Leadership – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Mon, 30 Mar 2020 13:45:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.5 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Leadership – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 We REALLY wish you were here. Celebrating one of The Citadel’s most important weekends from a distance https://today.citadel.edu/we-really-wish-you-were-here-celebrating-one-of-the-citadels-most-important-weekends-from-a-distance/ Mon, 30 Mar 2020 13:40:26 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=15132 Corps Day Weekend is when The Citadel celebrates the birthday of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. This normally includes several days of events, military parades and ceremonies along with]]>

Corps Day Weekend is when The Citadel celebrates the birthday of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. This normally includes several days of events, military parades and ceremonies along with large crowds on campus witnessing these meaningful moments in the life of a cadet.

Due to COVID-19, the Corps will mark this anniversary off campus – but that does not make this weekend any less important. Here’s a look at some of the meanings behind cherished Corps Day weekend events, bringing you what we can, from afar.

Thoughts from the Regimental Commander, Cadet. Col. Richard “Ben” Snyder

We are all living a very 2-dimensional experience at the time of what would be our Corps Day/Recognition Day celebrations. Online classes, emails, and over the phone communication minimizes much of what makes the cadet experience—face to face interaction. You can view this situation as limiting or you can view it as a new challenge to grow from.

When it comes to training your replacement, this last month and a half is still very important. On campus, we are usually dedicated to preparing the next class for the leadership positions they are going to step into next semester. There is now a greater responsibility for everyone in a leadership position to over-communicate. Pour genuine thought and sincere effort preparing the cadet who follows you, regardless of class or rank.

Take the challenge. Own it by figuring out how to produce that third dimension of your cadet experience from home. Stay connected in every safe way possible. We can do this.

Cadet Col. Richard “Ben” Snyder, Regimental Commander
Cadet Col. Richard “Ben” Snyder, Regimental Commander

Corps Day Weekend announcements

  • Announcing the new faces of leadership for the Corps, 2020-21
    The Citadel’s mission to educate and develop cadets into principled leaders is the driving force behind the integral military system at the college. It is in operation at all times when school is in session, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, run by cadet leadership.
  • Announcing the 2020-21 Summerall Guards
    Saturday, March 28, the current Summerall Guards were to provide their final performance, and then exchange their ceremonial arms with the incoming guards. There is a bond from class to class among those selected to participate in this elite drill platoon. As we wish farewell to the current guards, we welcome the new group who are no doubt practicing drills at home right now.
  • Remembering 2020 Recognition Day
    The day when freshmen are finally recognized as members of The South Carolina Corps of Cadets after months of training was held early, on March 10, with the anticipation that campus may close.
  • The Palmetto Awards Parade
    There will be no parade, but the Palmetto Medal Award, one of the highest awards presented by The Citadel, will be presented to these principled leaders at later date if possible. Read about the 2020 recipients here.
  • The Spring Blue and White Game
    The spring game was held early, and in an unusual step, was staged on Summerall Field in the center of campus to the delight of the many who enthusiastically turned out for the spectacle. Here is an article in case you couldn’t attend.
  • Principled Leadership Symposium and Krause Center Award
    The symposium had to be canceled, but the Krause Center Award recipient will be announced on The Citadel Today web newsroom Monday, March 30.

Congratulations and best wishes to all!

The Citadel 2017-18 Recognition Day Oath on the Green after the March to Marion Square
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Women’s History Month: meet several of the many outstanding women at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/womens-history-month-meet-a-few-of-the-outstanding-women-at-the-citadel/ Wed, 25 Mar 2020 18:20:31 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=14744 In celebration of Women's History Month 2020, the college would like to introduce you to a few of our many outstanding women.]]>

Photo above: Cadet Julianna DeSalle with parents, Janet and John, during her Ring Ceremony, 2019

Every March is designated Women’s History Month by Presidential proclamation. Institutions and organizations around America, including The Citadel, participate in and encourage the study, observance and celebration of the vital role of women in American history and in society today.

Some of the ways the college has celebrated in the past included featuring alumnae stories, reviewing newsworthy contributions by Citadel women, by studying principled leaders and by hosting distinguished guests.

In March 2020, the college would like to introduce you to more outstanding cadets and students.

Cadet Ruby Bolden, Regimental Public Affairs NCO

Cadet Ruby Bolden serves as the Regimental Public Affairs non-commissioned officer who assists with VIP campus tours, media relations and communications at The Citadel. Bolden will rise to the position of Regimental Public Affair Officer for the 2020-21 academic year.

Bolden is an Exercise Science major from Grovetown, Georgia. She is a three year Army contract cadet who anticipates graduating in May 2021 and accepting a commission into the Army.

Q. Why did you select The Citadel?

A. It began when my mom’s boss gave me a brochure about this institution. I saw the uniforms and thought that it would be a great experience for me. From there, I watched videos online and the more I watched, the more I wanted to attend. 

Read Bolden’s full article here.

Meet Cadet Julianna DeSalle, electrical engineer standout; future mining industry leader

Cadet Julianna DeSalle is an Electrical Engineering major from Navarre, Florida. The head of her department recommended her as one of the standout future leaders in her field.

