Science & Mathematics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Wed, 10 Mar 2021 21:50:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Science & Mathematics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Closing the cyber workforce gap: the first Citadel Dept. of Defense Cyber Institute team at work https://today.citadel.edu/closing-the-cyber-workforce-gap-the-first-citadel-dept-of-defense-cyber-institute-team-at-work/ Wed, 10 Mar 2021 15:52:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22554 First cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber InstituteFirst cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute"I believe that through this program and the leaders who are sharing their knowledge with us, I will be more than equipped for the cybersecurity world when I graduate.]]> First cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber InstituteFirst cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute

The first group of cadets and students selected to study under the umbrella of The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute (CDCI) is hard at work, with the goal of being immediately ready to join America’s cybersecurity workforce after graduation. The cluster of future cyber warriors includes one active duty Marine student, one veteran student, and 19 cadets.

The CDCI mission is to ensure the delivery of principled leaders who are experts in cybersecurity and have the skillset and experience required to begin working for the U.S. Department of Defense as soon as they earn their degrees. The program will help expand America’s cyber capability by addressing the critical national security need for a larger cybersecurity workforce.

All of the CDCI participants are pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Cyber Operations, or a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, with a minor in Cybersecurity, or, a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with a minor in Data Science.

Among the students is Cadet Trey Stevens, a junior with a triple major in Computer Science, Cyber Operations and Intelligence and Security Studies. “I feel very fortunate that I’ve been selected to not only advance my own cyber education, but to be better prepared for the agency that I work with post-graduation so that I may perform my job as best as I can,” Stevens said. “This is a unique opportunity where professionals and experts are pouring in their knowledge in order to pave the path for future cybersecurity professionals. I’m planning on maximizing my engagement with this amazing program.”

The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute (CDCI) cadets and students being led by Lt. Col Linda Riedel, SCARNG, and Dr. Shankar Banik, professor of computer science and cyber operations, and director of CDCI and numerous other programs at The Citadel.

The Citadel and the nation’s other five Senior Military Colleges (SMC) have each received approximately $1.5 million of federal money to establish a cybersecurity institute as pilot programs on their campus. The funds are part of a $10 million Department of Defense (DOD) appropriation to the National Security Agency (NSA) for these institutes, included in the 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act.

“It is an honor to be selected for such a program,” said Cadet Jalen Singleton, a junior Computer Science major with a minor in Cybersecurity. “I am included in an extremely talented cohort that has been given access to top cybersecurity knowledge and tools. I believe that through this program and the leaders who are sharing their knowledge with us, I will be more than equipped for the cybersecurity world when I graduate.”

The Department of Defense outlined three priorities for the SMC institutes: sustain a cyber-ready workforce, enhance the nation’s cyber talent and establish a top talent management program. The Citadel is helping achieve these goals.

“Being a part of CDCI is already an amazing experience,” said Cadet Hannah Collee. She is a sophomore double-majoring in Computer Science and Cyber Operations. “There is hands-on learning and countless opportunities for growth. This program helps students get in contact with numerous businesses and internships too. I can’t wait to continue with our team.” 

The 21 cadets and students selected to participate in the college’s first CDCI cohort include:

All, Jackson A.
Collee, Hannah E.
Deans, Conor W.
Freeman, Lydia S.
Hanulcik, Avery
Jensen, William M.
Johnson, Jared M.
Lilling, Eric R.
Lindenmeyer, Andrew R.
Ling, Nathanael C.
Race, Benjamin R
Reynolds, Aaron G.
Roser, Robert G.
Ruiz, Ashley
Singleton, Jalen A.
Skibicki, Ryan
Smiles, Shiloh O.
Stevens, Trey J.
Toomer, Timothy C.
Wells, Noah M.
Whitlock, Benjamin T.

Prospective cadets and students wanting more information should email dhoward2@citadel.edu or call (843) 953-1089.

The Citadel is a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education, as named by the United States Department of National Security Agency and Homeland Security.

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Editorial: Celebrate our success on Mars. Another giant leap may be near. https://today.citadel.edu/editorial-celebrate-our-success-on-mars-another-giant-leap-may-be-near/ Thu, 25 Feb 2021 16:46:32 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22369 This image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechThis image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechWhat they’re doing on site with the X-rays, UV and Raman spectroscopy, they can get that information directly uplinked. ]]> This image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechThis image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Photo above: NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. NASA/JPL-Caltech.

