Campus Life – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 24 Dec 2020 05:15:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Campus Life – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Six generations of Workmans and a wakeup https://today.citadel.edu/six-generations-of-workmans-and-a-wakeup/ Sat, 26 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20940 Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)When Billy Workman matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina.]]> Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)

By Cadet Merritt Reeves, The Citadel Class of 2022
Historic photos provided by The Citadel Archives and Museum

Photo above: Cadet-recruit William Douglas Workman V, The Citadel Class of 2024, a sixth generation Citadel cadet, poses for a portrait on campus on November 20, 2020.

When Billy Workman of Orangeburg matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina, a father-son tradition that dates all the way back to the late 19th century and his great-great-great-grandfather.

Billy’s full name: William Douglas Workman V.

In 1882, The Citadel resumed operations after closing its gates for 17 years after the Civil War. In that year, William Douglas Workman enrolled along with over a 100 other cadets. An 1886 graduate, he was the first of Billy’s ancestors to attend the college.

The second William Douglas Workman in the family line was William Douglas Workman Sr. who graduated from The Citadel in 1909 and was valedictorian of his class.

1909

William Workman Sr. was also the second, and the last, Workman to attend The Citadel before it moved from Marion Square campus to its current location on the Ashley River. Billy’s great-aunt, Dee Benedict, talked about her grandfather’s service during World War I.

 “If you look at my grandfather, he really was an absolute hero of the bunch,” said Benedict. “Back when South Carolina was in its own brigade, he led the charge and broke the back of the Germans.”

Dee Benedict, Billy Workman’s great aunt discussing William Douglas Workman Sr.

In 1935, William Douglas Workman Jr., Billy’s great-grandfather, graduated from The Citadel after holding the rank of battalion commander.

1935

In that year, the Corps numbered 89 cadets who were split into two battalions. William Workman Jr. was Benedict’s grandfather and, according to her, he served in North Africa during World War II. “After the war, he stayed in the reserves,” said Benedict, “He ran for the United States Senate against a newspaper man in Columbia and had 46% of the vote, which was amazing. There were a bunch of people who would get fired because they supported him which made it almost like a revival thing. Although he lost the race, that was the start of the Republican Party in South Carolina.”

Billy’s grandfather, William Douglas Workman III, graduated from The Citadel after serving as first sergeant in Tango Company. A 1961 graduate, he attended the college before it was integrated in 1966.

William Douglas Workman III, The Citadel Class of 1961

Billy’s father, Will (William Douglas Workman IV), who has a cotton ginning business in Orangeburg, was the last of the Workmans to attend The Citadel before the college turned co-ed. 

William Douglas Workman IV, '89
William Douglas Workman IV, ’89

He graduated in 1989 with the self-proclaimed title “centurion.” Known for his sense of humor, Will paid for this comedic streak throughout his years as a cadet with hundreds of tours. These punishments, however, hardly dimmed Will’s mischievous spirit.  According to Billy, he is still a jokester.  “He’s a pretty laid back guy,” said Billy, “but my going to The Citadel has loosened him up even more, and I can relate to him better.”

Doing what only felt natural, Billy is expected to graduate in 2024 with a Business Administration degree. After decades of forefathers who roamed the grounds of The Citadel, Billy finally joined the long line of Cadet Workmans. “Billy always had a choice on whether or not he would go to The Citadel,” said Will, “but when he decided he wanted to go for himself, it made me really proud. I was happy that the tradition wasn’t ending with me.”

William Douglas Workman V,
a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, who goes by Billy, posting for a portrait
at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on November 20, 2020.

The Workman family has seen the college through time and progress. Like Billy’s Citadel COVID-19 on campus freshman year, each generation has had difference experiences, but one thing remains constant—the lasting bond between alumni and college. With five generations before him, Billy feels a familial expectation, but he waits in earnest to fulfill this role and dreams even of continuing the legacy one day with a seventh William Douglas Workman.

Cadet Merritt Reeves is an intern in the Office of Communications and Marketing. A junior majoring in English with a Spanish minor, she has earned Gold Stars for academic excellence. After graduation, she plans to return to her home town of Columbia, South Carolina and attend law school.

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Live performances may have stopped, but The Citadel Gospel Choir has not https://today.citadel.edu/live-performances-may-have-stopped-but-the-citadel-gospel-choir-has-not/ Sat, 19 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20926 Members of The Citadel Gospel Choir gathered with safe distancing to record a variety of songs, to be played in lieu of a live performance.]]>

As the year (finally) comes to a close and we enter, what for many will be, a very strange holiday season, there are at least two ways of looking back at 2020.

One is to remember all that went wrong or what we didn’t like. But another is to feel proud of how we overcame that which could have brought us down.

There’s no way to know for sure — but it’s likely that most of the cadets who are part of The Citadel Gospel Choir will be taking the second option.

Not only did they, like the rest of The Citadel community, make it through a uniquely challenging year: the Gospel Choir also found a way, despite the pandemic, to continue sharing their faith and talents through their performances.

