Humanities & Social Sciences – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Fri, 11 Nov 2022 17:04:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.6 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Humanities & Social Sciences – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 “The greatest benefit to being a veteran here is the community”: Meet Army veteran student Samuel Erickson https://today.citadel.edu/the-greatest-benefit-to-being-a-veteran-here-is-the-community-meet-army-veteran-student-samuel-erickson/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 16:29:16 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=33643 Samuel EricksonSamuel EricksonSamuel Erickson is a veteran and an undergraduate student at The Citadel majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies and focusing on Chinese language studies. He served for six years in the military before attending a college in Chicago, eventually enrolling into The Citadel. After graduating, Erickson plans continue serving his country and work at the Defense Intelligence Agency. ]]> Samuel EricksonSamuel Erickson

In honor of Veterans Day on Nov. 11, The Citadel is featuring some of the college’s outstanding veteran students representing different branches of the U.S. Armed Forces.

There are more than 250 veterans currently studying at The Citadel as either undergraduate or graduate students. They can take classes as day students alongside the Corps of Cadets, evening students with other non-cadet students or online. The Citadel’s Veteran Student Success Center also offers resources to these students to ensure they have an easy transition and excel here.

Named #1 Best College for Veterans in the South for five consecutive years, the Military College of South Carolina is honored to help our nation’s heroes advance their education.

Q&A with Samuel Erickson, Class of 2024

Samuel Erickson is a veteran and an undergraduate student at The Citadel majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies and focusing on Chinese language studies. He served for six years in the military before attending a college in Chicago, eventually enrolling into The Citadel. After graduating, Erickson plans to continue serving his country and work at the Defense Intelligence Agency.

What was your time in the military like?

I left the Army shortly after I got my E5 sergeant rank, so I served for about six years. My time in the Army was one of the most formative experiences of my life. Before entering I would describe myself as full of potential, but aimless. The military showed me how I could turn that potential into results, and in what ways I would be able to help whenever it was needed. In short, my time in the military had its ups and downs, but I would never trade those years for anything.

How did you hear about The Citadel?

I heard about The Citadel from a classmate and fellow veteran at College of DuPage. He told me it was open to students like me, and now we are both attending the college.

What experiences from your military service have prepared you to be a better citizen?

My experiences — such as serving as a team leader in an infantry platoon, being stationed in Korea at the DMZ and being deployed to places like Afghanistan — showed me what life was like in different societies and overall broadened my world view. These experiences helped me to not only understand how lucky we are to live where we do and want to protect that, but it also instilled in me the desire to communicate with other cultures and communities in the U.S. and abroad. I also credit my military service with instilling the discipline needed to be an effective student at The Citadel.

Are there any advantages to being a veteran at The Citadel?

I think the greatest benefit of being a veteran here is the community of veterans The Citadel has. It makes showing up worth every minute of the school day. Professors expect more from you and use you as an asset in class, pulling from our experiences to drive the subject matter at times. 

Erickson, second from right, with members of the veteran’s intermural basketball team.

Do you ever get to interact with cadets on campus? If so, what are those interactions like?

I interact with the cadets every day, and it is honestly both fun and rewarding. I get to answer questions on what options they have to serve or what my time was like, or even proof read the emails they send to professors and recruiters. I also just get to talk to them about what is going on in their lives and offer any advice I can. 

What’s your favorite thing about The Citadel as a whole?

My favorite thing about The Citadel are the people that make it happen each day. The professors are on a different level in terms of their knowledge base and what their classes have to offer. I also get to have classes taught by professors whose books I’ve used in papers for my other degrees, which is a cool experience. The student body, both veteran and cadet, make each day rewarding and have kept me laughing while I learn. That’s pretty special.  Then there’s the staff here, like Sally Levitt and Jessie Brooks at the Veteran Student Success Center — having people like them in your corner is one of the best things about being here. My hope is that each cadet knows they can stop any of us vets at any time and we will be more than happy to give them our time to help or talk.