As seen in The Post and Courier
By the Editorial Staff

After a year of grappling with a deadly pandemic, racial injustice and disturbing political turmoil, the landing of NASA’s most advanced rover on Mars sends an important and timely message of how the United States can still do great things.

Last week’s stunning, near-touchdown picture of Perseverance — NASA’s particularly fitting name for the rover — should instill in us a sense of wonder of our ever-expanding ability to explore new worlds.

The image already is being compared with NASA’s most iconic photos, including Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the moon and Saturn as seen by Voyager 1.

The spacecraft has 25 cameras and two microphones, many of which were turned on during Thursday’s descent, and still more pictures and even audio recordings were released this week. But its most tantalizing potential goes far beyond photos.

The $3 billion craft was guided to a site only a mile away from an ancient river delta, where it soon will look for signs of ancient life; if Mars ever harbored life, scientists’ best guess is that it occurred about 3 billion to 4 billion years ago, when water flowed on its surface.

The rover ultimately will be able to take rock and soil samples and jettison them back into space for retrieval to Earth by yet another spacecraft within the next decade. (NASA is working with the European Space Agency on that.)

“They’re not just looking at the surface but the subsurface. That turns out to be important too when you think about what was the history of this place,” he said. “What they’re doing on site with the X-rays, UV and Raman spectroscopy, they can get that information directly uplinked. Even if they can’t bring back soil samples, they can do a lot.”

The craft also has a miniature automated helicopter that can fly through the planet’s thin air to capture images the rover can’t. And it will try to convert a small amount of carbon dioxide into oxygen, which, if it works, would be crucial to providing breathable oxygen and fuel for future manned missions.

All signs show Perseverance stuck its landing, and it could start roving around by early March.

Admittedly, NASA has sent rovers to Mars before — this is our ninth spacecraft and fifth NASA rover to land on the planet — and China and the United Arab Emirates also have spacecraft in orbit there.

And of course, we shouldn’t put all our bets on Mars. Venus also deserves more exploration, particularly after last year’s controversial discovery in which powerful telescopes detected faint amounts of the molecule phosphine, which might exist only because something living emitted it.

But our six-wheeled, car-size rover is the most advanced ever and ultimately could provide the first proof of the existence of life outside our own planet. If it does, that would be yet another giant leap for mankind indeed.

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Citadel Physics Department makes virtual learning into a physical reality for high school students https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-physics-department-makes-virtual-learning-into-a-physical-reality-for-high-schoolers/ Wed, 24 Feb 2021 16:33:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22171 The Physics Department offers a virtual, but still hands-on, “class” for high school students about physics and its practical applications.]]>

Photo: Physics professor Kaelyn Leake, Ph.D., leading cadets and high school students through The Citadel Applied Physics Experience.

There’s a big difference between knowing the equations that explain gravitational forces and actually being hit in the head by an apple.

One is theoretical, and the other is a real-world effect of those theories.

Working to help high school students bridge the divide between physics equations and physical events: The Citadel’s Department of Physics.

Faculty and cadets in the department are working with high school students three times a year through The Citadel Applied Physics Experience. It’s a virtual, but still hands-on, “class” that teaches high school students about physics and expands their knowledge of the study’s practical applications.

“The goal of our Citadel Applied Physics Experience is to help high school students understand that physics is more than theory, through tactile experiences demonstrating real-world uses,” said Hank Yochum, Ph.D., head of the Department of Physics. “We don’t want to just tell students why physics is important — we want to demonstrate and discuss. It’s a chance to build something together, even via Zoom in the COVID environment, and to talk about how and why it works.”

Cadets help guide high school students in breakout sessions during The Citadel Applied Physics Experience

The department is currently accepting registrations for both the spring and summer sessions, after having kicked off the program in the fall semester. Faculty and cadets in the Department of Physics will continue to hold events like this three times a year — in both semesters and during the summer.

The experience is not limited to certain high schools. Physics faculty members will send a kit, for the hands-on portion, to registered students — so anyone who can receive mail can participate. Any student can participate regardless of STEM background.

Current Citadel cadets and faculty will help the high school students assemble a light-seeking, biology inspired robot that looks a lot like a bug.

The next Applied Physics Experience will be held on Saturday, April 3 from 1 to 5:30 p.m. A two-day summer session is planned for July 8-9.

The event is open to any high school sophomore, junior or senior who enjoys problem solving, science, math and hands-on projects.

The cost for all materials is $20. Space for each session is limited.

To register for the spring session, click here. The deadline for this session is March 12.