Instead of waiting for things to return to normal, the choir took matters into their own hands.

In early November, the devoted cadets gathered in Johnson Hagood Stadium — with safe, social distancing — to record a variety of songs. The Gospel Choir usually performs multiple times a year, both in and out of South Carolina. These recordings will be played at events where the choir cannot safely perform.

Part of the Gospel Choir tradition includes a performance at the annual, heavily attended Christmas Candlelight Service in Summerall Chapel.

A traditional Christmas Candlelight Service in Summerall Chapel

Though they were not able to perform together like they had hoped, members of the Choir still found ways to maintain one of the most valuable aspects — the kinship.

The relationships are what mean the most to Ruby Bolden, the Regimental Public Affairs Officer. Read about her experience with the Gospel Choir, starting in her knob year, below.

“The race is not given to the swift nor the strong”

I matriculated in August 2017, not knowing what to expect except a challenge. I was grouped with people I did not know and had to learn to trust very fast, which is something that I am not used to doing.

As challenge week progressed, I was introduced to a member of The Citadel Gospel Choir, and he was very warm-hearted and approachable. After that encounter, I believed that the group had to be the same.

Cadet Ruby Bolden, Regimental Public Affairs Officer

Appearing the following semester, I walked through the chapel doors being greeted upon arrival. Classmates that I recognized walking down the Avenue of Remembrance were there and some classmates that were in my company were there as well.

As I greeted everyone and they returned the greeting, I was placed in the soprano section and began to learn and sing songs that I had sung at my home church. The Gospel Choir reminded me a lot of home to the point where I almost wanted to cry.

The people were friendly, and I was comfortable in that space. I remember when I had to introduce myself, I mentioned that it felt like home and at that moment, I knew I would be in it for the long haul.

As years went on, I was able to witness the many successes that the Gospel Choir achieved. From performing in front of our peers, singing at the late Senator Hollings’ funeral to going on tour in the Spring of 2019; the Gospel Choir is one organization that has changed my life significantly.

Since COVID-19 took the world by storm, it has put a lot of things on hold for us. We could not go on tour last year and practices were cancelled for a while which put a strain on the choir’s familial aspects.

Ruby Bolden and members of The Citadel Gospel Choir on their spring tour in 2019

However, through those trying times, we stayed in contact over Zoom and other platforms to stay in touch. Now, practices are being conducted while maintaining social distancing and wearing masks.

These protocols made it hard for us to continue the familial aspects of the choir however, after the practice prayers we state this verse for Ecclesiastes 9:11, “The race is not given to the swift nor the strong, Nor bread to the wise, Nor riches to men of understanding, Nor favor to men of skill; But time and chance happen to them all.”

Simply put, adversities are given to those that are capable of enduring the challenges that comes with it. The Gospel Choir is a testament of that scripture and we will continue to be.

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The Citadel Department of Athletics Announces Partnership with Roper St. Francis Healthcare https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-department-of-athletics-announces-partnership-with-roper-st-francis-healthcare/ Tue, 15 Dec 2020 19:06:35 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20914 Graphic showing Roper St. Francis Logo and Citadel Athletics logoGraphic showing Roper St. Francis Logo and Citadel Athletics logoRoper St. Francis Healthcare will be listed as one of The Citadel athletics department's first cornerstone partners and coined as the official healthcare provider fpr Bulldog athletics.]]> Graphic showing Roper St. Francis Logo and Citadel Athletics logoGraphic showing Roper St. Francis Logo and Citadel Athletics logo

As seen on Citadelsports.com

The Citadel Department of Athletics announced an extended partnership with Roper St. Francis Healthcare to make them the official health care provider for Bulldog athletics.
 
Under the agreement, the healthcare system will be listed as one of The Citadel athletics department’s first cornerstone partners and coined as the official healthcare provider for Bulldog athletics.
 
“Roper St. Francis has been a long-standing partner with The Citadel athletics and have developed strong relationships with our Sports Medicine Department over the years,” said Mike Capaccio, The Citadel director of athletics. “This partnership will help us to increase the quality of care provided for every cadet-athlete that comes to The Citadel. We would like to thank Craig Self and his team for the collaboration on this partnership and we are excited for the future.”

Through the partnership, The Citadel athletics department will work to more fully integrate Roper St. Francis Healthcare into its campus operations.
 
“As the Lowcountry’s only private, not-for-profit healthcare system with a specific focus on advancing community health, Roper St. Francis Healthcare deeply values its long-term partnership with The Citadel,” said Craig Self, vice president & chief strategy and business development officer of Roper St. Francis Healthcare. “We are excited to expand our official healthcare partnership with The Citadel in support of Bulldog athletics and look forward to continuing to collaborate with The Citadel Sports Medicine Department team as it provides health services to both The Citadel student athletes and the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.”
 
