Campus Life – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 11 Mar 2021 18:47:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Campus Life – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Col. Thomas J. Gordon, U. S. Marine Corps, to be next Commandant of Cadets at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/col-thomas-j-gordon-u-s-marine-corps-to-be-next-commandant-of-cadets-at-the-citadel/ Mon, 08 Mar 2021 19:08:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22517 Colonel Thomas J. Gordon, USMC, The Citadel Class of 1991, brings a wealth of leadership, operational, and academic experience to the role]]>

The President of The Citadel has selected the college’s next Commandant of Cadets.

Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC, (Ret.) sent the following announcement to the campus community on Monday, March 8:

After an exhaustive vetting and interview process, I am pleased to announce our next Commandant of Cadets.

Colonel Thomas J. Gordon, USMC, The Citadel Class of 1991, brings a wealth of leadership, operational, and academic experience to the role. I am certain he will build on the strong foundations set by Captain Geno Paluso. We are fortunate such dynamic leaders choose to return to their Alma Mater in this critical position. The Corps will continue in good hands.

I wish to thank everyone who expressed interest in the position, particularly finalists Captain Matt Meilstrup, Colonel Mike Larsen ‘92 and Colonel Scott Nahrgang ‘96. This was not an easy choice, each had extraordinary success in their military careers, and the requisite skill and experience to be a successful commandant.

I also thank our search committee, and everyone who took time to assist in the selection process.

On behalf of the entire Citadel Family, I welcome Colonel Gordon, wife Candace, son Shane, and daughters Shannen and Shelby to campus.

The Citadel Commandant of Cadets is a vice presidential position that is responsible for the command, leadership development and oversight of the 2,300-member South Carolina Corps of Cadets and is crucial to the success of the Military College of South Carolina.

Gordon sent this statement in response to his selection:

“I am honored and humbled for the opportunity to serve The Citadel as the next Commandant of Cadets. I am grateful for the confidence Gen. Walters and the BOV have extended, and am excited to give back to the institution that has given me so much. Candace and I are looking forward to returning to Charleston and serving alongside our Citadel family. “

Col. Thomas J. Gordon, USMC

Gordon graduated from The Citadel in 1991, becoming a U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) officer. He retires from military service in May 2021 after 30 years.

Gordon is currently the Director of the Command & Staff College at Quantico, Virginia, one of the four Department of Defense professional military education colleges where he leads the development of future commanders of the joint force with graduate level education.

Previously Gordon served as the Chief of Staff to the Commandant of the Marine Corps, supporting the coordination of policy, plans, and decisions governing the manning, training, and resourcing of nearly 200,000 Marines and 13,000 civilian employees with an annual budget of $42 billion.

Examples of other his positions include serving as a Resident Fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations and as Commanding Officer for a 4,000 member organization executing world-wide combat operations that provided the communications, intelligence, electronic and cyber warfare capabilities, supporting arms integration, and liaison capabilities for the USMC. Gordon holds a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from Webster University and studied as a Fellow of International Relations and National Security with Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The search for a new commandant was initiated in November following an announcement about the retirement of the current commandant, Captain Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.), ’89, who will leave at the end of the current academic year. Paluso joined his alma mater as commandant in 2014.

Approved photo of Col Gordon
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Upcoming News from The Citadel – March 2021 https://today.citadel.edu/upcoming-news-from-the-citadel-march-2021/ Mon, 08 Mar 2021 14:25:54 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22388 A look at some of the events happening in and around The Citadel’s campus, including those honoring Women's History Month.]]>

Global Women in Leadership Day

Monday, March 8
9-11 a.m.
Virtual, via WebEx
Free, open to The Citadel community and the public

One of the first major events for Women’s History Month on campus involves a high-flying graduate from The Citadel Graduate College.

Alecia Lopez Floyd — who earned a Master’s in Business Administration in 2009 and a Master’s in Project Management in 2016 — currently works in leadership development for Boeing. Now, she’s working with her alma mater to host an event celebrating International Women’s Day.

Floyd, along with The Citadel’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Council and the Diversity Advisory Board, are hosting the event virtually on Monday, March 8 from 9 to 11 a.m.

The event will focus on self-preservation, especially during times of isolation, and will feature speakers cross the world, including:

  • Alicia Lopez Floyd – United States
  • Anu Hatti – India
  • Ilaria Sbrilli – Italy
  • Samhita Seal – India
  • Catherine Ahdjila Geffroy – France
  • Saranya Udayakumar – India
  • Agnieszka  Buczak – Poland

The women specifically address areas such as self-awareness, self-efficacy, self-promotion and self-care. The event will also include a 15-minute breakout session.

To join the session, click here.

Meeting number (access code): 144 762 0621
Meeting password: aDVDmk445DZ

First round on the 2021 Corps-Wide Speaking Competition

Monday, March 22
2-4 p.m.
Patricia McArver Public Speaking Lab
Open to cadets

Every member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets has a personal story to tell — and one of the annual traditions on campus gives them a chance to win money for speaking up.

Though the pandemic has forced some small changes to the structure, the 11th Annual Henry Dale Smith Corps-Wide Public Speaking Contest will kick off on March 22.

From 2 – 4 p.m., cadets are invited to record a five to seven minute speech in the Patricia McArver Public Speaking Lab, in Bond 367.