To register for the summer session, click here. The deadline for this session is June 15.

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Black History Month: a look back at the emergency medics that help shape the field of EMS https://today.citadel.edu/black-history-month-a-look-back-at-the-emergency-medics-that-help-shape-the-field-of-ems/ Wed, 17 Feb 2021 18:16:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22393 Hazzard is a former paramedic and the author of A Thousand Naked Strangers.]]>

In 1970 as the shock effects of the civil rights movement reverberated around him, 21-year-old John Moon, a Black man from the Hill district of Pittsburgh seeking to make a better life for himself became one of the original 25 members of the Freedom House Paramedics. It was the birth of the field of emergency medical services, and Moon and his colleagues became part of history in the making.

“At that time, you couldn’t get a cab and a private ambulance service often would not come into a Black neighborhood,” said Moon, who retired as assistant chief of Pittsburgh Emergency Medical Services in 2009 and now runs a home healthcare business with his daughter.    

Today, Moon and the Freedom House Paramedics are the focus of a book being written by Kevin Hazzard, ’99. In celebration of Black History Month, Hill and Hazzard joined The Citadel Health Careers Society for a virtual discussion that explored how the mostly Black medic corps struggled for recognition and went on to shape the framework for the field of EMS.


Hazzard is a former paramedic and the author of A Thousand Naked Strangers. His research on the Freedom House Paramedics first appeared in the Atavist Magazine in a feature story called The First Responders. In 2019, he wrote a story for The Citadel magazine entitled The First Class.

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Citadel professor finds not all plastic is equal in study on decomposition https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-professor-finds-not-all-plastic-is-equal-in-study-on-decomposition/ Sat, 13 Feb 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22120 Weinstein said there are only about 100 of these composters, begging the question of whether someone who chooses a PLA product as a green option would actually be able to dispose of it properly.]]>

As seen in The Post and Courier
By Chloe Johnson

Photo above: Former Cadet John Deckle collecting samples for PLA research spring 2018

A new study by a Citadel professor shows that some plant-derived plastics, meant to replace traditional fossil fuel products, may present their own problems for the environment.

The research, led by Biology Department Chair John Weinstein, was conducted on the banks of the Ashley River. It’s one of the few field studies documenting how plastics break down. While there are many estimates of the time it takes for plastic bottles, bags or cups to fully disintegrate, there is relatively little real-world observation of this debris disintegrating. 

A citadel research project placed a board with small strips of various plastics in salt marsh along the Ashley River to observe how the products disintegrated.

But in testing several conventional and plant-derived plastics, Weinstein observed something surprising: the slowest decomposer was a material made from corn. 

The compound, called polylactic acid, or PLA, is one of the most common bio-plastics used today. But it’s also the most resistant to breaking down, “with almost no change observed between the control and 32-week sample,” according to Weinstein’s study.

The experiment, conducted in 2017, involved attaching small strips of the various plastics to a wooden board, and placing the device in salt marsh along the Ashley. Samples were examined and compared with unexposed pieces of the same plastics after four, eight, 16 and 32 weeks outside. The resulting paper was published in November in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin.

Professor John Weinstein at microscope
Professor John Weinstein at microscope

The intent, Weinstein said, was to simulate a likely scenario — what would happen to plastic trash that ends up entangled in a marsh?

“It really was meant to be like a backyard study and really, the Ashley River was like the backyard of The Citadel,” Weinstein said.

The study included seven materials, all chosen because Weinstein said they were “readily available” to consumers. Two were classified as biodegradable, and two were bio-based, like PLA. Researchers compared these bio-plastics with three more conventional materials, like the HDPE used in jugs of laundry detergent, or foamed polystyrene commonly known as Styrofoam.

Sangwon Suh, an industrial ecologist at the University of California at Santa Barbara, said Weinstein’s study “confirms our understanding” of PLA’s persistence in the environment.

Part of the issue is the material is designed for industrial composters, facilities that use temperatures in excess of 120 degrees to break down waste. Weinstein said there are only about 100 of these composters in the United States, begging the question of whether someone who chooses a PLA product as a green option would actually be able to dispose of it properly.

Oil-based plastics, by contrast, are degraded by the sun’s UV rays. 

Plastic decomposition rates also vary widely depending on the environment. Suh recently helped conduct a review of existing scientific work on plastic decomposition. A PET bottle, like the kind that might be filled with soda, takes an estimated 2,500 years to decompose halfway if buried in a landfill, but just 2.3 years if exposed to sun and water while floating in the ocean, Suh said.