 
Roper St. Francis Healthcare cares for more Lowcountry families than any other healthcare provider in our area. Anchored by Roper Hospital, Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital, Roper St. Francis Mount Pleasant Hospital, and Roper St. Francis Berkeley Hospital, our 657-bed health system includes more than 100 facilities and doctors’ offices conveniently located throughout our region. We are Charleston’s only private, not-for-profit hospital system with a specific focus on community outreach, and our mission is “healing all people with compassion, faith and excellence.”
 
 
 

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Citadel completes in-person fall semester https://today.citadel.edu/battle-posture-leads-to-mission-focused-fall-despite-historic-pandemic/ Thu, 10 Dec 2020 21:52:46 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20619 "We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our 177-year history."]]>

College’s mission focus overcomes pandemic

Operation Fall Return, a campus-wide effort encompassing every member of The Citadel campus community, set the conditions to accomplish the mission of completing fall semester in person, despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It is our duty to protect ourselves and others from COVID-19,” became the mantra, based on the college’s core values of honor, duty and respect.

College and Corps leadership — along with support teams — collaborated to set, adjust and maintain conditions allowing cadets, students, faculty and staff to be on campus beginning in mid-August, until the Corps started winter furlough Nov. 24 and faculty and staff depart for the holidays December 22.

Kelly Cup practice squads work on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, September 8, 2020.

There would be no break in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets’ Long Grey Line.

I write today as the Corps prepares to depart on winter furlough after one of the most unusual periods in Citadel history. I could not be more pleased with the performance of the Corps. We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our 177-year history. Our students, faculty, staff, and alumni showed what a united campus community can do—it’s inspiring watching everyone doing their part. The success we’ve achieved is only possible with everyone adapting and overcoming. 

The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.) in a letter to the campus community, November 20, 2020

Staging the base of fire

The objectives centered on the delivery of top-quality instruction coupled with continuing the in-person military training required for all cadets. The in-person training is mission critical for freshmen, who could not be recognized as members of the Corps in the spring without completing rigorous training objectives designed to develop them to assume leadership roles later in their cadet careers.

Ray Cervantes, contract manager for The Budd Group, demonstrates a backpack atomizer, which can clean an entire barracks in four hours, in Daniel Library at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, June 23, 2020.

Strict protocols were put in place for cadets and for all members of the campus community to protect the health of The Citadel family.

Examples of operational elements include the following, some of which remained in place all semester:

Freshmen socially distanced in chairs with face masks second day of challenge week Class of 2024 at The Citadel
Freshmen socially distanced in chairs with face masks second day of challenge week Class of 2024 at The Citadel

Matriculation Day, August 8

Foxtrot Company commander Alfred Gregg descends the stairs in Padgett-Thomas Barracks during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

The Matriculation Day process is usually completed in about two hours, but was stretched out to twelve to ensure social distancing.

Members of the Class of 2024 arrived on campus, said their goodbyes to their family at the curb, and had their temperatures checked before processing.

Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

Approximately 700 knobs matriculated, a class size mirroring those in non-pandemic years.

Mike Company XO Kenneth Spurlock checks with knobs to make sure they have their barbershop tickets in Padgett-Thomas Barracks during Matriculation Day for the Class of 2024 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Saturday, August 8, 2020.

Class of 2024 Oath Ceremony and Challenge Week

An especially poignant Oath Ceremony was held on Summerall Field for the freshmen — with drone footage from above — showing the many people watching via livestream one of the first groups of college students safely gathered en masse since the pandemic took hold of America in the spring of 2020.

Challenge Week training was underway, with Cadre — the group of upperclassmen tasked with training the knobs — working efficiently to complete all necessary components. They also lived in the same barrack with the freshmen, reducing possible virus transmission from intermixing large groups of cadets.

Cadre lead Knobs from the Class of 2024 in Drill instruction during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, August 13, 2020.

Academics: Flexible and focused

Cadets walk along Jones Avenue at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, November 10, 2020.

Back to class for cadets and students meant alternating in person and remote class days, with many courses divided into two groups to allow for distancing in the classroom.

Led by the Office of the Provost — faculty, cadets and students leaned in, adapting to new technology for teaching and learning.

Dr. Simon Ghanat, teaches a HyFlex environmental engineering course in LeTellier course at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 25, 2020.

“We are so impressed with our faculty, cadets and students and their commitment. They continue to grow and improve within our new hybrid learning model,” said Diana Cheshire, Ph.D., director for the college’s Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching, Learning and Distance Education.

High profile academic engagements for cadets and students continued, including the Baker Business Bowl and competitions for the Citadel Cyber Security Team which “smoked the competition” in one event according to the organizer.

Dr. Cory Nance with members of The Citadel Cybersecurity Club after winning the National Cyber Range Complex “Capture the Flag” context

“The students learn a lot when they apply their skillset in a contest environment that simulates a situation from real world,” said Shankar Banik, Ph.D., professor and head of the Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences and student advisor of The Citadel Cybersecurity Club. “They won the Capture the Flag contest at the National Cyber Range Complex which was a big opportunity for our students to practice their skills in a cyber simulation based on the Department of Defense infrastructure and control systems.”

Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic hosts a “Capture the Flag” cyber competition event

Demonstration of unity and respect

Five rings on Summerall Field — made of members from The Citadel community, linked together — were a visual representation of what unites members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. In October, cadets, faculty and staff gathered, connecting themselves with spirit T-shirts, to stay safely distanced.

The event was conceived by Cadet Hayden Brown, captain of the basketball team, in response to the emotions filled, race-related activism and turmoil the nation saw for many months in 2020.

The Citadel community participates in a Unity Formation on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, October 7, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Despite all of the national attention and conversations surrounding inequities in our country, many remain apathetic. As the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, we are unified in our belief that no member of the Corps is any more important than another.

Cadet Ruby Bolden, regimental public affairs officer, reading the statement of unity on behalf of attendees

ROTC: Advancing future officers

ROTC training and labs moved along in a fashion similar to normal semesters, just in smaller, masked groups with more outdoor activities.

“I continued to be impressed by our Army ROTC Cadets at The Citadel whose performance this semester, in spite of the challenges they and all students face, has been exemplary,” said Col. John Cyrulik, professor of military science at The Citadel, in a statement. “These Army ROTC Cadets are mentally and physically tough, disciplined, and highly motivated. We have trained hard all semester to ensure we remain on-track to commission next year the largest cohort of Army officers from The Citadel since the Vietnam War.”

Senior ring celebrations

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2021 receives their class rings at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 25, 2020.

Though there was not a crowd to cheer them on, the significance of The Citadel Ring Presentation was not diminished for seniors. A livestream provided parents and loved ones the opportunity to view this cherished tradition, and the seniors were celebrated after with a private, outdoor reception.

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2021 receives their class rings during a presentation ceremony adjusted for COVID-19 conditions in McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 25, 2020.

And the juniors, less that a year away from their Ring Day, were able to be sized for their rings in late November to receive next fall.

Cadets from the Class of 2022 are sized for their senior class rings in the Holliday Alumni Center at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, November 17, 2020.

Athletics: Committed to the game

The Citadel football team travels from Charleston, South Carolina to Tampa, Florida in advance of their game against the University of South Florida on Friday, September 11, 2020.

Their commitment to their sport and their teammates meant enduring more than 30 nasal swab COVID-19 tests for each member of the Bulldogs football team — required by the NCAA — as they practiced, traveled and played a limited game schedule with one of the highlights being the game against West point. Plans are underway to play a more complete season in the spring.

The Citadel Volleyball Team poses for their team photograph with Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters ’79, USMC (Retired) in McAlister Field House in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, October 7, 2020.

The other cadet athletes playing indoor sports with contact also endured, and are enduring, numerous coronavirus tests. That isn’t discouraging the basketball team, on a five game winning streak at the time this was published.

Finding the fun

Knobs play intramural kickball on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, August 31, 2020.

To keep the campus community and the Corps energized, a number of COVID-safe activities were held.

Intramural practices and competitions were increased.

Food trucks and games were brought in on the weekends that the Corps didn’t have leave.

And G3, the college’s new bulldog, made his debut.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020.

G3 has a new house he shares with the first team of cadet handlers to hold rank positions related to caring for the beloved mascot.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

G3’s official name, Gen. Mike D. Groshon, will be familiar to many in The Citadel family and in Charleston. He was named for Coach Mike D. Groshon, Citadel Class of 1976, who passed away in 2016, after caring for several generations of mascots.

Photoshoot with Gen. Mike D. Groshon, AKA G3, at the Mascot Handlers’ house at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, September 4, 2020.

Servant leadership continuum

Servant leadership looked a bit different throughout the semester, but it did not stop. There was not a traditional Leadership Day…

The Citadel Republican Society places American Flags around Summerall Field in commemoration of the 19th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, September 10, 2020.

…but there was plenty of volunteer service.

Citadel cadets led by Dr. Sarah Imam volunteer with Soldiers’ Angels to Supply Low-Income Veteran Families with Food Assistance at the Elks Lodge in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, October 9, 2020.

The Citadel Health Careers Society turned out to help veterans in need, for example, and the Krause Center of Leadership and Ethics grew its children’s reading initiative and continued organizing COVID-19 safe ways to help the college’s community partners.

Launching three major developments

1. Our Mighty Citadel 2026 strategic plan
The Citadel’s new strategic plan, Our Mighty Citadel 2026, is now in place to serve as the guideline for the college’s evolution. The Citadel Board of Visitors (BOV) voted to approve the plan in September. Academic programing, how the college interacts with the region and the community, and the campus infrastructure are at the center of the plan.

“The Citadel has played a large role in shaping Charleston and South Carolina since its creation 177 years ago, and its new strategic plan is an encouraging sign that will continue to be the case.”

The Post and Courier Editorial Staff

2. Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF, ’77, Center for Climate Studies Climate variability, risks and the advancement of solutions will be the focus of a new, interdisciplinary Center for Climate Studies being established at The Citadel. The Center’s mission will be to promote climate science through education, research, outreach and the development of public-private partnerships, according to Scott Curtis, Ph.D., recently named the Dr. John Lining Professor of Physics and director of the Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF ’77 Center for Climate Studies.

