerto Rico.

Biloxi Blues

Friday, October 30 at 7 p.m.
Saturday, October 31 at 7 p.m.
Sunday, November 1 at 3 p.m.
South of Broadway Theatre Company; 1080 East Montague, North Charleston
$30 for general admission and $20 for students, open to the public

Delayed by COVID-19, the Biloxi Blues performance is on its way back to the state. Though it was originally going to be held on campus, it’s been moved to a theater in Park Circle; however, it’s still supported by The Citadel Fine Arts program and has multiple Citadel cast members, as well as a Citadel alumnus as the director.

Biloxi Blues tells the story of young Army recruit Eugene Morris Jerome as he travels from Brooklyn to Biloxi, Mississippi for boot camp during World War II. On his quest to find love, achieve fame, and attain his manhood,

Last performed at the military college in 1988, the new production is directed by Citadel alumnus Bob Luke ‘76. Luke runs a successful acting studio in New York City and has enjoyed an illustrious career as an on-set acting coach for Hollywood movies including RansomRacing Stripes, and Enchanted.

Due to social distancing requirements within the theater, please contact mary@southofbroadway.com to reserve tickets.

A Night in the Archives: Cadet Rebellions from Citadel History

Saturday, October 31
6 – 8 p.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

It started with five seniors sneaking out at night to go to a party, and ended with a riot that brought police to campus and resulted in the expulsion of 60 cadets. The biggest rebellion in Citadel history, The Cantey Rebellion in 1898, is just one of the events that will be discussed during a virtual version of A Night in the Archives.

On October 31, The Citadel Archivist, Tessa Updike, and the Archives Assistant, Alex Adler, will present stories of cadet rebellions dating back to the 1850s. In addition to rebellions, the event will focus on hunger strikes, food fights and more that have occurred over the years.

The Zoom discussion will be held on Halloween night, from 6 – 8 p.m. A link to the Zoom meeting will be posted here closer to the event.

Faculty expert spotlight

Lee Westberry, Ph.D., is a professor in the Zucker Family School of Education and the program coordinator for Educational Leadership.

She arrived at The Citadel with extensive educational experience, having served the last 21 years in Berkeley County Schools as a high school assistant principal, middle school principal, high school principal, Executive Director of Secondary Programs and Executive Director of Accountability and Assessment. 

Westberry’s recent scholarship activities include presenting at the National CTE Best Practices Conference, which highlighted her work with career academies. She recently published Putting the Pieces Together: A Systems Approach to School Leadership, which helps school leaders understand how to develop the systems to support the critical work of schools, in order to prevent the “putting out fires” mode of operation. Westberry will release a second title, focused on student support systems and the culture system, in December.

In addition to coordinating the program that helps train more educators in South Carolina, Westberry continues to work with schools across the state to assist with school improvement efforts — including curriculum and assessment alignment, principal mentoring, the learning process and more.

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My ring story: Self discipline and accountability https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-self-discipline-and-accountability/ Wed, 23 Sep 2020 21:15:33 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18804 Regina-Amber-Mills-and-other-cadets-2Regina-Amber-Mills-and-other-cadets-2To “wear the ring” means that The Citadel is a unique and shared experience...that we have earned our right to be in the Long Grey Line.]]> Regina-Amber-Mills-and-other-cadets-2Regina-Amber-Mills-and-other-cadets-2

Meet Regina Amber Miles, Aiken, South Carolina, ’21

Photo above: Cadets in order of appearance are Thorne, Miles, Engel and Reen. This picture was taken right after they graduated from Marine Officer Candidate School.

Who or what inspired you to attend The Citadel?

I read Pat Conroy’s Lords of Discipline and In the Company of Men, by Nancy Mace, and that was what initially intrigued me. I also knew people who went here. But, the real selling point was when I attended a pre-knob overnight and just had this overwhelming feeling that this is where I belonged.

What was the most difficult obstacle you conquered that made you feel you earned the honor of wearing the ring?

I’d say just having the endurance to uphold your commitment to this school, no matter what personal hardships you’re going through, is reason enough to wear the ring. It can be very tempting to give into an easier alternative, especially after knob year, but this institution was not made to be easy or to become easier; that in itself is the whole point of The Citadel.

