Humanities & Social Sciences – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 09 Jun 2022 17:58:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Humanities & Social Sciences – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 America’s Intelligence Community gains 85 new professionals from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets https://today.citadel.edu/americas-intelligence-community-gains-85-new-professionals-from-the-south-carolina-corps-of-cadets/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 17:58:01 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32410 Intelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelIntelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelThe Class of 2022 includes 85 cadets who studied Intelligence and Security Studies. Before graduation, some shared their career goals and advice for others considering The Citadel. ]]> Intelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelIntelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel

Photo: Intelligence and Security Studies professor Lt. Col. Michael Brady, USA (Ret.), ’90, former Director, Presidential Emergency Operations Center in the White House (2001 – 2002), leading a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel in 2019.

The Citadel ignites careers for mission-driven, global problem solvers

As the number and types of positions within the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) continue to expand, those earning degrees from The Citadel are in high demand. For decades, The Citadel has been known by America’s IC leaders as a top producer of young professionals for intelligence roles.

In 2017, The Citadel formalized this career pathway, founding the first Department of Intelligence and Security Studies and corresponding undergraduate degree in South Carolina. Now it’s one of the most in-demand majors at The Citadel. There are 18 organizations in the IC, and Citadel alumni are serving in those agencies as intelligence analysists; inspection, investigation and compliance professionals; field agents and supervisors; cybersecurity officers; business and finance experts; facilities design; set up and logistic experts; or visual information specialists, to name just some of the many intelligence job functions.

The Class of 2022 includes 85 cadets who studied Intelligence and Security Studies. Below, some of them share thoughts about their career goals along with advice for younger students considering studying intelligence at The Citadel.

Joshua Babcock, South Carolina Highway Patrol Academy
Hometown: Johnson City, New York

Joshua Babcock, The Citadel Class of 2022

As a highway patrol officer, I will provide equitable service and protection, and uphold the laws of the constitutions of the United States and the state of South Carolina in order to promote a safe and secure environment for the public.

After gaining professional experience with the South Carolina Highway Patrol, I plan on using my degree to join an intelligence organization.

I believe the best reason to attend The Citadel is that it will forge you into a better leader. It will make you more mature, confident, physically fit and will challenge you to become a better version of yourself that you may have never thought was possible.”

2nd Lt. Christian Blase, U.S. Army
Hometown: North Augusta, South Carolina

2nd Lt. Christian Blase, The Citadel Class of 2022

Preparing physically before you arrive at The Citadel for knob year is very important.

Come focused on wanting to learn and grow as a leader.

The structure you follow day to day as a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets will help if you choose to apply it to your daily life later.

2nd Lt. Gregory Chaves, U.S. Marine Corps, intelligence officer
Hometown: Los Angeles

The Citadel helped me focus on learning and thinking for myself. The friendships and experiences of cadet life help us all grow, preparing us to meet our goals.

Ensign Collin Gleco, U.S. Navy, submarine officer
Hometown: Shavertown, Pennsylvania

Collin Gleco, The Citadel Class of 2022

Double major: Spanish, Political Science, minor in Intelligence and Security Studies.

The Citadel provided the opportunity to build my leadership philosophy before being commissioned as an officer in the Navy. The ROTC programs are excellent.

In high school, I would never have believed that I would attend The Citadel, become a double major, first sergeant, company commander and an ensign in the Navy.

Jarett King, Department of Defense
Hometown: Sumter, South Carolina

When I was academically accepted to The Citadel, I was elated. I found out afterwards about the height/weight requirement for cadets and was worried that I would not be granted admission. During my senior year of high school, I reflected on what was important to me and why I wanted to attend The Citadel. That inspired me to lose 100 pounds before becoming a knob.

Attending The Citadel was probably one of the best decisions I’ve ever made in my life. The Citadel will teach you what type of follower you wish to be, what type of leader you wish to be. It will help you focus on your goals and aspirations and it will provide a sense of comradery that cannot be rivaled.

2nd Lt. Angelea Lance, U.S. Army, military intelligence officer
Hometown: Fort Worth, Texas

My goals are to stay in the Army past my scholarship obligation and fulfill my passion of serving others and my nation in the best way possible.

For those considering attending The Citadel, know that it creates a solid foundation for your future by challenging you to be the best you can be.

2nd. Lt. David McBain, U.S. Army Aviation Center, pilot
Hometown: Damascus, Maryland

The best reason to attend The Citadel is the structure of the Corps and the many requirements that teach time management, plus the focus on academics afforded to the cadets.

Phillip Quinn, Department of Defense
Hometown: Highland Park, Texas

Double major: Intelligence and Security Studies, Political Science, minor in Cybersecurity.

I selected The Citadel to push myself.

Those deciding to come here must arrive knowing knowing you need to just keep your head down and enjoy the grind. You can’t make it at The Citadel alone. That’s the whole point of being in the Corps. You must work together with your classmates — that’s what makes the difference.

2nd Lt. Steven Reisinger, U.S. Marine Corps cyber officer, Quantico, Virginia
Hometown: Millerton, Pennsylvania

The Citadel sets you apart from your future competition in life. The interpersonal skills and ethics you learn from your time here transform you into the kind of leader this country so desperately needs.

And — the many friends you make here will become family for life.

Learning Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel

There are numerous ways to learn Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. There is a South Carolina Corps of Cadets program and a non-cadet online undergraduate program which includes veteran and active duty students.

There are five areas of concentration for undergraduates to select when majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. They include:

  • Business Intelligence
  • Chinese Area Studies
  • Counterterrorism
  • General Intelligence
  • Military Intelligence

There is also an option for cadets and students to use their tuition from one semester to study in Washington, D.C., through The Citadel in DC program.