Construction progress on the Swain Boating Center at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, August 17, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

3. Swain Boating Center
The Swain Boating Center at The Citadel is restoring the campus water culture with some major upgrades, thanks to a generous donation from Dr. and Mrs. Christopher C. Swain, Class of 1981. New docks, a picnic pavilion and new equipment including motor and sail boats, kayaks, canoes, paddleboards and fishing gear are being used by cadets, faculty, staff and alumni.

Gospel Choir stays united with virtual performance to close out semester

The Citadel Gospel Choir, directed by their dedicated leader, Momolu Cooper, ’10, records songs in Johnson Hagood Stadium’s club level at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 19, 2020.

One last, revered annual tradition of each fall semester, the Citadel Candlelight Services, cannot take place this Christmas season, but The Citadel Gospel is finding a way to bring joy to others.

The choir, a group that normally performs during the heavily attended Candlelight Services and around the city and state, didn’t let the pandemic stop them. Though their live engagements were cancelled, the devoted members of the choir gathered – with safe distancing – to record a variety of songs. The recordings will be played at events where the choir cannot safely perform.

Cadet Col. Nick Piacentini: maintaining lines of resistance to coronavirus

Almost last because that’s where he’d ask to be, but not least, is a regimental commander leading his 2,300, 18 – 21 year old classmates through their Citadel experience during an unprecedented, sweeping pandemic.

“I am extremely proud of how the cadets have really led themselves when it concerns their duty to follow our COVID-19 protection protocols to keep themselves and others safe. We have a strong team of regimental officers, staff and NCOs and everyone worked to maintain the conditions needed to keep us on campus this fall. We are striving to be an example of what ‘right’ looks like.

To me, being able to complete a face-to-face fall semester shows the kind of person a Citadel cadet is, someone with the grit needed to push through our mission together.”

Cadet Col. Nick Piacentini, Regimental Commander, South Carolina Corps of Cadets

Watch a news report with Piacentini here.

#1 for the 10th year!

And in the midst of it all, The Citadel was ranked #1 Top Public College in the South for the tenth consecutive year by U.S News & World Report.

“We want prospective students to know why The Citadel experience is superior. We encourage high school students and their parents to contact us to discuss what the college offers for their areas of interest in a specially tailored, one-on-one conference, “said Sally Selden, Ph.D., SPHR, provost and dean of The Citadel.

Fall 2020 Photo Gallery

https://www.citadel.edu/root/our-mighty-citadel/nick-piacentini?fbclid=IwAR11EMUNU79B6gT6i4MziFSJbXxL-fmGNASumryuxHd12sARNxum4tMhgiA
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Bowling for business bucks: cadets and students prepare to compete for $10,000 https://today.citadel.edu/bowling-for-business-bucks-cadets-and-students-prepare-to-compete-for-10000/ Thu, 10 Dec 2020 00:00:04 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20487 Five teams will spend their winter furlough working on a business idea that could turn into their future career -- and also a hefty check.]]>

Photo: Shawn Swartwood, director of the Baker Business Bowl, introducing the teams on Zoom before the semifinals

The final round of the Business Baker Bowl VII will be held in April

Five groups of Citadel cadets and students will spend their winter furlough and the beginning of the spring semester working on a business idea that could turn into their future career — and also a hefty check.

In early November, 9 teams — from multiple and various majors — squared off to earn a spot in the final round of the Baker Business Bowl VII. The competition was broadcast on Zoom to allow for social distancing.

In the end, the judges chose five teams to compete in the finals.

The final business ideas include: designing and building an off-road BAJA vehicle, a 3D printing filament recycler that can also convert used bottles into filament, a one-handed Xbox controller, a solar-powered dehumidifier, and an app that allows you to schedule hair stylists to visit you at home (much like Uber Eats).

The first place prize is $10,000, meant to help them start their business; the second-place team will receive $5,000. The prize money is made possible by The Citadel Class of 1989.

Each team was given five minutes to present their business ideas to a panel of business experts. After the teams pitched their ideas, the judges were given ten minutes to ask questions.

The teams that will compete in the final round of the Baker Business Bowl are:

BAJA SAE

A single-seat, all-terrain sporting vehicle — designed and constructed by the team — which is capable of being produced on a mass scale.

Team members include:

  • Zachary Adkins
  • Stephen Channell
  • Dusty Jones
  • Jeff Kidner
  • Marshall McKee
  • Tyler Nathan
  • Joseph Pham
  • Mike Sanada
  • Giselle Shapiro
  • Kenneth Spurlock
  • John Stork
  • Sara Surrett
  • Clifford Swindel
  • Phil Wellons
  • Maxwell Whalen

Extrusionaire

A device that melts down 3D printed parts and scrap, and then reforms it back into filament to be reused by a 3D printer; also allows used water bottles to be melted down into filament.