No one can better themselves by being complacent. There should never be a point in anyone’s life where they can say they “have made it.” One should always seek self-improvement whether they are a private or a general. That is the mindset The Citadel instills within us.

In what ways has this institution impacted your life?

This institution forces you to grow up in some ways, and I mean that in the best way possible. Self discipline and accountability are drilled into our heads from the start. If we fail, it is completely on us. We have to take responsibility for it, learn from it, and move on.

Why do you think it is important that cadets and/or people in general understand the symbolism and weight that the ring holds?

I don’t think that people outside of the Citadel – other than the alumni, will ever truly understand the magnitude of what the ring means to us because they have not experienced what we have endured. The ring symbolizes four years of pure sacrifice, I hope they understand that, at least.

What is inscribed on the inside of your ring and what is the significance?

“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” Eleanor Roosevelt. I live my life by this quote. Essentially, it just means your worth does not come from others nor should you let it be influenced by others.

What is a song that describes your emotions leading up to Ring Day?

“Humble Beginnings by Bazzi.” The chorus reflects how I imagine I’ll feel when I get my ring. We have been looking forward to this day for so long and it’s going to feel surreal when we have finally earned it: “Can’t believe that we made it, can’t believe that we made it. We was broke, we was breakin’…now I’m here and I’m stayin’…”

“We wear the ring” is a repeated phrase amongst Alumni. What does it mean?

It’s a really moving concept, honestly.

To “wear the ring” means that The Citadel is a unique and shared experience. The Ring also means that we have earned our right to be alumni in the Long Grey Line when we graduate. Historically speaking, every cadet does not undergo the exact same Citadel experience, but we are all connected in having been part of the Corps of Cadets. We will always have each other’s backs because we have that mutual respect.

Miles is a part of the mascot cadet handing team. She is the senior dog handler and team captain. Miles will commission as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps upon graduation. She was included in this local news story about the mascot handlers.

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My ring story: Humility over pride https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-humility-over-pride/ Wed, 23 Sep 2020 13:20:31 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18757 "...an individual wearing The Citadel band of gold will not be someone who will give up easily."]]>

Meet Cadet Tromaine Cobbs, Reevesville, South Carolina, ’21

…the first and last thing that I will see is the big ring statue at the campus entrance symbolizing one point in my life where I chose not to turn and take the easy way out.

Tromaine Cobbs, Citadel Class of 2021

Who or what inspired you to attend The Citadel?

I chose to attend The Citadel because my grandmother always loved seeing me in my JROTC uniform and she told me to always continue to be great. I have also been working with two men who are brothers and who are both alumni of The Citadel at a W&B Enterprises. I have known them all my life.

Cades with Bruce Alexander marking in MLK Day Parade
Cadet Tromaine Cobbs seen on left holding banner during Charleston’s Martin Luther King Day parade

What was the most difficult obstacle you conquered that made you feel you earned the honor of wearing the ring?

The most difficult obstacle would be being more outgoing because I am naturally an introvert, but over these past years I began to talk more and made friendships with new brothers and sisters.

In what ways has this institution impacted your life?

This institution has continued to help me grow as a leader by introducing me into a whole new environment with countless opportunities to learn.

Why do you think it is important that cadets and/or people in general understand the symbolism and weight that the ring holds?

It is important for people to understand what the ring means because it represents much more than just an indication that I graduated from college. It stands for all the blood, sweat, and tears that have been shed before me. Additionally it shows that an individual wearing The Citadel band of gold will not be someone who will give up easily.

What is a song that describes your emotions leading up to Ring Day?

“Struggle No More” by Anthony Hamilton is a song that describes my emotions over these years, because the song takes about the hard times and how loved ones will help to lift you up and then being able to provide for your family without struggling through hard times.

What obligations do you feel you have in the future as a member of the Long Gray Line who wears the ring?

As a member of the Long Grey Line, I feel as though it will be my duty to not bring discredit to myself, family and the institution. I also feel that I should always continue to motivate others to be brave and to step out of their comfort zone in order for them to grow as a person.

What is inscribed on the inside of your ring and what is the significance?

A phrase that I have in my ring is “Humility over Pride.” To me, this means that a leader must be humble themselves in order to receive the loyalty of their followers and then everyone would be able to be prideful of what has been accomplished.

You are connected to thousands of alumni, not only through your Citadel experience but through the ring. How does that make you feel?