Q. Why did you select The Citadel?

A. I selected The Citadel because of the discipline and high standards required of a cadet. Both of my parents were active duty Air Force service people and are now retired so I grew up being held to a high standard. 

Q. What compelled you to become an electrical engineer?

A. I chose to study engineering because I have always been good with math and science and I also really enjoy being hands on with the work that I do. I chose Electrical Engineering because the discipline is so diverse I can do whatever I want to do while having a firm educational background. 

Read DeSalle’s full article here.

Meet Cadet Hannah Jalbert, Company Commander, Oscar

Cadet Hannah Jalbert attends The Citadel as an Army scholarship student. She is majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies, one of the most in-demand programs on campus. She also serves the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at the commander of Oscar company.

Jalbert is originally from North Haven, Connecticut. Her parents now live in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina.

Jalbert graduates in May as a member of The Citadel Class of 2020. She will accept a commission to become an officer in the Army upon graduating.

Q. Why did you select The Citadel?

A. It was a sunny day in August when I first visited The Citadel. I stepped on the campus and fell in love. The rest was history. Within the month I told my parents I was going to attend The Citadel and pursue an Army contract.

Q. What is your major and what led you to select that area of study?

A. My major is Intelligence and Security Studies with a focus in Chinese Area Studies. I chose this major due to the career I planned to pursue in the Army, with the desire to work as a military intelligence officer. I have also been speaking Chinese for eight years so it was my two passions within one major – perfect!

Q. What do you love most about attending The Citadel?

A. I love The Citadel with all of my heart. I love seeing boys become men and girls become women. This place changed my life and am forever grateful.

Read Jalbert’s full article here.

Meet Cadet Lilly Layden, working to increase the number of women in military cyber operations

Cadet Lillian Layden being sworn in as USAF ROTC contract cadet

Cadet Lilly Layden is a junior, Dean’s List student from King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. She is with her family there studying remotely during the campus closure forced by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Layden is a contract cadet with the U.S. Air Force ROTC and is working on a double major: Cyber Security and German. She anticipates graduating in 2021 and accepting a commission as an officer in the Air Force at that time.

Q. Why did you select The Citadel?

A. I decided to attend The Citadel set myself up for success with a planned career in the military. I hope to follow in my father’s footsteps as a member of the U.S. Armed Forces serving our country.

I have always been technologically driven and women are severely underrepresented in STEM roles. Only 2% of the world can code and only about 20% of that 2% are women. I am need in the realm of cyber security operations and I knew The Citadel could help get me there.

Q. What do you love most about attending The Citadel?

A. I love the structure of cadet life here. It makes me put my best foot forward and makes me take on so much more than I could have ever imagined I could. It keeps me focused, connected, and well rounded. I have a bright future because of it. I also love the bonds I make with people. I’ve made my best friends and made the best memories with people I love here. We can be so close knit.

Read Layden’s full article here.

Meet more outstanding Citadel women in our Our Mighty Citadel features here.

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Citadel’s service commitment earns second Carnegie Foundation Classification for Community Engagement https://today.citadel.edu/citadels-service-commitment-earns-second-carnegie-foundation-classification-for-community-engagement/ Tue, 04 Feb 2020 00:00:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=13582 "Being classified by the Carnegie Foundation as a community-engaged campus is an honor few colleges achieve. The real victory though is the many students who find their calling and go on to be lifelong engaged citizens."]]>

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is, for the second time in two consecutive cycles, awarding The Citadel with the Carnegie Foundation Elective Community Engagement Classification.

On Jan. 31, the foundation released a list of 119 colleges and universities receiving the classification out of the nation’s more than 7,000 institutions of higher education. The Citadel first earned this important distinction from the Carnegie Foundation in 2015.

“Your application documented excellent alignment among campus mission, culture, leadership, resources, and practices that support dynamic and noteworthy community engagement.”

The Carnegie Foundation

“The South Carolina Corps of Cadets is the nucleus of who we are; the center of gravity for our model to train future leaders by teaching them that they first must learn to serve. But the idea of serving our community is woven into our entire campus community—faculty, staff, cadets, students, veterans and alumni,” said Citadel President Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.). “Being selected for a second time by the Carnegie Foundation for the community engagement designation reaffirms how impactful our service learning component is for our neighbors and our larger Citadel community.”

The classification is an evidence-based affirmation of best institutional practices earned through years of accountability and the presentation of that work. The Citadel and its South Carolina Corps of Cadets provide approximately 30,000 hours of community service annually, organized through the college’s Krause Center of Leadership and Ethics.

“Being classified by the Carnegie Foundation as a community-engaged campus is an honor few colleges achieve. The real victory though is the many students who find their calling and go on to be lifelong engaged citizens,” said Conway Saylor, Ph.D., director of service learning and civil engagement at the college’s Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. “Also important is the fact that the cadets’ service means our long-term community partners increase their capacity to address important issues like food insecurity or educational access.”