Competing cadets can present original speeches on topics such as:

  • A personal story that shaped their life
  • History revisited
  • The benefits of science
  • How culture has shaped them or society
  • A hobby or passion

The following round will be held the week after, where cadets will present their speeches, live, to judges. Speeches given in that round will be open for the public.

The first-place winner will earn the title “Best Speaker in the Corps,” an award included in the college’s annual Commencement Week Awards Convocation, as well as a $500 prize. The second-place cadet will receive $300.

The speaking competition is hosted by The Patricia McArver Public Speaking Lab, where students, faculty and staff can polish their public speaking skills. From timid talkers to confident communicators, The Public Speaking Lab works one-on-one with a variety of individuals to create great presenters.

Presentations on “Climate change and its impact on international and national security”

Tuesday, March 15
6 p.m.
Virtual, via Zoom
Free, open to the public

The threat of climate change brings with it wide-ranging risks. One of those risks is to national security, not just for the United States but for the world as a whole.

That’s why The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies is focusing on climate change for its upcoming session of Emerging National Security Topics.

The presentation on March 15 will feature:

The lecture series will be streamed online at 6 p.m.

Click here to join the Zoom meeting.

The Emerging Topics Lecture Series is open to the public, and is especially designed for Citadel cadets and students, and others interested in hearing national security issues by Citadel faculty members, alongside other international experts.

The Gold Star Journal Academic Conference

Tuesday, March 30
6-7:30 p.m.
Buyer Auditorium
Free, open to Citadel cadets, students, faculty and staff

The Citadel’s premier scholarly publication, The Gold Star Journal, will celebrate its 25th anniversary during an Academic Conference on Tuesday, March 30.

The featured speakers will be the published authors from the 2021 edition of The Gold Star Journal. Authors and papers published in this year’s edition include:

  • Hannah Dion, 2022, Biology Major, “Cleopatra:  The Propagated Villain of Rome”
  • Joseph M. Field, 2021, Political Science Major, “The Importance of Military Discipline in the 17th Century Manchu Army as Seen in Dzengseo’s ‘Diary of my Service in the Army’”
  • Nick Fricchione, 2021, History Major, “German War Graves: A Tragic and Somber Reminder of Cost of War”
  • Frank Hoffman, Graduate Student, International Politics and Military Affairs Major, “Engaged Containment: A Viable Solution to the North Korea Problem”
  • Thomas Kyte, 2022, Political Science Major, One Belt and One Road Right Through Ethiopia?
  • Ashley Ruiz, 2022, Political Science and Intelligence Major, “Geopolitical Impacts of Wahhabism in the Middle East”
  • Jalen Singleton, 2022, Computer Science Major, “Cybersecurity and Cryptography: The Interrelation”
  • Shiloh Smiles, 2021, Computer Science and Cyber Operations Major, “Implications of Quantum Computing on Computational Complexity Theory”
  • Dylan R. Wood, 2023, Mechanical Engineering, “Electric Car Battery Development and Analysis”

The conference will include presentations and awards.  Free copies of the journal will be available.

This year’s edition features nine cross-disciplinary papers written by The Citadel’s best and brightest undergraduate and graduate students and many photographs taken by Citadel students.

Social distancing will be enforced, and hand sanitizer will be provided upon entry.

Registration for The Citadel Applied Physics Experience

Faculty and cadets in the department are working with high school students three times a year through The Citadel Applied Physics Experience. It’s a virtual, but still hands-on, “class” that teaches high school students about physics and expands their knowledge of the study’s practical applications.

The department is currently accepting registrations for both the spring and summer sessions, after having kicked off the program in the fall semester. Faculty and cadets in the Department of Physics will continue to hold events like this three times a year — in both semesters and during the summer.

The experience is not limited to certain high schools. Physics faculty members will send a kit, for the hands-on portion, to registered students — so anyone who can receive mail can participate. Any student can participate regardless of STEM background.

For more information on The Citadel Applied Physics Experience, click here.

To register for the spring session, click here. The deadline for this session is March 12.

To register for the summer session, click here. The deadline for this session is June 15.

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Recognizing the women ROTC leaders helping train America’s next military officers https://today.citadel.edu/recognizing-the-women-rotc-leaders-helping-lead-americas-next-military-officers/ Tue, 02 Mar 2021 17:34:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22398 Women are -- and for decades have been -- an integral part of the team that helps the Military College of South Carolina produce so many future leaders]]>

Women’s History Month is March 1 – 31, 2021

The 40th anniversary of the formal celebration of women in the United States is March 7, 2021. According to WomensHistoryMonth.gov, Women’s History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28, which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as “Women’s History Week.”

At The Citadel, approximately 200 graduates accept commissions every year in all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces to become officers. Women are — and for decades have been — an integral part of the team that helps the Military College of South Carolina produce so many future leaders.

U.S. Air Force/Space Force Detachment 765

The Air Force/Space Force ROTC Detachment at The Citadel is one of the largest in the nation with more than 500 cadets. The department supports The Citadel’s mission of educating and developing principled leaders, providing select cadets with the opportunity to earn a commission in the U.S. Air Force upon graduation.

