Humanities & Social Sciences – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 11 Mar 2021 17:38:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Humanities & Social Sciences – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Lu Parker, ’94: Citadel Graduate College alumna, journalist, former Miss USA, and kindness entrepreneur https://today.citadel.edu/lu-parker-94-citadel-graduate-college-alumna-journalist-former-miss-usa-and-kindness-entrepreneur/ Thu, 11 Mar 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22573 We strive to help all people better understand and embrace the power of kindness.]]>

“Never underestimate the power of a kind woman.” Lu Parker

Lu Parker doesn’t dawdle in the slow lane. She’s flying along numerous professional pathways, and while she’s navigating, she’s deliberate about conveying one key message: Be kind.

“The best is when someone sees my t-shirt or hoodie while I’m wearing it and stops me to say “I love your shirt!” or “What a great message!”  When that happens, it makes me realize that I am doing the right thing. It’s working,” Parker shared with The Citadel.

As a journalist with two decades of experience (including with WCSC-TV in Charleston, South Carolina) and multiple Emmy awards, Parker anchors four hours of news daily for KTLA in Los Angeles. Additionally, she is an inspirational speaker, an author, and the founder of Be Kind & Co. which recently launched a line of apparel.

Lu Parker in the studio at WCSC-TV, Live 5, in Charleston in the late 1990s.
Lu Parker in the studio at WCSC-TV, Live 5, in Charleston in the late 1990s.

Prior to her career in broadcasting, Parker was a ninth-grade English Literature teacher. In 1994, while she was a teacher, Parker captured both the Miss South Carolina USA, and Miss USA titles, going on to place fourth in the Miss Universe Pageant.

But, before all of that, Parker graduated from The Citadel Graduate College in 1993 with a Master of Arts in Education, after earning a BA in English Literature from the College of Charleston.

After seeing the launch of the Be Kind & Co. apparel line, The Citadel Graduate College reached out to Parker to ask her to share some reflections.

This is what she said.

An interview with Lu Parker, The Citadel Graduate College Class of 1994 and founder of Be Kind & Co.

What is your goal for Be Kind & Co.?

We strive to help all people better understand and embrace the power of kindness. My goal is to use Be Kind & Co. as a way to share content, experiences, and merchandise that inspires all of us to be a bit more kind each day. I truly believe that each kind act, even if small, helps to collectively heal the world.  

In 2021, we launched our BKC Apparel line and we are thrilled to be seeing so many people wearing our merchandise around the country, including in South Carolina. We like to say it’s “Merchandise with a Message.” We share small sayings like, “Be a Kind Human” – “Born Kind” – Be Kind Y’all – “Never Underestimate the Power of a Kind Woman.” 

 Why did you create Be Kind & Co.?

The original concept of Be Kind & Co. was created after I experienced an unfortunate situation where I was attempting to be kind to someone and it backfired on me. At the time, the experience made me seriously question kindness. I questioned my urge to help people and literally almost gave up on being kind ever again.  But eventually, I came to my senses and realized that kindness is a gift that I cherish. Be Kind & Co. was originally a blog but now it’s more of life-style media company that shares content, offers merchandise with messaging, and creates a space where people can share insights into the power of kindness.  

I am also in the early stages of writing a book about my experiences and how I handled it.  I am also looking forward to traveling again to speak around the country at conventions and venues on “How Kindness Creates Success.”

Lu Parker accepting her diploma for a Master of Arts in Education
from The Citadel Graduate College in 1993.

Why did you pursue a Masters of Education and why did you select The Citadel Graduate College?

I was already interested in English Literature and hoped to one day teach on a college level. My Mom suggested that I apply to The Citadel because I was living in Charleston at the time and she said the program had a great reputation. 

I have fond memories of attending the Citadel Graduate College.  My professors were helpful and the process was a smooth experience. I believe that anytime you set a goal in life, personally or professionally, you must complete each small task while staying focused on the future goal. Studying at The Citadel allowed me to further my education so I could eventually teach high school. I did teach high school at North Charleston High School after graduating from The Citadel. 

What do you miss most about Charleston?

Ahhhh, Charleston. The city has my heart in so many ways. I spent over two decades there growing up, going to college and graduate school. I also taught in the city, and eventually returned to work in tv news there at WCSC. I often say I have a memory on every corner of the city.  I love the beaches, the Southern accents, the people and the style. I even miss the heat, humidity and rain.   

What is your greatest achievement to date?

To answer your question about my greatest achievement to date, I would say I have been very fortunate in my life and had the opportunity to experience a lot of wonderful moments including attending college, winning Miss USA, winning Emmys, traveling the world, working in TV news, meeting celebrities, going to Hollywood events, and even writing a book….But I still don’t consider those accomplishments. They were all wonderful experiences. To answer you question about my greatest achievement to date, I would say it’s the fact that I have never given up on the belief that kindness can create huge change. Kindness can save a life.  Kindness can shift the world. Kindness is strength. It’s a daily practice that I hope I can continue to share through my writings, my company and my voice. 

What would you say to young women considering various careers about innovating their own pathways or even multiple careers?

I am a huge believer that life is better when you love what you do. I always suggest to young women and men to find a career or a path to that career that lights a fire inside of you. I love my job as a tv news anchor because I am able to combine my love of writing, reading, and interacting with people.  It’s the same with my company Be Kind & Co. Creating a company takes a lot of behind the scenes work. It’s challenging and can be overwhelming, but when you feel good about what you are doing, then it’s worth it. I also totally believe that it’s never too late to change your profession or start a company, non-profit or passion project. It may require you to work after your “real” job, but again, when the passion is there, it won’t always feel like work. It’s a joy.  

As we celebrate Women’s History Month, I want to add that I 100% believe that when women support each other’s success, we all succeed.  There is so much success available out in the world, let’s help each other along the path and celebrate each other!  That’s true kindness!

