Athletics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Mon, 22 Apr 2019 19:32:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.10 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Athletics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Three Citadel companies earn special privileges during first ever Spring Regimental Tournament https://today.citadel.edu/three-citadel-companies-earn-special-privileges-during-first-ever-spring-regimental-tournament/ Fri, 22 Mar 2019 22:40:30 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=6772 Kilo celebrates after winning tiebreakerKilo celebrates after winning tiebreakerAfter a grueling competition and a dramatic, last-minute tiebreaker, three cadet companies will get to enjoy special privileges after coming out on top.]]> Kilo celebrates after winning tiebreakerKilo celebrates after winning tiebreaker

Photo: Kilo Company celebrates after willing tiebreaker

On March 22, the South Carolina Corps of Cadets held a physical training competition instead of a parade

After a grueling competition and a dramatic, last-minute tiebreaker, three cadet companies will get to enjoy special privileges after coming out on top.

Athletic Officers compete in push-up tiebreaker
Athletic Officers compete in push-up tiebreaker

To break the tie for first place, the athletic officers from Kilo and Palmetto Battery faced off in a push-up competition.

But in the end, Kilo Company came out on top.

The competition was made up of multiple events, with only a handful of cadets participating in each challenge. Cadets who weren’t involved in the different events were required to take part in a two-mile run. The companies earned points, based on how well they performed in

Kilo Company celebrates win
Kilo Company celebrates win

each event, and all those points were totaled to determine the company that earned first, second, and third place, overall.

As a reward for winning first place, cadets in Kilo will be excused from the Saturday morning inspection, which include personnel, rooms, arms, equipment and common areas of the barracks.

Cadets participating in log lift competition
Cadets participating in log lift competition

For coming in second place, Palmetto Battery cadets will be excused from Monday morning personal training, giving them the rare opportunity to sleep in.

And for a third place prize, the cadets in Oscar will be awarded a block overnight, which gives them one extra night they’re allowed to stay off campus.

Truck push competition
Truck push competition

Some of the events in the competition included:

  • 8 person tire flip relay
  • 4×400 run
  • 4 person 100 meter swim
  • 6 person log lift
  • 12 person 40 yard tunnel
  • 9 person O-course relay (teams of 3)
  • 3 team pull ups (1 person max for 1 min)
  • 3 team medicine ball throw (total distance)
  • 12 person tunnel race
  • 9 person tug-o-war tournament style
  • 3 team slam ball volley ball tournament style
  • 9 person truck push for time
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The Citadel Judo team takes top slot in collegiate championship https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-judo-team-championship/ Thu, 07 Mar 2019 14:00:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=6440 The Citadel Judo team, March 2019The Citadel Judo team, March 2019The Citadel Judo team is training for its next competition after taking first place in the senior category during the recent Southeast Regional Collegiate Judo Championships in Summerville. ]]> The Citadel Judo team, March 2019The Citadel Judo team, March 2019

The Citadel Judo Team. Top row left to right: Justin Zeilstra, Sam Wendt, Lilly Laydan, Will Herbert
Middle row, coaches: Lorenzo Menzel, Lisa Capriotti, Rob Gouthro
Bottom Row: Matt Dixon, Matt Devine, Gunther Martin

The Citadel Judo team is training for its next competition after taking first place in the senior category during the recent Southeast Regional Collegiate Judo Championships in Summerville.  The Citadel hosted tournament included junior, collegiate, and senior judo teams from the University of Florida (UF), University of Tennessee, University of West Georgia, University of Central Florida, and several others.

The Citadel beat UF’s Gator Judo in the senior category by a narrow margin of 51 to 46.  In reply, UF won the collegiate category, with The Citadel placing second.

“The Citadel Judo athletes have really developed in the past 6 months.  It is an honor to coach each one of these dedicated athletes,” said Lisa Capriotti, Ph.D., The Citadel team’s coach, 2016 World Veteran Jiu Jitsu Champion, and chemistry professor.

Capriotti reported that two notable players were team captain, Joshua Malott, who won the Men’s Collegiate under 73kg Novice Division, and Matthew Dixon, who won the Men’s Collegiate Under 90kg Novice Division.