The Citadel Graduate College offers a (non-cadet) Master of Arts in intelligence and Security Studies. There are close to 60 students in that program, learning online, with the options of selecting concentrations in Cybersecurity or Leadership. The Class of 2022 included 17 master’s level graduates.

For more information about Intelligence and Security Studies programs at The Citadel and how to apply, visit this webpage, email intell@citdel.edu.

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Citadel professor co-organizing conference marking 50th anniversary of Watergate https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-professor-co-organizing-conference-marking-50th-anniversary-of-watergate/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 17:28:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32471 Registration is now open for the free, online conference that will allow Watergate experts to explore some of the scandal's lingering mysteries.]]>

Photo: The Watergate Hotel complex in 1985 (Courtesy: National Archives)

Registration now open for free, online conference

The 50th anniversary of the Watergate break in, one of the most well-known political scandals in American history, will be on Friday, June 17.

The week before that, Melissa Graves, Ph.D., from The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, and Shane O’Sullivan, Ph.D., from Kingston School of Art in London, will convene a free, two-day virtual conference to reflect on the lasting impact Watergate had on American politics and culture.

The conference will be held on Thursday, June 9, and Friday, June 10, beginning at 10 a.m. on both days.

Much of Graves’s research is focused on Watergate, including a book on the FBI’s response. In Feb. 2020, she organized a historic panel, which reunited the FBI’s lead investigators for Watergate for the first time since the scandal.

“Watergate is a great example showing the importance and expertise of the intelligence community,” said Graves. “Though many Americans — and people around the world, for that matter — know of Watergate, fewer know about the fascinating stories of the case’s investigators. Through this conference, we will bring together experts who will explain the myths, the investigation, the results and much more.”

Five decades after it happened, and despite the amount written about the scandal, many mysteries from the case remain. The conference, titled “The Watergate Break-in: 50 Years Later,” will allow experts to explore some of those questions.

The surviving investigators and prosecutors still can’t understand why the burglars entered DNC headquarters in the early morning hours of June 17, 1972; or how the experienced intelligence operatives in the break-in team made such elementary mistakes, resulting in their arrests and President Nixon’s resignation two years later.

from “The Watergate Break-in: 50 Years Later” conference website

Speakers at the conference will include historians, academics, as well as Watergate prosecutors and investigators. The full program can be found here.

The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies is one of the largest and fastest-growing on campus, offering degrees to cadet and non-cadet undergraduates, as well as graduate students.

The online conference is free to attend. Click here to register.

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Advancing careers: certificates in intelligence analysis https://today.citadel.edu/advancing-careers-certificates-in-intelligence-analysis/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 17:40:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31812 woman on computerwoman on computerStudents in the Intelligence and Security Studies online program come from all over the country with a variety of backgrounds.]]> woman on computerwoman on computer

Identifying threats to the U.S.

By Barry Waldman for The Lowcountry Graduate Center

A young woman with a bachelor’s degree in the social sciences decided early in her career that what she really wanted to do was work in intelligence analysis for the federal government.

Intelligence analysis is the process by which information is collected on a potential enemy and analyzed to understand current operations, predict their behavior and determine any threats they may pose.

Courses completely online

The Citadel graduate certificate program in Intelligence Analysis is a five-course, asynchronous online program that introduces students to intelligence analysis concepts, applicable management principles, policy analysis, critical thinking and enhanced critical leadership skills necessary to successfully address security and intelligence challenges facing the United States.

By its nature, it is conducive to working professionals and military service member to pursue a graduate certificate without interrupting their careers.

As the Military College of South Carolina, The Citadel is uniquely positioned to offer this program, which serves for most students as a stepping stone to the full master’s degree program in intelligence analysis. With a certificate, a master’s degree student is nearly halfway through the curriculum.

All certificate students take the three core courses – Introduction to Intelligence, Intelligence Research and Analysis, and Intelligence Theory Application. A long list of electives provide context for the analysis techniques learned, in courses like Topics in Homeland Security, European History, Evolution of Military Leadership Thought, International Political Theory, and Russian Active Measures, to name just a sampling.

Dipping toes into academia

Larry Valero, Ph.D., head of The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, says most students complete the certificate program in two or three semesters, but they have a couple of years to do so. Many students are working professionals in mid-career who haven’t attended college for years and need to dip their toes in academia before committing to a full master’s degree program. Once they have established their ability to juggle work, family and the rigors of graduate school coursework, most go on for the full master’s.

Students in the program come from all over the country with a variety of backgrounds, Valero said. Some are serving members of the armed forces, first responders like police officers and firefighters, some work in Homeland Security. Others work in completely unrelated fields and have no intelligence background whatsoever but are interested in a career transition.

Putin and Intelligence Analysis

Events today involving Russia and its western neighbors, and the intelligence community’s need to understand Vladimir Putin’s motivations and incentives, are testament to the urgency of intelligence analysis. The future of Eastern Europe could be at stake.

“Our field is very interdisciplinary, running the gamut of politics, people, and technology,” Valero said. It is so topical and timely, there is no limit to what can be applied to the field. We offer that additional background that analysts may need to know now and in the future.”

For more information on studying Intelligence and Security Studies with The Citadel email intel@citadel.edu.

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The Citadel faculty serving as expert resources on Ukraine and many trending issues https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-faculty-serving-as-expert-resources-on-ukraine-and-many-trending-issues/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 21:17:17 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31308 Photo: Dr. Jeffrey Rogg, a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, during an interview with WCSC-TV on Wednesday, March 16. Faculty answers call to contribute from media,]]>

Photo: Dr. Jeffrey Rogg, a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, during an interview with WCSC-TV on Wednesday, March 16.

Faculty answers call to contribute from media, community

Many of those working to fulfill the mission to educate and develop principled leaders at The Citadel, regularly demonstrate their own leadership by serving as contributing experts for media reports and community interests.