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Closing the cyber workforce gap: the first Citadel Dept. of Defense Cyber Institute team at work https://today.citadel.edu/closing-the-cyber-workforce-gap-the-first-citadel-dept-of-defense-cyber-institute-team-at-work/ Wed, 10 Mar 2021 15:52:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22554 First cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber InstituteFirst cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute"I believe that through this program and the leaders who are sharing their knowledge with us, I will be more than equipped for the cybersecurity world when I graduate.]]> First cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber InstituteFirst cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute

The first group of cadets and students selected to study under the umbrella of The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute (CDCI) is hard at work, with the goal of being immediately ready to join America’s cybersecurity workforce after graduation. The cluster of future cyber warriors includes one active duty Marine student, one veteran student, and 19 cadets.

The CDCI mission is to ensure the delivery of principled leaders who are experts in cybersecurity and have the skillset and experience required to begin working for the U.S. Department of Defense as soon as they earn their degrees. The program will help expand America’s cyber capability by addressing the critical national security need for a larger cybersecurity workforce.

All of the CDCI participants are pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Cyber Operations, or a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, with a minor in Cybersecurity, or, a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with a minor in Data Science.

Among the students is Cadet Trey Stevens, a junior with a triple major in Computer Science, Cyber Operations and Intelligence and Security Studies. “I feel very fortunate that I’ve been selected to not only advance my own cyber education, but to be better prepared for the agency that I work with post-graduation so that I may perform my job as best as I can,” Stevens said. “This is a unique opportunity where professionals and experts are pouring in their knowledge in order to pave the path for future cybersecurity professionals. I’m planning on maximizing my engagement with this amazing program.”

The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute (CDCI) cadets and students being led by Lt. Col Linda Riedel, SCARNG, and Dr. Shankar Banik, professor of computer science and cyber operations, and director of CDCI and numerous other programs at The Citadel.

The Citadel and the nation’s other five Senior Military Colleges (SMC) have each received approximately $1.5 million of federal money to establish a cybersecurity institute as pilot programs on their campus. The funds are part of a $10 million Department of Defense (DOD) appropriation to the National Security Agency (NSA) for these institutes, included in the 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act.

“It is an honor to be selected for such a program,” said Cadet Jalen Singleton, a junior Computer Science major with a minor in Cybersecurity. “I am included in an extremely talented cohort that has been given access to top cybersecurity knowledge and tools. I believe that through this program and the leaders who are sharing their knowledge with us, I will be more than equipped for the cybersecurity world when I graduate.”

The Department of Defense outlined three priorities for the SMC institutes: sustain a cyber-ready workforce, enhance the nation’s cyber talent and establish a top talent management program. The Citadel is helping achieve these goals.

“Being a part of CDCI is already an amazing experience,” said Cadet Hannah Collee. She is a sophomore double-majoring in Computer Science and Cyber Operations. “There is hands-on learning and countless opportunities for growth. This program helps students get in contact with numerous businesses and internships too. I can’t wait to continue with our team.” 

The 21 cadets and students selected to participate in the college’s first CDCI cohort include:

All, Jackson A.
Collee, Hannah E.
Deans, Conor W.
Freeman, Lydia S.
Hanulcik, Avery
Jensen, William M.
Johnson, Jared M.
Lilling, Eric R.
Lindenmeyer, Andrew R.
Ling, Nathanael C.
Race, Benjamin R
Reynolds, Aaron G.
Roser, Robert G.
Ruiz, Ashley
Singleton, Jalen A.
Skibicki, Ryan
Smiles, Shiloh O.
Stevens, Trey J.
Toomer, Timothy C.
Wells, Noah M.
Whitlock, Benjamin T.

Prospective cadets and students wanting more information should email dhoward2@citadel.edu or call (843) 953-1089.

The Citadel is a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education, as named by the United States Department of National Security Agency and Homeland Security.

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Citadel Graduate College Masters in Intelligence and Security #10 in U.S. by Best Value Schools https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-graduate-college-masters-in-intelligence-and-security-10-in-u-s-by-best-value-schools/ Tue, 09 Mar 2021 17:48:08 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22490 Photo above: Citadel Graduate College students meeting with the Director of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats, on campus in 2018 As seen on BestValueSchools.org It is easy for individuals that are]]>

Photo above: Citadel Graduate College students meeting with the Director of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats, on campus in 2018

As seen on BestValueSchools.org

It is easy for individuals that are not familiar with the complex nature of security professions to assume that a security education is part of criminal justice. The truth is that there are many types of security specialists. The growing need for security professionals leads to the need for those interested in security to receive a a high-quality education, such as a masters in security degree. 

Badge for Best-Masters-in-Security

What Can I Do with a Master’s in Security Degree? 

There are a variety of master’s in security programs available to individuals that have an interest in providing security at national and international levels. Pursuing a masters in security in the field that a person wants to enter requires selecting the right program. This helps to determine what a person can do with a master’s degree in security.

Consider a master’s degree in security studies if you want a career that focuses on security leadership, crisis management, or security analysis. Individuals that want a career in cybersecurity or homeland security often find ideal master’s in security programs that fulfill the goals or requirements for working in these fields. Do you want to focus on the security of populations or on security efforts after a disaster? Earning a master’s in security that focuses on human security is an option that leads to a rewarding career.  

The pay and job growth in security is likely a reason that some people choose to earn a master’s degree in security. The 2019 median pay was $99,730 for information security analysts, with an anticipated job growth of 31 percent through 2029. The National Security Agency (NSA) lists the entry level pay for a mid-level investigator at more than $72,000, and the pay for an NSA Forensic Analyst starting at $93,822 a year. 

Some schools allow students to complete program requirements online to accommodate the busy schedules of working professionals. Other programs require on-campus coursework and other face-to-face meetings. Exploring the best master’s in security programs allows for determining the best school and program that meets your goals and interests.

About The Citadel Master of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies: an online program offering real-world skills

DNI Coats speaking during the 2018 Intelligence and Cyber Security Conference at The Citadel
Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats, speaking during the 2018 Intelligence and Cyber Security Conference at The Citadel

The Master of Arts (MA) degree program in Intelligence and Security Studies (ISS) prepares students to enhance national security through intelligence and homeland security leadership. Best practices for intelligence collection and analysis and national security combined with current theory, research, and experience give students the background necessary to cultivate critical thinking, concise writing, and effective briefing. By introducing applicable management principles and policy analysis, the program fosters the leadership skills to successfully address security and intelligence challenges facing the United States.