Having the chance to wear the ring will be a unique and unreal experience, because the first and last thing that I will see is the big ring statue at the campus entrance symbolizing one point in my life where I chose not to turn and take the easy way out.

Cobbs is a 2nd Lieutenant in the Corps, a Civil Engineering major, and enjoys being a member of The Citadel Gospel Choir.

Note: This is one in a series stories intended to show the different journeys members of The Citadel Class of 2021 have undertaken to earn their bands of gold. The Regimental Public Affairs team, Cadet Ruby Bolden, public affairs officer, and Cadet Samantha Walton, public affairs NCO sent a list of questions to participating cadets. These are the resulting stories.

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My ring story: Striving to lead https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-striving-to-lead/ Fri, 18 Sep 2020 20:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18677 I believe the ring shows that you are willing to do what it takes to successfully manage any task that may be thrown your way]]>

Hampton Rowe, Sumter, South Carolina, Regimental Executive Officer, ’21

I hope to become a game warden for the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

Cadet Hampton Rowe, ’21

Who or what inspired you to attend The Citadel?

I have had a lot of family come through The Citadel, which played a role in my attending this institution. Primarily though, I came for the challenge and to prove to the ones who told me I would never make it the first year, that they were wrong. 

What was the most difficult obstacle you conquered that made you feel you earned the honor of wearing the ring?

Honestly, the most difficult challenge I have had was trying to keep developing into the leader I was asked to be, and wanted to be for each level of rank that I achieved in the Corps. I wanted to become a leader that left an impression on the ones in lower ranks, that helped them achieve their goals, as well as my classmates. I am not perfect, but I have tried to be an effective leader and one I hope some people will remember. 

What is inscribed on the inside of your ring and what is the significance?

My ring holds the initials of a friend of mine that committed suicide the summer before arriving as a knob. Every day I think of him and try to live my life the way he did when it came to how well he treated his close friends and anyone he met. We were inseparable basically since we were born. I have his initials in my ring so when people look inside of my ring they will ask and I can tell them about how great of a guy he was. 

In what ways has this institution impacted your life?

Our college has helped me become an individual that people recognize as someone who goes to The Citadel — by that I mean a sense of values and standards. It has helped my self-confidence and decision making. It has also helped me develop respect for other people and those who might be different from me, both on campus and outside of The Citadel. 

When you put your ring on your finger, what cadet memories will you be thinking about?

I think probably the ring will give me memories of all the hard work I have put in as a cadet. Also it will always allow me to look back at all the friendships that I have created while being here. 

“We wear the ring” is a phrase alumni often use. What does it mean to wear the ring?

It represents the hard work, commitment and responsibility that a graduate put toward earning the band of gold. I believe the ring shows that you are willing to do what it takes to successfully manage any task that may be thrown your way. I also believe that it shows people outside of this school that you are a person who strives for high achievement, and that you carry that with you when you exit the gates for good. 

What obligations do you feel you have in the future as a member of the Long Gray Line who wears the ring?

Always striving to lead by example, with the goal of inspiring people to then also lead in a way that symbolizes the true meaning of being a servant-leader.  

You are connected to thousands of alumni, not only through your Citadel experience but through the ring. How does that make you feel?

It makes me feel like I am part of the closest group of people that there is. Once a you’ve earned that ring, no matter what year you graduate, or where you go, you will always run into alumni that will share great stories look out for each other.

Rowe is a Business Administration major and hopes to become a game warden for the state of South Carolina.

Cadet Hampton Rowe with his prized wild turkey after hunting during spring furlough

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My ring story: Don’t tell me I can’t do it https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-dont-tell-me-i-cant-do-it/ Thu, 17 Sep 2020 18:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18610 This is a group of people who have become family to me. This picture was taken after our first SMI. First Row Left to Right Alfred Gregg, Desmond Lewis, Ruby Bolden, Myself, Dennis Hathorn, Jacob True, Kienen Holmes. Second Row Olivia HimeThis is a group of people who have become family to me. This picture was taken after our first SMI. First Row Left to Right Alfred Gregg, Desmond Lewis, Ruby Bolden, Myself, Dennis Hathorn, Jacob True, Kienen Holmes. Second Row Olivia Hime"When people back home heard that I was thinking about going to a military college they kept telling me that I wasn’t going to make it."]]> This is a group of people who have become family to me. This picture was taken after our first SMI. First Row Left to Right Alfred Gregg, Desmond Lewis, Ruby Bolden, Myself, Dennis Hathorn, Jacob True, Kienen Holmes. Second Row Olivia HimeThis is a group of people who have become family to me. This picture was taken after our first SMI. First Row Left to Right Alfred Gregg, Desmond Lewis, Ruby Bolden, Myself, Dennis Hathorn, Jacob True, Kienen Holmes. Second Row Olivia Hime