Members of the college’s five schools are often called upon for their insight expertise in a variety of fields. Jeffrey Rogg, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies within the School of Humanities and Social Science is just one of many examples of the relevant and insightful expertise found on campus.

As the third week of the Russian invasion of Ukraine came to a close, Rogg spoke with WCSC-TV, the local CBS affiliate, to help viewers in the Lowcountry understand more about the war and what it could mean for the United States.

When asked about the motives behind the invasion, Rogg answered: “From Vladimir Putin’s view, he believes that the greatest tragedy to befall modern Russia was the collapse of the Soviet Union. Because of that, he’s been intent on not just restoring the Soviet Union or even the Russian Empire, but also the pride and the power of Russia.”

To see more of the coverage from Rogg’s interview with Live 5 News, click here.

“One of the many strengths of an education at The Citadel is the access to experts who can put critical global events – such as Russia’s war in Ukraine – into a wider context,” said Brian Madison Jones, Ph.D., dean of The Citadel’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences. “As the Military College of South Carolina, we’re uniquely positioned to help our cadets, students and community understand what is currently happening and what it means.”

Throughout multiple newscasts, Rogg discussed the historical context for the invasion, what a no-fly zone would entail, how the war could affect the American economy and a range of other topics.

“Within the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, professors from the Departments of Intelligence and Security Studies, Political Science and History, including military history, are studying these events in real time for use in the classroom and offering expert insight and analysis to help the next generation of leaders understand and address the great challenges of today and tomorrow,” Jones said.

Other examples of The Citadel faculty in the news

Shankar Banik, Ph.D.
Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences – Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics

South Carolina National Guard attends Cyber Boot Camp at The Citadel
DVIDS

Conference series helps Army identify U.S. infrastructure risks
The Watch

Hee Yoon Kwon, Ph.D.
Department of Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Economics – Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

The continuing supply chain saga
South Carolina Public Radio

Side effects of pipeline shutdown linger in Lowcountry
WCIV – ABC News 4

David Preston, Ph.D.
Department of History – School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Citadel professor curates new perspectives on Revolutionary War
Moultrie News

When young George Washington started a war
Smithsonian Magazine

John Weinstein, Ph.D.
Department of Biology – Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics

Tires: The plastic polluter you never thought about
National Geographic

Citadel experiment will analyze how PPE degrades in coastal environments
The Post and Courier

John Zardus, Ph.D.
Department of Biology – Zucker Family School of Science and Mathematics

Some barnacles can more around to improve feeding position
The Scientist

For information about joining the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, click here.

To learn more about non-cadet undergraduate and graduate programs offered by The Citadel, click here.

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Getting to know Sergeant First Class Kellin J. Varela, a Women’s History Month feature https://today.citadel.edu/getting-to-know-sergeant-first-class-kellin-j-varela-a-womens-history-month-feature/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 17:41:12 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31237 "As a first-generation Hispanic, I was blessed to receive my American citizenship through the United States Army."]]>

By Cadet Samantha Walton, Regimental Public Affairs Officer, Class of 2022

As a cadet attending The Citadel on contract with the U.S. Army, I spend a great deal of time with the Army ROTC Palmetto Battalion on campus and the active duty professionals there who lead us. I wanted to do an interview with someone in our detachment for Women’s History Month, and I selected Sergeant First Class Kellin J. Varela.

SFC Varela is a native of El Progreso Yoro, Honduras, but has spent much of her life living in the United States. She entered the Army in September 2005, attending Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, where she earned the distinct honor of being a Human Resource Specialist (42A).

SW: What made you want to join the military?

SFC Varela: The reason I joined the military was based on the opportunities for education. During my time in the military, I have received my Associate of Science in Criminal Justice, Bachelor of Science Interdisciplinary Studies and am three classes away from completing a Master of Arts Degree in Human Services Counseling in Criminal Justice.

As a first-generation Hispanic, I was blessed to receive my American citizenship through the United States Army. My number one choice was the United States Marine Corps, but I was impatient to leave home after high school graduation so I joined the United States Army instead as to not have to wait. Also, through the Army I’ve been blessed to travel the world, which was not an opportunity I have had before.

SW: What powerful female figure has inspired you?

SFC Varela: I believe she is retired from military service now, but Tonja Hill was First Sergeant Hill, she was my inspiration as a female role model. As a young soldier, she made me the leader that I am. 1SG Hill would always say, “pay it forward,” so I did. As a young soldier, I had terrible leadership skills, but she changed that. I adhered to the creed that “all soldiers are entitled to outstanding leadership; I will provide that leadership. I know my soldiers, and I will always place their needs above my own.” I take the Creed of the Non-commissioned Officer seriously.

SW: What advice would you give to young women following in your footsteps? Or looking to join the military?

SFC Varela: You can do anything that you put your mind to. Remember, you are your own worst enemy and you are stronger than you think. As women, we don’t give each other the credit we deserve. Never underestimate your potential. You are powerful beyond measure.

SW: What do you feel is the biggest challenge women in the military face today? What about in society at large?

SFC Varela: The biggest challenge women in the military face today is sexism, sexual harassment and sexual assault. As a woman and a minority, you will experience racism and injustice during all ranks. Serving as the Battalion Sexual Harassment/Assault and Response Prevention representative, I am passionate and a true advocate for our women.

While assigned to this position, I have assisted cadets with concerns or issues. Contributing to the embodiment of the Army Values, I am also Equal Opportunity Leader (EO) trained. As a trained EO representative, I ensure cadets and cadre alike practice the Army Values and treat all persons with dignity and respect. I am not afraid to correct an issue the minute I see it, recruiting other cadres to help teach cadets what appropriate conduct is.

SW: What is an obstacle you faced while growing up, or in the military? What did you learn from this?