Still, Suh acknowledged that there’s a dearth of studies actually observing these breakdowns in the real world, something Weinstein’s work addresses.

Mark Hahn, a toxicologistat Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, said Weinstein’s study was soundly designed.

The question, however, is whether it’s a good thing at all to find plastics that break down quickly. While larger debris can entangle sea creatures, decomposing plastics shed tiny particles that spread throughout the water and air.

“People have found (microplastics) wherever they’ve looked,” Hahn said. “Deep sea sediments, arctic sea ice … they find microplastics.”

Weinstein’s own past work has found that shrimp will readily eat these microplastic pieces, introducing them into the food chain.

“It’s a real challenge to know what the right balance is between degradability and persistence,” Hahn said.

It’s still unclear what the health effects are of these invisible-to-the-eye plastics, which sometimes attach to other pollutants in the environment.

Hahn said he’s at the beginning of work now to suss out how these particles are taken up by the animals that consume them, and whether some are tiny enough to infiltrate the circulatory system. Some animals have been observed expelling the plastics that they eat

As for Weinstein, he said his next focus is to estimate how much extra litter has been released in the area from protective equipment like gloves and masks used and discarded during the coronavirus pandemic. 

Previously, Weinstein has estimated that 7½ tons of plastic trash was floating in Charleston Harbor. 

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Near Center for Climate Studies announces advisory board https://today.citadel.edu/near-center-for-climate-studies-announces-advisory-board/ Thu, 11 Feb 2021 16:31:35 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21825 Storm over the oceanStorm over the oceanNear Center for Climate Studies is now being guided by a distinguished group of advisors.]]> Storm over the oceanStorm over the ocean

The Lt. Col. James B. Near Jr., USAF, ’77, Center for Climate Studies (NCCS) was founded in 2020. The NCCS serves the cadets/students and faculty of The Citadel and citizens of South Carolina by enhancing understanding of climate and its variability, change and risks through education, research, outreach and the development of public-private partnerships.

The NCCS now has an advisory board to assist in guiding its director, staff and Fellows in the development of atmospheric and climate science curriculum, place-based research and advancement of information promoting the design of sustainable, scientifically sound, technologically feasible, economically efficient and ethically defensible climate-risk management strategies.

NCCS Advisory Board members

Kevin Cooley, ’90

Cooley directs of Office of Planning and Programming for Service Delivery, for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS). He ensures that the NWS has the capabilities needed to enable the provision of its climate, weather and water forecasts, watches and warnings to the American public and its public safety officials. Cooley oversees the planning, resourcing, development, fielding and operation of these essential mission capabilities. A primary example of such a capability is the NWS NEXRAD W88D Weather Radar used across the nation to enable effective severe weather forecasting and warning. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps for five years and in a civilian capacity for numerous military and federal government entities. Cooley’s NOAA biography can be read here. He graduated from The Citadel in 1990.

Kirstin Dow, Ph.D.

Dow is the Carolina Trustees Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina. She is a social-environmental geographer focusing on understanding climate impacts, vulnerability, and adaptation using methods involving extensive participation of stakeholders and decision-makers. Dow serves as principal investigator of the Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessments (CISA) (www.cisa.sc.edu), 1 of 11 NOAA-supported Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) teams partnering with decision makers to bridge climate science and decision making in support of climate adaptation strategies specific to water resources, coastal regions, and public health concerns in the Carolinas. Dow’s full biography can be read here.

Fred Holland, Ph.D., ’64

Holland received a B.S. from The Citadel (1964) and his M.S. (1972) and Ph.D. (1974) degrees from the University of South Carolina. He has more than 45 years of technical and management experience in environmental sciences supporting state and federal governmental agencies. Holland held positions in the environmental consulting industry (vice president, Versar Inc. 1987-1991), state government (director, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Marine Resources Research Institute 1991-2001) and federal government (director of NOAA’s Hollings Marine Laboratory and Center of Excellence for Oceans and Human Health 2001-2008). Holland also held academic positions with the College of Charleston, University of South Carolina, Medical University of South Carolina and the University of Maryland’s Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. Read more about Holland here.