Team members include:

  • Luis Garcia
  • Mateo Gomez
  • Craig Niswender
  • Benjamin Perry
  • Tiernan Van Dyke

Helping Hands Gaming

A one-handed Xbox gaming controller, with designs for both left- and right-handed users, that retains full functional capabilities like buttons and joysticks; the controller will include a wrist strap and the option to use with foot pedals.

Team members include:

  • Jordan Cavender
  • Daniel Esteban
  • Jason Flowers
  • Fuller Prickett

Solar Suck

An effective dehumidifier that exclusively uses solar power to lower utility prices and promote clean energy; it can also be used in survival situations, such as in a lifeboat, in order to collect water from the air to drink.

Team members include:

  • Cade Bennett
  • Andrew Brabazon
  • Charles Marsh
  • Joshua Valencia
  • Jack Zappendorf

Zip Clips

An app for smart phones that takes the popular model of third party delivery and applies it to the hair industry; users can order or schedule a haircut, much like they can order food or rides through Uber or Lyft.

Team members include:

  • Thomas MacDonald
  • Thomas Kyte

The Baker Business Bowl is a program aimed at helping budding entrepreneurs who have an idea for a new product or service, and the desire to turn that idea into a business. The competition is open to cadets, evening undergraduate students and graduate students.

The date of the final round, sometime in April 2021, has not yet been determined; when available, the schedule can be found here.

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Majority of South Carolina colleges going virtual after Thanksgiving break https://today.citadel.edu/majority-of-south-carolina-colleges-going-virtual-after-thanksgiving-break/ Tue, 01 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20427 Citadel cadets packing to leave for winter furloughCitadel cadets packing to leave for winter furloughThey’re going to take their exams remotely, reducing that movement on public transportation and airlines and reducing that possibility of having COVID-19 come back to campus.]]> Citadel cadets packing to leave for winter furloughCitadel cadets packing to leave for winter furlough

As seen on WCIV-TV, by Carolina Balchunas

This week, college kids will be home from college. There’s been a lot of talk about what to do before and during the holiday, but the semester isn’t over yet. What happens after Thanksgiving?

Majority of schools are going fully virtual after the Thanksgiving break.

Clemson University, the University of South Carolina, Charleston Southern University, the College of Charleston and the Citadel will finish out the semester online.

“We’re not going to have people come back after the Thanksgiving break,” said Col. John Dorrian, the Citadel’s vice president of communications and marketing. “They’re going to take their exams remotely, reducing that movement on public transportation and airlines and reducing that possibility of having COVID-19 come back to campus.”

Between students, faculty and staff, the Citadel only had 171 reported COVID-19 cases this year. Aside from a few currently in isolation, Dorrian said they’ve cleared cadets to go home and credits the cadets for making it possible.

“They implemented through peer leadership a lot of the measures that led us to the success of them being able to finish today,” Dorrian said. “For example, the last two weekends, the corps of cadets stayed on campus and just did on campus activities, so they could reduce the possibility of spreading COVID, catching COVID, and then bringing it home over the holidays.”

He said the collective commitment helped the school stay on course and maintain much of the unique Citadel experience, which cannot be replicated in an online environment.

Watch the video version of this story on WCIV.com here.

On Tuesday, Citadel cadets packed up and cleared out the barracks, and many were greeted by parents eager to have them home. Bob Cave was there to pick his son up and said he’s proud of how the Citadel has handled the pandemic throughout the semester.

“I think kids need to be at school and these kids need to be at school. They need to have the Citadel experience. Doing this from home is not the Citadel experience, so they need to be on campus in my opinion,” Cave said. “But I think it’s great, I think it’s great having them home, having them home for about a month and a half, I think is great.”

Dorrian said they conducted random testing every two weeks this semester and will continue in the spring, adding everyone will be tested when they return next year.

The Citadel, CSU, CofC and USC are all starting the spring semester on Monday, January 11, a week later than usual due to the cancellation of spring break.

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Citadel ’02 alumna selected for American Red Cross board of directors in Illinois https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-02-alumna-selected-for-american-red-cross-board-of-directors-in-illinois/ Mon, 30 Nov 2020 15:27:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20419 Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002Note: Ragan Freitag Pattison graduated from The Citadel in 2002 with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. She went on to earn a Juris Doctor, Law from Mississippi College]]> Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002Ragan Freitag Pattison, The Citadel Class of 2002

Note: Ragan Freitag Pattison graduated from The Citadel in 2002 with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. She went on to earn a Juris Doctor, Law from Mississippi College School of Law in 2008. Photo courtesy of America Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley website.

As seen in The Herald-News

ROMEOVILLE – The American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley on Friday announced the appointment of Ragan Freitag Pattison to the organization’s board of directors. Board members are chosen based on their commitment to the Red Cross mission as well as their individual expertise, experience and willingness to serve the needs of the board. 

Pattison is the director of state and local government market for Wight & Co. She was one of the first women to graduate The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, earning her bachelor’s degree in political science with a concentration in American government. 

After graduating The Citadel, Pattison returned home and began her early civic career serving as alderwoman for the city of Wilmington.