SFC Varela: As a child in Honduras, I experienced traumatic events that have made me very resilient as a leader now. I’m a very compassionate, dedicated and passionate leader who always takes the time to help those in need. The one obstacle in the Army I have faced is that I don’t feel I get the same opportunities as some others, but I love being the underdog because the fight to move up and to serve with increasing levels of authority, such as where I am today, is a testament to other minority women that you can accomplish anything.

Regimental Public Affairs officer, Major Samantha Walton is from Macon, Georgia and attends The Citadel on an U.S. Army scholarship. She will accept a commission to become an officer upon graduating. Walton is majoring in Political Science.

The women of The Citadel Army ROTC department pose for a portrait in Jenkins Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, February 10 2021. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)
A 2021 photograph of women serving in The Citadel Army ROTC department, with SFC Kellin Verela seen second from right.
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Joseph P. Riley, Jr., ’64, earns Collaborative Achievement Award from American Institute of Architects https://today.citadel.edu/joseph-p-riley-jr-64-earns-collaborative-achievement-award-from-american-institute-of-architects/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31144 Prof. and former Charleston Mayor Joe P. Riley Jr. teaching at The CitadelProf. and former Charleston Mayor Joe P. Riley Jr. teaching at The CitadelAcross four decades of leadership, Riley continuously considered Charleston’s public realm first and foremost.]]> Prof. and former Charleston Mayor Joe P. Riley Jr. teaching at The CitadelProf. and former Charleston Mayor Joe P. Riley Jr. teaching at The Citadel

Note: Joseph P. Riley, Jr. is a member of The Citadel Class of 1964, and the first occupant of the Joseph P. Riley, Jr., Endowed Chair of American Government and Public Policy, a professorial position on the faculty of The Citadel School of Humanities and Social Sciences he assumed after retiring from public service as mayor of Charleston for 40 years. The photo above shows Riley teaching on campus at The Citadel.

As seen on AIA.org

When Joseph P. Riley became mayor of Charleston, South Carolina, in 1975, the city’s urban center was quickly deteriorating. Over his 10 terms as Charleston’s leader, Riley completely transformed the city into a top cultural destination and positioned himself as one of the country’s most visionary and effective leaders. Few understand as well as Riley the many ways in which architecture, urbanism, and human fabric intersect to create great places, and he has forged a path for generations of mayors to follow his positive example.

Across four decades of leadership, Riley continuously considered Charleston’s public realm first and foremost. His work to develop the city’s Waterfront Park, the redevelopment of the urban renewal-era Gaillard Center into new city offices, and his insistence that Charleston’s government remain in the city’s heart demonstrate his forward-thinking vision. The International African American Museum, designed by Moody Nolan and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, will reaffirm Riley’s commitment to the city and, more importantly, to its entire history when it opens later this year. Riley considers the project the most important work of his lifetime.

“Joe believes in architecture,” wrote Christian Sottile, AIA, professor and former dean at Savannah College of Art and Design, in a letter nominating Riley for the Collaborative Achievement Award.

“As mayor, Joe always surrounded himself with outstanding designers, recognizing that the bone structure of a good city, and all its fine-grained details, mattered.”

Christian Sottile, AIA

Throughout his leadership, Riley endeavored to ease racial tensions by working closely with the African American community. Charleston, committed to racial harmony and progress, saw a significant decrease in crime as it simultaneously experienced a stunning revitalization of its historic business district. During Riley’s tenure as mayor, the city amassed an impressive record of innovation in public safety, housing, the arts, and development. Today, it is often hailed as one of the most livable and progressive cities in the U.S.

Read the full article here.

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Law Enforcement career jumpstart: first cadets are sworn in as community service officers https://today.citadel.edu/law-enforcement-career-jumpstart-first-cadets-are-sworn-in-as-community-service-officers/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 22:40:54 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31155 The Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for Sergeant Reagan Moore, Private First‐Class Cameron McNeill, Community Service Officer Brandon Birsner, Imani Bowie, David Desplaces and Chelsea Sitarik at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The ceremony was the first time current cadets were sworn in as community service officers. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelThe Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for Sergeant Reagan Moore, Private First‐Class Cameron McNeill, Community Service Officer Brandon Birsner, Imani Bowie, David Desplaces and Chelsea Sitarik at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The ceremony was the first time current cadets were sworn in as community service officers. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelThe Citadel welcomed its first class of cadet Community Service Officers during a ceremony led by the college's Department of Public Safety.]]> The Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for Sergeant Reagan Moore, Private First‐Class Cameron McNeill, Community Service Officer Brandon Birsner, Imani Bowie, David Desplaces and Chelsea Sitarik at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The ceremony was the first time current cadets were sworn in as community service officers. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The CitadelThe Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for Sergeant Reagan Moore, Private First‐Class Cameron McNeill, Community Service Officer Brandon Birsner, Imani Bowie, David Desplaces and Chelsea Sitarik at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The ceremony was the first time current cadets were sworn in as community service officers. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The Citadel

By Cadet Olivia Hime, Regimental Public Affairs NCO

The Citadel welcomed its first class of cadet Community Service Officers during a ceremony in early March led by the college’s Department of Public Safety.

“This is a first in the history of The Citadel,” said Captain Shaun Ferguson, who developed and oversees the Public Safety internship program. “We have never had interns who then went on to become sworn officers, serving their community, while they are still cadets.”

Friends, family and other guests gathered for the event in the Swain Boating Center on campus. The three cadets were sworn in alongside a member of the college’s faculty, and two experienced officers recently hired by Public Saftey.

The Citadel Department of Public Safety’s Captain Sean Ferguson speaks during an Oath Ceremony for the department’s new officers at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022.

“Right now, the cadets will be working as community service officers, patrolling campus to identify any issues compromising safety and security and helping where needed, with the assistance of our more senior officers, like myself,” Ferguson explained.