Mike Johns, ’72

Johns graduated from The Citadel in 1972 with a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology. He also received a commission in the U.S. Air Force upon graduation. Johns went on to earn a Master of Science in Zoology and a Ph.D. in Marine Science from the University of South Carolina. Additionally, he earned an MBA from the University of Rhode Island. From 1976 to 1985, Johns was a principal investigator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Research Laboratory where he developed national guidance for addressing problems with chemically contaminated aquatic environments. He later worked in environmental consulting, eventually creating Windward Environmental LLC, which now has offices in three states and works to identify scientifically sound, environmentally sustainable remediation solutions for complex chemical pollution problems.

David Johnston

Johnston is a lawyer, advisor and businessman, with over thirty-five years of experience working with a broad range of private, non-profit and government organizations. He is the founder and CEO of Hamilton Advisors, LLC, a South Carolina-based company that advises organizations and their leadership on domestic and international challenges and solutions involving community resilience, collaboration and finance, with a special focus on water-related issues. Hamilton collaborates with organizations globally to achieve results for its client and their initiatives. Johnston has been a partner in major law firms and has served as corporate counsel for a number of public and private companies. His legal work focuses on complex corporate, securities, finance and environmental matters. Additionally, Johnston is chairman of the steering committee for the Charleston Resilience Network, and serves on the board of directors of the South Carolina Aquarium, the Medical University of South Carolina Neuroscience Advisory Board and Elements of Genius, Inc, Advisory Board.

Susan Lovelace, Ph.D.

Lovelace is the executive director for the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium. Her primary duties include administration of the agency and identifying the strategic directions for Consortium funded research, education and communication. She shepherds a multi-disciplinary staff as they work with researchers, businesses, communities and organizations to sustain, appreciate and wisely use the ecosystem services of our coastal area while understanding and responding to the challenges and opportunities of changes in climate and land use. Previously she was the Consortium’s assistant director for development and extension. Prior to this, she was manager of the Human Dimensions Research Program at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Hollings Marine Laboratory. Lovelace earned a Ph.D. in coastal resource management at East Carolina University, a B.S. in science education also at East Carolina University and a B.S. in Zoology at North Carolina State University. Read more about Lovelace here.

Hope Mizzell, Ph.D.

Mizzell has served as the South Carolina State Climatologist since 2003 and Supervisor for the South Carolina Flood Mitigation Program since 2014. The South Carolina Flood Mitigation Program is South Carolina’s coordinating agency for the National Flood Insurance Program. Hope’s responsibilities as State Climatologist include providing climatic information and meteorological interpretations, certifying climate records, overseeing the State’s Drought Response Program, providing emergency weather support, and conducting applied research to improve decision making activities. Dr. Mizzell has authored or co-authored studies on topics ranging from extreme rainfall, flooding, drought, and climate trends and variability. She began her career in 1992 as a Climatologist for the Southeast Regional Climate Center before advancing to Assistant State Climatologist for the South Carolina State Climate Office in 1995. She is the Past President of the American Association of State Climatologists. She received her Ph.D. focused on Climatology from the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina in 2008.

Geoff Scott, Ph.D.

Scott received his Bachelor of Science in Biology from Wofford College, and his Master of Science and Ph.D. in Marine Science from the University of South Carolina. He is currently a clinical professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. Scott is also director of the NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions housed in the Arnold School of Public Health with collaborating universities including the College of Charleston, The Citadel, Baylor University, Rutgers University and the University of Maryland. Some of Scott’s decades of research experience includes assessing impacts of the Ixtoc Well Blowout in the Gulf of Mexico; investigating hazardous waste sites, oil spills and Vibrio cholerae outbreaks in the Gulf of Mexico; assessing the impacts of agricultural pesticides, synthetic fuels and urban NPS runoff on coastal ecosystems; and measuring the health of coastal ecosystems and evaluating the impacts of changing landscape ecology from urbanization on ecosystem and human health.

Fellows of the Near Center for Climate Studies

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Class of ’21 cadet studying in Canada through prestigious Fulbright Killam Fellowship https://today.citadel.edu/class-of-21-cadet-studying-in-canada-through-prestigious-fulbright-killam-fellowship/ Tue, 02 Feb 2021 21:00:12 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21761 Cadet Gomes senior yearbook photo The Citadel '21Cadet Gomes senior yearbook photo The Citadel '21The Citadel Honors Program cadet is studying at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, during the spring semester through a Fulbright Canada Killam Scholarship.]]> Cadet Gomes senior yearbook photo The Citadel '21Cadet Gomes senior yearbook photo The Citadel '21

Cadet Thomas Gomes, a member of The Citadel Class of 2021, is finishing his college career with a distinction earned by few. The Citadel Honors Program cadet is studying at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, during the spring semester through a Fulbright Canada Killam Scholarship. It is provided by the Foundation for Educational Exchange Between Canada and the United States of America.

