Science & Mathematics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Wed, 27 Apr 2022 13:31:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Science & Mathematics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 The Citadel Dept. of Defense Cyber Institute cadets and faculty mentors earn two of three awards at first joint SMC event https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-dept-of-defense-cyber-institute-cadets-and-faculty-mentors-earn-two-of-three-awards-at-first-joint-smc-event/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 23:35:17 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31758 Cyberspace is a battlefield and the adversary is always out there. We need you defending our country in the cyber environment.]]>

And Citadel team places second out of ten colleges in NWIC (Atlantic) cyber defense competition

Photo above, left to right: Cadet Slaltean Frederick, Dr. Shankar Banik, and Cadets Shiloh Smiles and Jared Johnson posing with their awards at the inaugural conference on Cybersecurity Research in Undergraduate Programs held at Norwich University.

Just as The Citadel cybersecurity programs and initiatives continued to grow this academic year, cadets in the program expanded their skills and experiences through cyber defense competitions, their work with The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute, the college’s CyberCorps Scholarships for Service program and, for the seniors, planning for the next stage of their careers by accepting positions as cyber defense professionals.

A highlight of the spring semester was the first gathering of cadets from America’s six Senior Military Colleges who are participating in their school’s Department of Defense Cyber Institute. It was hosted by Norwich University in early April.

The inaugural conference on Cybersecurity Research in Undergraduate Programs (CyRUP) was a collaborative effort between the military colleges who are jointly dedicated to advancing cybersecurity research and to developing research opportunities for undergraduate students. Cadets from The Citadel, the University of North Georgia, Texas A&M, Virginia Military Institute, Virginia Tech and Norwich University, as well as professionals from U.S. Cyber Forces, gathered to learn more about current research interests and what is coming next in cybersecurity.

The Citadel earned two of the three awards presented at the conference. The Best Paper Award went to cadets Jared Johnson, Eric Lilling and their faculty mentors, Drs. Shankar Banik and Deepti Joshi, for “Efficient Phishing Detection using Email DNA.”

The Best Presentation Award was earned by cadets Slateon Frederick, Jessica Roginski, Shiloh Smiles, Noah Wells and Banik, their faculty mentor. The presentation title: “Context Aware Access Control for Internet of Things (IoT) Network.”

Other cybersecurity news from The Citadel: cadet team takes 2nd place in college division at NIWC cyber defense competition

The Citadel Cybersecurity competition team during the Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic  2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition
The Citadel cybersecurity competition team posing for a photo after earning second place in the Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic 2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition

The Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic hosted the 2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition this spring. The three day event included a competition between 10 colleges. The Citadel team earned second place, just behind Clemson. The cadet participants were: Jared Johnson, Ben Race, Robert Roser, Shiloh Smiles, Trey Stevens and Noah Wells.

Additionally, The Citadel’s cybersecurity programs director, Shankar Banik, Ph.D., provided a keynote address during the three day event.

This kind of experience will give you an edge and a platform to apply your skillsets to a real-world situation. A degree is one thing, a certification is one thing, but learning in this way — how to do the critical work of hardening systems and testing your skills — is invaluable.

Cyberspace is a battlefield and the adversary is always out there. Students like you give us hope and we need you defending our country in the cyber environment.

Dr. Shankar Banik, professor and Graduate Program director of Computer Science, co-director for the Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel

Read more about the event here.

Dr. Shankar Banik, professor and Graduate Program director of Computer Science, Co-director for the Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel, speaking to high school competitors during the Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic 2022 Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition
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With summer just around the corner, urban heat island effect is something to consider https://today.citadel.edu/with-summer-just-around-the-corner-urban-heat-island-effect-is-something-to-consider/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 13:59:56 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31567 "We learned the hottest urban heat island areas, in the deep red on the map, are often the most population dense and are as much as 11.1 degrees warmer than neighboring areas on a sweltering summer day."]]>

Learnings from my undergraduate research experience

By Cadet Emma Larsen, The Citadel Class of 2022, Civil and Environmental Engineering major

I was recently introduced to the urban heat island effect, the occurrence of an overall higher temperature being documented in urban areas compared to their rural counterparts, through The Citadel’s Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE).

Much of this temperature difference is a result of infrastructure factors of materials — including asphalt and concrete — absorbing and re-emitting the sun’s rays, urban geometry trapping the energy within the confines of the urban boundary, and large amounts of movement and activity in a small area (roadways) causing an abundance of heat waste. The urban heat island effect directly impacts Charleston, South Carolina, my home for 11 years, piquing my interest.

I wanted to participate in research that is important to my family and me. Additionally, as an undergraduate Civil Engineering major, I was interested in learning more about extreme heat variances to help fellow cadets survive the Charleston heat as we wear grey woolen uniforms and stand outside for hours for our military dress parades and practices. So, I began engaging with HeatWatch through the SURE program and the Near Center for Climate Studies at The Citadel.

HeatWatch is an ongoing, national effort to record temperature and humidity in participating cities on a single day to see how they vary from one area of a city to the next. Through this effort, the data collected about heat within cities around the U.S. can be formed into maps visualizing how the temperature varies throughout the urban area, how the layout of the structures causes this variation and which communities are most vulnerable.

The national HeatWatch campaign is coordinated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and CAPA Strategies, a climate research and data collection company. They provide devices that are heat sensors to local companies, colleges, organizations and volunteers within selected cities to conduct the data collection campaigns themselves, contributing the results to the national project and to local agencies that will find it helpful.