The classification is awarded following a process of self-study by each institution, which is then assessed by a national review committee led by the Swearer Center for Public Engagement at Brown University, the administrative and research home for the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification.

Gen. Glenn Walters encouraging cadets during Leadership Day 2018
Gen. Glenn Walters , Citadel President, encouraging cadets during Leadership Day

The foundation defines community engagement as “the partnership of college and university knowledge and resources with those of the public and private sectors to enrich scholarship, research, and creative activity; enhance curriculum, teaching and learning; prepare educated, engaged citizens; strengthen democratic values and civic responsibility; address critical societal issues; and contribute to the public good.”

Some of The Citadel’s year-round community engagement programs include an annual Leadership Day during which the majority of the college’s cadets fan out across the Lowcountry for a day of service. The cadets also have weekly commitments to work with veterans, people with disabilities and students in Title I schools. The full-time summer SUCCEED service program, and alternative winter and spring breaks, allow cadets to engage at a deeper level and grow as leaders.

Additionally, every cadet completes four years of leadership and ethics courses preparing them to be servant leaders. They complete required physical training and military training in a 24/7 military environment that includes mandatory study session nightly. That combination of service, structure and discipline, known as The Citadel Effect produces the highest return on investment in the State of South Carolina among other 4-year colleges.*

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Servant leadership for the community and the Corps https://today.citadel.edu/servant-leadership-for-the-community-and-the-corps/ Thu, 02 Jan 2020 17:20:56 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=12004 To be a servant leader means working to meet the needs of others, in order to allow followers to better focus on, and accomplish, the mission.]]>

Members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets learn to be servant leaders all year long. Each of a cadet’s four years at The Citadel are dedicated to different aspects of this leadership style: from the first year to the last, The Citadel’s leadership model helps cadets prepare, serve, lead, and then command.

To be a servant leader means working to meet the needs of others, in order to allow followers to better focus on, and accomplish, the mission.

One unforgettable day each year

A key example of this type of leadership is concentrated into one day every fall, when much of the campus community is focused on servant learning.

This year, Leadership Day was on Oct. 23. More than 400 sophomore cadets went into the community and helped lend a hand at nearly 30 different community partner agencies. Not only that, but 15 veteran and active duty students also volunteered to spend the day on service learning. All together, that equals more than 2,800 service hours, and an estimated value to the community of more than $73,000.

Cadets working at the Lowcountry Food Bank on Leadership Day 2019

In addition to the sophomores’ service learning, 650 freshmen cadets helped educate more than 3,000 students in Charleston County on Leadership Day. The freshmen cadets spent a total of more than 4,700 hours speaking with local students from Kindergarten through 8th grade.

While it’s important to remember that Citadel cadets helped out from Wadmalaw Island to McClellanville and as far inland as Harleyville, it’s also important to remember how Leadership Day helps the cadets, too.

In their own words

Read some reflections about Leadership Day directly from two sophomore cadets — one who volunteered at Charles Towne Landing and one who worked with the Lowcountry Food Bank.

A team of leaders at Charles Towne Landing
by Cadet Kathryn Christmas

Cadet Kathryn Christmas

To be completely honest, the night before — and the morning of — Leadership Day 2019, I did not feel compelled to serve my community in any way. My knowledge of the site that my group would be working at was brief, and I did not understand why or how this would help my community.

However, my outlook changed completely when I discovered what my group was going to accomplish at Charles Towne Landing.

When we arrived, Jessica, one of the many caretakers, greeted us and explained that we were going to be cleaning up various animal exhibits. Before that day, I was under the impression that cutting down trees was our only goal. Almost immediately my attitude changed, and I was the most excited individual on that site.

We began in the aviary, an enclosure for confining birds, collecting fallen branches from the water, removing small trees and limbs from the bank, and clearing the pathway for visitors to walk through. We were eager to finish the tasks that she had divvied out among the groups.

Some were lucky enough to find a banana spider, while others were victims of stinging nettle, fire-ants or water soaking through their boots.

Once we finished at the aviary, the puma cage needed trimming. Ear plugs were distributed because of the intense sound from the wood chipper. Different groups were dragging branches to a pile while the rest created a chain towards the wood chipper. I did not think that the job given to us qualified as a group effort, but the way our team came together and knocked out the task quickly and efficiently shocked me. Each individual understood that it needed to be done.

Being a CIC (this means “cadet in charge” yes?), I did not have to harass anyone to begin working or to stop fooling around. It was an understood agreement within the whole team. I tried to make it clear in the beginning that my thought process as a leader was that if I was not working, then the others did not have to work.

I appreciated the opportunity to discover new places and friends during the ten hours of service at our site. In the end, I enjoyed every minute of serving my community at Charles Towne Landing while growing closer with my classmates.

Putting food on Lowcountry tables
by Cadet Angela Lance

Cadet Angela Lance

19 members from the Class of 2022 and I went to the Lowcountry Food Bank for Leadership Day. Our mission that morning was to pack grocery bags with meals for the weekend for children who do not know when their next meal will be. The head of the bank called this food insecurity. Food insecurity is different from hunger in the sense that some wake up and are hungry but can go to the pantry or mess hall and have a meal. Those with food insecurity do not know when their next meal is or where it is coming from, it is not a hunger that can be easily solved. Our baggy with a few food items was meant to ease some of this food insecurity.

