Science & Mathematics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Tue, 14 Jan 2020 21:26:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.5 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Science & Mathematics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Citadel to create a South Carolina CyberCorps with $2.8 million grant https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-to-create-a-south-carolina-cybercorps-with-2-8-million-grant/ Tue, 14 Jan 2020 15:44:52 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=13092 Photo of data on a computer screen with profile of a personPhoto of data on a computer screen with profile of a personThe first in SC: Cybercorps SFS at The Citadel highly trained cybersecurity and intelligence leaders through new scholarship program.]]> Photo of data on a computer screen with profile of a personPhoto of data on a computer screen with profile of a person

The Citadel, dedicated to training America’s cyber warriors, will harness a new $2.8 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to create the state’s first CyberCorps Scholarship for Service (SFS) program. It is the largest grant The Citadel has earned to date.

The CyberCorps SFS program at The Citadel is linked with the national CyberCorps: Scholarship for Service program offered by the NSF and co-sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security and other federal agencies. The program will help The Citadel continue to recruit and train the next generation of cybersecurity professionals to meet the needs of federal, state, local and tribal government organizations.

“This grant recognizes the value of The Citadel’s singularity − a 24/7 Senior Military College where the mission of developing principled leaders is blended with a multi-disciplinary cybersecurity education,” said Darin Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean of the Swain School of Science and Mathematics at The Citadel.

Specifically, CyberCorps SFS at The Citadel will provide scholarships supporting undergraduate students pursuing a major in Computer Science, Cyber Operations, Intelligence and Security Studies, or Criminal Justice with a minor in Cybersecurity at the military college. The recipients will then pursue employment with a government entity in a cybersecurity-related position.

“CyberCorps SFS at The Citadel will provide a steady supply of highly trained cybersecurity graduates for government positions over the next several years”, said Shankar Banik, Ph.D., professor and head of Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences at The Citadel. Banik is also the principal investigator for The Citadel’s CyberCorps SFS Project. 

CyberCorps SFS cadets and students at The Citadel will participate in research, outreach and cyber defense competitions, in addition to their academic courses, leadership learning and military requirements. 

“The outcome of the project will be a pool of principled leaders with cybersecurity skills in multiple domains who can serve in the Charleston area where there numerous cybersecurity enterprises such as the Naval Information Warfare Center (Atlantic), or wherever they are most needed,” said Banik.

Banik noted that CyberCorps SFS cadets and students at The Citadel will also benefit from the long-established relationships between the college and federal and state entities such as the Naval Information Warfare Center (Atlantic), Central Intelligence Agency, Department of Defense, Federal Bureau of Investigation and National Security Agency.

Banik will be assisted by a group of co-principal investigators from The Citadel faculty including:

The program represents a college-wide effort utilizing resources and expertise from the newly created Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences, the Departments of Criminal Justice and Intelligence and Security Studies, the college’s Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies, The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence and the college’s Student Success Center, Office of Admissions, and Career Center.

The Citadel is one of only six federally appointed Senior Military Colleges, and one of only two that continue to have a 24/7 military structure for their undergraduate population. The Citadel has the highest 4-year graduation rate in South Carolina and is U.S. News & World Report’s #1 Top Public College in the South for the ninth consecutive year.

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Undergrad math wiz publishes theory about Fibonacci numbers https://today.citadel.edu/undergrad-math-wiz-publishes-theory-about-fibonacci-numbers/ Fri, 10 Jan 2020 18:43:55 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=13065 A Citadel cadet, along with two professors, wrote an academic paper titled "Matrices in the Hosoya Triangle" which was published in The Fibonacci Quarterly.]]>

In mathematics, a Fibonacci Sequence is a string of numbers where each number is the sum of the two numbers that come before it.

A Fibonacci Sequence starts with 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34 — and it goes on and on after that.

Much in the same way a Fibonacci Sequence builds on what came before — Citadel cadet Matthew Blair took what his professors taught him and turned it into an academic paper on the mathematical sequence.

Antara Mukherjee, Ph.D., Cadet Matthew Blair and Rigoberto Flórez, Ph.D.