For Charleston, the head of this campaign was Dr. Janice Barnes, of Climate Adaptation Partners. She led a group of local organizations including The Citadel’s James B. Near Center for Climate Studies, the City of Charleston, the Medical University of South Carolina Arboretum, the Institute for Air Quality Studies and Office of Health Promotion, Charleston Resilience Network, Charleston Medical District, South Carolina Interfaith Power and Light, and Carolinas Integrated Science Assessment.

On our assigned collection day, July 31, 2021, about 30 people were needed to drive throughout the city on preplanned routes with the provided heat sensors on their cars to gather the data including temperatures and locations. While members of the organizations participated in the data collection, most volunteers were members of the community interested in helping discover more about Charleston’s urban heat impacts.

This temperature map, released as part of a report months after our data collection day, displays the results of our combined efforts. We learned the hottest urban heat island areas, in the deep red on the map, are often the most population dense and are as much as 11.1 degrees warmer than neighboring areas on a sweltering summer day.

Working with the HeatWatch effort allow me to participate in paid undergraduate research through our SURE program and it offered a highly unique experience of partaking in a much larger, national endeavor.

I was able to interact with Dr. Barnes, who involved those of us representing The Citadel in the planning, video conference calls, organizational emails, volunteer recruiting efforts and the day of data collection for Charleston HeatWatch. On collection day, I was one of the volunteers driving in my car on a pre-planned route of the city with a heat index sensor attached to my window. For my experience in participatory learning, in addition to the in-depth learning I achieved from my research, I gained experience with major project planning, learned how a multi-company endeavor is planned and coordinated, and saw how global climate issues can be addressed within a community.

After being encouraged to read and study deeply into a topic, I have understood more about the urban heat island effect than I could have learned in a regular class. The SURE program created a community of professors and students interested in studying beyond the expected curriculum and encouraged active participation instead of passive. There were not any tests or exams that created parameters of what I was supposed to know. Instead, this is an educational experience without limits, where students are given room to teach themselves and become subject matter experts on a topic. Overall, my research experience made me see the city in a different light and made me more aware of how small design choices around me are directly affecting the climate. I am going to take these experiences with me as I am writing an academic journal article about participatory learning and pursuing a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering.

Now, as I approach graduation this May and with summer just around the corner, I am considering the urban heat effect that will affect so many people in our Charleston community. I hope that my future career as an engineer will include being able to help make a difference in mitigating some of the negative impacts of climate change on local communities.

Cadet Emma Larsen is a Civil and Environmental Engineering major from Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.

Read the full report resulting from the Charleston HeatWatch team’s work at this link.

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From knob to nurse, Second Lt. Catherine Hill serves Charleston and America by living her dream https://today.citadel.edu/from-knob-to-nurse-second-lt-catherine-hill-serves-charleston-and-america-by-living-her-dream/ Wed, 23 Mar 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=25354 2nd. Lt. Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, receives her diploma at graduation from her father, Lt. Col. Rustin Hill, '90The Citadel Class of2nd. Lt. Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, receives her diploma at graduation from her father, Lt. Col. Rustin Hill, '90The Citadel Class of"All nurses lead whether at the bedside, in the community, or at hospitals. Catherine Hill is most certainly doing that."]]> 2nd. Lt. Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, receives her diploma at graduation from her father, Lt. Col. Rustin Hill, '90The Citadel Class of2nd. Lt. Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, receives her diploma at graduation from her father, Lt. Col. Rustin Hill, '90The Citadel Class of

Photo above: Second Lieutenant Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, receives her diploma at graduation from her father, Lt. Col. Rustin Hill, The Citadel Class of 1990, during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets commencement ceremony in May 2021.

“I would choose The Citadel all over again”

For as long as she could remember, Catherine Hill wanted to be a nurse

That was how her story began at The Citadel, when Hill matriculated as a knob in August of 2017 from her home in North Garden, Virginia. She entered college with an Army scholarship and a declaration to major in nursing — military service, nursing and attending The Citadel, all traditions in her family.

Now, Second Lt. Catherine Hill, The Citadel Class of 2021, is living her dream. Like many in her family, she is serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. She is a a reservist for the Army Nurse Corps.

Hill’s fulltime role is serving young patients and their families as a nurse at MUSC Shawn Jenkin’s Children’s Hospital.

“While The Citadel is developing principled leaders, our nursing program is growing the next generation of nurse leaders,” said Lenora S. Horton, Ph.D., an instructor with The Citadel’s Swain Department of Nursing. “Second Lieutenant Catherine Hill clearly exemplifies the highly desirable traits of a leader who lives by the values of honor, duty and respect. All nurses lead whether at the bedside, in the community or at hospitals. Catherine is most certainly doing that.”

Catherine Hill, while a cadet, administering a COVID-19 vaccine to a member of The Citadel staff during a clinic at McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, March 24, 2021.

After graduating, and while preparing for her nursing board examination, Hill took the time to answer these questions.

Q. What is the one thing you miss the most about The Citadel?

A. It goes without saying that The Citadel experience isn’t just about the place, it’s about the people that you get to see everyday. I will miss the memories I have made with all my friends and the endless laugher you can hear in the barracks of cadets enjoying their time together. I will miss all the people that I have become closer with nursing program and hope to see them again soon. 