When we got in the room, there were nine bins set up in a circle, each filled with a different item. There was canned spaghetti and meatballs, canned ravioli, canned green beans, milk, two cereals, a pudding cup, a fruit cup, and a fruit strip. These were very simple food items, but items that would feed them for the weekend. Something that we would just go to the pantry for when feeling too lazy to cook for is something that was meant to last them two days.

Once briefed, we were all ready to make these meals for children all across South Carolina. Without a word, everyone went to a station and instantly, the work was flowing easily. Our method was so efficient that we finished 6 pallets of food in an hour and 15 minutes, which would, in turn, feed 1,084 children.

It was a fun and amazing environment to be in. Everyone was smiling and worked together smoothly. There was a feeling of shared instant satisfaction of seeing these pallets move out and knowing that so many children would be fed from these little bags of simple foods. This was my second incredible experience with the food bank and has always given me a sense of pride. I would encourage all to take on this humbling volunteer project.

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Double-Edged Role of Leaders, J. Goosby Smith of The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/double-edged-role-of-leaders-j-goosby-smith-of-the-citadel/ Wed, 14 Aug 2019 10:00:56 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=10008 J. Goosby Smith, Associate Professor of Leadership at The Citadel, discusses the double-edged role leaders have and the duties that come with that.]]>

As seen on Charleston CEO

J. Goosby Smith, Associate Professor of Leadership at The Citadel, discusses the double-edged role leaders have and the duties that come with that.

View video »

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The new faces of cadet leadership at The Citadel for the Class of 2020 https://today.citadel.edu/the-new-faces-of-cadet-leadership-at-the-citadel-for-the-class-of-2020/ https://today.citadel.edu/the-new-faces-of-cadet-leadership-at-the-citadel-for-the-class-of-2020/#comments Thu, 28 Mar 2019 19:44:53 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=6832 The Office of the Commandant announced the cadets who will lead the Corps for the 2019-2020 school year The South Carolina Corps of Cadets 11 top ranking officers for the]]>

The Office of the Commandant announced the cadets who will lead the Corps for the 2019-2020 school year

The South Carolina Corps of Cadets 11 top ranking officers for the 2019-2020 academic year are preparing for their new roles. This will be the first year the regimental staff will include the position of deputy regimental commander, which will be the second in command.

The cadets who have earned the top leadership positions are:

Richard Snyder – Regimental Commander
From Powell, OH and majoring in business administration
Brennen Zeigler – Deputy Regimental Commander
From Chapin, SC and majoring in business administration

Richard Snyder, 2019-2020 Regimental Commander Brennen Zeigler, 2019-2020 Deputy Regimental Commander

Bailey Richardson – Regimental XO
From Galivants Ferry, SC and majoring in biology
Preston Bell – Honor Board Chair
From Moncks Corner, SC and majoring in political science
Jeffrey McGee – Regimental Academic Officer
From Bowling Green, KY and majoring in accounting

Bailey Richardson, 2019-2020 Regimental XO Preston Bell, 2019-2020 Honor Board Chair Jeffrey McGee, 2019-2020 Regimental Academic Officer

Mitchell Dobin – 1st Battalion Commander
From Lafayette, CA and majoring in business administration
James Quimby – 2nd Battalion Commander
From York, SC and majoring in physics
Henry Brown – 3rd Battalion Commander
From St. Louis, MO and majoring in political science

Mitchell Dobin, 2019-2020 1st Battalion Commander James Quimby, 2019-2020 2nd Battalion Commander Henry Brown, 2019-2020 3rd Battalion Commander

Adam Niehoff – 4th Battalion Commander
From Wantage, NJ and majoring in political science
Brady Lucas – 5th Battalion Commander
From Gilbert, SC and majoring in business administration
Carson Adams – Sergeant Major
From Chapin, SC and majoring in accounting

Adam Niehoff, 2019-2020 4th Battalion Commander Brady Lucas, 2019-2020 5th Battalion Commander Carson Adams, Sergeant Major

The regimental staff will lead approximately 80 cadet officers in the command of the Corps’ five battalions and 21 companies next year, with positions ranging from battalion sergeant majors to company first sergeants. They are selected by the Office of the Commandant after a series of interviews and reviews of their performance during the years leading up to becoming a first class (senior) cadet. Following this selection process, the remaining staff and leadership positions will be filled by cadets whose performance within the Corps qualifies them for leadership roles.