Blair, along with co-authors Rigoberto Flórez, Ph.D., and Antara Mukherjee, Ph.D., wrote an academic paper titled “Matrices in the Hosoya Triangle.” The article was published in The Fibonacci Quarterly, the primary publication of The Fibonacci Association since 1963.

Most authors who are published in academic journals are professionals who already work in their areas of expertise; it’s unusual for a student to be published alongside those established professionals.

The focus of Blair’s research is on a Hosoya Triangle, which is when Fibonacci numbers are arranged in a triangle, rather than a straight line.

Matrices in the Hosoya triangle

“We used linear algebra on a triangular array whose entries are products of Fibonacci numbers,” said Blair. “By encapsulating these entries in a matrix, we found several unique properties that highlight the beauty of the geometry.”

In this paper, we use well-known results from linear algebra as tools to explore some properties of products of Fibonacci numbers. Specifically, we explore the behavior of the eigenvalues, eigenvectors, characteristic polynomials, determinants, and the norm of non-symmetric matrices embedded within the Hosoya triangle. We discovered that most of these objects either embed themselves within the Hosoya triangle, or they give rise to Fibonacci identities.

From Cadet Matthew Blair’s paper abstract statement

The entire academic paper can be found here.

Blair is a senior Computer Science major from Anderson, South Carolina. He has also presented his work at several conferences including Kennesaw State University Mathematics Conference, the Mathematical Association of America and the INTEGERS Conference.

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Getting into the coding spirit with cookies and cocoa https://today.citadel.edu/getting-into-the-coding-spirit-with-cookies-and-cocoa/ Tue, 10 Dec 2019 21:39:52 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=12633 One unique -- and educational -- way The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence celebrates the season is by hosting "Cookies, Cocoa and Coding."]]>

From decorating the barracks to putting on the annual Christmas Candlelight Service, there are many ways The Citadel celebrates the holidays.

One unique — and educational — way The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence celebrates the season is by hosting “Cookies, Cocoa and Coding,” an event that offers all three to students from kindergarten to high school.

Baker with Merge Cube
Baker with Merge Cube

“It was so cool,” said Baker, a gaming enthusiast and fourth-grade student at St. Andrew’s School for Math and Science. “I got to play with VR and Merge Cubes and learn more about coding, and there was hot chocolate. We had fun.”

The experience gave local students a chance to learn about virtual and augmented reality, programmable robots, problem solving with code and more. It also gave the students a chance to get into the holiday spirit, with Christmas music and decorations throughout.

“We were thrilled to have over 100 children and parents join us in celebration of Computer Science Education Week through our partnership with Code.org,” said Jennifer Albert, Ph.D., director of the STEM Center of Excellence. “It’s great to give students a chance to enjoy cookies and cocoa while also learning about code by participating in hands-on activities, including spheros, flowcharting, binary beads with 4-H, and a virtual reality project from Porter Gaud students.”

  • Cookies for coders
  • Playing with the Merge Cube
  • Students playing with Ozobots
  • Learning about flowcharting
  • Students learning about programing with Osmo
  • Students playing CodeCombat
  • Experiencing virtual reality
  • Students learning with CodeCombat
  • Playing with Spheros
  • Students learning about coding with binary beads

Included in those numbers are two separate Girl Scout groups who are working to earn STEM and coding badges.

“Cookies, Cocoa and Coding” was held on Dec. 7 on The Citadel’s campus, but it’s only one of the many ways the STEM Center of Excellence helps educate the community.

In just a few months, the STEM Center will host the 10th annual Storm The Citadel, a multi-faceted STEM event that is open to students from kindergarten through college. Storm The Citadel will be in Feb. 2020.

Registration for Storm The Citadel is open until Dec. 20.

To register, click here.