There are six women in the detachment that work as professors of military science or staff. They include:

The women of The Citadel’s Air Force ROTC detachment. (Left to right: Ms. Cheryl Oliver, Maj. Kathleen Thurber, Capt. Jessica Specht, Capt. Rachel Loomis, Capt. Julie Dewey and Capt. Heather Verner)

U.S. Army ROTC Palmetto Battalion

The Citadel’s Army ROTC detachment, known as Palmetto Battalion, is the second largest of the 275 detachments across the United States Army Cadet Command.

It is comprised of cadets from The Citadel, as well as the College of Charleston, Charleston Southern University, and the Medical University of South Carolina.

The detachment supports the U.S. Army, the Army National Guard, and the Army Reserves. There are five women in the detachment working as professors of military science or staff. They include:

  • Cpt. Laura Alvarez, professor of Military Science
  • Michelle Brown, administrative assistant
  • Sgt. Quamar Crapps
  • 1st Lt. Natalie Thompson, recruiting operations officer
The women of The Citadel Army ROTC department. (Left to right: 1st Lt. Natalie Thompson, Sgt. Quamar Crapps, Sgt. Kellin Varela and Cpt. Laura Alvarez. Not pictured: Michelle Brown)

The Citadel would like to thank all of the women working in ROTC detachments at the college for their dedication and leadership.

Women’s History Month events and resources

APPLE
Feature stories and highlights honor powerful female voices in the App Store and Apple TV app, on Apple Music and Apple Arcade, and in curated collections for Apple News, Apple Podcasts, and Apple Books. Learn more here.

Classrooms without borders: Film and Discussion about Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Free public event, with preregistration required. March 7, 2021 Film and Discussion “RBG” with Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice David Wecht, litigator Ann-Marie Ahern, and Prof. Jonathan Entin- moderated by attorney Courtney Cardin. Sign up here: https://classroomswithoutborders.org/events/rsvp.php?365

Grammy.com on Spotify
Women’s History Month playlist featuring the nominees from the 2020 Grammy Awards Show. The link to the playlist is here.

Military.com
Every March Military.com marks women’s history month by recognizing the contributions made and the glass ceilings broken each day by women in the U.S. ArmyNavyAir ForceMarine Corps and Coast Guard. Read a selection of featured stories here.

NASA
During the month of March, NASA celebrates and pays tribute to the many women who have played an essential role in shaping the history of the  Agency. From astronauts to specialists in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), as well as professionals in communications, human resources, and more, women are helping NASA fulfill its mission to explore our universe for the benefit of all. Learn more here.

Naval History and Heritage Command
On 7 March 1994, the Navy issued the first orders for women to be assigned aboard a combatant ship, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). Today, women serve in every rank from seaman to admiral and in every job from naval aviator to deep-sea diver. Read more here.

PBS.org
A collection of stories by and about women for March 2021. See the list here.

Smithsonian and National Portrait Gallery
What does a leader do? Together with educators from the National Air and Space Museum and the National Women’s History Museum, we will explore this key question in relationship to portraits of activists Sojourner Truth and Sylvia Rivera, and pilot Bessie Coleman. Register for this free event here.

Society of Women Engineers
SWE celebrates some historical figures in the field of engineering who “built American, fought for civil rights, and who were pioneers in their field.” Learn more here.

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Members of The Citadel African American Society are presented club patches https://today.citadel.edu/members-of-the-citadel-african-american-society-are-presented-club-patches/ Fri, 26 Feb 2021 21:57:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22405 A new generation of cadets are officially patch-holding members of The Citadel's African American Society.]]>

A new generation of cadets has officially earned The Citadel African American Society membership patches. The cadets received their patches — fittingly — in February, Black History Month, in the lobby of Daniel Library.

As far as records show, this is the first time cadets in the African American Society have been able to earn club patches.

Cadets who have paid their membership dues, and attended a certain number of meetings, are eligible for their club patch. For cadets who had paid their dues, the first round of patches were free, paid for by The Citadel African American Alumni Association.

The African American Society was founded in 1971. In the 1972 yearbook where, the organization made its debut, the caption underneath says it was founded for “the purpose of providing members with a spectrum of Black History, fine arts, and American life style. Members are involved with social work, which gives them knowledge and insight about problems facing Black people today.”

Cadets from The Citadel African American Society pose with their patches in Daniel Library

Before the pandemic curtailed their volunteering opportunities, cadets with the African American Society would travel to local public schools — such as Charleston Development Academy and Burke High School — to help students with their homework, or sometimes to just speak with — and encourage — them.

“The Society has been very instrumental in my cadet career. We talk about our history in our institution, as well as our history outside of it,” said Cadet Ruby Bolden, Regimental Affairs Public Officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. “I have a sense of pride when I say that I am a part of a society that represents all of me! The bonds we make in our Society come from our experiences — both good and bad — and our triumphs as a people.”

The Society was the concept of Joseph Shine, ’71, and Larry Ferguson, ’73.

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Most distinguished cadets named to fall 2020 President’s List https://today.citadel.edu/most-distinguished-cadets-named-to-fall-2020-presidents-list/ Thu, 25 Feb 2021 21:11:20 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22377 The President’s List, awarded for academic and military excellence, is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel.]]>

Photo: General Glenn Walters, UCMC (Ret.), Class of 1979, during the Gold Star and President’s List presentation on Feb. 25, 2021

The President’s List is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel. It indicates excellence in academics and military duties. The list is a combination of the Dean’s List and the Commandant’s Distinguished List and is composed of cadets who contribute the most to their companies while maintaining excellent military and academic records.