The team will travel to West Point for the National Collegiate Judo Championships March 23.  According to Capriotti, the team has a gofundme.com fundraiser underway, and is planning a BBQ fundraiser on campus for staff and faculty later this month to help cover the travel costs. The date will be announced later on DogNews and on the team’s Facebook page.

 

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Citadel adds transfer running back with 2,000 career yards to recruiting class https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-football-recruits-running-back/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 16:52:50 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=5353 Bulldogs gear in Alabama locker room. By Lou Brems, Citadel photographer.Bulldogs gear in Alabama locker room. By Lou Brems, Citadel photographer.Citadel football expects to sign most of its 2019 recruiting class during the early signing period that starts Wednesday, and the class should come with an added bonus — a transfer running back with more than 2,000 career rushing yards to his credit.]]> Bulldogs gear in Alabama locker room. By Lou Brems, Citadel photographer.Bulldogs gear in Alabama locker room. By Lou Brems, Citadel photographer.

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Jeff Hartsell

Citadel football expects to sign most of its 2019 recruiting class during the early signing period that starts Wednesday, and the class should come with an added bonus — a transfer running back with more than 2,000 career rushing yards to his credit.

Former Sam Houston State running back Remus Bulmer announced earlier this month that he would transfer to The Citadel as a graduate student for his final season of eligibility.

Bulmer, 5-7 and 185 pounds, rushed for 2,117 yards and 15 touchdowns in four seasons at Sam Houston State, a member of the FCS Southland Conference. He averaged 6.1 yards per carry over his first three seasons.

But this season, Bulmer had just 27 carries for 119 yards in the Bearkats’ first three games when he decided to take advantage of the new rule that allows players to participate in up to four games and still take a redshirt year.

Bulmer left the Bearkats after three games and took a redshirt year, allowing him to transfer as a graduate student for his final season. He hopes to get more opportunities to run the ball in The Citadel’s triple-option offense.

“The Citadel wants to use me as a running, catching and blocking back,” Bulmer told Hero Sports. “I love how their offense gets down in the dirt and physical. It reminds me of how things were when I first started playing ball.”

Among high school prospects, The Citadel has commitments from at least 14 players who could sign early.

Among them is Lowcountry product Tereis Drayton, a 6-2, 270-pound lineman from James Island Charter High School who played in the North-South All-Star Game.

Among state players are linebackers Michael McDowell (6-1, 215) and Logan Billings (6-0, 200) from Boiling Springs High; linebacker Nicoles Rogers (6-1, 223) from Blythewood; defensive backsJake Kenison (6-1, 195) of Hillcrest and Antareus Pressley (6-1, 155) of Belton-Honea Path; lineman Stephon Stokes (6-2, 290) from Greenville; and linebacker Jaloveon Lagroon (6-2, 200) from T.L. Hanna.

Stokes also was chosen for the North-South game, while Billings was selected for the Shrine Bowl.

Citadel coach Brent Thompson will hold a Wednesday press conference to discuss the new recruits.

The Citadel commitments

Name/Pos./Ht./Wt./Home HS

Nick Grier DL 6-3 250 S. Gwinnett HS

Nicoles Rogers LB 6-1 223 Blythewood HS

Dejon Conway RB/LB 5-11 190 Luella HS (Ga.)

Logan Braucht FB/LB 6-0 212 Ware Co. HS (Ga.)

Jake Kenison DB 6-1 195 Hillcrest HS

Tereis Drayton OL 6-2 270 James Island HS

Robert Harbor DL 6-0 275 Ri chmond, Texas

Antareus Pressley DB 6-1 185 Belton-Honea Path

Michael McDowell LB 6-1 215 Boiling Springs HS

Logan Billings LB 6-0 200 Boiling Springs HS

Stephon Stokes OL 6-2 290 Greenville HS

Hayden Williamson LB 6-1 210 Kubasaki HS (Okinawa)

Michael Matthews RB/LB 6-1 235 Jack Britt HS (NC)