Growing as a STEM student
Growing as a STEM student
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Following up: thoughts from Dr. John Weinstein after plastics pollution discussions with French leaders and scientists https://today.citadel.edu/leading-microplastic-pollution-researcher-dr-john-weinstein-to-address-french-parliament/ Fri, 06 Dec 2019 10:00:51 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=12564 Citadel oceans toxicology researcher Dr. John Weinstein on panel of scientists address members of French ParliamentCitadel oceans toxicology researcher Dr. John Weinstein on panel of scientists address members of French ParliamentWeinstein, whose research into microplastics pollution was recently featured in National Geographic, is being flown to Paris at the request of the French Embassy to share his discoveries.]]> Citadel oceans toxicology researcher Dr. John Weinstein on panel of scientists address members of French ParliamentCitadel oceans toxicology researcher Dr. John Weinstein on panel of scientists address members of French Parliament

Photo above: Citadel ocean toxicology researcher, Dr. John Weinstein wearing translation device while appearing before special committee of French lawmakers looking into plastic pollution in the world’s oceans. Weinstein was requested for two events in France: a roundtable with the Parliamentary Office for Scientific and Technological Assessment and a French-American microplastics workshop. He provided these reflections upon his return.

OPECST roundtable on plastic pollution in oceans held in Paris. Dr. John Weinstein, Citadel professor and researcher, seen second from left.

The Parliamentary Office for Scientific and Technological Assessment (OPECST) has recently launched a study on plastic pollution. Senator Angèle Préville for Lot and Député Philippe Bolo for Maine-et-Loire were nominated to carry out this study.  They have been holding weekly meetings on this topic with various stakeholders for the past several months.  On December 11, they held a roundtable discussion to learn more about what is happening in the United States concerning plastic and microplastic pollution studies.  I was one of six American scientists to present ongoing research findings at this meeting. The roundtable was sponsored by the National Council for Science and the Environment, and the French Embassy’s Office of Science and Technology.

Following the OPECST meeting in Paris, the two parliamentarians then traveled to Le Mans, France to attend the French-American Workshop to learn more about the current state of the science from other French and American scientists.

Personally, I was impressed with Senator Préville’s and Député Bolo’s engaged leadership, their desire to learn more from both French and American scientists on the current state of our knowledge of the impacts of ocean plastic, and their commitment to address this global problem. I hope their approach to making data-driven policy recommendations can serve as a model on how we address complex, multi-stakeholder, international problems.

The workshop served as a forum by which scientists from both France and the United States could learn more about on-going research projects, challenges, and opportunities that we each face on this topic.  It was clear that although our scientific knowledge on the impacts of plastics and microplastics continues to grow, critical uncertainties are still present.

I am optimistic that by sharing our research results and our commitment to pursue joint research collaborations in the future, we will be able to help shape cross-national strategies on how to deal with this global problem. 

John Weinstein, Ph.D., chair for the Department of Biology, professor of physiology and aquatic toxicology researcher

Citadel Biology head and researcher, Dr. John Weinstein (back row, right) with other scientists and French legislators meeting in France to discuss plastic pollution in oceans, December 2019

Original story from Dec. 6, 2019: Leading microplastic pollution researcher, Dr. John Weinstein, to address French Parliament

One of the America’s leading scientists investigating plastic pollution in oceans and inland waterways, Citadel professor John Weinstein, Ph.D., will share his discoveries with French lawmakers, government officials and with other scientists during events Dec. 10 and 11 in France.

Weinstein, whose research into microplastics pollution in waterways was recently featured in National Geographic and Pattrn (The Weather Channel), is being flown to Paris at the request of the French Embassy.

He will participate in a microplastics pollution workshop in Le Mans, with the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea, and the National Science Foundation and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

As part of the trip, Weinstein will participate in roundtable hearings in Paris with the Parliamentary Office for Scientific and Technological Assessment (OPECST). The gathering will include députés (legislators) of the French National Assembly, as well as other American and French scientists.

“OPECST recently launched a study on plastic pollution,” said Weinstein, “and is interested in learning more about ongoing microplastics research in the U.S., including ours at The Citadel. I am honored to be included in these meetings.”