Unlike traditional graduate programs that take a theoretical and conceptual track in preparing students for further academic research, The Citadel’s ISS program combines theory and practice to provide the real-world skills necessary to enter and advance in the public and private intelligence arenas.

This program is entirely online to provide maximum flexibility for students, and at the same time allow the ISS program to attract instruction from intelligence professionals located around the world. Our program is taught by internationally recognized experts, with real-world experience at agencies like the FBI, CIA, DHS and at the White House.

Citadel.edu

Learn more and find information about how to apply to The Citadel Graduate College here.

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Hamilton Baiden, ’91, on how Citadel experience contributed to his career success with Heritage Health Solutions, Inc. https://today.citadel.edu/heritage-health-solutions-inc-announces-new-president/ Tue, 23 Feb 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22326 Headshot of Hamilton BaidonHeadshot of Hamilton Baidon"In his elevated role, Baiden continues to lead the strategy and execution of Heritage's business development and growth while providing transparent leadership..."]]> Headshot of Hamilton BaidonHeadshot of Hamilton Baidon

Note: Hamilton Baiden graduated as a member of The Citadel Class of 1991 with a Bachelor of Arts in English Literature. He resides in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Mr. Baiden emailed these thoughts to the college after we contacted him to congratulate him and to ask what about The Citadel contributed most strongly to his professional success.

“When I look back at all the different influences in my life that have contributed to any success I might have achieved, The Citadel is definitely near the top of the list. Most people that know my personality and learn I went to The Citadel immediately ask “How the heck did you graduate from there?” Sometimes I ask the same question. At the end of the day, at 18 years of age, I needed to learn how to wrangle my energy and use it to the best of my ability. I needed to learn when to listen and when to talk. The greatest thing The Citadel taught me was how to handle all the different things that get thrown your way and solve the problems that really matter. I always look back on my four years at The Citadel with admiration and respect, and I cherish the lasting relationships that were built there.”

Hamilton Baiden, The Citadel Class of 1991, President, Heritage Health Solutions

As seen on PR Newswire

COPPELL, Texas, Feb. 22, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Heritage Health Solutions, Inc. (Heritage) has promoted Hamilton Baiden to President effective immediately. In his elevated role, Baiden continues to lead the strategy and execution of Heritage’s business development and growth while providing transparent leadership and expanding upon Heritage’s vast portfolio of services and solutions. His strategic direction and initiatives will cement Heritage’s status as one of the industry’s top Integrated Health Care Managers. Hamilton’s extensive knowledge of the industry will also lend itself to developing new healthcare solutions and services within the Heritage Health Solutions brand.

Baiden first joined Heritage in 2018 as the Executive Vice President and General Manager, where he oversaw business development and strategic planning. He is credited with adding new innovative solutions to Heritage’s already impressive suite, including Heritage CARES, a virtual substance use, suicide prevention, and mental health program, and launching a new corrections division focused on the health and wellbeing of those in confinement.

“I am honored to be asked by the Board to help lead Heritage Health Solutions forward in our mission to improve people’s lives by offering innovative solutions to the health care journey,” said Baiden. “Over the year’s we have created an organization with incredible employees that dedicate their time to the cause and who work tirelessly to make a difference.” 

Prior to joining Heritage, Baiden was Executive Vice President of Sales, Marketing, and Business Development at Avella Specialty Pharmacy (Avella), where he grew annual revenues over 1000 percent. During Baiden’s 13 years at Avella, he implemented successful sales strategies at all levels of engagement. He also served in various roles for prominent pharmaceutical sales companies, including MedImmune, Serono, and Daiichi and Sanofi. Baiden received his undergraduate degree from The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.

About Heritage Health Solutions, Inc.

Headquartered in Coppell, Texas, Heritage Health Solutions, Inc. is a premier provider of integrated health care management to correctional, public sector, and commercial entities. Heritage meets the demands of an ever-changing health care landscape by providing our clients with comprehensive, customized solutions. We manage costs, utilization, and quality, which leads to optimal health care outcomes. For more information about Heritage, please visit us at

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The Nixon Precedent: Lawyer, author reviews book by Citadel Intelligence professor https://today.citadel.edu/the-nixon-precedent-lawyer-author-reviews-book-by-citadel-intelligence-professor/ Mon, 15 Feb 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22122 Melissa Graves, Ph.D., arranged the Watergate panel held at The Citadel as part of the Intelligence and Cybersecurity conference in Feb 2020.]]>

Photo: Melissa Graves, Ph.D. (left) arranged the Watergate panel, held on The Citadel campus in February 2020 as part of the Department of Intelligence and Cybersecurity’s two-day conference. (Seated left to right: Melissa Graves, Ph.D., John Mindermann, John Clynick, Paul Magallanes, Daniel Mahan and Angelo Lano.)

As seen in Washington Decoded, by James Robenalt

Nixon’s FBI: Hoover, Watergate, and a Bureau in Crisis
Melissa Graves
Lynne Rienner Publishers. 246 pp. $85

Exactly one thousand twenty-five words comprise Article II of the Constitution, and most of them are devoted to how to select a president of the United States.

The two hundred or so left over describe a president’s substantive powers. That the key phrase—“executive power shall be vested in the president of the United States”—has been interpreted generously is an understatement. It has become the basis for vast power since it confers unenumerated powers. By contrast, Article I, which governs the Congress, only vests all legislative powers “granted herein”—a limiting qualifier.

Add sweeping clauses like “commander in chief,” and “he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed,” and you arrive at the dilemma posed in Melissa Graves’s new book, Nixon’s FBI, Hoover, Watergate, and a Bureau in Crisis. What are the limits of a president’s control over federal law enforcement, especially when the crimes at issue may involve the president in either his/her private or elected capacity? This issue, in turn, raises the question of the government’s power to surveil its citizens, including citizens who may be considered political dissidents and not seditious criminals. That question is at the heart of the present danger posed by domestic extremists or terrorists who have grown exponentially during the Trump administration.