Jaloveon Lagroon LB 6-2 200 T.L. Hanna HS

Reach Jeff Hartsell at 843-937-5596. Follow on Twitter @Jeff_fromthePC

 

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The Citadel’s coach explains what it’s like to be tied with Alabama at the half https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadels-coach-explains-what-its-like-to-be-tied-with-alabama-at-the-half/ Wed, 21 Nov 2018 19:00:35 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4934 Bulldogs gear in Alabama locker room. By Lou Brems, Citadel photographer.Bulldogs gear in Alabama locker room. By Lou Brems, Citadel photographer.“One thing we’ve realized ever since we’ve been here is, our kids will get up for those games,” Thompson says. “They’ll play extremely hard. Most of my guys don’t have a whole lot of scholarship offers coming out of high school. They play with a little bit of an edge.”]]> Bulldogs gear in Alabama locker room. By Lou Brems, Citadel photographer.Bulldogs gear in Alabama locker room. By Lou Brems, Citadel photographer.

As seen on SportsIllustrated.com, By Joan Niesen

When coach Brent Thompson’s Bulldogs allowed an Alabama field goal with 4:59 to go in the first half of Saturday’s game, the coach wasn’t too concerned. The Citadel, an FCS program widely expected to be trampled by the No. 1 Crimson Tide, were only down three points, 10–7. In the nearly five minutes remaining before halftime, Thompson’s objective was to chew up clock and go into the locker room down by just a field goal.

Instead, his team put together a 44-yard drive, taking the ball from its own 25-yard line to the Alabama 30. The Bulldogs gained one yard over the next three plays, and then Jacob Godek drilled a 48-yard field goal to create Saturday’s most surprising halftime scoreline: Alabama 10, The Citadel 10. “From there it was, what’s the adjustment going to be?” Thompson says. “How long can we stay in this one?”

The answer would be barely more than two quarters—but the Citadel went into halftime tied with a team that, until last week, had not led by fewer than 16 points after two quarters in 2018.

“One thing we’ve realized ever since we’ve been here is, our kids will get up for those games,” Thompson says. “They’ll play extremely hard. Most of my guys don’t have a whole lot of scholarship offers coming out of high school. They play with a little bit of an edge.”

And for 30 minutes of game clock, that edge was enough to match Alabama, score for score. The Bulldogs, who run the triple option, managed to achieve their goal of simply holding onto the ball so long to the Tide wouldn’t get a chance to put the game out of hand, and The Citadel took advantage of the shots it created for itself. After all, this is a team that had beaten South Carolina 23–22 and played two other defending national champions (Florida State and Clemson) since Thompson arrived as offensive coordinator in 2014. Thompson, and many of his players, had been here before, which is why halftime was a more measured affair than one might imagine.

There would have been plenty of reason to throw a party in that 15-minute break: No team has even been within striking distance of Alabama at the half this year, which makes it all the more remarkable that the Tide were tied with a tiny military college whose roster is stocked with kids that didn’t get FBS offers. Thompson tried to bring down the collective heart rate.

“I liken it a lot to golf,” Thompson says. “You’re about ready to go on the back nine. You’ve had a great first nine at the Masters as a younger guy. The pace starts to pick up, and everybody gets hyped up, and as you go to the back nine, you kind of blow a few holes.”

That’s what Thompson wanted to avoid. So he took his time even getting off the field, letting his own head clear. There were two or three minutes off the clock, he says, before he even stepped into the locker room. “Listen,” he told his players. “Settle down. Here’s what we’re going to do. We’re a second-half ball club. We need to make some adjustments here. We’ve got to figure out what their adjustments are. We can’t lose our heads here.”

Thompson’s worst fear was that his team would expend too much energy at halftime and go out flat—and his mellowing tactics worked. Alabama fumbled its kickoff return to open the third quarter, and the Citadel mustered enough yards to get into field-goal position. But after a false start penalty, the kick started wide right and stayed wide right, and momentum shifted. From there, Alabama cruised to a 50–17 win. But Thompson and his players were anything but discouraged that their magic wore out.