The following cadets have been recognized for their outstanding work during the fall 2020 semester:

First nameLast name
TrevorAtkins
MaryBallentine
JackBeehler
CarletonBeiliff
CharlotteBrailsford
TylerBurgess
PatrickCamatcho
BrentonCarnes
JackCasazza
AlbertCastro
JonahCharles
Yen RuChen
RyanCherrier
PatrickCherry
AlexanderClark
JoshuaCoats
HunterCongdon
GrantConner
WilliamConnor
CharlesCorte
JonathanCribb
AydenDevlin
MaximillianDonegan
JacksonDulay
DakotaDurham
MayaElassal
ChaseErvin
GraysonFree
NicholasFricchione
ZavierGebrayel
CharlesGeiger
JeremyGentle
CollinGleco
CarrettGraettinger
CodyGreen
CatherineGuenther
MitchellHamm
ThomasHammerstone
BuddyHerring
ElijahHolder
KienenHolmes
MichaelHooks
MalcolmJackson
IanJenkins
StephenKaiser-Parlette
JacobKnapp
RomanKokowsky
PatrickKrese
SamuelLittle
AveryLollis
StevenLynch
BrandonMacDonald
TriniMartinez
DavidMcBain
JakeMcPherson
JohnMichne
ZacharyMooney
JosephMurphy
GrantNorman
BrooksO'Brian
TizianaOrtega
TimothyOverend
IsaacPatterson
SamuelPoulin
RonaldPrince
MethRanaweera
WilliamRathke
StevenReisinger
KevinRevuelta
JackRose
IanSchultz
HadouSlimani
GrantSpeer
EthanStanley
JosephStilwell
BradleyStone
DanielStone
RichardStuckey
WilliamTempleton
CionnorThomas
BraxtonWeaver
JonathanWestmoreland
MadelynWojciehowski
JesseYoung
SamuelZuschlag
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At the Citadel, a three-step approach to keeping college-age Eagle Scouts involved https://today.citadel.edu/at-the-citadel-a-three-step-approach-to-keeping-college-age-eagle-scouts-involved/ Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:22:40 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22319 Members of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South CarolinaMembers of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South CarolinaThese Eagle Scouts take trips together, host events for local packs and troops, and complete acts of service in the community.]]> Members of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South CarolinaMembers of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South Carolina

As seen on ScoutingMagazine.org
By Bryan Wendell

Photo above: Members of The Citadel Eagle Scout Association in January 2021 in Charleston, South Carolina

The saying, repeated at Eagle Scout courts of honor for generations, goes something like this: “The Eagle Scout Award isn’t the end of your journey. It’s the beginning.”

It should sound like a challenge — something to remind young people that they remain Eagle Scouts for life.

And yet, when Eagle Scouts turn 18 and are no longer youth members of the BSA, the Scouting part of their journey often does end.

They move away to attend college or start a career, effectively closing their Scouting chapter until they have kids of their own.

Ted Fienning and his colleagues at the Citadel have a plan to change that.

“As an Eagle myself, I’m very familiar with the feeling many young Scouts have that it’s, ‘get it done by 18 or you’re out!’” he says. “That’s a consistent message to our Scouts: You’re done at 18. In effect, it means that at a time when Scouts are leaving their home towns to head to college, we allow them to disappear. And we do so right when they’re at the pinnacle of training, having earned Scouting’s highest award.”

Fienning is the staff advisor for the Citadel Eagle Scout Association, or CESA — a group of 50 Eagle Scouts who attend the senior military college in Charleston, S.C. These Eagle Scouts take trips together, host events for local packs and troops, and complete acts of service in the community.

They’re led by CESA President Jackson Jenkins, an Eagle Scout from Troop 392 of the Quapaw Area Council in Arkansas and a junior political science major at the Citadel.

“It was always taught to me by my Scoutmasters — Mr. Ken, Mr. Scott, Mr. Mark and others — that giving back to the program as an adult is one of the most important things I could do,” Jenkins says. “When I learned that the Citadel had an Eagle Scout Association, I jumped at the chance to get involved with the group and stay involved with Scouting as a college student.”

Through CESA, Jenkins says he’s been able to make friends, serve others and “continue to grow both myself and other young Eagles as leaders, all while being able to have fun and fulfill that promise I made to give back to the program that gave so much to me.”

So how do they do it? How has CESA bridged the gap between youth and adult Scouting? By taking a three-pronged approach.

Members of the Citadel Eagle Scout Association in Fall 2017. (Courtesy of CESA)

1. Give them a shared purpose

Young people, especially those in college, want to make an impact. They want to know that their work matters.

For the members of CESA, that shared purpose is serving others.

“We identify an annual project or two that they can plan, serve and sink their teeth and skills into,” Fienning says.

Last year, they launched a Cub Scout Adventure Rodeo. This year, they’re hosting a Scouting University (at an actual university), as well as designing and building a trail for a nearby state park.

“We also train them on adult Scouting opportunities and connect them to packs and troops to help out where they can,” Fienning says.