“This fellowship affords me the time to conduct research as I finish both my biology and psychology majors,” said Gomes in an emailed message. “Additionally, this opportunity allows me to be a cultural ambassador for The Citadel and to gain knowledge about Alberta and the Canadian healthcare system.”

Gomes, who is from Indian Land, South Carolina, hopes to attend medical school and eventually open a medical practice with his father.

“Cadet Gomes embodies principled leadership, honor, duty, and respect, said  Lloyd “Chip” Taylor, Ph.D., head of The Citadel Department of Psychology and former Fulbright Fellowship Distinguished Chair in Brain Science and Family Wellness at the University of Calgary. “The fact that he was awarded the prestigious Fulbright Canada Killam Fellowship, which is incredibly competitive, comes as no surprise to those of us who have had the pleasure to teach him during his time at The Citadel.”

Gomes applied for the fellowship after learning about it from Taylor. The Killam Fellowships Program provides an opportunity for exceptional undergraduate students from universities in Canada and the United States to spend either one semester or a full academic year as an exchange student in the other country, according to the website.

“Being able to explore the beauty of Canada and to ski as much as possible is also a great benefit of this opportunity,” Gomes said.

During his cadet career, Thomas has been awarded both the Gold Star Award and the President’s Award for outstanding performance in academics, physical fitness as well as military duties.

In the spirit of the college’s servant-leader mantra, Gomes says he has worked to spread cultural understanding in multiple South American Countries. In Brazil, Thomas served as a teacher’s assistant, helping to increase foreign English proficiency and helping with daily operations. In Peru, he volunteered at the Special Children of the Amazon school and conducted research on the biodiversity of the Tamshiyacu-Tahuayo reserve in the Amazon jungle. In his free time, Gomes serves as vice president of The Citadel Surf Club taking the group to outings on on Lowcountry beaches.

Gomes anticipates returning to Charleston join his classmates in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets for their Commencement ceremonies on May 9.

Applications for The Citadel Honors Program from prospective cadets for the Class of 2025 are currently being accepted by invitation only, issued as part of the applications process to those who might qualify. To learn more about The Citadel Honors Program, please visit the website here, or email Prof. Ragan at dragan@citadel.edu.

Cadet Thomas Gomes with his mother, Stephanie Gomes.
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Daily Herald: Department of Defense funds $1.465 million for cybersecurity education at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/daily-herald-department-of-defense-funds-1-465-million-for-cybersecurity-education-at-the-citadel/ Sun, 31 Jan 2021 19:00:45 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21711 The Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel CoatsThe Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats"There is a critical shortage of qualified cyber professionals within the Department of Defense, both military and civilian."]]> The Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel CoatsThe Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats

Photo above: Former Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats meets with cadets and students studying cyber security and intelligence at The Citadel in 2018.

As seen in Chicago Daily Herald

CHARLESTON, S.C., Jan. 26, 2021 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The Citadel and the nation’s five other Senior Military Colleges (SMC) are all developing aligned, Department of Defense Cybersecurity Institutes, funded by the federal government. The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute and the other SMC cyber institutes will address the critical national security need for a larger cybersecurity workforce.

The SMCs are federally appointed military colleges offering higher education combined with required military training in the form of Reserve Officers Training Corps Programs or ROTC. Unlike the Federal Services Academies such as the U.S. Air Force Academy, many graduates of SMCs go into military service, but it is not required. The Citadel is only one of two SMCs that continues to offer a full, 24/7 military structure for its on campus, undergraduate population.

Each of the SMCs was awarded approximately $1.5 million in 2020 to form pilot cyber institutes, intended to grow the number of highly trained cybersecurity professionals serving America. The funds, included in the 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act, are part of a $10 million Department of Defense appropriation to the National Security Agency (NSA) for the SMC-based institutes.

“There is a critical shortage of qualified cyber professionals within the Department of Defense, both military and civilian, “said Cyber and Computer Science professor Shankar Banik, Ph.D., a co-director of The Citadel Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies. “More than 500,000 cybersecurity jobs are open nationally. The objective of The Citadel Department of Defense Institute is to provide leaders who are experts in cybersecurity and have the skills and real world experience to join the cyber workforce immediately after graduation.