The next step is to guide the cadet-officers as they earn their Class 3 Constable Certification, attaining a degree of authority that allows young officers to experience the responsibilities and rewarding nature of law enforcement, according to Ferguson.

“I hope that this program helps the college produce the leaders law enforcement needs,” said Mike Turner, chief of The Citadel Department of Public Safety and a member of The Citadel Class of 1986. “I worked with a lot of violent crimes early in my law enforcement career and the ability to bring closure to the families of victims has been one of the most rewarding aspects that I have carried with me. Working here at The Citadel, I want to make a difference not only for the college but for the cadets. Law enforcement is a constant process during which you will never stop learning and always have room for improvement.”

The Chief of The Citadel Department of Public Safety, Mike Turner, Class of ’86, speaks during the Oath Ceremony for the departments new officers at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022.

Turner said the Public Safety team is looking forward to working with the cadet-officers and to growing the college’s intern-to-officer program.

Introducing The Citadel’s new Community Service Officers

Cadet Brandon Birsner Mount Pleasant, South Carolina

Cadet Brandon Birsner, The Citadel Class of 2023, takes an oath to become an officer with The Citadel Department of Public Safety after training as an intern. Birsner is from Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina.

Currently holding the position of Romeo Co. Human Affairs Sgt., Cadet Brandon Birsner is a junior majoring in Political Science. He plans to become a Class I Officer upon graduating in 2023. Birsner has helped to fuel The Citadel PSAF Internship program by fostering connections with agencies providing that provide NARCAN training to assist in saving the life of a person who has overdosed on opioids or other substances, as well as the local Polar Plunge fundraiser.

Cadet Imani Bowie – Augusta, Georgia

Cadet Imani Bowie, The Citadel Class of 2023, takes an oath to become an officer with The Citadel Department of Public Safety after training as an intern. He is from Augusta, Georgia.

In addition to now being a sworn-in Community Service Officer, Cadet Imani Bowie is a member of the South Carolina National Guard. He is the South Carolina Corps of Cadets Squad Sgt., the Army Dept. Recruiting Sgt. and a future Honor Court Representative. Bowing is majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies and will graduate in 2023.

“I have learned a lot from this program so far and it has led me to consider pursuing a career in law enforcement after college,” Bowie said. “It has also helped me with my confidence and opened my eyes to all of the work that goes into being a police officer. I have developed a lot of respect for those in this line of work.”

Cadet Chelsea Sitarik – Folly Beach, South Carolina

Cadet Chelsea Sitarik, The Citadel Class of 2022, takes an oath to become an officer with The Citadel Department of Public Safety after training as an intern. She is from Folly Beach, South Carolina.

A senior in Charlie Company, Cadet Chelsea Sitarik is studying Criminal Justice and Psychology. She plans to continue her education and earn a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology following graduation. Sitarik is also pursuing a career in law enforcement. She has dedicated much of her time to the the internship program and the Public Safety team describes her as someone who will be a great asset to any law enforcement team in the future.

David Desplaces, Ph.D. – Citadel faculty member with the Baker School of Business

The Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for Sergeant Reagan Moore, Private First‐Class Cameron McNeill, Community Service Officer Brandon Birsner, Imani Bowie, David Desplaces and Chelsea Sitarik at the Swain Boating Center in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The ceremony was the first time current cadets were sworn in as community service officers. Credit: Cameron Pollack / The Citadel
Citadel Professor, Dr. David Desplaces, takes an oath to become an officer with The Citadel Department of Public Safety. He is a member of the Baker School of Business faculty and also holds extensive emergency management experience.

Professor David Desplaces, Ph.D., holds extensive experience in emergency management as a member of the Lowcountry Incident Management Team, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxillary, Captain in the South Carolina State Guard Provost Marshall Detachment (critical infrastructure protection unit), among other positions. On the other side of his career, Deplaces is a professor of Strategic Management with the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business at The Citadel, with expertise in global commerce and trade, cultural management, leadership, change management and entrepreneurial venturing.

New Class I Officers

Private First-Class Cameron McNeill

Private First-Class Cameron McNeill has 11 years of law enforcement experience. Earlier in his career, he served in both Dorchester and Collin counties as a sheriff’s deputy and in North Charleston as a full time SWAT officer. For the last 12 years, McNeill served as a member of the State Department Bureau of Diplomatic Security. He conducted protective operations for U.S. diplomats in Afghanistan for approximately five years and trained in the High-Threat Operations branch for the following seven years. Upon completion of the academy, he will become a full-time trainer for The Citadel Department of Public Safety.

Sgt. Reagan Moore

Sergeant Reagan Moore, an experienced law enforcement professional is sworn as an officer in with The Citadel Department of Public Safety March 1, 2022.

Before joining The Citadel Department of Public Safety, Sgt. Reagan Moore worked with Coastal Carolina University’s Department of Public Safety as an investigator. She has been a law enforcement professional for eight years, working for the city of Conway, the Green County Sheriff’s Office and the J. Reuben Long Correctional Center. Moore has a wide range of experience and holds degrees in Criminal Justice, Criminology, Online Security and Education.