This makes Nixon’s FBI an important read.

Melissa Graves, Ph.D.

An assistant professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel, Melissa Graves started out to write about the fundamental conflict between the FBI’s duties, as the premier federal investigative agency, and the fact that it answers to the president while also investigating said president from time to time. Her focus was the Nixon administration, when this conflict was in sharper relief, owing to the Watergate scandal, than at any other time save for the past four years. Eventually her research encompassed the courageous FBI agents who pursued the Watergate investigation despite all the headwinds from higher-ups to constrict the search for the truth—including, as it turned out, a higher-up named Richard M. Nixon. Special agents like Angelo Lano, John Mindermann, Daniel Mahan, Paul Magallanes, and John Clynick are profiled in an important chapter about the investigation of the break-in by the FBI’s Washington Field Office. These agents are depicted, correctly,  as being many steps ahead of Washington Post journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. While Woodward and Bernstein are celebrated in history as the “intrepid” reporters who cracked the Watergate case, in reality it was the hard work of these FBI agents who simply would not be waylaid.

But the wider context of the Watergate investigation, naturally, dominates the book. In that ambitious endeavor she sought to explore the issue of presidential control over law enforcement, and the concern that unlimited presidential power could lead to a surveillance state where political speech and thought become crimes against the state. Concern over government overreach goes all the way back to the founding of the nation as shown through the passage of the Bill of Rights, which included the First Amendment rights of free speech, a free press, freedom of religion and assembly, and the right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures as delineated in the Fourth Amendment.

These rights, though guaranteed, have been tested continuously in American life, almost always under the banner of national security, which is seen as the province of the president. During Watergate, the Vietnam war provided the pretext for political repression not only of real bomb throwers but true dissenters. What Graves shows is that a president inclined to authoritarianism and corruption will manipulate weak actors around him to use law enforcement to attack political opponents in the name of national security.

Graves rightly points to Tom Huston as her first example. Huston, a low-level White House lawyer, was asked to create a coalition of intelligence-gathering agencies to address the anti-war violence of students and Black activists who were rising in urban areas because of abhorrent living conditions and repressive police power. While this kind of federal intelligence-sharing was exactly what happened following 9/11 and the passage of the Patriot Act, the tactics envisioned by the Huston plan were much more invasive and dubious constitutionally, involving “black bag” jobs, wiretaps, and bugs. The plan also touched off internal fights in the Nixon administration. FBI director J. Edgar Hoover initially approved and then withdrew his sanction of the Huston plan, likely because he did not want to share such powers with rival agencies like the CIA. Attorney General John Mitchell likewise got his nose out of joint because he wasn’t informed of the effort until after most of the meetings had already taken place.

This tension exacerbated relations between an aging Hoover and Nixon. According to Graves, Hoover was taking heat in the press for domestic intelligence-gathering that had the approval of the Nixon administration, but the White House was not backing up the director in public. The alienation grew to a point where Nixon spent hours of his time trying to figure out how to get Hoover to resign after more than forty years as director. Nixon failed to pull the plug out of fear of repercussions in the 1972 elections. But he had every intention of removing Hoover if and when he was re-elected to a second term.

Initially it appeared as if Hoover had done Nixon somewhat of a favor by dying in early May 1972, weeks before the Watergate break-ins. Nixon looked for a weak character to replace Hoover, one who he imagined he could easily manipulate. There was no weaker actor than L. Patrick Gray, who had never served in any capacity in the Bureau. Gray was a middling lawyer at the Department of Justice with a military background, a crew-cut former Navy officer who would cheerfully follow orders while trying to appear to be in control. His appointment as acting director, as with everything in this story, sparked a surreptitious revolt by longtime Hoover acolyte W. Mark Felt, who thought he had been denied his rightful anointing as the next director. Felt undertook to subvert Gray’s tenure by leaking details about the Watergate investigation to Time magazine and The Washington Post, making it seem to Nixon that Gray could not control the FBI.

After his landslide victory in November 1972, Nixon miscalculated and sent Gray’s name to the Senate for confirmation in February 1973. The hearings, a preview of the Watergate hearings to come, were a complete disaster. Gray was not a facile man. He tried to show the Senate that he was his own man and in the process threw White House counsel John Dean under the bus. He testified that he had kept Dean informed of the Watergate investigation, provided FBI files to him, and allowed him to sit in on FBI interviews of officials in the White House, such as Charles Colson. Behind the scenes, Nixon fumed, eventually plotting to destroy Gray’s credibility with planted questions through a friendly senator on the Senate Judiciary Committee.

While Graves has it right about Gray’s incompetence, a deeper dive into the White House tapes from the time would have added substance and color to her narrative. Chief domestic advisor John Ehrlichman, for example, famously quipped to John Dean that Nixon should let Gray “twist slowly, slowly in the wind” after Gray had implicated the White House in what appeared to be a cover-up. Even worse, when Dean broke ranks, one tape from the evening of 15 April 1973, shows Gray telling Ehrlichman that he intended to lie if asked about receiving files given to him by Dean and Ehrlichman early in the investigation. The files were from Howard Hunt’s safe in the Executive Office Building, and consisted of political sabotage materials that were highly embarrassing, but had nothing to do directly with the Watergate break-in per se. Gray had been given the files so that the White House could say that everything in Hunt’s safe had been handed over to the FBI. Yet later, without being specifically asked to do so, Gray had destroyed the files while burning Christmas wrappings.

Graves’s final chapter is also a good start but could have profited from a more complete and nuanced discussion of executive power and national security. She points out that post-Watergate reforms and the Church Committee’s review of FBI and CIA secret operations almost led to an FBI charter that would have defined and limited domestic spying by the FBI. This leaves the reader wondering what the answers may be when the nation confronts a lawless president, or when the intelligence agencies, engaged in combating foreign or domestic terrorism, begin to gather information about everyday citizens via clandestine surveillance.