Citadel researcher Dr. John Weinstein with cadets and students collecting samples of oysters for microplastic pollution research
Citadel researcher Dr. John Weinstein (seen standing/back of boat) with cadets and students collecting samples of oysters for microplastic pollution research

Weinstein is leading change through ongoing, collaborative aquatic toxicology research conducted at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. The Citadel campus is boarded by tidal marshes and by the Ashley River.

The research is conducted by undergraduate cadets and graduate students, in conjunction with funding Weinstein receives from the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, National Science Foundation and other sources. Weinstein and his students discovered that plastic items break down much more rapidly in coastal waters that anyone knew, that particles wearing off of tires are among the most prolific microplastics and that there are microplastics in bottled beverages and in some local municipal drinking water.

Addtionally, Weinstein is one of the scientists supporting a five university oceans, human health and climate change alliance funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

To read more about Weinstein’s discoveries visit The Citadel Today newsroom here.

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Noted Citadel scientist recognized by governor for service to state https://today.citadel.edu/noted-citadel-scientist-recognized-by-governor-for-service-to-state/ Thu, 05 Dec 2019 15:00:26 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=12481 In recognition of his lifetime of service and contributions to the State of South Carolina, Richard Dwight Porcher Jr., Ph.D., was awarded The Order of the Palmetto.]]>

Above photo: Dr. Richard Porcher, by Alex Fox, Traditional Wild America

In recognition of his lifetime of service and contributions to the State of South Carolina, Richard Dwight Porcher Jr., Ph.D., was awarded The Order of the Palmetto by The Honorable Henry McMaster, Governor of South Carolina on Dec. 4, 2019. The Order of the Palmetto is South Carolina’s highest civilian honor.

Porcher is an acclaimed biologist, historian, naturalist, author, conservationist, lecturer and teacher. Among his many accomplishments is a distinguished 33-year career as professor and researcher at The Citadel, during which he taught several thousand cadets, integrated field biology into his courses and used his research on South Carolina botanical and cultural resources to influence environmental policy.

Dr. Richard Porcher’s yearbook photo as Biology faculty at The Citadel in 1972

“Dr. Porcher’s infectious enthusiasm, dedication, and mentorship sparked a love of nature and influenced the career paths of generations of cadets at The Citadel,” said John Weinstein, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Biology at The Citadel.

During a private event at the Charleston Library Society, Sen. George E. “Chip” Campsen III, chairman of the South Carolina Senate Fish, Game and Forestry Committee, presented Porcher with the honor on behalf of the governor before the scientist’s family, friends and colleagues.

Photo of Dr. Richard Porcher's Order of the Palmetto award

“My father, Dr. Richard Porcher, has worked tirelessly for decades to protect and preserve the natural wonders of the state of South Carolina for future generations, said Dorthy Porcher Holland. “At 80, he is travelling from one end of the state to the other working on several books that combine his passion for the natural world and for telling the stories of the land.”

Currently underway, according to Holland, is a collaboration titled Santee Canal: The Wedding of Two Rivers, a study of one of the first canals constructed in the U.S. Porcher is updating some of his earlier work by co-authoring Wildflowers of the Coastal Plain with The Citadel’s Dr. Joel Gramling. Additionally, Porcher is exploring the community from which he came in the upcoming Our Lost Heritage: A Cultural History of the Peoples of Middle St. John’s Parish.

Lastly, in what Holland describes as possibly Porcher’s greatest achievement, will be a additional collaboration with Gramling to be titled: The Lowcountry Landscape in the Footprints of our Forebears, a study of how man and nature have shaped the land on which we live.

Some of Porcher’s previous work includes Wildflowers of the Lowcountry and Lower Peedee, A Guide to the Wildflowers of South Carolina, The Market Preparation of Carolina Rice (coauthored with William Robert Judd), and The Story of Sea Island Cotton (coauthored with Sarah Fick). 

At the event, it was revealed that a vast photographic library of more than 1,400 South Carolina wildflowers — built by Porcher — will be presented as a gift to the state. The collection will be made available to educational, environmental, scientific and cultural organizations.