The Citadel Department of Public Safety hosts a Oath Ceremony for new officers while friends and family looked on at the Swain Boating Center on campus in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, March 1, 2022.
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Embassy of Georgia welcomes Citadel cadets and students studying in D.C. https://today.citadel.edu/embassy-of-georgia-welcomes-citadel-cadets-and-students-studying-in-d-c/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 21:12:52 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30840 Citadel cadets and students holding The Citadel's flag with Georgian dignitaries at the Embassy of Georgia on March 2, 2022Citadel cadets and students holding The Citadel's flag with Georgian dignitaries at the Embassy of Georgia on March 2, 2022The timing for our gathering at the Embassy of Georgia was fortuitous from an educational aspect. There were numerous high level Georgian officials.]]> Citadel cadets and students holding The Citadel's flag with Georgian dignitaries at the Embassy of Georgia on March 2, 2022Citadel cadets and students holding The Citadel's flag with Georgian dignitaries at the Embassy of Georgia on March 2, 2022

Photo above: Citadel cadets and students studying away in Washington D.C. holding the college’s flag and posing for a photograph with dignitaries from Georgia, at the Embassy of Georgia, on March 2, 2022. Pictured far left is Dr. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, the director of The Citadel in D.C. program, with Tornike Nikvashvili, First Secretary for the Embassy to his right. In the center wearing glasses is Giorgi Tsikolia, Charge d’affaires of Georgia to the United States. Col. Robert Argvliani, the Defense, Military, Naval, and Air Attaché of Georgia to the United States and Canada, is wearing the military uniform.

The Citadel cadets and students living and studying in Washington D.C. for the spring semester are realizing the many benefits of the program. The proximity of their studies to global leaders is one of them.

On March 2, some of the college’s cadets and students there were welcomed to the Embassy of Georgia for an opportunity to discuss current world events and, in particular, the invasion of Ukraine by Russia with senior officials from Georgia. Like Ukraine, Georgia was formerly a part of the Soviet republic.

According to a researcher with Harvard’s Program on Georgian Studies, “Georgia formally recognizes Ukraine as a vital strategic partner, and scholars Levan Kakhishvili and Alexandre Kupatadze found that since 1991 fully 39 percent of all Georgia’s bilateral agreements have been with Ukraine.”

Ukraine is represented in orange, with Georgia seen here in green.

“The timing for our gathering at the Embassy of Georgia was fortuitous from an educational aspect. There were numerous high level Georgian officials in the meeting, with the Ambassador away and closer to home due to needs related to the Russian-Ukrainian conflict,” said Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, Ph.D., The Citadel in D.C. program director and a professor of Intelligence and Security Studies.

“Senior officials from Georgia in attendance included Giorgi Tsikolia who currently serves as Charge d’affaires of Georgia to the United States. Mr. Tsikolia was appointed Deputy Chief of Mission (DCM) at the Embassy of Georgia to the United States in August 2015,” Frasir-Rahim continued.

Additionally, Tornike Nikvashvili, a career diplomat serving as a First Secretary at the Embassy covering economic issues, attended along with other Embassy representatives.

Fraser-Rahim, who arranged the meeting, says 90% of a Citadel student’s time while studying for a semester in D.C. is spent outside of the classroom, as a group. “It’s the exposure to the inner-workings of the nation’s capitol, including access to embassies, leading figures on Capitol Hill and experts in international affairs, intelligence and diplomacy that really make an impact on the cadets and students who come here.”

How does The Citadel in D.C. program work?

The full course offerings, providing nine credit hours for Political Science and Intelligence and Security Studies students can be seen here.

The tuition a cadet or student is already paying to attend The Citadel covers all living and travel expenses, other than food, for the semester in D.C. Food costs will be deducted from tuition amounts. Students in the program stay in WISH program housing, in Capitol Hill Classic Houses. There is an additional $500 program fee, not covered by tuition.

Summertime option

The Citadel in DC Summer Program is a 10-week program in Washington DC from June – August. This experience also involves living, learning and interning in DC. Cadets and students can earn up to nine academic credits — three academic and six internship credits — in the summer section. Contact studyabroad@citadel.edu for more information.

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Citadel professor to publish companion book on internationally best-selling “Wheel of Time” series https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-professor-to-publish-companion-book-on-internationally-best-selling-wheel-of-time-series/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 23:04:10 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30639 "Origins of The Wheel of Time" is written by Michael Livingston, Ph.D., Secretary-General of the United States Commission on Military History and professor of medieval literature at The Citadel]]>

Note: Michael Livingston, Ph.D., (photo above) is an acclaimed academic interpreter of Robert Jordan’s literary accomplishment and legacy. Among his many other books are the Shards of Heaven trilogy of novels (published by Tor) and multiple award-winning studies of military history. At present, he serves as the Secretary-General for the United States Commission on Military History and teaches at The Citadel.

James Rigney Jr. — known as Robert Jordan, author of the Wheel of Time Series — graduated from The Citadel in 1974.

From Tor.com

Tor Books is proud to announce the acquisition Origins of The Wheel of Time: The Legends and Mythologies that Inspired Robert Jordan by Michael Livingston, including a foreword by Harriet McDougal, by Robert Davis via Paul Stevens of the Donald Maass Literary Agency. The UK and Commonwealth rights were acquired by Bella Pagan, Publishing Director of Pan Macmillan’s Tor imprint.

Origins of The Wheel of Time by Michael Livingston will be available on November 8, 2022 from Tor Books.

“Jordan has come to dominate the world Tolkien began to reveal.” —The New York Times on The Wheel of Time® series

Explore never-before-seen insights into the Wheel of Time, including:

  • A brand-new, redrawn world map by Ellisa Mitchell using change requests discovered in Robert Jordan’s unpublished notes
  • An alternate scene from an early draft of The Eye of the World

Take a deep dive into the real-world history and mythology that inspired the world of Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time®. Origins of The Wheel of Time is written by Michael Livingston, Secretary-General of the United States Commission on Military History and professor of medieval literature at The Citadel, with a Foreword by Harriet McDougal, Robert Jordan’s editor, widow, and executor of his estate.

This companion to the internationally bestselling series will delve into the creation of Robert Jordan’s masterpiece, drawing from interviews and an unprecedented examination of his unpublished notes. Michael Livingston tells the behind-the-scenes story of who Jordan was, how he worked, and why he holds such an important place in modern literature.