“It’s going to be great for our program to rely on this past experience, no matter what [FBS] program we play ever again,” the coach says. “Our young guys are going to remember this experience as one of the most positive experiences.”

“We got what we wanted out of it. We got what we needed out of it.”

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The guy behind The Citadel’s savage Twitter account explains the strategy https://today.citadel.edu/the-guy-behind-the-citadels-savage-twitter-account-explains-the-strategy/ Mon, 19 Nov 2018 17:03:04 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4855 Citadel fans during Bulldogs and Alabama game, Bryant-Denny Stadium. By Lou Brems, The Citadel.Citadel fans during Bulldogs and Alabama game, Bryant-Denny Stadium. By Lou Brems, The Citadel.He said he’s “just a graphic designer,” but King was the name behind The Citadel football team’s Twitter account that went viral during the 50-17 loss at Alabama.]]> Citadel fans during Bulldogs and Alabama game, Bryant-Denny Stadium. By Lou Brems, The Citadel.Citadel fans during Bulldogs and Alabama game, Bryant-Denny Stadium. By Lou Brems, The Citadel.

(Photo by Lou Brems, The Citadel, not part of original report)

As seen on Alabama.com, By Michael Casagrande | mcasagrande@al.com

From his third-row seat in the Bryant-Denny Stadium press box, Parker King set the college football internet ablaze.

He said he’s “just a graphic designer,” but King was the name behind The Citadel football team’s Twitter account that went viral during the 50-17 loss at Alabama. The regimented military school let its hair down Saturday in Tuscaloosa and the masses noticed.

“It’s been pretty surreal,” King said after the game in the room just off from the small visitors’ locker room in Bryant-Denny Stadium. “We knew if our players came in here and performed the way we knew they could, we would have a small window of essentially going viral on Twitter. We had a good plan that if we performed, we’d be ready. And we’d be willing to take some shots at some people in the SEC.”

They sure did.

Their big tweet of the day followed a second-quarter touchdown that tied the score 7-7. It ended Alabama’s shutout streak that covered both the LSU and Mississippi State wins and King was well aware.

Mentioning the official Twitter accounts of both LSU and Mississippi State and a “WE SCORED” graphic, the text read “It isn’t that hard guys.”

The graphic King made when they arrived Saturday topped it off.

“We had a moment,” King said. “We took it.”

https://twitter.com/CitadelFootball/status/1063850093852413952

As of Saturday afternoon, it had 14,000-plus favorites and north of 6,000 retweets. It drew a wide variety of responses.

King laughed when asked about the mentions the account received.

“A lot of mad people but we knew that going into it and that was kind of the point,” he said. “We knew a lot of people would get riled up and really excited. A lot of our mentions were like ‘Hey, we were Citadel football now.’ So, it was good. It was really exciting to have a chance to be front of so many people and get so many people that aren’t Citadel football fans’ eyes our Twitter for football, for recruiting and the campus itself.”

Of course, it was all in good fun. None of the schools called out responded, nor did King expect they would.

It was a rare opportunity for the school of 2,300 students to get this kind of national stage. They spent the week preparing and dropping a few early tweets to prime the engine.

“In this game, we don’t have a lot to lose,” King said. “A lot of eyes will be on our account after this week. We might as well have some fun with it.”

As of Saturday afternoon, the account picked up 1,500 new followers on game day up to the 12,800-range.

After scoring 10 points before halftime, Ole Miss was next.

“By the way, @OleMissFB we scored more points than you too,” the tweet read with a picture of the scoreboard. “We didn’t want to leave you out of the party!”

Alabama beat Ole Miss 62-7 in Week 3.

For the 2016 graduate of South Florida, a touch of anxiety crept in when pulling the trigger on some of the SEC call-out tweets.

“There definitely was some energy,” King said, “like adrenaline shakes when we first scored because we knew the potential of what this week could be. It started to build throughout the week.”

“That score blew completely out of the water what we thought was possible with our account. It was definitely exciting. It’s still exciting.”

Michael Casagrande is an Alabama beat writer for the Alabama Media Group. Follow him on Twitter @ByCasagrande or on Facebook.