During that time, she worked for former U.S. Rep. Jerry Weller, R-Streator, handling constituent concerns and legislative matters within the district.

In 2005, she entered Mississippi College School of Law in Jackson, Mississippi.

During her time in law school, she served on the committee for the law school chapter for Habitat for Humanity, where they raised money and built new homes for the victims of Hurricane Katrina.

Pattison graduated from law school in 2008, and that year, she also was admitted to practice law in Illinois. Pattison had a successful career practicing criminal defense, family law and governmental law with Kavanagh Grumley & Gorbold LLC. Currently, she is a licensed attorney with Gwendolyn J. Sterk and the Family Law Group P.C. 

While practicing law, Pattison ran and successfully won two elections, serving as a Will County Board member and commissioner for the Forest Preserve of Will County. Pattison served as chairwoman of the Will County Capital Committee, where she began working with Wight & Co. She continued working with Wight & Co. as she transitioned into the chief of staff role for the Will County Board. 

Pattison’s relationship with Wight & Co. was instrumental as the Will County Courthouse project began to kick off, sparking a series of capital projects for Will County. 

“The Red Cross does its best work because local people volunteer their time to help their community,” said Brian McDaniel, executive director of the American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley.

“Pattison is a talented leader who makes an impact every day. She has a strong commitment to the Red Cross mission, and we are fortunate to have her join the chapter board. Without board members like Ragan, backed by the organizations she works with, we wouldn’t have as strong of an organization as we do.” 

Brian McDaniel, executive director of the American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley

The American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley always is welcoming new board members. Those interested in volunteering as a board member or community volunteer leader should contact McDaniel at 815-370-6729 or brian.mcdaniel2@redcross.org.

The American Red Cross of the Illinois River Valley serves more than 1 million people in five counties in northern Illinois, including Kankakee, Will, Grundy, Kendall and La Salle.

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families.

The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For information, visit www.redcross.org/ILRiver or follow on Twitter @RedCrossIL. 

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Unbroken: Giving thanks for those working to restore the iconic stained-glass windows of Summerall Chapel https://today.citadel.edu/unbroken-giving-thanks-for-those-working-to-restore-the-iconic-stained-glass-windows-of-summerall-chapel/ Mon, 23 Nov 2020 21:38:52 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20351 The hundreds of panels of stained-glass windows provide a distinctive aurora, surrounding visitors with kaleidoscopic artistry. ]]>

The Citadel Foundation continues fundraising for $2 million window restoration project 

With many thousands of hand-cut bits of glass held together by lead, they have poured shimmering colors and rays of hope down upon generations of cadets, faculty, staff and visitors. Whether praying in solitude or singing in the Gospel choir; attending religious services or funerals; or simply taking refuge in the quiet beauty of The Citadel’s historic Summerall Chapel, the hundreds of panels of stained-glass windows provide a distinctive aurora, surrounding visitors with kaleidoscopic artistry. 

Each window panel has thousands of individually hand-painted, kiln-fired stained-glass pieces. But the lead holding those bits of glass in place is deteriorating. They are slowing falling apart.

Lela Sijtsma, Summerall Chapel’s Administrative Assistant, point out bowing and damage to the stained glass windows in Summerall Chapel

Though difficult to capture in a photograph and despite patching, sections of some windows are buckling in a manner pointing to future ruptures.

The reason the windows are bowing is Charleston’s excessive heat, combined with cooling the chapel interior, and the many dramatic temperature fluctuations between, according to the company that created the windows when the chapel was constructed in the 1930s. Not an unusual peril for old stained-glass windows in hot, humid climates. 

The original group of artisans who build the stained-glass windows in Summerall Chapel

The good news is that the original team of artisans with Pittsburg Stained Glass Studios who worked on the designs and instillations were meticulous artists and record keepers. That same company, still in business, is consulting on the case. They have the original copies of the designs for the windows, for example. In fact, the current president of the company, Kirk Weaver, is the grandson of the man who was originally awarded the contract for the windows about 80 years ago. 

“In order to repeat the same design accurately hundreds of times brass stencils were made of all the decorative vignettes that are found in the borders and other decorative areas of the windows. Having these stencils is invaluable in accurately restoring damaged or previously repaired mismatched pieces. We have every stencil that was used when we made the windows originally.”

Weaver says his grandfather came across an article in the 30s reporting that The Citadel was building a chapel with stained-glass windows. “He drove to Charleston and expressed interest in bidding for the project. Of course, it was the depth of the depression era and Grandfather’s company was about to close its doors. Once granted the contract, it saved the company.”

The windows were designed in the manner of the Gothic period and the color scheme follows that of the stained-glass of the thirteenth century. The human figures, however, are in a more modern form. Some of the windows have up to 25 scenes and symbols within. 

Funding the restoration of the Summerall Chapel stained-glass

The restoration project, estimated to cost $2 million, will consist of each individual window panel being removed, packaged and safely shipped to the selected contractor. The contractor will then dismantle and refinish every panel to look the exact way they did 80 years ago.