The second part of the book is a glossary to the “real world” in The Wheel of Time. King Arthur is in The Wheel of Time. Merlin, too. But so are Alexander the Great and the Apollo Space Program, the Norse gods and Napoleon’s greatest victory—and so much more.

Origins of The Wheel of Time will provide exciting knowledge and insights to both new and longtime fans looking to either expand their understanding of the series or unearth the real-life influences that Jordan utilized in his world building—all in one, accessible text.

A letter to Readers from the Author, Michael Livingston

I’m a scholar, an investigator, a historian. I’m a man who weighs facts, examines evidence, an uncovers truth. I’m sensible. I’m responsible.

And I’m here to tell you that magic is real.

Let me prove it to you.

I was fifteen when I pedaled my bike—a black huffy with dirt tires—across a dusty Albuquerque prairie to reach my local bookshop. I had allowance and birthday money to spend, and a thirst that could only be quenched with a new book. I parked the bike, locked it up, and then perused the shelves for what seemed like hours. The store had these big comfy chairs, I remember—blue and welcoming—and whenever I found a potential new book I’d sit down with it and take the first chapter or two for a quick spin.

I was into fantasy back then—the kind of magic that a fifteen-year-old on a beaten-up bike wanted to believe in as he pedaled his way here and there under the hot sun, ever watchful for scorpions and snakes. The kind of magic that isn’t real, of course.

I found such a fantasy on the new release shelves. A big and fat one. The Eye of the World, by Robert Jordan. I picked it up. I liked the nifty cover it had on the outside and the cool map it had on the inside. I thought it had the hum of Tolkien.

So I sat down in one of those stuffed blue chairs and started to read.

In pages I was hooked. I spent every dime of the little coin I had and claimed my prize as my own. I tucked it into my backpack and pedaled home faster than I’d ever done before.

Not because of the snakes or the scorpions. Because of the magic.

That magic stayed with me long after I devoured that first book. Every year I saved up to buy the latest volume in The Wheel of Time as soon as I could. I became—I am—one of its many millions of fans.

I read the books on the bus to high school. I read them in college and in graduate school, where I earned a PhD and became a specialist on the Middle Ages.

I became—I am—a serious academic. If I should read the chronicler Adam of Usk claiming there was a dragon haunting northern England 600 years ago, I will find a natural phenomenon to explain it. Because despite my love of fantasy literature—from Homer to Beowulf and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, from Tolkien to Jordan and Nemisin—I know magic isn’t real.

And yet…

After I graduated, I was asked to interview for a professorship at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina. The only thing I really knew about the place came from a single notice on the back of every book of The Wheel of Time in my library: Robert Jordan was a graduate of The Citadel.

I interviewed. I got the job. I moved to Charleston, and every day I walked past the iconic white tower on our campus. Every day, more and more, I wondered if that meant something.

A coincidence, of course. Magic isn’t real.

And yet…

In the fall of 2006, I was talking to The Citadel’s other Big Name literary alumnus, Pat Conroy, about starting student writing awards to honor him and James O. Rigney, Jr—the man the world knew as Robert Jordan. Pat suggested he could write Jim to help introduce me. Before I knew it I was exchanging emails with the man who’d given me The Wheel of Time.

I mentioned to Jim I was a fan. I told him at one point that I hoped to publish fiction myself one day, and that I planned to do it with Tor for no other reason than the fact that they’d given people like me his Wheel of Time. He said he looked forward to my success: “You have my best wishes on your rise (soon) to bestsellerdom,” he wrote me in early January 2007.

A few months later, he came to the first ceremony to bestow the student award named in his honor. He was already very ill, but he nevertheless cut a dashing figure with his lovely wife and legendary editor Harriet by his side. My script had me call out thanks to the English Department for their support. From the first row, Jim grumbled that he’d been an engineering graduate. It was awesome.

We shook hands. I thanked him for helping change my life. He was charming and kind and unforgettable.

The summer passed.

On September 16, I was making photocopies for my class on Norse mythology when I heard that he’d died.

For a moment it felt as if the magic in the world had died, too.

And yet…

Not long afterwards, the chair of my department called me into his office and told me that Jim had been elected into the South Carolina Academy of Authors. I was asked to give a speech at the ceremony, which would be held at The Citadel.

The event came in March. Harriet was in the front row and I couldn’t look at her as I talked. I was too afraid to cry.

But I got through. I sat down. A bit later, Harriet stood up to accept the award for her beloved Jim. She was gracious—by the Light, far more gracious than I could ever be—and then she publicly asked me if I’d come take part in a panel with her and Brandon Sanderson, who’d just been tapped to finish The Wheel of Time.

It might’ve felt like magic—in that moment I thought I could fly—but magic isn’t real.

Later, after that panel, I went to dinner with Harriet and Brandon and Team Jordan. They asked me if I wanted to come and tour Jim’s office sometime.

His writing desk was there when I visited: a beautiful old roll-top, where he’d spent countless hours building a world. So was his library and his armory and so much else that he used in the effort. At one point I looked up to see a saber-toothed tiger skull staring down at me and realized I was literally standing in the middle of the Tanchico Museum.

But, I forcibly reminded myself, magic isn’t real.

Not long after that I was invited down again. The Estate was going to auction off many of the weapons in his armory to raise money for medical research. They wanted me to pick one first, and they left me alone in his office to decide.

I remember staring at his desk, wanting to sit down but too afraid to do so. I felt a sudden impulse to turn around, and when I did I found my hands reaching past far nicer looking pieces to pick up an otherwise unremarkable katana leaning against the wall. I don’t know why. When I unsheathed it, I saw that it had a dragon etched into its sweeping blade.

I keep the sword in my campus office, and it was there, in later years, that one of my veteran students saw it. Turns out, he’d been deployed in Iraq when his father-in-law, an antiques dealer, had sold that very blade to Jim. He had pictures of the event.