Members of the Citadel Eagle Scout Association in Fall 2016. (Courtesy of CESA)

2. Remove financial barriers

CESA members pay no dues.

CESA covers all costs, including transportation to and from service events, like CESA’s “Mom & Me” and “Dad & Me” camps or support at the Coastal Carolina Council’s other Scouting events.

To make this work, you need an advocate who works for the college. In addition to his role as CESA advisor, Fienning is the associate director for professional leadership programs at the Citadel, meaning he has the administration’s ear.

Fienning worked with the college’s foundation to build a Citadel Eagle Scout Association Fund. The fund raised more than $6,000 in a campaign last year, which will go a long way toward meeting the group’s $1,500 annual budget for some time.

Over the years, this fund will kick out 5% of endowed funds to keep these Eagles serving in perpetuity. The fund will pay for equipment, logistics, food and more.

“Working with the college foundation really reduces the administrative burden of tracking accounts and donors, plus it lends credibility to the Eagle Scout Association and its ties to the college,” Fienning says.

Members of the Citadel Eagle Scout Association volunteered at a Cub Scout day camp in October 2019. (Courtesy of CESA)

3. Feed them

It’s a tradition as old as colleges themselves.

“College students will gather for free food,” Fienning says.

Sure enough, CESA leaders understand that food isn’t the only reason members attend meetings, but it helps. CESA cooks its meals outdoors in large batches — a delicious serving of nostalgia that makes these Eagle Scouts remember time spent in their home troops.

“Scouts bring their mess kits, and we eat well,” Fienning says.

Starting your own collegiate Eagle Scout Association

Want to start an Eagle Scout Association at your school and keep these young Eagles around the Scouting campfire?

To help CESA grow, Fienning says he worked closely with Ray Capp and the BSA Alumni Association. That’s a great place for anyone to start.

To learn more about the Citadel Eagle Scout Association, visit the group’s official Facebook page.

Jackson Jenkins, CESA president

‘One of the greatest influences on my life’

Jenkins, the CESA president and Eagle Scout, is a shining example of why we need groups like CESA.

We need to keep young people like him engaged — especially while their greatest Scouting memories are still fresh on their minds.

Jenkins has been an unofficial Scout since he was 4 and started tagging along on his older brother’s Cub Scout adventures.

The instant he could join, Jenkins did.

“Ever since then, it’s been one of the greatest influences on my life,” he says. “The Scout Oath and Law, the examples of my adult leaders, and the amazing experiences gained on so many countless days and nights of camping have shaped me into the person I am today. I am so very thankful for all of it.”

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Commandant finalist presentations getting underway Feb. 22 https://today.citadel.edu/commandant-finalist-presentations-getting-underway-feb-22/ Fri, 19 Feb 2021 19:02:27 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22294 A portion of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in parade practice on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 5, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)A portion of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in parade practice on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 5, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)The Citadel Commandant of Cadets is a vice presidential position that is responsible for the command, leadership development and oversight of the 2,300-member South Carolina Corps of Cadets.]]> A portion of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in parade practice on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 5, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)A portion of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in parade practice on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 5, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Col. Thomas Gordon, USMC, ’91, will be the first of the four finalists for the position of Commandant of Cadets to make a presentation to the campus community at noon on Monday, Feb. 22.  

During individual presentations on different days, Gordon and the other finalists will address this question: “Describe how you, as the Commandant of Cadets, will advance The Citadel’s mission of educating and developing our students to become principled leaders in all walks of life by instilling the core values of The Citadel in a disciplined and intellectually challenging environment.”

There will be limited seating in Bond 165 for each presentation on a first-come, first-served basis. As an alternative, members of the campus community are encouraged to watch the candidates remotely via Zoom, with a different link for each presenter. A brief registration form will be required before viewers will permitted into the Zoom meeting.

The Citadel Commandant of Cadets is a vice presidential position that is responsible for the command, leadership development and oversight of the 2,300-member South Carolina Corps of Cadets and is crucial to the success of the Military College of South Carolina. The current commandant, Captain Geno Paluso, USN (Ret.), ’89, will retire from the position in June.

Col. Thomas Gordon, USMC, ’91

Col Tom Gordon headshot
Col. Thomas Gordon, USMC, ’91

Gordon graduated from The Citadel in 1991, becoming a U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) officer. He retires from military service in May 2021 after 30 years. Gordon is currently the Director of the Command & Staff College at Quantico, Virginia, one of the four Department of Defense Professional Military Education Colleges where he leads the development of future commanders of the joint force with graduate level education.

The Zoom presentation link for this candidate is: https://citadelonline.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_YZzXtp0yQG2474tA-Kp2zw.

The other finalists will present at noon on these dates, in Bond 165 and via Zoom:

February 24: Capt. Matt Meilstrup, USCG

Capt. Matt Meilstrup, USCG

Meilstrup graduated from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Academy in 1992 and continues to serve the USCG. He is currently Senior Manager, Logistics and Business Operations for the USCG, directing enterprise-level logistics policy, procedures and integrated assessments and business operations for the nearly $2 billion directorate. 