Zachary Joseph Henriquez, Staten Island, New York, ’21

Photo above: “This is a group of people who have become family to me. This picture was taken after our first SMI this semester.” Left to Right: Alfred Gregg, Desmond Lewis, Ruby Bolden, me, Dennis Hathorn, Jacob True, Kienen Holmes. Front: Olivia Hime.

Who or what inspired you to attend The Citadel?

It was not a “who” that inspired me to attend The Citadel but, a “what.” When people back home heard that I was thinking about going to a military college they kept telling me that I wasn’t going to make it, and I think that that was one of the biggest driving factors. I feel when someone tells me that I can’t do something or can’t make it through something, then I have to prove them wrong. I show them just how strong I am.

What was the most difficult obstacle you conquered that made you feel you earned the honor of wearing the ring?

I’m originally from Staten Island, New York, so that is 745 miles away from the front gates of The Citadel. Being so far from home and out of my comfort zone was only made worse by that fact that I was 10 hours and 47 minutes away from my family and if anything happened, I would not be able to get there in time.

A few months before I graduated high school my uncle was diagnosed with liver cancer. We were very very close. After I matriculated, there was one thought always on my mind: will I get to say goodbye to him? We knobs made it to Thanksgiving and I was able to go home. I was extremely happy to spend the holiday with him. He passed away during winter furlough and being away from family after losing a close family member was the toughest thing ever and sometimes, I thought I wouldn’t make it through, but I did. Knowing that I made it through what was probably one of the most difficult things in my life, and stayed on track, makes me confident I earned the honor of wearing the ring.

In what ways has this institution impacted your life?

I have met people who have become great friends, mentors, and family. I would probably never change this experience for anything. I have learned so much in these past years that I would never learn elsewhere.

What is inscribed on the inside of your ring and what is the significance?

On the inside of my ring it says “And still, I rise, ” a quote from poet and philosopher Maya Angelou. I chose this quote because one thing that I have held onto is no matter what you face, it’s not the end. After losing my uncle to liver cancer my freshman year, I found in my junior year that my aunt had breast cancer. I thought it was the end of the world. I was lucky enough to have my closest friends to lean on. I went from thinking it was the end of the world to knowing that no matter what comes my way, it will not stop me.

When you put your ring on your finger, what will you be thinking about being a cadet?

Of course, I will remember all the stuff from knob year, but I will never forget the people here. They are what make everything worth it. I think one of the scariest parts about this year is knowing that soon, I won’t be able to see some of these people everyday who have become like family.

What is a song that describes your emotions leading up to Ring Day?

“Started from the bottom” by Drake. We all started this as knobs, at the very bottom of the totem pole, and now we are the seniors that run the Corps.

You are connected to Alumni, not only through your Citadel Experience but through the wearing of the ring. How does that make you feel?

Knowing that I’m connected to the people that came before me is amazing. Knowing that I will now wear the same ring, alongside the people that I looked up to before, makes me even more proud of this accomplishment.

Why do you think it is important that cadets and/or people in general understand the symbolism and weight that the ring holds?

It is important for cadets to understand the elements in the ring that we wear. It symbolizes a bond. We have all been molded, bent and shaped to be the men and women we now are. The weight of the ring is like the weight of the standards the school has set; we must carry them everywhere we go.

Henriquez is a Health and Exercise Science major.

Note: This is the first in a series stories intended to show the different journeys members of The Citadel Class of 2021 have undertaken to earn their bands of gold. The Regimental Public Affairs team, Cadet Ruby Bolden, public affairs officer, and Cadet Samantha Walton, public affairs NCO sent a list of questions to participating cadets. These are the resulting stories.

This is me as a knob during my first week, with Marcus Milhouse who graduated in 2019. He was my cadre squad leader and my mentor.
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