Dr. Richard Porcher teaching in the field
Dr. Richard Porcher teaching in the field

Porcher lives in Mt. Pleasant where he grows blueberries and camellias, and spends much of his time on his farm in Clarendon County where he grows Long Leaf Pines and wildflowers. He has two children, three grandchildren, countless friends and many cousins.

Porcher continues to lecture to clubs, schools, and organizations across the state.

Only by placing large tracts of natural communities under protection will we ensure that future generations receive the same pleasures we experience when viewing a bloodroot or pitcher plant in its natural setting.

Leave the earth a better place than you found it. Make a difference.

Dr. Richard Porcher
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Citadel professor speaks about stealthy microplastics https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-professor-speaks-about-stealthy-microplastics/ Sun, 24 Nov 2019 11:00:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=12354 Citadel professor John Weinstein, Ph.D., speaks about microplastics with Pattrn, an online media outlet connected to The Weather Channel.]]>

As seen on Pattrn

Citadel professor John Weinstein, Ph.D., speaks about microplastics with Pattrn, an online media outlet connected to The Weather Channel.

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Citadel STEM Center spreads computer science excellence across South Carolina https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-stem-center-spreads-computer-science-excellence-across-south-carolina/ Sat, 23 Nov 2019 00:00:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=12314 Students experimenting with virtual realityStudents experimenting with virtual realityThe Citadel hosted more than 340 middle and high school students interested in computer science from 12 different schools across the state.]]> Students experimenting with virtual realityStudents experimenting with virtual reality

The Citadel hosted more than 340 middle and high school students interested in computer science

From as far away as Fairfield, 12 South Carolina schools sent their students to The Citadel, to show them how many careers rely on computer science.

The event’s sponsor, Code.org, said this was the largest computer science fair ever hosted by one of its regional partners.

Students had the opportunity to get hands on experience with things like virtual reality, renewable energy, Sphero robots and computer programming. The students also had the opportunity to speak with representatives from local businesses and organizations like Benefitfocus, SLED, Mercedes Benz and Clemson Extension.

Specifically, the fair was meant to help the students see how computer science can vary in different industries, like game design, music, sports, intelligence, sustainability and business.

Students from Marrington Middle School at the Computer Science Fair
Students from Marrington Middle School at the Computer Science Fair

“We were thrilled at the diversity of schools that attended, partially thanks to Code.org funding to reimburse the schools’ travel expenses,” said Jennifer Albert, Ph.D., director of The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence. “Our exhibitors all did an amazing job of engaging students and helping them see what would be possible if they pursued a computer science career.”

The computer science fair is just one of the many ways The Citadel’s STEM Center helps educate the community. Later this year, the STEM Center will be hosting Cookies, Cocoa and Coding on Saturday, Dec. 7 and the KidWind Competition on Saturday, Dec. 14.

To get more information or to register for either of these events, click here.

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Citadel nursing students helping lead the way for breast cancer awareness https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-nursing-students-leading-the-way-for-breast-cancer-awareness/ Mon, 30 Sep 2019 18:58:58 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=11199 The department will be hosting two different events in October to recognize National Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day.]]>

Swain Department of Nursing, Citadel Graduate College recognizing Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Photo above: The Citadel’s Swain Department of Nursing hosts breast cancer awareness events in Oct. 2019. Guest host, actor/author John O’Hurley in center, black suit. Dr. and Mrs. Chris Swain, two of the namesakes for the department, seen on far left.

Updated October 14

A gallery from The Citadel’s Swain Department of Nursing metastatic breast cancer awareness documentary viewing at Charleston Music Hall is below.

Original story

The Citadel’s Swain Department of Nursing is on a mission to educate and develop nursing cadets and students into principled leaders in the healthcare environment. They’re doing it by incorporating the college’s core values of honor, duty and respect into the learning experience.

In October, this is evidenced by National Breast Cancer Awareness Month activities being lead by cadets, students, faculty and staff from the department. They will be hosting two events to recognize National Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day. The first event will feature two documentary screenings, showcasing powerful stories surrounding metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The second event is a breast cancer awareness “fun run” and beach party on the Isle of Palms. The event will also serve as the launch for a new charity, “Racing for MBC.”