A contractor is expected to be selected to be selected in 2021 with the restoration beginning shortly thereafter. It would likely take three years to complete. 

Some have already stepped forward to help. The Class of 1974 jump-started this campaign in conjunction with their 45th Class Reunion in 2019, and have raised over $120,000 toward its goal of $250,000 by December 31, 2021. 

The Citadel Foundation will now coordinate the broader fund-raising effort sparked by the efforts of the Class of 1974.

Gifts can be made securely online by visiting: https://foundation.citadel.edu/StainedGlassWindows

Office of Communications and Marketing graduate assistant Demi Lewis assisted in writing this article.

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A message from The Citadel President https://today.citadel.edu/a-message-from-the-citadel-president-3/ Fri, 20 Nov 2020 21:44:48 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20340 Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our history. ]]> Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Knobs from the Class of 2024 and the Cadre gather on Summerall Field for an address from Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters '79, USMC (Retired) during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

Citadel Family:

Greetings.  I hope this reaches everyone in good health.

I write today as the Corps prepares to depart on Winter Furlough after one of the most unusual periods in Citadel history. On 13 March 2020, we began Spring Break in an atmosphere of uncertainty as the threat from COVID-19 developed into a worldwide crisis.  After finishing the semester remotely, and cancelling most in-person and on-campus activities, our Citadel family faced the challenge of how best to restart, and return to as normal a routine as conditions allowed.

Our mission remains the production of principled leaders in an academically challenging environment, centered on The Citadel’s core values of Honor, Duty and Respect. This informed our pandemic objectives of consistent delivery of high-quality instruction coupled with continuing our in-person military environment and maintaining the Long Gray Line.

Core values also guided us as we contemplated reconstitution of our campus community during a time of national turbulence regarding race, and a contentious election season. Our college is unique, as these values are part of daily conversations, and take on greater importance in uncertain times.

Our faculty and staff’s efforts, innovation, and attention to detail in these past months cannot be overstated. We learned much during our partnership with the Marines, but make no mistake– the entire team performed magnificently in preparing for the return of our cadets and students.

But great planning means little without execution.  We needed the entire Citadel family to work together.

I could not be more pleased with the performance of the Corps. We asked much of you, and you delivered in an environment unique in our 177-year history.  Our students, faculty, staff, and alumni showed what a united campus community can do—it’s inspiring watching everyone doing their part. The success we’ve achieved is only possible with everyone adapting and overcoming.  Congratulations and Thank You!

Challenges remain, and new ones will surely appear. We have the conditions, tools, and values in place to overcome those obstacles as they emerge. What I’ve seen since March gives me great hope and confidence we will continue our success.

These are among the many blessings we share as a community as we celebrate Thanksgiving and enter the holiday season. Gail and I send best wishes to you, your families and friends – safe travels and good health.

We look forward to seeing everyone back in January to hit the deck running for the start of the spring 2021 semester.

Good Luck and God Bless each of you.

Glenn M. Walters ‘79

General, USMC (Retired)

President

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A “General” review of the closed weekend https://today.citadel.edu/a-general-review-of-the-closed-weekend/ Mon, 16 Nov 2020 21:53:37 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20176 Cadets, who can't leave campus before returning home for the long Thanksgiving/winter furlough, enjoyed some fun diversions for the on-campus weekend.]]>

Photo: Citadel mascot Gen. Mike D. Groshon, also known as G3, reviewing the food trucks on campus

With just over a week of on-campus classes left, cadets at The Citadel are doing what leaders do: making sure they stay safe so they can keep others safe.

Since they will soon be returning to their hometowns, and due to increasing cases of COVID-19 nationwide, cadets can’t leave campus during their last two weekends before the long Thanksgiving/winter furlough.

But with the goal of keeping the cadets engaged (while squeezing in some early holiday celebrations), The Commandant’s Office and the Office of Cadet Activities arranged some fun diversions for the two on-campus weekends.

The cadets (occasionally joined by G3) were kept busy with activities like intramurals, swim meets, corn hole games, DJ entertainment and food trucks. But if it sound like the cadets are having too much fun — don’t worry — the weekend kicked off with a Spirit PT across campus.

The closed weekend also opened new doors.

“For the first time in my cheerleading experience, I had the opportunity to cheer on the Bulldogs at a wrestling match,” said Cadet Lauren Sordo, a junior Biology major from Orchard Park, New York. “It was a great way to start the day. After the match, my team and I went to the food trunks and played games. The activities on the parade deck were a fun way to engage with other cadets and increased moral for a few hours.”

Next weekend will also include battalion cookouts and Thanksgiving festivities.

The last day of classes this fall for cadets and students at The Citadel is November 24. They will take finals from home following Thanksgiving and will not return until January.

The Citadel President, Provost and Commandant will update parents on how the fall has gone and on what to expect for the spring semester return during the final Virtual Town Hall for the semester. It is scheduled for 7 p.m., November 19 and will be livestreamed on The Citadel Facebook page.

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