The Zoom presentation link for Meilstrup is:
https://citadelonline.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_D55N3l_VRz-rsRkO_qgk5g 

February 26: Col. Mike Larsen, U.S. Army, ’92

Col. Mike Larsen, U.S. Army, ’92

Larsen graduated from The Citadel in 1992 and has served in the U.S. Army as an active duty Infantry Officer for 28 years. Larsen is currently Deputy Commanding Officer for the U.S. Army Training Center at Fort Jackson where he is second in command over the Basic Combat Training of 50,000 soldiers annually.

The Zoom link to view Larsen’s presentation is:
https://citadelonline.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Tkeb3a1ITe-92i8864MWaw

March 1: Col. Scott Nahrgang, USAF, ’96

Col. Scott Nahrgang, USAF, ’96

Nahrgang graduated from The Citadel in 1996 and became an officer in the U.S. Air Force (USAF). He continues to serve almost 25 years after his commission. Nahrgang is currently Chief of Command and Control, Electronic Warfare and Global Integrated Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Strategic Plans and Programs, at the USAF headquarters in the Pentagon.

The Zoom link to watch Nahrgang’s presentation is:
https://citadelonline.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gF-48PkYR9uVG9x4CqFswQ

How to weigh in on the candidates

If you are a current member of The Citadel campus community and would like to participate in the commandant candidates feedback surveys, please email the Office of Institutional Research at InstitutionalResearch@citadel.edu.

  • Emails requesting a link should be received by 5:00 p.m. on the day of each candidate’s presentation.
  • Each email will contain a unique link to the candidate’s survey. 
  • The email may not be forwarded and can only be completed once. 
  • The survey will remain available until 5:00 p.m., (1700) EST, the day after each presentation.

Read more about the finalists here.

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From the Corps to the Chapel: Meet Chaplain Aaron Meadows https://today.citadel.edu/from-the-corps-to-the-chapel-meet-chaplain-aaron-meadows/ Tue, 16 Feb 2021 19:36:07 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22033 The former cadet, and current Air Force reservist, will now serve his alma mater as the Chaplain to the Corps of Cadets.]]>

“Remember Now Thy Creator in the Days of Thy Youth”

Those old words above Summerall Chapel greeted the new Chaplain to the Corps of Cadets, Aaron Meadows, a member of the Class of 2004.

The former cadet, and current Air Force reservist, will now serve his alma mater as the Chaplain to the Corps of Cadets.

Meadow’s role will involve tending to the spiritual needs of cadets, alumni, faculty and staff and also serving as a community leader, bringing religious leaders from different faiths around the city together for worship and fellowship. He also leads celebrations, such as the annual Christmas Candlelight Services, and the celebrations of the lives of the many people who request to have funeral services in the chapel.

Learn more about Ch, Lt. Col. Meadows below:

How many years have you served in the military?

I graduated from The Citadel in 2004 and accepted a commission that May — so May of this year will be 17 years in the U.S. Air Force Reserves.

Why did you join the military?

I actually grew up in a military family — a Navy family — and I applied here my junior year. I got in, and I didn’t apply anywhere else.

My family could not pay for me to come to college, so I had to have some kind of scholarship, and I ended up getting a four year Army scholarship. My sophomore year, I switched from Army to Air Force but was able to maintain the scholarship.

Why did you want to become a chaplain in the Air Force?

My junior year, when I was doing campus ministry as a cadet — I was involved here in the chapel, went to Campus Crusade, Baptist Collegiate Ministry, Charleston Wesley Foundation and several other campus ministries — God was calling me to ministry as a chaplain, so that’s when I switched. I had to go through a ton of hoops because there was no process to go from an active duty commitment to a reserve commitment at that time, and I was told it wouldn’t happen. But God just opened up a door and I was able to take a reserve commitment so I could go to seminary.

So I left The Citadel, went to seminary, and enrolled in the Chaplain Candidate Program. I became a chaplain, and I’m still an Air Force Reserve chaplain with the 315th Airlift Wing, stationed at Joint Base Charleston. Then God opened up the door for me to do campus ministry, which I’ve done with the Methodist Church for seven years. I am transitioning out of that to fully focus on my work here on campus.

Why have you stayed in the military?

I feel like God has given me the gifts and graces to do ministry in the military as a chaplain. I love caring for people, I love being able to meet people at the best of circumstances and — not that I love this part, exactly — but I also get to help people at their lowest, as well as people in the middle, too. And I get to do that from a perspective of faith.

As a Christian minister, I get to lead worship, I get to help people grow in their faith as Christians. As a chaplain I get to do this for everyone, for people of many faiths and beliefs. I get to help support others in their faiths or even those who have no faith at all. I get to be that person who’s there for them. That’s a big reason I’ve stayed in the military, but also why I wanted to do the chaplain job here at The Citadel.

What is the most defining moment of your service to date?

I think it would be all the times I was able to help multiple people — not just one person or moment. I feel like, for people who were at a low point of their life, or who’re completely lost and directionless, I was able to be a part of helping them get from where they were to where they needed to be — to a healthier place. God put me in the right place at the right time to help.

What does being an Air Force reservist mean to you?

I think that the beauty of the reserve world for me is that it lets me stay connected and be a part of the military, doing all the things I love to do there. I was initially planning on going active duty in 2010. I’d just started at a church in North Charleston that was struggling, but God started doing some really cool things, the church was growing and I thought, ‘I can’t abandon this ministry to go active duty.’ So I stayed in the Air Force Reserve.