Graves also might have analyzed the 16-page memo written by William Barr about the Mueller investigation in June 2018, which Barr composed to burnish his credentials in his quest to return as attorney general. In that memo, Barr argued that Trump’s request of FBI director James Comey to “let it go” when it came to then national security adviser Michael Flynn was a proper exercise of power by the president and not an obstruction of justice. Barr and other proto-authoritarians base such arguments on what they refer to as the “plenary law enforcement powers” granted the president by the Constitution, mainly the “take care” clause. This, Barr submitted, allows a president to supervise criminal investigations directly, including the firing of officials, without ever running afoul of the Constitution. The “unitary executive” theory favored by those like Barr is exactly the kind of unfettered authority Nixon believed he had, and sought to exercise, with respect to the Huston plan and in the effort to gum up the FBI’s Watergate probe. As Nixon himself succinctly described the theory in 1977 during an interview with British journalist David Frost, “when the president does it, that means that it is not illegal.”

History has much to teach us in these fraught days. It is good to have a book that reminds us of a time when law enforcement stood up to unconstitutional efforts and pursued justice without fear or favor.

James Robenalt is a lawyer and author of four nonfiction books, including January 1973: Watergate, Roe v Wade, Vietnam, and the Month That Changed America Forever. He is also a contributor to The Presidents and the Constitution, A Living History (ed. Ken Gormley). He has taught a Continuing Legal Education Course on Watergate with John Dean.

The FBI Watergate Panel, featuring Angelo Lano, Daniel Mahan, John Clynick, Paul Magallanes, and John Mindermann, moderated by Assistant Professor Melissa Graves, takes place during the 2020 Citadel Intelligence Ethics Conference in Mark Clark Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, February 12, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)
Dr. Melissa Graves, John Mindermann, John Clynick, Paul Magallanes, Daniel Mahan and Angelo Lano at the Watergate panel held on The Citadel campus in February 2020.
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Citadel cadets tour the International African American Museum site https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-cadets-tour-the-international-african-american-museum-site/ Thu, 04 Feb 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21832 Former mayor Joe Riley and Citadel cadets in his class toured the International African American Museum currently under construction.]]>

Photo: Former Mayor of Charleston and current Citadel professor, Joe Riley, ’64, speaking to his class as they tour the International African American Museum construction.

As seen on WCSC – Live 5 News, by Ann McGill

Cadets studying American history at The Citadel will experience history in the making. To kick off recognition of Black History Month at the military college of South Carolina, they will tour the International African American Museum currently under construction in Charleston.

The students are enrolled in the spring semester course titled, “The Why and the How: The Making of the International African American Museum.”

The instructor is Joseph Riley. The former Charleston mayor is a graduate of the class of 1964, and now serves in the role of professor of American Government and Public Policy at his alma mater.

Riley will tag team with history professor Kerry Taylor, Ph.D., who specializes in African American history. Taylor is director of the Charleston Oral History program at The Citadel.

“I believe for the students this will be a most meaningful college experience, for they will study a project that is under construction and learn much about our nation’s long-hidden history,” Riley said in a statement from the school.

“Upon graduation, in years to come, I have no doubt the museum will be part of their return visits to Charleston.”

The IAAM is located near the South Carolina Aquarium along the Charleston Harbor, and is set to open in 2022.

According to the IAAM website, “This museum is about a journey that began centuries ago in Africa, and still continues. It is about the journey of millions of Africans, captured and forced across the Atlantic in the grueling and inhumane Middle Passage, who arrived at Gadsden’s Wharf in Charleston, South Carolina and other ports in the Atlantic World. Their labor, resistance and ingenuity and that of their descendants shaped every aspect of our world.”

A statement released by the school describes the goal of the class. This collaborative course, while offering Citadel cadets the unique opportunity to learn African American history through the establishment of the IAAM, is as much a study of history as it is a study of the making of history, drawing additionally on the disciplines of marketing, finance, architecture and design, civil engineering, public policy, and project management.

Riley and Taylor are planning a second visit to the museum later in the semester.

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Class of ’21 cadet studying in Canada through prestigious Fulbright Killam Fellowship https://today.citadel.edu/class-of-21-cadet-studying-in-canada-through-prestigious-fulbright-killam-fellowship/ Tue, 02 Feb 2021 21:00:12 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21761 Cadet Gomes senior yearbook photo The Citadel '21Cadet Gomes senior yearbook photo The Citadel '21The Citadel Honors Program cadet is studying at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, during the spring semester through a Fulbright Canada Killam Scholarship.]]> Cadet Gomes senior yearbook photo The Citadel '21Cadet Gomes senior yearbook photo The Citadel '21

Cadet Thomas Gomes, a member of The Citadel Class of 2021, is finishing his college career with a distinction earned by few. The Citadel Honors Program cadet is studying at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, during the spring semester through a Fulbright Canada Killam Scholarship. It is provided by the Foundation for Educational Exchange Between Canada and the United States of America.

“This fellowship affords me the time to conduct research as I finish both my biology and psychology majors,” said Gomes in an emailed message. “Additionally, this opportunity allows me to be a cultural ambassador for The Citadel and to gain knowledge about Alberta and the Canadian healthcare system.”

Gomes, who is from Indian Land, South Carolina, hopes to attend medical school and eventually open a medical practice with his father.

“Cadet Gomes embodies principled leadership, honor, duty, and respect, said  Lloyd “Chip” Taylor, Ph.D., head of The Citadel Department of Psychology and former Fulbright Fellowship Distinguished Chair in Brain Science and Family Wellness at the University of Calgary. “The fact that he was awarded the prestigious Fulbright Canada Killam Fellowship, which is incredibly competitive, comes as no surprise to those of us who have had the pleasure to teach him during his time at The Citadel.”

Gomes applied for the fellowship after learning about it from Taylor. The Killam Fellowships Program provides an opportunity for exceptional undergraduate students from universities in Canada and the United States to spend either one semester or a full academic year as an exchange student in the other country, according to the website.