Q. What do you miss the least about The Citadel?

A. I definitely do not miss 6 a.m. formations. 

Q. Who is the one person at The Citadel who had the most positive impact on your time here and why?

A. I would have to say that my brother 2nd Lt. Russ Hill (Rustin Hill II), who graduated in 2020, had the most positive impact on my time at The Citadel. Although he graduated last year, he taught me a lot throughout my time here at school. He taught me to stand up for myself and to never be ashamed of the person I am. He always looked out for me and was never afraid to stand up for me. I was fortunate enough to get to live in the same battalion as him, and because of that we now share so many memories that we will tell as we get older. The best advice he gave me was that if I could find humor and laugh at any hard situation in life that came my way, I would always win. 

Cadet Catherine Hill with her older brother, Russ Hill. Provided by Catherine.

Q. How has your mindset changed since studying, and then starting your career in nursing during one of history’s worst pandemics?

It was inspiring, especially, to watch my Mom working as a nurse during the pandemic while finishing my degree at The Citadel. If anything, the pandemic has made me love nursing even more. Nursing is truly a selfless career path. 

One of my top memories while training at The Citadel to become a nurse was helping people on campus during the pandemic. As senior nursing students we were honored to be asked to administer the COVID-19 vaccine. Our nursing instructor said it best, ‘we are making history getting to distribute the vaccine to the faculty and staff at The Citadel.’ As as a nation we patiently but anxiously waited for a vaccine to come out with the hopes that one day we would return to normal. Having the opportunity to administer the COVID-19 vaccine seems like a small role, however, it was truly an honor to be a part of the solution to this crisis.

2nd Lt. Catherine Hill, fall 2021

Q. What advice do you have for young people considering a nursing degree?

I have two pieces of advice to those who are seeking to pursue a nursing degree.

One. Make sure you are choosing to become a nurse because you genuinely love taking care of others not because of the pay. You will play a vital role in tough situations and you have to possess the ability to be empathic and put yourself in someone else’s shoes. It is incredibly challenging but also the most rewarding thing you will ever do. It truly is a blessing to stand by a patient’s side and watch as they make a full recovery and also be that person to hold their hand when they don’t.

My second piece of advice is to make friends with the other people in your nursing program. Nursing is collaborative and deals a lot with working alongside others. Becoming close with a group of your fellow nursing students will enhance your experience in nursing school through the tough times as well as learn to collaborate with others. I had had the ability to become very close with my nursing peers as there were only eight of us. We were a very tight group, taking the same classes and studying for tests together for four years. They have made this experience one that I will never forget and I am thankful for them. 

More about the Swain Department of Nursing

The Swain Department of Nursing expects to have 22 nurses graduating as part of the Class of 2022 on May 7. A traditional Nurse Pinning Ceremony will be held at 3:30 p.m. on May 5 at Summerall Chapel to honor the graduates and recognize their dedication toward completing their degrees and their commitment to serve as nurses in the future. The group will be addressed by Lt. Gen. Dorothy A. Hogg, USAF (Ret.), the former Surgeon General, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Pentagon.

The mission of the Nursing Program is to educate and develop cadets and students to become principled leaders in the healthcare environment and profession of nursing by incorporating The Citadels core values of honor, duty and respect into the learning experience.

For more information about studying nursing as a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, or as a non-cadet, evening undergraduate, please visit the Swain Department of Nursing web section here, email nursing@citadel.edu, or call (843) 953-1630.

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree at The Citadel is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

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Cybersecurity cadet mentors AFJROTC cyber team, helping lead them to #1 in SC, and now a national competition https://today.citadel.edu/cybersecurity-cadet-mentors-afjrotc-cyber-team-helping-lead-them-to-1-in-sc-and-now-a-national-competition/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 20:41:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29897 Ashley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC Cyber competition team being trained in lab by Citadel Cadet Trey StephensAshley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC Cyber competition team being trained in lab by Citadel Cadet Trey Stephens"It's really been great to have the leadership of Cadet Stephens, and now the other Citadel cadets who are engaging to help the Ashley Ridge High School cyber team continue to grow and thrive."]]> Ashley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC Cyber competition team being trained in lab by Citadel Cadet Trey StephensAshley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC Cyber competition team being trained in lab by Citadel Cadet Trey Stephens

Photo above: Citadel Cadet Trey Stevens (far left), with members of the Ashley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC cybersecurity competition team training in the high school’s lab.

Ashley Ridge High School’s JROTC Cybersecurity team competing in Maryland

A senior cadet who is a quadruple major heard about a need and stepped up to meet the challenge. Cadet Trey Stevens is majoring in Computer Science, Cybersecurity Operations, Intelligence and Security Studies, and Criminal Justice. He is studying as part of the first group of cadets with The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute, and will be working with the Department of Defense after graduating in May.

Stevens learned that Ashley Ridge High School’s Air Force JROTC (AFJROTC) wanted to start a cybersecurity team to help expand interest in the field as the country’s need for cyber defenders continues to escalate. He met with the head of the unit there and set up weekly training sessions for the students.

About eight months later, the high school’s Swampfox AFJROTC Cyber Team — that Stevens helped develop and mentors — is surpassing all expectations. The Dorchester County high schoolers earned their way to the top in South Carolina, placing first in the state’s Platinum Tier overall in the All-Service Division. Now they are competing in CyberPatriot XIV—the fourteenth season of the Air Force Association’s National Youth Cyber Defense Competition, held March 17 – 21 in Bethesda, Maryland.