What it’s allowed me to do is keep that military connection. That has opened up so many doors, even getting to work here at The Citadel. I get to do military ministry and to fulfill that part that I love, as well as staying connected to the church ministry and the civilian world. It’s allowed me to stay grounded in two, often, very different worlds.

What leadership qualities did you learn in the military that have helped guide you through your career and life?

There’s an important role that’s played by the military, so I think bringing that attitude, the understanding that sometimes you have to dig in and work hard, shows how there’s something valuable about sacrificing and working hard for the benefit of the whole. So I think those things — like adversity, discipline, getting yelled at — build the military attitude that’s part of making changes and breaking down barriers.

As an alumnus, what does it mean to you to take on this position?

I think that, when I walk around meeting cadets, they see me as just some 40-year-old balding guy — until they see my ring and say, “Wait a minute, you went here,” and then there’s an instant connection. We’ve done something similar.

As a cadet, I was a cadre corporal, squad sergeant, platoon sergeant, battalion recruiting master sergeant, regimental religious officer, on the honor committee, wrestler in my knob year — all those things I did as a cadet are now how I can better relate to current cadets.

Cadets know that as a graduate, I can relate to the fact that SMIs suck, or that I understand that morning PT isn’t always fun. I feel like I can understand those things in a way that I couldn’t if I hadn’t gone here. I feel like God’s gifted and graced me to support these young men and women and help transform their lives, specifically from a spiritual and faith-based aspect, for those who choose to engage there. But also for those who don’t, I think that I have an opportunity to help them in a positive way outside of the concepts and components of faith. That brings me joy — I feel like that’s a part of how God wired me.

What do you hope to accomplish as Chaplain to the SCCC?

I really want to be a part of growing the specific chapel ministry so, on campus, kids can grow in their faith and that part of their life for those who want to. We’re part of making this campus what it should be so that all students can come, thrive and leave here as better people.

Chaplain Aaron Meadows (center) with Summerall Chapel staff members LeLa Sijtsma (left) and Geri Jones (right).
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The Citadel to host Minority Contractor Info Session on Feb. 16 for Capers Hall replacement https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-to-host-minority-contractor-info-session-on-feb-16-for-capers-hall-replacement/ Mon, 15 Feb 2021 20:58:20 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22155 The exterior of Capers Hall is seen at The Citadel in Charleston,The exterior of Capers Hall is seen at The Citadel in Charleston,We intend for at least 10% of the work on the new Capers Hall to be awarded to minority contractors,” said Shawn Edwards, chief diversity officer for The Citadel.]]> The exterior of Capers Hall is seen at The Citadel in Charleston,The exterior of Capers Hall is seen at The Citadel in Charleston,

As seen on GroundBreakCarolinas.com

The Citadel has scheduled a Minority Contractor Information Session for February 16, 2021, for its Capers Hall Replacement Project. The Citadel will begin demolishing Capers Hall in the summer of 2021. The Capers Hall Replacement Project will cost $68 million. Of that amount, $50 million will go toward construction. It will be the largest construction project in the history of the college.

“This is an important project for The Citadel community and for the broader Charleston community. We intend for at least 10% of the work on the new Capers Hall to be awarded to minority contractors,” said Shawn Edwards, chief diversity officer for The Citadel. The Capers Hall Replacement project, and the goal of achieving a 10% minority contractor rate are both incorporated into the college’s strategic plan, Our Mighty Citadel 2026.

Edwards and representatives from the college’s Departments of Finance, and Facilities and Engineering are working together to grow the number of minority contractors the college has as resources to bid on services and projects, including the Capers Hall Replacement Project. One of the ways they are doing this is by hosting The Citadel Minority Contractor Information Session with several community partners including the Hispanic Business Association Charleston, the National Action Network Southeast chapter, and the Charleston Trident Urban League.

The college also has a program to increase the number of Veteran contractors, and plans to conduct similar events for Veterans.

About the session

The Citadel Minority Contractor Information Session will be held from 5:30 – 7p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 16, in the college’s Altman Center, which is the building at the end of the football stadium facing Fishburne St. The address is 68C Hagood Ave., and there is complimentary parking just outside of the building.

The session is open to all minority contractors in South Carolina.

Registration for in-person attendance is requested, but not required, by calling Nate Spells, Jr. at (803) 754-3395, extension 316, or by emailing cdi@cdi-sc.com.

The session can be attended virtually by registering at this link.

In 2019, Edwards began working with community partners to develop a list of minority contractors in the Lowcountry and the state. She says there are 25 now, and there is plenty of room for growth.

“We would like to engage many more minority contractor and suppliers. You do not need to be certified by the state to come to the session or to bid on some of the smaller projects. And, if you wish to become certified, The Citadel has plans to help you through that process.”

According to Edwards, helping minority contractors navigate the state procurement process benefits The Citadel and the state, because those contractors can subsequently bid on other state projects, increasing competition, which helps control costs.

More information about the session is in the flyer below:

Details on the Capers Hall Replacement Project

At least 75% of cadet and students at The Citadel take classes in Capers Hall at some point during their educations. It houses the college’s largest school, the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, which includes seven academic departments providing many required general education courses.