The Citadel’s mission to educate and develop cadets into principled leaders is the driving force behind the integral military system at the college, which is in operation at all times when school is in session, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Below are the names of the full regimental staff, company commanders, battalion sergeants majors and company first sergeants:

Regimental Staff

Richard Snyder – Regimental Commander
Brennen Zeigler – Deputy Regimental Commander
Bailey Richardson – Regimental XO
Preston Bell – Honor Board Chair
Jeffrey McGee – Regimental Academic Officer
Johnathan Holliday – Regimental Adjutant
Zachary Blackburn – Regimental Provost Marshall
Ethan Warner – Regimental Operations Officer
George Wisniewski – Regimental Supply Officer
Breana Broad – Regimental Public Affairs Officer
Oliver Terry – Honor Vice Chair for Education
Trace Guy – Honor Vice Chair for Investigations
Carlos Camacho – Honor Vice Chair for Operations
Victoria Krone – Regimental Religious Officer
Nathaniel Ballard – Regimental Human Affairs Officer
Marcell Randall – Regimental Athletic Officer
Rhaei Brown – Regimental Activities Officer
Carlos Camacho – Regimental Recruiting Officer
Darrian Wyble – Regimental Head Drill Master Officer
Carson Adams – Regimental Sergeant Major
Matthew E. Dittrich – Regimental Academic NCO
William Rathke – Regimental Admin NCO
Ryan Salter – Regimental Operations NCO
Collin Buckhannon – Regimental Supply NCO
William Rowe – Regimental Provost NCO
Anthony Sands – Regimental Human Affairs NCO
Ruby Bolden – Regimental Public Affairs NCO
Keyton M. Daniels – Regimental Recruiting NCO
Christian Seidler – Regimental Athletics NCO
Michelle Banzon – Regimental Activities NCO
David McBain – Regimental Operations Clerk
Matthew Wren – Regimental Operations Clerk
Angelea Lance – Regimental Admin Clerk
Matthew Jones – Regimental Admin Clerk
Matthew Dangerfield – Regimental Supply Clerk
Noah Mills – Regimental Supply Clerk

1st Battalion

Mitchell Dobin – Battalion Commander
Andrew Caron – Battalion Sergeant Major
Montele Adams – A Company Commander
Victoria Conley – A Company First Sergeant
Jennifer Pozzani – B Company Commander
Marrik Kelley – B Company First Sergeant
Thomas Lowery – C Company Commander
Alfred Gregg – C Company First Sergeant
Gabriel Gonzalez – D Company Commander
Douglas Smith – D Company First Sergeant

2nd Battalion

James Quimy – Battalion Commander
Nicholas Piacentini – Battalion Sergeant Major
Raymond Sullivan – E Company Commander
Gillian Druzisky – E Company First Sergeant
Chase Kinsey – F Company Commander
Ethan Stanley – F Company First Sergeant
James Mundy – G Company Commander
Caleb Williams – G Company First Sergeant
Andrew Diegel – H Company Commander
William Curtis – H Company First Sergeant
Phromnachanok Ketphan – BD Company Commander
Logan Scronce – BD Comany First Sergeant

3rd Battalion

Henry Brown – Battalion Commander
Fuller Prickett – Battalion Sergeant Major
Christopher Russell – I Company Commander
Jacob Hardee – I Company First Sergeant
Justice Woods – K Company Commander
Ryan Williams – K Company First Sergeant
James Lipscomb – L Company Commander
Samantha Engel – L Company First Sergeant
Anna Dinovo – M Company Commander
Daniel Esteban – M Company First Sergeant

4th Battalion

Adam Niehoff – Battalion Commander
Wesley Kelley – Battalion Sergeant Major
William Hesse – N Company Commander
JoAnna Winborn – N Company First Sergeant
Hannah Jalbert – O Company Commander
Patrick Kress – O Company First Sergeant
Mark Weakland – R Company Commander
Brock Mehl – R Company First Sergeant
Benjamin Klassen – T Company Commander
Peter Tillman – T Company First Sergeant

5th Battalion

Brady Lucas – Battalion Commander
Caleb Moseley – Battalion Sergeant Major
Olivia Jones – P Company Commander
Nicholas Fricchione – P Company First Sergeant
Daniel Barberena – Palmetto Battery Commander
Owen Dunne – Palmetto Battery First Sergeant
Sameul Santiago – S Company Commander
Noah Hammond – S Company First Sergeant
Gus Karres – V Company Commander
Joseph Field – V Company First Sergeant

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Cadets honored with distinguished MacArthur and Cincinnati awards https://today.citadel.edu/cadets-honored-with-distinguished-macarthur-and-cincinnati-awards/ Sat, 23 Feb 2019 11:00:06 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=6246 Cadets Sarah Zorn and Mitchell Felt at awards paradeCadets Sarah Zorn and Mitchell Felt at awards paradePhoto: Cadets Sarah Zorn and Mitchell Felt at awards parade Two members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets are now proud recipients of prestigious awards. The highlight of February’s final]]> Cadets Sarah Zorn and Mitchell Felt at awards paradeCadets Sarah Zorn and Mitchell Felt at awards parade

Photo: Cadets Sarah Zorn and Mitchell Felt at awards parade

Two members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets are now proud recipients of prestigious awards.

The highlight of February’s final parade was the presentation of two distinguished awards. Cadet Col. Sarah Zorn was awarded the Society of the Cincinnati Medal and Cadet Lt. Col. Mitchell Felt was presented with the General Douglas MacArthur Cadet of the Year Award.