“Being able to explore the beauty of Canada and to ski as much as possible is also a great benefit of this opportunity,” Gomes said.

During his cadet career, Thomas has been awarded both the Gold Star Award and the President’s Award for outstanding performance in academics, physical fitness as well as military duties.

In the spirit of the college’s servant-leader mantra, Gomes says he has worked to spread cultural understanding in multiple South American Countries. In Brazil, Thomas served as a teacher’s assistant, helping to increase foreign English proficiency and helping with daily operations. In Peru, he volunteered at the Special Children of the Amazon school and conducted research on the biodiversity of the Tamshiyacu-Tahuayo reserve in the Amazon jungle. In his free time, Gomes serves as vice president of The Citadel Surf Club taking the group to outings on on Lowcountry beaches.

Gomes anticipates returning to Charleston join his classmates in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets for their Commencement ceremonies on May 9.

Applications for The Citadel Honors Program from prospective cadets for the Class of 2025 are currently being accepted by invitation only, issued as part of the applications process to those who might qualify. To learn more about The Citadel Honors Program, please visit the website here, or email Prof. Ragan at dragan@citadel.edu.

Cadet Thomas Gomes with his mother, Stephanie Gomes.
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Daily Herald: Department of Defense funds $1.465 million for cybersecurity education at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/daily-herald-department-of-defense-funds-1-465-million-for-cybersecurity-education-at-the-citadel/ Sun, 31 Jan 2021 19:00:45 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21711 The Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel CoatsThe Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats"There is a critical shortage of qualified cyber professionals within the Department of Defense, both military and civilian."]]> The Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel CoatsThe Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats

Photo above: Former Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats meets with cadets and students studying cyber security and intelligence at The Citadel in 2018.

As seen in Chicago Daily Herald

CHARLESTON, S.C., Jan. 26, 2021 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The Citadel and the nation’s five other Senior Military Colleges (SMC) are all developing aligned, Department of Defense Cybersecurity Institutes, funded by the federal government. The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute and the other SMC cyber institutes will address the critical national security need for a larger cybersecurity workforce.

The SMCs are federally appointed military colleges offering higher education combined with required military training in the form of Reserve Officers Training Corps Programs or ROTC. Unlike the Federal Services Academies such as the U.S. Air Force Academy, many graduates of SMCs go into military service, but it is not required. The Citadel is only one of two SMCs that continues to offer a full, 24/7 military structure for its on campus, undergraduate population.

Each of the SMCs was awarded approximately $1.5 million in 2020 to form pilot cyber institutes, intended to grow the number of highly trained cybersecurity professionals serving America. The funds, included in the 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act, are part of a $10 million Department of Defense appropriation to the National Security Agency (NSA) for the SMC-based institutes.

“There is a critical shortage of qualified cyber professionals within the Department of Defense, both military and civilian, “said Cyber and Computer Science professor Shankar Banik, Ph.D., a co-director of The Citadel Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies. “More than 500,000 cybersecurity jobs are open nationally. The objective of The Citadel Department of Defense Institute is to provide leaders who are experts in cybersecurity and have the skills and real world experience to join the cyber workforce immediately after graduation.

Banik says within The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute there is a new Cyber Leaders Development Program (CLDP). Each year, 20 cadets will be selected for CLDP and provided with stipends and specialized training. They can pursue a major in Cyber Operations, or a major in Computer Science, with a minor in Cybersecurity, or a major in Computer Science with a minor in Data Science.

“I am so pleased to partner with the Senior Military Colleges to initiate the Department of Defense Cyber Institute pilot program” said Diane M. Janosek, the commandant of NSA’s National Cryptologic School. “The Nation’s focus and investment in these six elite institutions is a key element in the expansion of the talent pipeline. These graduating cybersecurity professionals will go on to serve either on Active duty or in the National Guard or Reserves as service members in the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines or as Department of Defense civilians.”

Objectives of The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute:

1. Develop principled leaders with a cybersecurity skillset who’ll be able to join the cybersecurity workforce on “day one” after graduation
2. Establish a Cyber Lab to provide the type of training required by the Department of Defense
3. Organize cybersecurity summer camps for K-12 teachers and students, creating a pipeline for the cybersecurity workforce
4. Develop and organize cybersecurity boot camps for the South Carolina National Guard
5. Provide experiential learning opportunities to cadets through cyber competitions, internships and outreach activities
6. Encourage talented students to pursue academic programs in cybersecurity, with priority given to women and underrepresented minority students to increase the diversity in the cybersecurity workforce
7. Provide professional development opportunities for cyber faculty
8. Create cybersecurity awareness by organizing a Cybersecurity Day in the month of October (National Cybersecurity Awareness Month).

“With The Citadel’s mission laser-focused on building principled leaders, and with the significant investment by the Department of Defense, our partnership with the other Senior Military Colleges stands to return enormous gains as we prepare the next generation of outstanding graduates skilled in executing cyber defense,” said Darin T. Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean of the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics.

The Citadel has been designated as a National Center for Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education by the National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security since 2016.

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Department of Defense funds $1.465 million for cybersecurity education at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/department-of-defense-funds-1-465-million-for-cybersecurity-education-at-the-citadel/ Mon, 25 Jan 2021 19:00:37 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21580 The Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel CoatsThe Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats20 cadets selected annually for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute Photo above: Former Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats meets with cadets and students studying cyber security and]]> The Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel CoatsThe Citadel SY 18-19,Cyber Security Conference, Department of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats

20 cadets selected annually for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute

Photo above: Former Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats meets with cadets and students studying cyber security and intelligence at The Citadel in 2018.

The Citadel and the nation’s five other Senior Military Colleges (SMC) are all developing aligned, Department of Defense Cybersecurity Institutes, funded by the federal government. The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute and the other SMC cyber institutes will address the critical national security need for a larger cybersecurity workforce.

The SMCs are federally appointed military colleges offering higher education combined with required military training in the form of Reserve Officers Training Corps Programs or ROTC. Unlike the Federal Services Academies such as the U.S. Air Force Academy, many graduates of SMCs go into military service, but it is not required. The Citadel is only one of two SMCs that continues to offer a full, 24/7 military structure for its on campus, undergraduate population.