Constructed in the 50s and updated in the 70s, the building is the largest on campus. It cannot be affordably or effectively retrofitted for contemporary needs. The replacement project was approved by the city in 2020.

“The Citadel is a public college, we’re an iconic part of the Charleston city community and we want this to be an inviting space. This facility is going to be consistent with the Moorish design elements for which our campus is known,” said Col. John Dorrian, USAF (Ret), vice president of Communications and Marketing. “It will become the welcoming point for everyone entering Lesesne Gates.”

The Capers Hall replacement will be 40% larger than the current building. Some of the features will include 37 classrooms, 200 offices, collaborative work spaces and a 250-seat theater. Current plans call for Capers Hall to be demolished in June 2021 and for construction to be complete on the new building in 2023.

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Hicks: When things went wrong, these Charleston institutions did things right https://today.citadel.edu/hicks-when-things-went-wrong-these-charleston-institutions-did-things-right/ Fri, 05 Feb 2021 15:38:04 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21852 General Glenn Walters addresses campus regarding COVID-19General Glenn Walters addresses campus regarding COVID-19Unlike some people, the Corps of Cadets (to use another military term) has “embraced the suck.” They know this isn’t an ideal situation, but they’re doing what has to be done to remain on campus.]]> General Glenn Walters addresses campus regarding COVID-19General Glenn Walters addresses campus regarding COVID-19

As seen in The Post and Courier
By Brian Hicks

Photo above: The Citadel President, General Glenn Walters, addresses campus regarding COVID-19 in March, 2020

A lot of folks are flat-out doing this pandemic all wrong.

They don’t keep their distance, refuse to stay home when possible and consider it an infringement on their “freedom” to wear a mask. After nearly a year of this madness, they still don’t understand they can unwittingly spread the virus to others.

Or they just don’t care.

Everybody gripes about these types, and with good reason. But today, let’s recognize some of those who are doing it right. There are thousands of people in this community who’ve helped minimize the virus’ spread and pitched in with key assists for everyone else — and they deserve our appreciation.

Let’s start with The Citadel.

As you might imagine, a military college with about 2,300 cadets living together in barracks has the potential to become a monumental petri dish.

As of Monday, the campus had just 18 positive cases in quarantine.

Col. John Dorrian, The Citadel’s vice president for communications and marketing, says the college unsurprisingly treated its efforts to fight the virus as a military campaign. And even as cases of COVID-19 have spiked in the Lowcountry and pretty much everywhere else, Operation Fall Return has been an astonishing success.

Like most colleges, The Citadel went online in March but was determined to get students back on campus for the fall because, well, that’s sort of the point of being in the Corps of Cadets.

They sacrificed some traditions — no parades, for instance — and limited off-campus leave. Cadets divide their time between in-person and virtual instruction, and they are subject to weekly, random COVID testing. And, because it could, the college made masks a mandatory part of cadet uniforms.

The college learned a lot about containing the virus over the summer when the Marine Corps used the campus as a staging area for new recruits headed to Parris Island. Ultimately, The Citadel spent months preaching a pretty simple suggestion that many others can’t seem to get through their heads.

“If you follow CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) recommendations, they work,” Dorrian says.

If only everyone employed such common sense.

Unlike some people, the Corps of Cadets (to use another military term) has “embraced the suck.” They know this isn’t an ideal situation, but they’re doing what has to be done to remain on campus and maintain some semblance of normal.

There’s a lesson there.

A number of local businesses have shown that same fighting spirit. Last week, at a virtual version of its annual Industry Appreciation Luncheon, Charleston County’s Economic Development Department saluted some local businesses that have responded to this crisis like patriots.

Brackish, the company that makes those snazzy bow ties, and Kate McDonald Bridal, which makes wedding gowns, put their seamstresses to work making face masks for front-line health care workers at the beginning of the pandemic (when those were in short supply).

Extremiti3D made face masks and anti-fogging face shields for nonmedical use. The Bourne Group made face shields for health care workers. And Multiplastics not only made face shields, but clear dividers and partitions for schools, churches and businesses around the state.

Summit Worx reconfigured its manufacturing operations to make air purifying respirators for FEMA, which sent them to hospitals dealing with the worst coronavirus outbreaks.

You may remember High Wire Distilling, in collaboration with Palmetto Brewing, manufactured sanitizer when there was a shortage early in the pandemic. Turns out they distributed more than 5,000 gallons of sanitizer to fire stations, shelters and charities. And Life Industries Corporation manufactured FDA- and CDC-approved sanitizer for those who couldn’t use alcohol-based sanitizers.

Finally, Limehouse Produce donated 1,200 boxes of fresh fruits and vegetables to the Lowcountry Food Bank in the early weeks of the pandemic, and has since worked with local hospitals to feed people who need it most.

Steve Dykes, the county’s executive director of economic development, says these companies are nothing short of inspiring, a credit to the county.

“Our businesses and community came together to respond to challenging circumstances, drawing upon the resiliency, generosity and grit that have always been at the core of this region,” Dykes says.

And that brings us back to a lesson that Dorrian says The Citadel has taught its entire campus: “It’s really not about you, it’s about everybody else.”

If only that sentiment spread as easily as the virus.

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