“The Swampfox team could hardly believe it when they realized they qualified for the nationals,” Stevens said after receiving the brackets for the final competitors.

Stevens, along with two other Citadel cadets who will take over as mentors next year, some of the Ashley Ridge cyber team and their AFJROTC unit leader, Major Bill Clark III, a Senior Aerospace Science Instructor, are in Maryland for the event after fall competitions narrowed the field from several hundred down to 28 finalists. The team’s travel expenses are all being covered by the competition.

“The students worked incredibly hard to make getting to a national competition a reality,” said Stevens. “Not all of the team member could travel to Maryland, but most will be able to take part in the next competition for the Ashley Ridge Swampfox JROTC Cyber Team which is the Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition on April 4 in North Charleston, much closer to home.”

The students on the Ashley Ridge Swampfox JROTC Cyber Team include:

  • Russell Brady – Unit Commander
  • Caleb Huckabee – Unit Commander
  • Emma Huckabee
  • Jade Benesh
  • Mikayla Benesh
  • Jean Lim
  • Jacob Kramer
  • Lindsay Shuford
  • J’Metrius Stanley

The Ashley Ridge cyber team visited The Citadel over their holiday break, practicing inside a lab on campus to get experience in a different venue.

Citadel Cadet Trey Stevens (left) with member of the Ashley Ridge High School Air Force JROTC cybersecurity competition team and one of their upcoming mentors for 2022-23, Citadel Cadet Dalton Hazelwood, posting for a photo in December when the high school team visited The Citadel campus in Charleston, South Carolina.

The two cadets besides Stevens accompanying the Foxswamp team in Maryland, Dalton Hazelwood and George Poleski, will be taking over as mentors for the incoming students who will begin training with the Ashley Ridge AFJROTC cyber team in the fall.

“It’s really been great to have the leadership of Cadet Stevens, and now the other Citadel cadets who are engaging to help the Ashley Ridge High School cyber team continue to grow and thrive,” said Major Clark. “Our high school AFJOTC cadets look up to The Citadel cadets and see a possible path for their futures.”

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Dr. John Palms, ’58, honored by The Citadel’s Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics https://today.citadel.edu/dr-john-palms-58-honored-by-the-citadels-krause-center-for-leadership-and-ethics/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 19:47:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30927 The South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in awards review on Summerall Field in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, March 4, 2022. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelThe South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in awards review on Summerall Field in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, March 4, 2022. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The Citadel"We are very excited to honor and recognize Dr. John Palms as the 2020 recipient of the Krause Center for Leadership & Ethics award..."]]> The South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in awards review on Summerall Field in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, March 4, 2022. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelThe South Carolina Corps of Cadets participates in awards review on Summerall Field in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, March 4, 2022. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The Citadel

Palms, former president of the University of South Carolina, honored during his alma mater’s military review parade

Photo above, left to right: Dr. John Palms, The Citadel Class of 1958, recipient of the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics, stands beside The Citadel Commandant of Cadets, Col. Thomas J. Gordon, USMC (Ret.), during the national anthem, to take review of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets military parade dedicated to Palms on March 4, 2022.

The Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics at The Citadel strives to create opportunities for leadership development, in support of the college’s mission to education and develop principled leaders. Additionally, the Krause Center works to recognize outstanding principled leaders from within the ranks of Citadel alumni.

Due to a pandemic-forced pause in the schedule, Dr. John M. Palms was recognized as the 2020 recipient of the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets’ dress parade on campus March 4, 2022.

“We are very excited to honor and recognize Dr. John Palms as the 2020 recipient of the Krause Center for Leadership & Ethics award for his service as a military officer, nuclear scientist, professor and President of the University of South Carolina which is unparalleled among the list of distinguished Citadel alumni,” said Bill Krause.

Palms was nominated for the 2020 award by The Citadel Foundation’s Chief Executive Officer and by the Dean for the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics in 2019.

It is my distinct privilege to present the nomination of Dr. John M. Palms, ’58, for the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics. An internationally recognized scientist and academician, national security advisor, eminent educator and public servant, distinguished Citadel graduate, and tireless advocate for humanitarian causes, Dr. Palms exemplifies, to the highest degree, the ethos of the Krause Award and the essence of servant leadership. His is the story of a life well-lived, a man running to win the prize for the upward calling.

Darin T. Zimmerman, Ph.D., Dean of The Citadel Swain Family School of Sciences and Mathematics

According to Zimmerman’s nomination, Palms was born in the Netherlands and immigrated to the U.S. in 1951, becoming a citizen in 1956. He graduated with a degree in Physics from The Citadel as a distinguished Air Force ROTC cadet in 1958, receiving a commission into the U.S. Air Force (USAF). While on active duty with the USAF, Palms completed a master’s degree in physics, served as a nuclear weapons officer and taught physics at the Air Force Academy. After being honorably discharged in 1970, Palms completed a Ph.D. in physics and joined the faculty of Emory University, where he rose through the ranks, ultimately being appointed as the Charles Howard Chandler Professor of Radiation and Environmental Physics. Palms’ 23-year career at Emory was one of ever-increasing responsibility and leadership, culminating in his role as the university’s chief academic officer. This accumulated experience led to a two-year turn as president of Georgia State University, after which he accepted the invitation to become the 26th president of the University of South Carolina, a post which he served faithfully and fruitfully for 12 years.