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Meet Helen McCoy. At 101, she might be Citadel football’s oldest living fan. https://today.citadel.edu/meet-helen-mccoy-at-101-she-might-be-citadel-footballs-oldest-living-fan/ Thu, 25 Oct 2018 13:19:33 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4427 Helen McCoy The CitadelHelen McCoy The CitadelAt age 101, Helen McCoy is the oldest member of The Citadel Brigadier Foundation and an avid Bulldogs football fan.]]> Helen McCoy The CitadelHelen McCoy The Citadel

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Jeff Hartsell

It’s game day at Johnson Hagood Stadium, and the oldest living fan of Citadel football settles into her place.

On the fourth-floor club level, Helen McCoy, 101, is seated smack in front of the window near the 40-yard line. She’s surrounded by family and fellow Citadel fans, gazing at her beloved Bulldogs on the green grass below.

“We moved down here in 1976, and I’ve been a fan ever since,” Miss Helen says.

“Actually, it was 1967,” gently corrects her son, Peter.

Whatever the date, Helen McCoy has been a Citadel fan for a long, long time. She’s the oldest member of The Brigadier Foundation, which raises money for athletic scholarships. And though such rankings are unofficial, she might be the oldest living Citadel fan. She will turn 102 on Dec. 4.

“She’s a huge fan and really means a lot to us,” says Citadel football coach Brent Thompson. “I first met Miss Helen at the women’s football 101 class we held a couple of years ago, and immediately fell in love with her.

“She’s so spirited about Citadel football, and I’d never met anybody that loved Citadel football as much as she does at that age.”

Helen McCoy The Citadel
Helen McCoy arrives at Johnson Hagood Stadium for The Citadel’s football game against East Tennessee State with her daughter-in-law Lucy McCoy on Oct. 13, 2018. Photo courtesy of The Post and Courier/Grace Beahm Alford/Staff

Miss Helen’s attachment to the Bulldogs began before her son, Peter, attended The Citadel on a wrestling scholarship. He graduated in 1974.

“When I was in high school (at the old St. Andrews in West Ashley), we went to Citadel football games,” says Peter, who serves on The Citadel’s Board of Visitors. “At that time, a lot of local people came out to the games, and we did as well.”

During Peter’s wrestling career at The Citadel, Helen became something of a “team mom,” coming to all the matches and even helping to drive the team to away contests.

Helen McCoy was born in New York, playing sports such as field hockey in high school and eventually going to nursing school. She worked at St. Francis Hospital when it was located downtown, and was married for 60 years to Dr. J. Joseph McCoy, who was a pathologist at the VA hospital in Charleston. He died in 2002.

Around that time, attending Citadel football games became a routine for Miss Helen, who has 11 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren.

“She has her hair done every Saturday, decked out in Citadel regalia, and then heads to the stadium,” Peter says. “We used to sit and tailgate in front of the alumni center. But if that cannon went off before the game and I didn’t have her in the stadium, she’d eyeball me big time.”

Helen McCoy The Citadel
Helen McCoy (right) enjoys water aerobics with her friend Marjorie H. Howard in this photo taken in 2013. Photo courtesy of The Post and Courier File/Staff

Miss Helen, who has had two hip replacements and a knee replacement, now lives with another son, orthopedic surgeon Dr. James Joseph McCoy, in West Ashley.

When the Bulldogs are on the road, she listens to the game on the radio. She’s a big sports fan, loves to watch golf and tennis and used to keep a scorebook during baseball games. And she’s a Dodgers fan, of course, “because they started out in Brooklyn.”

Her favorite Citadel player?

“Oh, Stump Mitchell,” she says, recalling the Bulldogs’ star running back of the late 1970s. “He was a stump!”

The 2015 and 2016 seasons were particularly fun for Miss Helen, as The Citadel won back-to-back Southern Conference championships.

“She loved (coach) Mike Houston, and she loved (running back) Tyler Renew,” Peter says. “And she loves Coach Thompson and is a big fan of his.”