The Society of the Cincinnati is given every year to the senior cadet officer who best exemplifies the combined qualities of a good soldier and good citizen, characteristics that were evident in the patriots who fought to win American’s freedom.

Cadet Col. Sarah Zorn awarded the Society of the Cincinnati Medal
Cadet Col. Sarah Zorn awarded the Society of the Cincinnati Medal

Zorn, of Aiken, S.C., has excelled throughout her tenure as a cadet, going on to become the first female regimental commander in The Citadel’s history. She is a business administration major who has distinguished herself in academics, fitness and leadership, earning dean’s list, president’s list, and commandant’s list multiple times.

Zorn is a four-year Army scholarship cadet, who supported and participated in Ranger Challenge, a highly competitive, three-day annual event against other senior military colleges. She has also mentored cadets interested in pursuing an Army career. Upon graduation, Zorn will be commissioned in the U.S. Army Field Artillery branch and is looking forward to Airborne School, followed by a challenging military career.

Due to Zorn’s high performance initiative and her leadership, she will join other Society of the Cincinnati recipients whose names are engraved on the plaque located in the entrance lobby of Bond Hall.

The Medal of the Society of the Cincinnati Award bears the name of a Roman farmer, Cincinnatus, who left his farm to take up arms and fight for his city. A successful general, he was an acclaimed dictator, but chose instead to return to civilian life. The officers who served in the Continental Army formed the Society. Their charter members included George Washington, Alexander Hamilton and Marquis De Lafayette. The South Carolina chapter, established in 1783, is one of the six original state societies that have been in continuous existence since that time.

Also each year, the General Douglas MacArthur Foundation presents MacArthur Cadet of the Year Awards to the most outstanding cadets from the 12 colleges and universities comprising the Association of Military Colleges and Schools.

Cadet Lt. Col. Mitchell Felt presented with the General Douglas MacArthur Cadet of the Year Award
Cadet Lt. Col. Mitchell Felt presented with the General Douglas MacArthur Cadet of the Year Award

Felt, of Simpsonville, S.C., has demonstrated exceptional performance in academics, athletics and leadership. He is a mechanical engineering major who has earned gold stars every semester with a cumulative 3.9 grade point ratio; he has also been named to the president’s and commandant’s distinguished service list multiple times.

Felt’s accomplishments extend to his commitment to the U. S. Navy, having earned the outstanding naval ROTC midshipman as a freshman, sophomore and junior. He Felt will complete his college career as a distinguished military graduate with plans to commission as a United States Naval Officer and report to flight school in Pensacola, Florida. Felt’s goal is to become a test pilot and eventually join the space program.

The objective of the General Douglas MacArthur Cadet of the Year Award is to encourage the students of the member institutions to emulate the qualities exemplified by General Douglas MacArthur when he was a cadet at the West Texas Military Institute and the United States Military Academy at West Point. The award is given to the senior class cadet at each of the schools with the most soldierly performance with consideration for academics, athletics, and leadership in accordance with the standards of each respective institution.

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General who commands US operations in space speaks at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/general-raymond-space-command-citadel-greater-issues/ Fri, 22 Feb 2019 13:49:52 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=6220 General John “Jay” Raymond, United States Air Force, delivered the first Greater Issues address of 2019. Every day, the life of almost every person in America is affected by what]]>

General John “Jay” Raymond, United States Air Force, delivered the first Greater Issues address of 2019.

Every day, the life of almost every person in America is affected by what the nation’s military is doing in space. That’s according to the man in charge of it all, General John “Jay” Raymond.

In his February address to the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, Gen. Raymond discussed how essential space operations are to both the American way of life and the American way of war.

“There is nothing that we do as a joint force, absolutely nothing, that isn’t enabled by space capability. Whether it’s humanitarian assistance, disaster relief operations or combat operations and everything in between, there’s nothing we do that isn’t enabled by space,” said Gen. Raymond.

Another thing space command is responsible for is tracking all everything that’s orbiting the earth. Gen. Raymond says that’s a total of about 24,000 objects. He said, “We act as the space traffic control for the world. So if one object is going to hit another object, we provide warning to make sure that domain stays safe.” Gen. Raymond went on to say, “It’s a congested environment, if you will.”

General Raymond during Greater Issues Address
General Raymond during Greater Issues Address

After the address, Gen. Raymond took questions from cadets. In response to a question about leadership, Gen. Raymond said, “To be a leader, the first thing that you have to be able to do is make sure that everybody in your organization understands their link to the mission. The second thing that I think a leader needs to do is set really high standards.” On leadership, Gen. Raymond went on to say, “The main thing in, my personal opinion, is you have to be a good person. You have to treat people with respect, you have to treat people with dignity and you have to treat people like you want to be treated.”

General John “Jay” Raymond is the Commander of Air Force Space Command and Joint Force Space Component. As Commander, Gen. Raymond is responsible or organizing, training, equipping and maintaining mission-ready space forces and capabilities for North American Aerospace Defense Command, U.S. Strategic Command and other combatant commands around the world. His command comprises approximately 30,000 space professionals around the world.