Each of the SMCs was awarded approximately $1.5 million in 2020 to form pilot cyber institutes, intended to grow the number of highly trained cybersecurity professionals serving America. The funds, included in the 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act, are part of a $10 million Department of Defense appropriation to the National Security Agency (NSA) for the SMC-based institutes.

Computer Networks class led by Professor Shankar M. Banik in Thompson Hall at The Citadel, February 11, 2020

“There is a critical shortage of qualified cyber professionals within the Department of Defense, both military and civilian, “said Cyber and Computer Science professor Shankar Banik, Ph.D., a co-director of The Citadel Center for Cyber, Intelligence and Security Studies. “More than 500,000 cybersecurity jobs are open nationally. The objective of The Citadel Department of Defense Institute is to provide leaders who are experts in cybersecurity and have the skills and real world experience to join the cyber workforce immediately after graduation.

Banik says within The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute there is a new Cyber Leaders Development Program (CLDP).  Each year, 20 cadets will be selected for CLDP and provided with stipends and specialized training. They can pursue a major in Cyber Operations, or a major in Computer Science, with a minor in Cybersecurity, or a major in Computer Science with a minor in Data Science.

“I am so pleased to partner with the Senior Military Colleges to initiate the Department of Defense Cyber Institute pilot program” said Diane M. Janosek, the commandant of NSA’s National Cryptologic School. “The Nation’s focus and investment in these six elite institutions is a key element in the expansion of the talent pipeline. These graduating cybersecurity professionals will go on to serve either on Active duty or in the National Guard or Reserves as service members in the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines or as Department of Defense civilians.”

Objectives of The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute:

  • Develop principled leaders with a cybersecurity skillset who’ll be able to join the cybersecurity workforce on “day one” after graduation
  • Establish a Cyber Lab to provide the type of training required by the Department of Defense
  • Organize cybersecurity summer camps for K-12 teachers and students, creating a pipeline for the cybersecurity workforce
  • Develop and organize cybersecurity boot camps for the South Carolina National Guard
  • Provide experiential learning opportunities to cadets through cyber competitions, internships and outreach activities
  • Encourage talented students to pursue academic programs in cybersecurity, with priority given to women and underrepresented minority students to increase the diversity in the cybersecurity workforce
  • Provide professional development opportunities for cyber faculty
  • Create cybersecurity awareness by organizing a Cybersecurity Day in the month of October (National Cybersecurity Awareness Month).

“With The Citadel’s mission laser-focused on building principled leaders, and with the significant investment by the Department of Defense, our partnership with the other Senior Military Colleges stands to return enormous gains as we prepare the next generation of outstanding graduates skilled in executing cyber defense,” said Darin T. Zimmerman, Ph.D., dean of the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics. 

The Citadel has been designated as a National Center for Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education by the National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security since 2016.

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#7 in America: The Citadel Intelligence and Security Studies bachelor’s degree https://today.citadel.edu/7-in-america-the-citadel-intelligence-and-security-studies-bachelors-degree/ Sat, 23 Jan 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21549 Security degree ranking logoSecurity degree ranking logoAll programs are ranked according to their cost, potential salary, and student satisfaction, using current information from IPEDS and Niche.]]> Security degree ranking logoSecurity degree ranking logo

As seen on Securitydegreehub.com

Individuals who are interested in pursuing an intelligence analysis career need to find a degree program that will offer them the skills they need to perform at the highest possible level. National security depends on how well the intelligence analysts do their job. With that being said, intelligence analysis career opportunities are available to those who meet or exceed the expectations that have been set for them. Being able to work in this highly stressful environment requires dedication to detail and a firm resolve to protect our country from any type of threat.

A career in intelligence analysis can lead to opportunities with employment opportunities with private security agencies as well. These private security agencies formulate risk analysis strategies that are beneficial to American companies who have vested financial interests in overseas markets.

Ranking the Best Intelligence Analysis Bachelor’s Degree Programs

Students who are considering a career in intelligence analysis want to know their degree will pay off. That’s why Security Degree Hub editors focuses their rankings on accredited, reputable colleges and universities. All programs are ranked according to their cost, potential salary, and student satisfaction, using current information from IPEDS and Niche.

1. Texas A&M University

The Bush School of Government & Public Service at Texas A&M University offers a practitioner-based learning methodology with its bachelor’s degree in Intelligence as an Instrument of Statecraft. Texas A&M University’s best degrees for intelligence analysis include classes in the art of counterintelligence, national security law, terrorism in today’s world, human intelligence, and advanced analytical tradecraft, to name a few. More than 275 students have graduated from Texas A&M’s intelligence studies degree programs.

Texas A&M University (A&M) was established in 1876 as a land grant school. Texas A&M University is also a sea-grant and space-grant university with a student enrollment that nears 70,000 students – the largest student body in the nation. Texas A&M University holds the distinction of being the only institution of higher education in Texas that has three grant designations – Sea, Space, and Land.

Program: Intelligence Studies

2. James Madison University

James Madison University offers a BS in Intelligence Analysis (IA) that is considered among Virginia’s best degrees for intelligence analysis. James Madison University’s undergraduate degree in intelligence analysis requires the completion of 120 semester units by degree candidates to graduate. The IA curriculum includes 48 semester hours of foundational and core classes that offer the exploration of interdisciplinary topics in the fields of philosophy, business, technology, political science, and technology, among others. Students graduate from James Madison University’s s intelligence analysis degrees to find rewarding careers as security analysis, political analysts, economic analysts, and diplomatic analysts, among others.

James Madison University (Madison) was established as an all-women’s teacher’s school in 1908 and named to honor to honor the fourth United States president. The school’s campus in the Shenandoah Valley is home to approximately 22,550 students. James Madison University became a coeducational school in the mid 1960s.