Miss Helen plans to be back at her spot at Johnson Hagood Stadium on Saturday when the Bulldogs play rival Furman University, her favorite drink perched on the ledge in front of her.

Asked the key to her long life, Miss Helen points at the cup.

“Sweet tea?” someone asks.

“Rum and Coke,” says Peter as Miss Helen laughs.

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Mark May picks The Citadel to beat VMI https://today.citadel.edu/mark-may-picks-the-citadel-to-beat-vmi/ Wed, 17 Oct 2018 19:05:23 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4005 The Crowd's Line College Football Show with Lou Holtz & Mark MayThe Crowd's Line College Football Show with Lou Holtz & Mark MayThis year, two time Super Bowl champion and College Football Hall of Fame inductee Mark May sides with The Citadel.]]> The Crowd's Line College Football Show with Lou Holtz & Mark MayThe Crowd's Line College Football Show with Lou Holtz & Mark May

As seen in The Crowd’s Line

The Military Classic of the South is Saturday Oct. 20 when The Citadel Bulldogs play the Virginia Military Institute at VMI. The game has been played between the two Senior Military Colleges since World War II.

The Citadel has owned the games in recent years, holding on to the coveted Silver Shako for eleven consecutive years, winning 15 of the last 17 matches.

This year, two time Super Bowl champion and College Football Hall of Fame inductee Mark May sides with The Citadel in the online program The Crowd’s Line College Football Show with Lou Holtz & Mark May. (Famed coach Lou Holtz seems to have predicted a different winner who will not be named.)

Led by Citadel junior, Rhaei Brown, Regimental Public Affairs NCO and editor of the college’s Brigadier, cadets share their thoughts on the predictions.

(At about 2:40 into the show)

Week 8: Lou Holtz and Mark May Break Down The Citadel at VMI from The Crowd’s Line on Vimeo.

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My ring story: an unexpected leader at my Dad’s formerly all-male college https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-an-unexpected-leader-at-my-dads-formerly-all-male-college/ Fri, 12 Oct 2018 20:36:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=3984 Cadet Hunter Crawley, Regimental Drum Major leading the Citadel Regimental Band and PipesCadet Hunter Crawley, Regimental Drum Major leading the Citadel Regimental Band and PipesThe ring is a connector. When I wear the ring, I will know that I am linked with a Long Gray Line of brothers and sisters that have come before me.]]> Cadet Hunter Crawley, Regimental Drum Major leading the Citadel Regimental Band and PipesCadet Hunter Crawley, Regimental Drum Major leading the Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes

By Cadet Hunter Crawley, Regimental Drum Major, President of The Citadel Women’s Rugby Club, Chemistry Major

I never intended to come to The Citadel when I was in high school. Before I was even born, my father had not intended to send any daughters to his alma mater, either.

Cadet Ronald Crawley, '83 and Cadet Hunter Crawley, Class of 2019
Cadet Ronald Crawley, ’83 and Cadet Hunter Crawley, Class of 2019

In the 1990s, my father was one of the biggest supporters of single gender education around. But when he saw the first few women step through Lesesne Gate, everything changed. Even before I was born, my dad put my name down for a provisional appointment, and it was that provisional appointment that led me to explore The Citadel during my senior year of high school, and eventually apply to attend.

Four years later, I serve as the first female Regimental Drum Major of The Citadel’s Regimental Band and Pipes as well as the President of the Citadel Women’s Rugby Club. If you had looked me in the eye in high school and told me that I would be leading a charge of fifteen women on a rugby pitch or representing my school by leading a group of over one hundred musicians on a national stage in the capital of the U.S., I would have laughed. I also would have laughed if you had told me that I would be so sentimental over a class ring.

Cadet Hunter Crawley, President of The Citadel Women's Rugby Team
Cadet Hunter Crawley, President of The Citadel Women’s Rugby Team

The ring is a connector. When I wear the ring, I will know that I am linked with a Long Gray Line of brothers and sisters that have come before me. My ring will contain some of the same gold that alumni decades before me brandished proudly, and that is something I cherish deeply. I hope to wear it proudly as a physician in the U.S. Army after I graduate, and truly give back to my family and the community that has invested so much in my growth into a woman worthy of calling myself a Citadel alumna.