Before taking command of the Air Force Space Command, Gen. Raymond was the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Headquarters U.S. Air Force. He was commissioned through the ROTC program at Clemson University in 1984.

About the Greater Issues Series

The Greater Issues Series was founded in 1954 to engage Citadel cadets’ interest and knowledge in important topics of the day. Since it was established by the Mills B. Lane Memorial Foundation, the series has brought presidents, heads of state, scholars, diplomats, journalists and distinguished business and military leaders to The Citadel, its cadets, students, faculty and staff and the Charleston community.

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Citadel professors honored for embodying the characteristics of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-professors-honored-mlk-black-history-month/ Thu, 31 Jan 2019 00:00:57 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=5834 Award recipients at 2019 MLK Picture AwardsAward recipients at 2019 MLK Picture AwardsPhoto: 2019 MLK Picture Award recipients at ceremony “I guess I’m just one of the soldiers trying to get up every day and do my best to be part of]]> Award recipients at 2019 MLK Picture AwardsAward recipients at 2019 MLK Picture Awards

Photo: 2019 MLK Picture Award recipients at ceremony

“I guess I’m just one of the soldiers trying to get up every day and do my best to be part of the solutions.” – Conway Saylor, Ph.D.

Citadel professor Conway Saylor, Ph.D. is one of the local leaders being honored for serving and uniting members of the community. The 2019 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Picture Awards, hosted by Rep. Wendell Gilliard on Jan. 29, presented 14 awards to the selected individuals for going above and beyond the call of duty, demonstrating that they are keeping the dream of Dr. King alive.

Saylor at MLK Picture Awards Ceremony
Saylor at MLK Picture Awards Ceremony

In a video featuring all of the awardees, Saylor said, “All of us can do this and all of us need to do this together if we’re going to make the kinds of changes that are needed.”

Saylor, a professor of psychology, is the director of service learning and civic engagement for The Citadel’s Krause Center of Leadership and Ethics. Saylor developed more than 35 partnerships between The Citadel and the Lowcountry community, and created the programs through which cadets and students serve those partners. One of the partners is Charleston County School District’s Title I schools served by volunteer cadets regularly. Through Saylor’s leadership Citadel cadets, students, faculty and staff provide more than 20,000 hours of volunteer service annually.

Citadel Gospel Choir performs at MLK Picture Awards
Citadel Gospel Choir performs at MLK Picture Awards

The Citadel Gospel Choir also performed at the ceremony, featuring a solo by Cadet Christina Capers. On February 24, the choir will perform in a Black History Month concert in Summerall Chapel. More information on the concert can be found here.

Also on Jan 29., Citadel professor Julie Lipovsky, Ph.D. was recognized as the college’s 2019 recipient of the Black History Month Intercollegiate Consortium’s MLK award. The Consortium, which works to promote the study of Black History, is comprised of representatives from Charleston Southern University, College of Charleston, Medical University of South Carolina, The Citadel and Trident Technical College.

Lipovsky with Black History Month Intercollegiate Consortium's MLK award
Lipovsky with Black History Month Intercollegiate Consortium’s MLK award

Lipovsky, a professor of psychology, served as The Citadel Assistant Provost for Diversity and as a co-chair of the Diversity Equity and Inclusion Council for years. She currently serves as the team leader for the National Coalition Building Institute program at The Citadel and has had direct involvement with more than 1000 faculty, staff, and students receiving diversity and inclusion training through the NCBI program since the program was introduced in 2011.

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Hundreds of Cadet servant-leaders volunteering at 40+ locations Oct. 17 https://today.citadel.edu/hundreds-of-cadet-servant-leaders-volunteering-at-40-locations-oct-17/ Mon, 15 Oct 2018 19:33:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4083 Sgt. Kyle White (Image courtesy of U.S Army)Sgt. Kyle White (Image courtesy of U.S Army)The night before Leadership Day 2018, cadets, students, faculty and staff will hear the inspiring story of Medal of Honor Recipient Sgt. Kyle J. White.]]> Sgt. Kyle White (Image courtesy of U.S Army)Sgt. Kyle White (Image courtesy of U.S Army)

Medal of Honor Recipient Sgt. Kyle White kicks off event the night before Oct. 16

The night before the campus community begins serving the Lowcountry for The Citadel’s Leadership Day 2018, cadets, students, faculty and staff will hear the inspiring story of Medal of Honor Recipient Sgt. Kyle J. White. Sharing his true story of servant-leadership, White will describe what happened on Nov. 9, 2007 while he was a platoon radio-telephone operator for the U.S. Army’s 173rd Airborne Brigade in Arnas, Afghanistan.

After a rocket-propelled grenade knocked him unconscious, he awoke to an enemy round fragmenting near his head sending shrapnel into his face. Then he saw that one of his friends was down. (Image of Sgt. White courtesy of U.S. Army).

White sprinted the 10-meter expanse toward his wounded battle-buddy, with enemy rounds ricocheting around his feet and snapping past his head. “It’s just a matter of time before I’m dead. I figured, if that’s going to happen, I might as well help someone while I can.”