Banik says within The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute there is a new Cyber Leaders Development Program (CLDP). Each year, 20 cadets will be selected for CLDP and provided with stipends and specialized training. They can pursue a major in Cyber Operations, or a major in Computer Science, with a minor in Cybersecurity, or a major in Computer Science with a minor in Data Science.

“I am so pleased to partner with the Senior Military Colleges to initiate the Department of Defense Cyber Institute pilot program” said Diane M. Janosek, the commandant of NSA’s National Cryptologic School. “The Nation’s focus and investment in these six elite institutions is a key element in the expansion of the talent pipeline. These graduating cybersecurity professionals will go on to serve either on Active duty or in the National Guard or Reserves as service members in the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines or as Department of Defense civilians.”

Objectives of The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute:

1. Develop principled leaders with a cybersecurity skillset who’ll be able to join the cybersecurity workforce on “day one” after graduation
2. Establish a Cyber Lab to provide the type of training required by the Department of Defense
3. Organize cybersecurity summer camps for K-12 teachers and students, creating a pipeline for the cybersecurity workforce
4. Develop and organize cybersecurity boot camps for the South Carolina National Guard
5. Provide experiential learning opportunities to cadets through cyber competitions, internships and outreach activities
6. Encourage talented students to pursue academic programs in cybersecurity, with priority given to women and underrepresented minority students to increase the diversity in the cybersecurity workforce
7. Provide professional development opportunities for cyber faculty
8. Create cybersecurity awareness by organizing a Cybersecurity Day in the month of October (National Cybersecurity Awareness Month).

“With The Citadel’s mission laser-focused on building principled leaders, and with the significant investment by the Department of Defense, our partnership with the other Senior Military Colleges stands to return enormous gains as we prepare the next generation of outstanding graduates skilled in executing cyber defense,” said Darin T. Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean of the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics.

The Citadel has been designated as a National Center for Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education by the National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security since 2016.

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Department of Defense funds $1.465 million for cybersecurity education at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/department-of-defense-funds-1-465-million-for-cybersecurity-education-at-the-citadel/ Mon, 25 Jan 2021 19:00:37 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21580 The Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel CoatsThe Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats20 cadets selected annually for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute Photo above: Former Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats meets with cadets and students studying cyber security and]]> The Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel CoatsThe Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats

20 cadets selected annually for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute

Photo above: Former Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats meets with cadets and students studying cyber security and intelligence at The Citadel in 2018.

The Citadel and the nation’s five other Senior Military Colleges (SMC) are all developing aligned, Department of Defense Cybersecurity Institutes, funded by the federal government. The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute and the other SMC cyber institutes will address the critical national security need for a larger cybersecurity workforce.

The SMCs are federally appointed military colleges offering higher education combined with required military training in the form of Reserve Officers Training Corps Programs or ROTC. Unlike the Federal Services Academies such as the U.S. Air Force Academy, many graduates of SMCs go into military service, but it is not required. The Citadel is only one of two SMCs that continues to offer a full, 24/7 military structure for its on campus, undergraduate population.

Each of the SMCs was awarded approximately $1.5 million in 2020 to form pilot cyber institutes, intended to grow the number of highly trained cybersecurity professionals serving America. The funds, included in the 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act, are part of a $10 million Department of Defense appropriation to the National Security Agency (NSA) for the SMC-based institutes.

Computer Networks class led by Professor Shankar M. Banik in Thompson Hall at The Citadel, February 11, 2020

“There is a critical shortage of qualified cyber professionals within the Department of Defense, both military and civilian, “said Cyber and Computer Science professor Shankar Banik, Ph.D., a co-director of The Citadel Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies. “More than 500,000 cybersecurity jobs are open nationally. The objective of The Citadel Department of Defense Institute is to provide leaders who are experts in cybersecurity and have the skills and real world experience to join the cyber workforce immediately after graduation.

Banik says within The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute there is a new Cyber Leaders Development Program (CLDP).  Each year, 20 cadets will be selected for CLDP and provided with stipends and specialized training. They can pursue a major in Cyber Operations, or a major in Computer Science, with a minor in Cybersecurity, or a major in Computer Science with a minor in Data Science.

“I am so pleased to partner with the Senior Military Colleges to initiate the Department of Defense Cyber Institute pilot program” said Diane M. Janosek, the commandant of NSA’s National Cryptologic School. “The Nation’s focus and investment in these six elite institutions is a key element in the expansion of the talent pipeline. These graduating cybersecurity professionals will go on to serve either on Active duty or in the National Guard or Reserves as service members in the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines or as Department of Defense civilians.”