Chris Swain, M.D.

“I’m delighted to see the Swain Department of Nursing at The Citadel engaging with the community in recognition of National Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day, said Christopher Swain, M.D., co-donor for the Swain Department of Nursing. “Metastatic breast cancer is a terrifying disease that kills 90% of all breast cancer patients, yet receives less than 5% of breast cancer research funds. Awareness events such as this can help to educate, increase visibility, and hopefully stimulate additional research funding in the future. I hope that the exciting and entertaining events of October 12th and 13th will bring the Charleston community together to celebrate life, as we focus a spotlight on the challenges of metastatic breast cancer.”

Documentary screenings

The two back-to-back documentary screenings will be on Saturday, Oct. 12 at 6 p.m. at the Charleston Music Hall. Doors open at 5 p.m.

Nursing breast cancer awareness screenings

The first film, Marathons for Mom, shows how one mother’s six-year battle with MBC inspired her son to compete in six marathons in just one year. The second film, Love Always, Mom, documents one woman’s struggle to become a mother while battling MBC.

Tickets to see both films are $10 and can be purchased here.

“Fun run” and beach party

The “fun run” and beach party will be on Sunday, Oct. 13 from 3 – 7 p.m. at The Citadel Beach Club.

Nursing breast cancer awareness run and beach house

The fun run will be one mile long, both starting and ending at The Citadel Beach Club. The run will be followed by food and drink, as well as a sunset concert by The Ultimate Eagles Tribute – On the Border.

Tickets for the “fun run” and beach party are $40 and can be purchased here.

Both the film screenings and the beach party will be hosted by John O’Hurley, an award-winning actor and New York Times Bestselling Author, best known for his role in Seinfeld and as the fifth host of Family Feud.

For more information on either of these events, click here.

The Citadel Graduate College Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign

The Citadel Graduate College (CGC) will also participate in National Breast Cancer Awareness Month with a month-long awareness campaign. The CGC hopes to educate the campus community and acknowledge those who fight against this disease.

Beginning on Tuesday, Oct. 1, CGC staff will distribute pink ribbons to support research, honor those who have lost their lives and commemorate those who continue to fight. Ribbons can be picked up in Room 101 of Bond Hall during normal business hours.

In May 2019, The Citadel community lost one of its own to this disease. Cicely McCray was CGC’s assistant director of enrollment management for continuing education. She was tenacious, confident, and vibrant and had an adoration for education. McCray operated with a spirit of excellence, class, and creativity; mediocrity was never an option. She is missed every day.

More information about how to get involved can be found on the Susan G. Komen website.

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My ring story: becoming resilient after losing my “everything” https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-resilient-citadel-senior/ Mon, 23 Sep 2019 10:00:02 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=10805 "My mother supported me in my quest to earn The Citadel Band of Gold. I am happy to report that I did not disappoint her."]]>

By Cadet Braxton Sharron Jeffcoat

My mother, Chauna Jeffcoat Rawlinson, was my everything.

We were completely dependent on each other “like two peas in a pod,” as she would say. She was my biggest fan, and as I was her child, she always said that I was her first love. That meant so much to me.

The biggest challenge in my life continues to be moving forward toward my goals without the most significant person in my life, my mother dearest.

My mother passed away unexpectedly from a heart attack in my hometown of Gaston, South Carolina, during my sophomore year at The Citadel. She was a God-fearing woman. She was also a hard worker who pushed herself to give her kids the best we could have in life.

Chauna and Braxton visiting during Parents’ Weekend

The Citadel class ring for me represents my struggles endured during four years here and my accomplishments. Through The Citadel, I became more disciplined, more organized and most importantly, with the help of my friends (especially cadets in the gospel choir), more resilient.

My mother supported me in my quest to earn The Citadel Band of Gold. I am happy to report that I did not disappoint her, in fact, I hope to create a legacy here for my siblings, my own children and other members of my family .