Magic isn’t—

I wrote The Shards of Heaven, a trilogy of historical fantasy novels, and achieved that life-long dream when Tor published them. And though they hardly achieved bestsellerdom, just seeing the books come out was more than I ever thought possible. It felt like a promise fulfilled, like the result of some secret wind pushing at my back.

I continued to give talks on Jim’s literary impact over the years. Out of love. Out of a feeling of gratitude. Not long ago, I was invited to a get-together with Team Jordan, and out of the blue Harriet stunned me by gifting me that saber-toothed tiger skull I’d seen in Jim’s office on that first visit.

Magic is—

Over this past summer, the administration here at The Citadel wrote me with the news that Harriet had donated Jim’s roll-top desk to the school. She’d asked only that it be used and not simply set in a corner.

Days after my eager agreement to have that desk moved into my office—the one where he wrote those books, the one I’d been too afraid to sit at before—Tor offered me a contract to write a book about the real world in the Wheel of Time.

Somehow, that kid who pedaled home through the New Mexican dirt with The Eye of the World in his backpack would write his own book about The Wheel of Time… at Jim’s own desk, beneath his dragon-marked sword and his tiger skull, looking out at a white tower amid peaceful trees in a city between two rivers.

Magic—

Is real.

It might’ve taken a bit for me to get the hint, Jim, but I don’t think I can deny it any longer. So thank you. For this. For everything. I promise I’ll do everything I can to make Origins of The Wheel of Time worthy of the Light of your memory.

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills.

I pray it weaves through me.

–Michael Livingston
The Citadel

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Commander of U.S. Army Cyber Command to speak at critical infrastructure conference event at The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/commander-of-u-s-army-cyber-command-to-speak-at-critical-infrastructure-conference-event-at-the-citadel/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 21:20:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29978 Headshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber CommandHeadshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber Command Attendance is open to professionals working in organizational functions responsible for infrastructure security. ]]> Headshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber CommandHeadshot of LTG Stephen Fogarty US Army Cyber Command

AND: The Citadel selected to join Cyber Command Academic Engagement Network

Lt. Gen. Stephen G. Fogarty, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command (ARCYBER), will make a keynote address at The Citadel during the Jack Voltaic cyber conference. The conference will take place on the iconic Citadel campus in Charleston, S.C., Feb. 24 – 25, 2022.

Fogarty’s presentation begins at 9a.m., Feb. 24, preceded by comments from South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster and will be livestreamed with a link available to a registered audience, including media. The conference theme is Cyber Resiliency for Critical Infrastructure. Attendance is open to professionals working in organizational functions responsible for infrastructure security.

The Jack Voltaic project and conference series is designed to enable the Army Cyber Institute (ACI) to study incident response gaps alongside assembled partners to identify interdependencies among critical infrastructure and provide recommendations. The program provides an innovative, bottom‐up approach to critical infrastructure resilience, focusing on cities and municipalities where critical infrastructure and populations are substantial.

LTG Stephen G. Fogarty, commanding general, US Army Cyber Command, speaks to cadets in at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on March 26, 2021.

Fogarty assumed command of ARCYBER in 2018. He visited The Citadel in 2021 to speak with cadets studying cybersecurity and toured the campus. His second visit, to participate in the Jack Voltaic event, comes shortly after The Citadel was selected to join the U.S. Cyber Command (CYBERCOM) Academic Engagement Network (AEN).

To request the link to the livestream, please email kkeelor@citadel.edu.

Training America’s cybersecurity professionals

There are 84 academic institutions partnering with CYBERCOM in AEN, including 70 universities, 14 community colleges, nine minority-serving institutions and four military service academies, spanning 34 states and Washington, D.C.

The AEN military components include CYBERCOM Headquarters, ARCYBER, Joint Force Headquarters-Department of Defense Information Network, the Cyber National Mission Force (CNMF), Air Force Cyber Command/16th Air Force, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/10th Fleet, U.S. Marine Forces Cyberspace Command, and the U.S. Coast Guard Cyber Command. 

“(U.S.) Cyber Command’s goal for the AEN is to strengthen our relationships and communication with these participating institutions,” said David Frederick, CYBERCOM’s executive director. “This will improve and sustain our efforts to meet cyberspace educational requirements and workforce needs.”

According to a January 5 CYBERCOM release, the AEN will support and enhance four primary lines of effort (LOE): future workforce, applied cyber research, applied analytics and strategic issues. These LOEs are intended to serve as an investment in creating a robust and accessible pool of qualified cyber professionals. “With our academic partners, we can shape our cyber workforce while supporting the command’s mission,” Frederick said.

“The Citadel is proud to be included in this prestigious partnership with U.S. Cyber Command,” said The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.), ’79. “With The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute already under way, and the growing number of cybersecurity cadets and students in our programs, the college is prepared to contribute highly trained, workforce-ready cybersecurity professionals to help defend the country.”

The AEN extends partnerships to institutions through collaboration and access to CYBERCOM via scheduled events and engagements with command staff, the CNMF and the four component commands.

Frederick added that “this network will further enable us to shape and enhance cyber-focused innovation with partnerships and support the Department of Defense’s ongoing strategic dialogue on cyberspace.”

Some of the requirements for AEN selection include:

  • Cyber-related engineering programs
  • Intelligence-related programs
  • Applied analytics-related sciences programs
  • Process-related programs and certifications such as Project Management
  • Regional accreditation by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation

Read more about the matrix of cybersecurity and intelligence programs, scholarships and opportunities at The Citadel and through The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute, here.

Contact the Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences here, or apply to attend The Citadel here.

LTG Stephen G. Fogarty, commanding general, US Army Cyber Command, touring The Citadel campus in Charleston, South Carolina on March 26, 2021.
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