Left to right: Col. Tom Clark, USMC (Ret.), Executive Director for the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics, congratulates Dr. John Palms, ’58, recipient of the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics, on March 4, 2022, during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets military parade March 4 on campus in Charleston, South Carolina.

To complete his remarkably successful career, he presided as director of governing boards for several national corporations. He has scholarships named in his honor at Purdue University and Linn State Technical College, as well as a science research facility bearing his name at the University of South Carolina.

Jay Dowd, III, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer, The Citadel Foundation

According to Dowd’s letter of nomination, Palms has been awarded honorary doctoral degrees from several institutions of higher education, including The Citadel in 1980 and the University of South Carolina in 2002. He has received the Distinguished Alumni Award from two of the institutions from which he holds degrees—the University of New Mexico in 2003 and The Citadel in 2009. In 2002, he received the Order of the Palmetto, the highest honor bestowed by the State of South Carolina.

Other recipients of the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics, which was initiated in 2011, include Col. Myron C. Harrington Jr., ’60; Lt. Gen. Mike Steele, ’67; Dr. Stephen Sittnick, ’77; Sen. Fritz Hollings, ’42; former Charleston major (now Citadel professor) Joseph P. Riley Jr., ’64; William B. Sansom, ’64; Gen. William W. Hartzog, ’63; W. Henry Johnson Jr., ’75 and Frank P. Mood, ’60.

John Palms, Ph.D. - Krause Award
John M. Palms, Ph.D., The Citadel Class of 1958, recipient of the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership and Ethics, 2020.

Read the full letter of nomination from The Citadel Foundation Chief Executive Officer here.

Read the full letter of nomination from the Dean of the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics here.

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Gov. McMaster: Russian attack on Ukraine highlights need for stronger cybersecurity https://today.citadel.edu/gov-mcmaster-russian-attack-on-ukraine-highlights-need-for-stronger-cybersecurity/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30918 During a two-day conference at The Citadel, Lt. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, of U.S. Army Cyber Command, said growing cybersecurity resiliency and closing the cybersecurity gap]]>

Photo: Lt. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, commanding general of U.S. Army Cyber Command, speaking at The Citadel as part of the Jack Voltaic cyber conference on Feb. 24.

As seen on WCBD – Count on 2, by Riley Benson

Local, state, and federal leaders were discussing South Carolina’s cybersecurity defense as the crisis in Ukraine is unfolding.

State leaders, cadets and cybersecurity industry professionals are looking at the strengths and resiliency of South Carolina’s cybersecurity protection while addressing areas where improvements can be made.

Tensions continued to rise hours after the Russian invasion of Ukraine, prompting leaders here at home to double down on protection.

“If Russia pursues cyber-attacks against our companies, our critical infrastructure, we are prepared to respond,” said President Joe Biden.

Like the president, Governor Henry McMaster says putting an emphasis on increased cybersecurity is important for South Carolina’s businesses and residents.

“This is just as dangerous but it doesn’t involve a bomb,” said Gov. McMaster.

Cyber attacks are a growing threat in foreign countries. Gov. McMaster said the threat to businesses in the state is something that could cripple South Carolina if measures aren’t taken now to prevent cyber attacks.

“In Russia, India, and North Korea, they have a whole industry dedicated to conducting cyber-attacks,” says Governor McMaster.

During a two-day conference at The Citadel, the United States Army Commanding Lt. General Stephen Fogarty of the U.S. Army Cyber Command and other military leaders say growing cybersecurity resiliency and closing the cybersecurity gap is the best protection.

“The attack surface is huge because everybody has a device and the devices and things that we do on the internet is vulnerability,” says Col. Linda Riedel, Deputy Director for the Department of Defense’s Cyber Institute at The Citadel.

The cyberworld is a backbone of South Carolina’s future and remains a top priority among leaders as they keep their eyes on Ukraine.

“Everybody depends on it so we need to have people who understand it and can fix things and can make things and can go on offense as well as go on defense,” says Governor McMaster.

The two-day conference at The Citadel will run a second day on Friday with more presentations and briefings for the group of cadets and industry leaders.

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Dr. Triz Smith, ’98, appointed by SC Governor to The Citadel Board of Visitors https://today.citadel.edu/dr-triz-smith-98-appointed-by-sc-governor-to-the-citadel-board-of-visitors/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 17:07:51 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30517 Dr. Triz Smith, '98 The Citadel Board of VisitorsDr. Triz Smith, '98 The Citadel Board of Visitors"Dr. Smith's experiences and insight will certainly enable him to make a lasting and constructive contribution to the governance and strategic planning of our mighty Citadel."]]> Dr. Triz Smith, '98 The Citadel Board of VisitorsDr. Triz Smith, '98 The Citadel Board of Visitors

Dr. Triz Smith is the newest member of The Citadel Board of Visitors (BOV). Smith was recently appointed to the seat by South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster. The BOV is the governing board responsible for the direction and supervision of the college. 

Smith, a member of The Citadel Class of 1998, is an obstetrician-gynecologist (OBGYN) in Sumter, South Carolina who serves or has served as a leader for numerous organizations. His six-year term with the BOV began January 18, 2022.

“The Citadel and our BOV are very excited to welcome Dr. Smith. He is coming on board at an exciting time for our college,” said Col. Dylan Goff, ’02, BOV chair. “Dr. Smith’s experiences and insight will certainly enable him to make a lasting and constructive contribution to the governance and strategic planning of our mighty Citadel.”