White’s presentation will take place at 7 p.m. on October 16 in McAlister Field House. It is free and open to the public, first come, first-served seating.

Leadership Day 2018, Oct. 17

Cadets start gathering before daybreak on Leadership Day
Cadets start gathering before daybreak on Leadership Day


While cadets volunteer year-round, on Leadership Day each year service learning is a unified campus wide effort. At 7:40 a.m. on Wed., Oct. 17, operations get underway with The Citadel’s new president, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC  providing a send off address to cadets in Buyer Auditorium. After that, sophomore cadets lead freshmen as they depart to volunteer at more than 40 schools and community partner programs around the Lowcountry. Walters will also spend time with 53 cadets working at a Sea Island Habitat for Humanity project for veterans on James Island, and then at James Simons Elementary school where cadets will teach students about heroism.

“This year cadets will be volunteering in 20 Charleston County Schools simultaneously, seven of which are new partners with some in Mt. Pleasant,” said Conway Saylor, Ph.D., director of service learning and civic engagement, Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics at The Citadel.

The juniors participate in a daylong leadership ethics experience on campus. The seniors attend leadership training provided by the college’s business partners some of which include Blackbaud, Boeing, Hollings Marine Laboratory, the Medical University of South Carolina and Wells Fargo. Faculty and staff assist with Leadership Day planning and implementation, while others attend leadership diversity skills training. In addition, for the first time some alumni are participating too.

“At The Citadel we learn that in order to lead, a person must first know how to serve,” said Cadet Logan Miller, Regimental Public Affairs Officer, South Carolina Corps of Cadets. “Many of us volunteer regularly, but it is especially fun and motivating when the entire campus is focused on service at the same time on Leadership Day.”

Krause Center leads the leaders

Leadership Day, initiated in 2011, and all of the college’s service learning initiatives are directed by The Citadel’s Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics.

“Our cadets are given the gift of being able to serve by our community and business partners around the Lowcountry who welcome them every Leadership Day and at many other times throughout the year,” said Col. Tom Clark, USMC (Ret.), executive director of The Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. “We are deeply grateful for their generosity to our students.”

Media coverage opportunities

Members of the media are welcome to cover any of the events listed below. No advanced notice required; times are approximate. Live shots are welcome on campus for Sgt. White’s event on Tuesday and for the early morning shows on Wednesday. For live truck parking instructions please email kkeelor@citadel.edu by 4 p.m. Tuesday.

Event Time Location/Address Website
New Citadel president Walters gives sendoff address to cadets 7:40 -8 Buyer Auditorium in Mark Clark Hall on campus Map of campus
Hundreds of cadets board buses to leave for 40+ volunteer sites 8:45-9:15 a.m. Jones Ave. on campus Map of campus
Gen. Walters joins 53 cadets at Sea Island Habitat for construction on veteran and other housing 9:30-10:15 (Cadets on site until 3p.m.) 1862 Ferguson Rd., James Island http://www.seaislandhabitat.org/

 

Gen. Walters joins cadets teaching elementary students about heroism 10:30 – 11:20

(Cadets onsite 9:30 – 3p.m.)

James Simons Elementary 741 King St., Charleston

 

https://simons.ccsdschools.com/

 

(NEW: cadets & alumni) Old Chicora school interior demotion  for eventual conversion to community center 9:30 – 3p.m. 3120 Chicora Ave, North Charleston One of five events this day that are part of Citadel’s partnership with Metanoia Charleston
Audubon Society/Charleston Natural History Society 9:30a.m. – 3p.m. Francis Beidler Forest, 336 Sanctuary Rd., Harleyville http://www.charlestonaudubon.org/

 

Onsite contact: mdawson@audubon.org

 

Charles Towne Landing 9:30 a.m. – 4p.m. 1500 Old Towne Rd., Charleston https://southcarolinaparks.com/charles-towne-landing

 

Onsite contact: jjohnson@scprt.com

 

City of Charleston Rec. Dept. games with special needs visitors 9a.m. – 2p.m. 1580 Ashley Gardens Blvd.,

Charleston

https://www.charleston-sc.gov/recreation

 

Stewards of Hampton Park cleanup 8:30 a.m. – noon Hampton Park, Charleston https://www.facebook.com/StewardsOfHamptonPark/

 

Windwood Family Service 10a.m.-3:30p.m. 4857 Windwood Farm Road, Awendaw https://windwoodfarm.org/

 

Senior Leadership Day business partner sessions

The Citadel would like to thank our community business partners whose leaders are providing a day of leadership and ethics training for approximately 500 senior cadets.

  • Barnwell, Whaley, Patterson and Helms, LLC
  • Blackbaud
  • Boeing
  • Charleston County Government
  • Dixon Hughes Goodman, LLP
  • Gibbes Museum of Art
  • Harbor Entrepreneur Center
  • Life Cycle Engineering
  • Joe Riley Stadium
  • Medical University of SC
  • South Carolina Historical Society
  • SCANA/SCE&G
  • SRS Distribution
  • T.Y. Lin International
  • Water Mission
  • Wells Fargo
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