Program: BS in Intelligence Analysis

3. Bellevue University

Bellevue University offers a BS in Intelligence and Security Studies that requires students to complete a total of 127 semester units to graduate, of which the major in intelligence requires 36 major classes plus 54 credits of electives. Bellevue University’s best degrees for intelligence analysis includes classes in ethical controversies in security & intelligence, introduction to geostrategy, essentials in strategic thought, and radical religion and political extremism, to name a few. Students can opt for a sub=specialization in comparative politics and international relations.

Bellevue University (BU) was founded in 1966 but withdrew rapid growth to become the state’s fourth-largest school in about a decade. Currently, Bellevue University’s suburban campus (and online platform) is home to about 10,250 students. Bellevue University also operates a professional center in nearby Omaha.

Program: BS in Intelligence and Security Studies

4. Arizona State University

Arizona State University offers one of Arizona’s best degrees for intelligence analysis with its Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) in Intelligence & Information Operations. Arizona State University’s baccalaureate degree in intelligence analysis Degree candidates can choose from three academic emphases – information warfare, law enforcement intelligence, and operational intelligence. Classes for ASU’s undergraduate degree in intelligence include counterintelligence, cyberwar and terror, advanced analytics for security operations, and cyber investigations & forensics, among others. Arizona State University is a designated Defense Intelligence Agency center of Excellence (IC-CAE).

Arizona State University was established in 1885 as a research institution of higher education. The multiple campuses operated by Arizona State University are home to 89,750 students. Arizona State University offers more than 700-degree options for undergraduate and graduate students through the university’s seventeen schools.

Program: Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) in Intelligence & Information Operations

5. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University offers one of the best degrees for intelligence analysis with its BS in Global Security & Intelligence Studies (GSIS). Students enrolled in Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s baccalaureate degree in intelligence offers three academic tracks from which to select – the security operations management track, the integrated security & intelligence track, and the Chinese Track where student spend a summer in China during their sophomore and junior years. This undergraduate intelligence degree program requires students to complete 122 semester credits to graduate.

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is a multi-campus institution of higher education that specializes in aerospace and aviation studies. Founded in 1926, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s campuses in Arizona and Florida serve approximately 33,550 students. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University holds the distinction of being the largest accredited school that specializes in aerospace and aviation education.

Program: BS in Global Security & Intelligence Studies

6. George Washington University

George Washington University offers one of the best degrees for intelligence analysis with its Homeland Security Bachelor’s completion program. George Washington University’s baccalaureate degree in intelligence analysis offers unique learning experiences using cutting-edge technology and training methods. Students explore the logical flow between the receipt of threats, the analysis, and the formulation of an appropriate response. Students graduate from GWU’s degree program with the skills and abilities required to successfully negotiate a career in intelligence working domestically or abroad. More than 60 percent of undergraduate students complete internships while studying at George Washington University.

George Washington University was established as Columbian College in 1821 by a congressional act. More than 27,050 students (from all fifty states and more than 125 countries) attend classes vying for degrees provided by the university’s ten colleges/schools. George Washington University has been recognized among the top schools for internship opportunities.

Program: Homeland Security Bachelor’s Completion

7. The Citadel

The Citadel offers a BA in Intelligence and Security Studies (ISS) that is among the best degrees for intelligence analysis. Students who have already complete at least 24 semester credits may apply for this completion degree program, which can be completed entirely online. Students explore the many aspects of global and national threats present to US security forces while employing tactical and strategic analysis.

The Citadel (full name The Military College of South Carolina)l was established as a senior military college in 1842 by the state’s legislative body. Citadel’s campus in Charleston is home to approximately 3,550 students. The Citadel is ranked among the best colleges for veterans. The student body at the Citadel is recognized as one of the biggest uniformed bodies in the nation.

Program: BA in Intelligence and Security Studies

8. American Military University

American Military University offers one of the best degrees for intelligence analysis that can be completed entirely online. American Military University’s BA in Intelligence Studies requires degree candidates to complete 120 semester credits, of which American Military University accepts up to 90 eligible transfer credits. AMU offers students a variety of concentrations in this undergraduate degree program in Asian Studies, Terrorism Studies, Counter and criminal Intelligence, Middle East Studies, Cyber studies, Latin America, General, Geospatial Intelligence, and Intelligence analysis, Collection and Operations. Students complete the degree with a senior seminar in intelligence studies. Students can enroll in this degree program throughout the year with available dates each month.

American Military University is a for-profit distance learning school that is owned by American Public Education Inc. The university serves approximately 46,350 students. American Military University offers online degree programs but maintains administrative offices in Charles Town, WV.

Program: BA in Intelligence Studies

9. Saint Louis University

Saint Louis University offers a BS in Security & Strategic Intelligence that is considered among the Midwest’s best degrees for intelligence analysis. Saint Louis University’s undergraduate degree in intelligence analysis offers students three academic emphases – global Corporate Security, Business Continuity, and Strategic Intelligence. Saint Louis University offers reduced tuition rates for veterans and active-duty military members. Classes for this degree from Saint Louis University include cybersecurity principles, workplace ethics, database analysis, analytics in security and intelligence, cyber threats & defense, threat, and risk assessment, and fundamentals of computer forensics.

Saint Louis University was established as a private academy in 1818. The school maintains two campuses, one in Saint Louis and another in Madrid. Saint Louis University is recognized as the oldest higher learning institution that is situated to the west of the Mississippi River.

Program: BS in Security & Strategic Intelligence

10. Sam Houston State University

Sam Houston State University offers two of the best degrees for intelligence analysis in Texas, offering both a BA or a BS in Security Studies. The primary difference between the two intelligence analysis degrees is the BA’s requirement to complete additional credit hours in a foreign language of their choice. Classes for this major in security studies include border security, introduction to cybersecurity, global terrorism, transportation security, homeland security, public health in homeland security, and water security, to name a few. This undergraduate degree from Sam Houston State University can be completed as a hybrid program or on-campus.

Sam Houston State University (Sam Houston) was established to train teachers in 1879. The college-town campus in Huntsville is home to approximate 21,150 students. Sam Houston State University is considered the third oldest of all public universities and colleges in Texas.

Program: BA or a BS in Security Studies

See the full listing here.

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