The Citadel BOV consists of 14 voting members, one of whom is appointed by the governor. Ex officio members include the governor, the adjutant general and the state superintendent of education; the other 11 members are graduates of The Citadel.

“The Citadel has given me many experiences and lessons that I have used throughout my adult life. My years at The Citadel were my most formative. They molded me into the person I am today. I appreciate the governor giving me the opportunity to contribute to the mission of The Citadel by serving on the Board of Visitors.”

Smith holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology from The Citadel and a Doctor of Medicine, earned in 2003, from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine; he completed his postdoctoral training in OBGYN with the Medical University of South Carolina from 2003 – 2007.

Smith is engaged in numerous professional societies including the South Atlantic OBGYN Society, for which he serves as the state of South Carolina representative. Smith serves as president for the South Carolina OBGYN Society and is also a member of the South Carolina Medical Association and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG). Some of the honors Smith has earned and positions he holds or has held include The Citadel Presidential Advisory Board on COVID, Prisma Health Department of OB Chair, South Carolina DHEC Advisory Task Force, ASOG South Carolina Section Treasurer (2017-2020) and Junior Fellow Vice Chair (2005).

Additionally, Smith is a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta Commission, The Citadel Brigadier Foundation and a lifetime member of The Citadel Alumni Association.

Smith replaces Colonel F.G. “Greg” Delleney, Jr. as the gubernatorially appointed BOV member. Delleney still serves on the board, but is doing so now as one of the seven members elected by the South Carolina General Assembly. Three BOV members are elected by alumni.

Read more about The Citadel Board of Visitors here.

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Cyber programs at The Citadel help crack the code for success https://today.citadel.edu/cyber-programs-at-the-citadel-help-crack-the-code-for-success/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30560 When Cadet Noah Wells, ’22, and Staff Sergeant Ryan Skibicki, ’21, met in Computer Science 305, they had no idea that they would land dream jobs within two months of each other.]]>

By Alaina Rink, CGC ’22

When Cadet Noah Wells, ’22, and Staff Sergeant Ryan Skibicki, ’21, met in Computer Science 305, they had no idea that they would land dream jobs within two months of each other. They say The Citadel’s commitment to rigorous academics and principled leadership in cybersecurity made them preferred candidates.

Wells, a triple major in Cyber Operations, Computer Science and Mathematics, will begin his career in McLean, Virginia as a Cyber New Professional with The MITRE Corporation, a company he discovered at a cybersecurity conference. He says he opened the conversation with, “Hey, want to give me a job?” and was soon fast-tracked on the applicant list because of his involvement with The Citadel’s cybersecurity program, research projects and his personal convictions for a more inclusive world. He is also one of the CyberCorps Scholarship for Service recipients.

Skibicki was already an active duty Marine when he decided to major in Computer Science with a minor in Cybersecurity. He said, “I had no idea about computer science before I came to The Citadel. The small class sizes allow students to pursue in-depth answers to their questions.” In December, Skibicki received a Cybersecurity contract through Military Occupational Specialties. He is one of four MECEPS to receive this competitive contract the first year it became eligible to their program. Skibicki will commission in April and complete more classified training before receiving further orders.

Wells and Skibicki are both in The Citadel’s first Department of Defense Cyber Institute and specifically credit Shankar Banik, Ph.D., for diligently working on the relevance and application of the curriculum. This institute is funded through a Department of Defense appropriation to the National Security Agency included in the 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act.

While The Citadel is committed to educating its future leaders in cybersecurity, it also seeks to inform present industry leaders. On February 24th and 25th, The Citadel will host the Jack Voltaic Conference Series which works to align current cybersecurity stakeholders in order to strengthen critical systems. The theme will be “Cyber Resiliency for Critical Infrastructure.”

Other cybersecurity programs, scholarships, designations and events at The Citadel include:

Department of Defense Cyber Scholarship (DoD CySP)
These scholarships, supported through the Department of Defense, are designed to encourage the recruitment of the nation’s top cyber talent to help secure America against threats. Currently The Citadel has seven DoD CySP Scholars (six Cadets and one graduate student).

The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute (CDCI)
The CDCI mission is to ensure the delivery of principled leaders who are experts in cybersecurity and have the skillset and experience required to begin working for the U.S. Department of Defense as soon as they earn their degrees.

The Citadel CyberCorps Scholarships for Service program
See the article above or read more about the program here.

Cybersecurity/Intelligence Scholars
An innovative program for gifted students who have a strong interest in cybersecurity and national security affairs.

National Center of Excellence in Cyber Defense
The Citadel was recently re-designated a National Center of Excellence in Cyber Defense through 2028 by the Department of Defense and the National Security Agency,

Women in Cybersecurity (WiCyS) Citadel chapter
There is a new Citadel chapter of the national WiCyS organization. Recently, travel grants were provided for 10 cadets and students to travel to the national conference.

Degrees in cybersecurity and operations
One of the colleges most popular undergraduate majors is Cyber Operations. Graduates will be able to:

  1. Apply security principles and practices to the design and implementation of the physical, software and human component of the cyber systems
  2. Analyze and evaluate cyber systems with respect to security
  3. Identify, analyze and mitigate threats in the cyber system

Other related academic programs, including a master’s degree and graduate level certificate can be viewed here.


Alaina Rink is a graduate assistant in the Office of Communications and Marketing while pursuing a master’s degree in English. She earned her undergraduate degree from the College of Charleston in secondary education English and taught in the Charleston area for four years.