 

Crawley leading The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes
Crawley leading The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes
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My ring story: how the generosity of strangers helped change my life https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-how-the-generosity-of-strangers-helped-change-my-life/ Fri, 12 Oct 2018 20:07:12 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=3957 Cadet Logan Miller, Regimental Public Affairs Officer, Class of 2019Cadet Logan Miller, Regimental Public Affairs Officer, Class of 2019I am the first in my family to graduate from The Citadel, but I hope I am creating a legacy for others here. ]]> Cadet Logan Miller, Regimental Public Affairs Officer, Class of 2019Cadet Logan Miller, Regimental Public Affairs Officer, Class of 2019

By Cadet Logan Miller, Regimental Public Affairs Officer, Varsity Track Team

It was spring break 2014. My family and I were on a college search adventure when we stopped at The Citadel. I knew nothing about the school, only that it was a military college. I certainly did not realize that this brief stop at The Citadel would start a life-changing transition taking me from my home in Kannapolis, North Carolina, to my new home in Charleston, South Carolina for the next four years.

On September 20, 1996, I was born to Sonya Green-Miller and Vincent Miller. My mother always stressed the importance of a great education as I was growing up. She inspired me to work hard to succeed in school and instilled in me a desire to make a difference in the world some day, in my own way.

I started applying to colleges at the beginning of my senior year in high school. My mother asked me about The Citadel, reminding me of our visit there. I told her that I was not considering it, thinking it was out of my reach, but she persisted in encouraging me to apply, and because they waived the application for me, I was able to do it. One week after submitting my application, I received an acceptance letter. I was thrilled because the turnaround time was so quick. I strongly felt that God wanted me there for a reason.

After a pre-knob visit where high school seniors get to spend a day and night on campus, followed by an interview with The Citadel Honors College, I knew that God was pushing me to go to The Citadel. However, I ran into some challenges on the way.

Fast-forward to April 2015, two months before my high school graduation. I received my financial package and to my surprise, I was $9,000 in the hole. I vividly remember walking into my mother’s room before she went to work, crying to her that I was not going to be able to attend the place that had become my dream, the number-one military college in the South. My mother wanted to help but simply was not in the position to be able to provide the money. Immediately, I went to my room, got on my knees, and prayed for an answer. A few days later some generous strangers−four Citadel alumni−graciously donated funds to help with my tuition. Just like that, I matriculated with the class of 2019.

(Back right) Cadet Logan Miller during summer study abroad in Lithuania
(Back right) Cadet Logan Miller during summer study abroad in Lithuania

Fast-forward again to three years after that. I am senior who has made the Gold Star and Dean’s List. I have traveled around the globe three times to study abroad. I have held positions of rank, including being Regimental Public Affairs Officer, and have been a varsity track athlete. I have earned several awards and am going to graduate with a degree in Health, Exercise and Sports Science. Finally, I find myself earning the band of gold!

When I first set eyes on this beautiful campus, I never would have imagined this journey, but with God, anything is possible. To me, the ring represents honor, courage, and discipline. I know it will help me in my quest to become a physician’s assistant in the U.S. Air Force.

I am the first in my family to graduate from The Citadel, but I hope I am creating a legacy for others here. Thank you, Col. John Falkenbury, Mr. Brian Floyd, Senator Robert Hayes and Col. Russ Olsen, for making this journey possible. With the ring, I know I have the power to make a profound impact on the world.

Cadet Logan Miller with his parents after receiving award
Cadet Logan Miller with his parents after receiving award
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Comfort Bears No Fruit https://today.citadel.edu/comfort-bears-no-fruit/ Tue, 02 Oct 2018 16:26:36 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=3858 Donnell BoucherDonnell BoucherDonnell was passionate about football, but when he realized that he was only going to be an average player, he revised his playbook and became passionate about what he knew he could do well.]]> Donnell BoucherDonnell Boucher


At the age of 14, Donnell Boucher was passionate about football, but when he realized that he was only going to be an average player, he revised his playbook and became passionate about what he knew he could do well. With precision focus that guides everything he does, Boucher sets his sights on becoming a strength and conditioning coach. Now, the assistant athletic director for strength and conditioning and head strength coach at The Citadel, Boucher has realized his goal, but that has not slowed him down. He’s working harder than ever, and he is making an impact, not only in physical fitness, but in helping to develop principled leaders.