Cadet Braxton Sharon Jeffcoat is a Biology major, a member of The Citadel Gospel Choir and has worked as a recruiting NCO.

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Citadel expands programs to improve physical readiness of military recruits and first responders https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-expands-programs-military-first-responders/ Fri, 13 Sep 2019 14:51:33 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=10646 Louis Brems - The Citadel SY 18-19, Tactical athlete, Dawg Pound Weight Room, Dan Bornstein, Kasee Hucks, Officer Shaw, Officer Brisbane, Sgt. Mjr. Andrew Yagle, KeithLouis Brems - The Citadel SY 18-19, Tactical athlete, Dawg Pound Weight Room, Dan Bornstein, Kasee Hucks, Officer Shaw, Officer Brisbane, Sgt. Mjr. Andrew Yagle, KeithThe Citadel’s Dept. of Health and Human Performance, and its newly established Center for Performance, Readiness, Resiliency, and Recovery (CPR3) are working to improve the safety and security of the state and the nation, through improving the fitness and health of its people.]]> Louis Brems - The Citadel SY 18-19, Tactical athlete, Dawg Pound Weight Room, Dan Bornstein, Kasee Hucks, Officer Shaw, Officer Brisbane, Sgt. Mjr. Andrew Yagle, KeithLouis Brems - The Citadel SY 18-19, Tactical athlete, Dawg Pound Weight Room, Dan Bornstein, Kasee Hucks, Officer Shaw, Officer Brisbane, Sgt. Mjr. Andrew Yagle, Keith

The Citadel’s Department of Health and Human Performance, and its newly established Center for Performance, Readiness, Resiliency, and Recovery (CPR3) are working to improve the safety and security of the state and the nation, through improving the fitness and health of its people, especially military recruits and first responders. 

Previous research conducted at The Citadel led by Dan Bornstein, Ph.D., demonstrated that South Carolina is part of a cluster of southern states that disproportionately threaten national security by producing U.S. Army recruits who were significantly less physically fit than those from other areas of the nation, therefore more likely to become injured during Army basic combat training.

“While that research shined a spotlight on a problem, The Citadel is committed to on-going research that involves undergraduate and graduate students to find ways to address this problem,” said Bornstein, the lead research investigator and a professor in The Citadel Department of Health and Human Performance.

Research being conducted at The Citadel Center for Performance, Readiness, Resiliency, and Recovery

Results from two of those on-going research studies, will be highlighted at the Southeastern Regional Meeting of the National Strength and Conditioning Association, being held at Winthrop University Sept. 14.  

During the conference, Citadel Graduate College Health and Human Performance student, Brennan Textor, will present results from her master’s thesis which investigates ways of predicting performance on the U.S. Army’s new Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT). 

“Graduate student Brennan Textor’s research is particularly relevant as the Army works to understand how the ACFT, and the training that prepares soldiers for it, can best prepare and maintain a fighting force ready to outmaneuver and outfight enemy forces,” Bornstein explained.

Brennan’s area of research will be continued by Citadel professor Ryan Sacko, Ph.D., via a study he’s leading within the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. 

Professor Dan Bornstein, The Citadel

“This study will provide cadets and graduate students with research experience that will assist the Army, and other military branches, in identifying the most efficient ways to predict performance and minimize risk of injuries across the U.S. Armed Forces,” Bornstein said.  

Cadet Charles-Michael Alexander, an Exercise Science Major, will also present findings from his research on The Citadel’s Physical Readiness Officer (PRO) Program.  The PRO program is designed to develop a core team of cadets who can lead their cadet companies in a form of physical training incorporating the science of exercise into traditional military physical training.

“Results from this study demonstrate the importance of having highly-trained individuals leading “tactical athletes” through their physical training programs,” Bornstein said. “This work has resulted in The Citadel taking the lead nationally in developing and launching three new academic degree and certificate programs in tactical performance and resiliency.”

For more information about The Citadel Health and Human Performance degrees and programs, visit the website, email hhp@citadel.edu or call (843) 953-5060.

Research-related training at The Citadel Center for Performance, Readiness, Resiliency, and Recovery

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