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Commander of U.S. Army Cyber Command to speak at critical infrastructure conference event at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/commander-of-u-s-army-cyber-command-to-speak-at-critical-infrastructure-conference-event-at-the-citadel/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 21:20:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29978 Headshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber CommandHeadshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber Command Attendance is open to professionals working in organizational functions responsible for infrastructure security. ]]> Headshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber CommandHeadshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber Command

AND: The Citadel selected to join Cyber Command Academic Engagement Network

Lt. Gen. Stephen G. Fogarty, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command (ARCYBER), will make a keynote address at The Citadel during the Jack Voltaic cyber conference. The conference will take place on the iconic Citadel campus in Charleston, S.C., Feb. 24 – 25, 2022.

Fogarty’s presentation begins at 9a.m., Feb. 24, preceded by comments from South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster and will be livestreamed with a link available to a registered audience, including media. The conference theme is Cyber Resiliency for Critical Infrastructure. Attendance is open to professionals working in organizational functions responsible for infrastructure security.

The Jack Voltaic project and conference series is designed to enable the Army Cyber Institute (ACI) to study incident response gaps alongside assembled partners to identify interdependencies among critical infrastructure and provide recommendations. The program provides an innovative, bottom‐up approach to critical infrastructure resilience, focusing on cities and municipalities where critical infrastructure and populations are substantial.

LTG Stephen G. Fogarty, commanding general, US Army Cyber Command, speaks to cadets in at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on March 26, 2021.

Fogarty assumed command of ARCYBER in 2018. He visited The Citadel in 2021 to speak with cadets studying cybersecurity and toured the campus. His second visit, to participate in the Jack Voltaic event, comes shortly after The Citadel was selected to join the U.S. Cyber Command (CYBERCOM) Academic Engagement Network (AEN).

To request the link to the livestream, please email kkeelor@citadel.edu.

Training America’s cybersecurity professionals

There are 84 academic institutions partnering with CYBERCOM in AEN, including 70 universities, 14 community colleges, nine minority-serving institutions and four military service academies, spanning 34 states and Washington, D.C.

The AEN military components include CYBERCOM Headquarters, ARCYBER, Joint Force Headquarters-Department of Defense Information Network, the Cyber National Mission Force (CNMF), Air Force Cyber Command/16th Air Force, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/10th Fleet, U.S. Marine Forces Cyberspace Command, and the U.S. Coast Guard Cyber Command. 

“(U.S.) Cyber Command’s goal for the AEN is to strengthen our relationships and communication with these participating institutions,” said David Frederick, CYBERCOM’s executive director. “This will improve and sustain our efforts to meet cyberspace educational requirements and workforce needs.”

According to a January 5 CYBERCOM release, the AEN will support and enhance four primary lines of effort (LOE): future workforce, applied cyber research, applied analytics and strategic issues. These LOEs are intended to serve as an investment in creating a robust and accessible pool of qualified cyber professionals. “With our academic partners, we can shape our cyber workforce while supporting the command’s mission,” Frederick said.

“The Citadel is proud to be included in this prestigious partnership with U.S. Cyber Command,” said The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.), ’79. “With The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute already under way, and the growing number of cybersecurity cadets and students in our programs, the college is prepared to contribute highly trained, workforce-ready cybersecurity professionals to help defend the country.”

The AEN extends partnerships to institutions through collaboration and access to CYBERCOM via scheduled events and engagements with command staff, the CNMF and the four component commands.

Frederick added that “this network will further enable us to shape and enhance cyber-focused innovation with partnerships and support the Department of Defense’s ongoing strategic dialogue on cyberspace.”

Some of the requirements for AEN selection include:

  • Cyber-related engineering programs
  • Intelligence-related programs
  • Applied analytics-related sciences programs
  • Process-related programs and certifications such as Project Management
  • Regional accreditation by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation

Read more about the matrix of cybersecurity and intelligence programs, scholarships and opportunities at The Citadel and through The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute, here.

Contact the Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences here, or apply to attend The Citadel here.

LTG Stephen G. Fogarty, commanding general, US Army Cyber Command, touring The Citadel campus in Charleston, South Carolina on March 26, 2021.
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Infrastructure bill could mean more funding for tree planting, canopy cover in SC https://today.citadel.edu/infrastructure-bill-could-mean-more-funding-for-tree-planting-canopy-cover-in-sc/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 19:59:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29786 Curtis said one concern in the Charleston area is finding the open areas to add more green space and plant trees.]]>

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Shamira McCray

Photo above: David Baldwin with the U.S. Forest Service carries a drip torch as he works on a prescribed burn in a section of Francis Marion National Forest on Oct 25, 2019. Funding made possible by the REPLANT Act will support reforestation after disturbances and harvests. (Courtesy of The Post and Courier)

Note: Dr. Scott Curtis ,Dr. John Lining Professor of Physics and director for The Citadel’s Near Center for Climate Studies, contributed to this report.

The $1 trillion Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act passed by Congress in November could benefit South Carolina in countless ways, from repairing roads and bridges to ensuring drinking water in all communities is clean and safe.  

But this infrastructure package also stands to benefit forests in the state and hot cities like Charleston and Columbia that may be cooled by improved canopy cover. 

REPLANT Act

In South Carolina, more than 600,000 acres of land are covered by national forests. The Francis Marion National Forest in the Lowcountry spans nearly 259,000 acres. And the Sumter National Forest in the Upstate sits on about 371,000 acres. 