At the small weight room in his hometown of Chicopee, Massachusetts, Boucher was the only high school freshman who could bench 200 pounds.

“I remember the feeling of being able to do something the other guys couldn’t. That got me thinking that maybe this is something I could be good at. I could be better at this than football. And that sort of started it off. Every year other players came over, and we went to lift together. I turned into the go-to source for when we were going to lift.”

When talk turned to workout programs, reps and sets, Boucher naturally understood the science behind strength and conditioning. As he set his course, he left no stone unturned.

Master’s degree and experience: check

In 2007, when The Citadel offered Boucher a graduate assistant position in strength and conditioning and an opportunity to pursue his master’s degree in Health, Exercise and Sport Science, Boucher headed to Charleston. The military college was the perfect fit.

“Right off the bat, I could line up with this place and I saw what kids are going through. Our kids that come here are not finished products. They come here and they have to be developed, and that’s exciting—knowing that I have an immense part in their physical development and their emotional and mental development. That drives me.”

Mentor: check

One of the foremost leaders in the field of strength and conditioning according to Boucher is Carolina Panthers Strength Coach Joe Kenn. Kenn is also someone Boucher considers a mentor, and when Kenn offered advice, Boucher listened.

“One of the first things he told me when I was just getting started down here: it doesn’t matter how good your program is—if the players don’t believe in you and don’t believe in the things you’re trying to get them to do, you’ll never be as effective as you should be.”

As Boucher considered his mentor’s advice, he realized that education was a priority.

Second master’s degree: check

Boucher began researching—visiting other places, learning what best practices are, and he decided a master’s degree in social science would help him to better understand people and be more effective in his career. As Boucher will attest: learning to understand people is the key to success.

“I wanted to understand people. I wanted to make sure that when our athletes came in here, they were being led by a competent person who was well-versed in our subject matter and who had the ability to make connections between what we were doing in here and what we were doing on the field…

I’m not interested in being just a part of our industry—I want to help shape it and leave it better than it was when I joined it.”

Goals: check, check, check

Boucher’s goals for The Citadel stretch beyond athletes and the weight room. He is currently working with the commandant’s office to improve physical training for the entire Corps of Cadets. “We want to be the senior military institute with the best PT performance.”

For Boucher, his work is all about challenge and taking advantage of opportunity.

“Every time you come in the weight room that barbell’s gonna weigh 45 pounds. It doesn’t care about what happened yesterday. It doesn’t care about the test you’ve got coming. It doesn’t care what happened the night before—it’s going to be 45 pounds. And you’re either going to deal with that or you’re going to walk out of here—a lost opportunity to be better than you were yesterday. And I think that’s a powerful lesson.”

Boucher is constantly reassessing, measuring and setting new goals.

“Anything valuable in life comes with prerequisites, suffering—you’re going to have to extend and stretch yourself if you want that product at the end. Comfort bears no fruit. And that’s what I love about this place. There ain’t much comfort anywhere on this campus. It’s hard for an 18, 19, 20-year- old person to understand that value, but I know as they go through it and become better for it, they build up resilience. Their commitment and the struggle they go through—it pays dividends in the end.”

It has been almost 12 years since Boucher first came to The Citadel, hoping to break into the field of strength and conditioning. He is just as eager to make a difference today as he was then, and while he claims that he does nothing to motivate athletes, it is clear that he does so just by being Donnell Boucher.

“The last thing I want to do, and I tell our athletes this: I may be a strength coach, but my sole mission in life isn’t to teach you to bench press. If all you learn from me is how to do a bench press in four years, I’m a tremendous failure. Our mission here is to set these kids up to win on the field and to win in life.”

To view more student and cadet stories, visit mighty.citadel.edu.

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