Objectives of The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute:

  • Develop principled leaders with a cybersecurity skillset who’ll be able to join the cybersecurity workforce on “day one” after graduation
  • Establish a Cyber Lab to provide the type of training required by the Department of Defense
  • Organize cybersecurity summer camps for K-12 teachers and students, creating a pipeline for the cybersecurity workforce
  • Develop and organize cybersecurity boot camps for the South Carolina National Guard
  • Provide experiential learning opportunities to cadets through cyber competitions, internships and outreach activities
  • Encourage talented students to pursue academic programs in cybersecurity, with priority given to women and underrepresented minority students to increase the diversity in the cybersecurity workforce
  • Provide professional development opportunities for cyber faculty
  • Create cybersecurity awareness by organizing a Cybersecurity Day in the month of October (National Cybersecurity Awareness Month).

“With The Citadel’s mission laser-focused on building principled leaders, and with the significant investment by the Department of Defense, our partnership with the other Senior Military Colleges stands to return enormous gains as we prepare the next generation of outstanding graduates skilled in executing cyber defense,” said Darin T. Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean of the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics. 

The Citadel has been designated as a National Center for Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education by the National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security since 2016.

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Citadel creates Center for Mathematical Inquiry to help SC public school students https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-creates-center-for-mathematical-inquiry-to-help-sc-public-school-students/ Fri, 22 Jan 2021 16:03:36 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21555 Rural SC high school math teachers encouraged to apply for professional development opportunity, with $2,000 stipend, by Jan. 31 deadline]]>

Photo: (left to right) Jennifer Albert, Ph.D., Evan Ortlieb, Ph.D. and Richard Robinson, Ph.D., leaders of the new Center for Mathematical Inquiry

South Carolina high school math teachers in rural school districts encouraged to apply for professional development opportunity, with $2,000 stipend, by Jan. 31 deadline

As a whole, South Carolina public schools are often ranked among the lowest in the country by organizations including U.S. News & World Report, and the National Education Association, for example. Math is identified as one of the key subject areas needing improvement.

Part of the mission of The Citadel’s Zucker Family School of Education (ZFSOE) is to help improve the quality of education in the state. ZFSOE continuously strives to provide professional development opportunities to K-12 teachers to help them improve their skills.

One new way the ZFSOE will help math teachers in South Carolina is the Center for Mathematical Inquiry. Funded by a $100,000 grant from the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education (SC-CHE), the Center will provide professional development opportunities to Algebra 2 teachers, paying each $2,000 for their participation.

Dean of the Zucker Family School of Education Evan Ortlieb, Ph.D.

It’s a joint effort involving the ZFSOE’s STEM Center of Excellence, led by Jennifer Albert, Ph.D., and Swain School of Mathematics and Science professor, Richard Robinson, Ph.D.

 “One of the key areas of need in the state is assistance with fully engaging high school students who are studying Algebra 2. Right now only about 70% of them in South Carolina pass the course,” said Evan Ortlieb, Ph.D., dean of the ZFSOE and project director for the Center. “Through a professional development workshop and webinar series, Algebra 2 teachers will come together across multiple rural school districts to collaborate and share best practices, as well as learn new concepts in teaching the course.”

The Center will provide this training virtually to 24 South Carolina high school teachers. “Teachers from anywhere in the state can apply through January 31,” Ortlieb said.

Ortlieb explained that 10 of those slots are reserved for teachers in Georgetown County School District (GCSD). Compared to the state’s pass rate of 70%, only about half of GCSD students pass Algebra 2, a particularly important area to focus on.

Superintendent for Georgetown County School District Keith Price, Ed.S.

“We are thrilled that The Citadel is partnering with us to provide this professional learning series for our Algebra 2 teachers,” said Keith Price, Ed.S., superintendent for GCSD. “Algebra 2 is such an important course to help students prepare for college and career readiness. By engaging in this opportunity, not only will our teachers have the opportunity to study, plan, collaborate and implement research-based best practices, but our students will also see increased potential for success in this rigorous course as well as subsequent courses to follow.”

The Center will provide other programming as well, including free monthly webinars, open to anyone interested in attending.

Applications are open to South Carolina teachers until January 31.

To apply for one of the Algebra 2 program openings, click here. For more information, visit the project’s website at: https://www.centerformathinquiry.com/, or contact Ashley Andrews at aandrew1@citadel.edu.

This is a sponsored project through a grant from the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education under the auspices of the EIA Centers of Excellence Grant Program.

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