Hurricane Hugo in 1989 knocked down nearly a billion board-feet of timber in the Francis Marion, and more than a third of the forest was leveled by the storm’s winds. Since that time, the Forest Service said this special area — filled with pine stands, swamps and marshes — has been working to recreate itself. 

The infrastructure package includes the REPLANT Act, which will remove the cap placed on a reforestation trust fund instituted in 1980 and provide money to restore areas after severe disturbances like wildfires and windstorms. 

The Forest Service said after Hugo, there was a resurgence of young trees and understory shrubs which caused an increased threat for catastrophic fire in the Francis Marion National Forest. 

So far this year, the state has experienced 1,220 wildfires across 7,487 acres, according to the S.C. Forestry Commission. There have been more than 19,000 wildfires in the state since 2010. 

notice from Columbia Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn’s office said under the infrastructure package, South Carolina can expect to receive $15 million over five years for wildfire protection.

National nonprofit organization American Forests has worked for years to see money designated for reforestation in the United States. Eric Sprague, the organization’s vice president of forest restoration, said the reforestation trust fund was initially capped at $30 million and remained that way until the REPLANT Act was passed last month. Money for the fund was collected from wood imports. 

“In 1980, $30 million may or may not been enough money to meet the needs, but certainly it is not now,” Sprague said. 

But by lifting the cap, the REPLANT Act will essentially allow all of the money to be pulled in from funding generated by tariffs on imported wood products. 

There is currently a 4.2 million acre backlog across the United States for reforestation. In the West, too much fire has proven to be a bad thing. And in the East, too little fire has caused problems. 

Massive wildfires burn so hot and large in western states like California that oftentimes, the forests don’t regrow afterwards. In a large part of the eastern United States, oak and longleaf pine forests — important for the economy, water and wildlife — are being overtaken by other species like maples that thrive better with a lack of natural fire.

Funding made possible by the REPLANT Act will support reforestation after disturbances and harvests. It can fund management actions like cutting down maple trees that are shading out oaks, and planting additional trees. In places like South Carolina, this could mean the creation of new longleaf pine forests. 

“So the REPLANT Act is a really important tool to help create the conditions where tools like fire can be useful again to us,” Sprague said.

Healthy Streets Program 

Money for reforestation isn’t the only way the infrastructure package will benefit the environment. Written into the act is a new Healthy Streets Program that will provide grants to certain entities to install cool and porous pavements and expand tree cover. States, local governments and select organizations will be eligible to apply for the grants.

This new program is intended to mitigate urban heat islands, improve air quality and reduce flood risks and heat impacts to infrastructure, among other things. Specifically, the money can be used to identify heat islands, plant more trees in urban areas and deploy cool surfaces, among other things.  

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said more than 11,000 Americans have died from heat-related causes since 1979. And certain population groups like adults over 65, children and people in lower income neighborhoods face greater risks of heat-related deaths. 

In July, volunteers and researchers fanned out across parts of Charleston on one of the hottest days of the year to record temperatures, humidity, time and location using special sensors mounted to cars and cellphone cameras. The recorded data was used as part of the national Heat Watch program to learn where action is needed to protect vulnerable populations now and in the future. 

Scientists, volunteers fan out across Charleston in national effort to map hottest areas

Results from the study were released earlier in December. They showed dense industrial and commercial areas, with a significant amount of impervious surfaces, can absorb and retain heat at all times of the day. In areas with lower tree canopy, residents are at a higher health risk because the heat can concentrate throughout the day. And conserved forests tended to help reduce heat concentration in single-family residential neighborhoods. 

Certain areas, especially parts of North Charleston, tended to be really hot on the day the heat-mapping project was conducted, according to Scott Curtis, who leads the Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr. Center for Climate Studies at The Citadel. He was one of several researchers to travel the area and record heat on July 31. The National Weather Service said the observed high temperature that day was 95 degrees at Charleston International Airport.

Curtis said areas in East Cooper and West Ashley tended to be a bit cooler than parts of the peninsula. 

“The density of structures is not as great there,” Curtis said. “So there’s probably more tracks of natural vegetation and trees as compared to, you know, downtown.”

Breezes from the water in downtown Charleston tended to not affect the heat much. 

Joel Pannell, the vice president of urban forest policy for American Forests, said the federal government is working to combat extreme heat, and tree cover is “nature’s best air conditioner” and air filter. 

A piece of proposed federal legislation called the Build Back Better bill is being considered by Congress, and if passed, it will also help fund the work cities are already doing to invest in the short and long-term health of urban canopy. 

In some places, that will look like planting a lot of trees, and in other cases, that could involve moving hazardous trees that are detrimental to the health of the urban community forest, Pannell said. 

He said more than 500 million trees need to be planted across the United States to achieve tree equity. 

“But it’s much more than just planting trees, Pannell said. “It’s the protection of your existing tree canopy. It’s the removal of invasive species and other threats to the canopy, and it’s also about, you know, really the human connection.”

Curtis said one concern in the Charleston area is finding the open areas to add more green space and plant trees. Potential areas could include abandoned shopping centers or parking lots that no one uses. 

“So I know it may be a cost involved, but you could just demolish all of that, remove all the rubble away, and then that would be an open area that you could potentially encourage tree growth and things like that,” Curtis said.

Cities are on the frontlines of climate change, and Pannell said it will take partnerships between government, nonprofits and private entities to plan, protect and maintain community trees or forests. 

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