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“The Citadel is a great place to transition into from the military”: Meet Navy veteran student Aurel Edyvean https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-is-a-great-place-to-transition-into-from-the-military-meet-navy-veteran-student-aurel-edyvean/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 22:04:07 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=33614 Aurel EdyveanAurel EdyveanAurel Edyvean is a veteran day student at The Citadel studying Political Science with a concentration in International Politics and Military Affairs. He is the current president of the Student Veterans Association at The Citadel. Edyvean still serves in the U.S. Navy Reserves and plans to pursue a career in either government work or law school after graduation.]]> Aurel EdyveanAurel Edyvean

In honor of Veterans Day on Nov. 11, The Citadel is featuring some of the college’s outstanding veteran students representing different branches of the U.S. Armed Forces.

There are more than 250 veterans currently studying at The Citadel as either undergraduate or graduate students. They can take classes as day students alongside the Corps of Cadets, evening students with other non-cadet students or online. The Citadel’s Veteran Student Success Center also offers resources to these students to ensure they have an easy transition and excel here.

Named #1 Best College for Veterans in the South for five consecutive years, the Military College of South Carolina is honored to help our nation’s heroes advance their education.

Q&A with Aurel Edyvean, Class of 2024

Aurel Edyvean is a veteran day student at The Citadel studying Political Science with a concentration in International Politics and Military Affairs. He is the current president of the Student Veterans Association at The Citadel. Edyvean still serves in the U.S. Navy Reserves and plans to pursue a career in either government work or law school after graduation.

What was your time in the military like?

I served six years on active duty. Upon discharge, I was an E4 Gunner’s Mate third class in the Navy. My time in the military was generally positive. There’s a lot of hardships but you learn to overcome them and adapt to those situations. But at the same time, you make lifelong friends. You learn how to be a leader, as well. It’s pretty informative.

Did you come to The Citadel immediately after active duty, or do something else in between?

My situation was a little weird because I got discharged from active duty in June 2020, which was during COVID, so trying to find a college was hard. You basically had to research it all online. I initially thought The Citadel was a cadet-only institution, so after personal research and word of mouth, I found out that they do accept veteran and non-cadet students. So, I went online and applied essentially right after I got discharged.

Why did you choose Political Science?

It’s a field I really enjoy, we do a lot of research and you look at big picture stuff around the globe. I expect to graduate in May 2024, and after that I’m pretty open to what I want to do. I kind of want to go back into government and continue serving my country in that respect. But I’m also open to going to law school, so I guess it just depends on what opportunities are there.

What experiences from your military service have prepared you to be a better student?

The ability to overcome and adapt to situations. Like when you have a big paper due, you have to learn how to manage that and all the other assignments you have. The military teaches you time management skills, so you learn how to better manage your time in college. When I go into my classes, I think of it like work — you have to have that mindset like, ‘Hey, this is my purpose.’ and be really focused on what you are reading or writing. Another advantage to being a veteran here is you have a better understanding of the resources offered and how to use them.

I’m also the president of the Student Veterans Association on campus. We mainly advocate for veteran inclusivity on campus, whether it’s through academic or social events. Right now, our main focus is rebuilding the veteran community. We work a lot with the Veteran Student Success Center.

Do you ever get to interact with cadets on campus?

Yes, I’ve met many cadets on campus. Usually, I let them come to me first, like if they have questions about my military service, or anything of that nature I’ll answer those questions. And if they’re not going into military service, they’re usually talking to me about class assignments or group projects. It’s pretty cool. I interact with cadets daily.

What’s your favorite thing about The Citadel as a whole?

I like the veteran community here. We’re rebuilding that community after COVID. And being around like-minded individuals is neat, especially after coming off active duty, so when you enter a similar environment, you appreciate that. I like the layout of the campus, it’s similar to a military base. The Citadel is really unique because it’s a great transition place. You have veteran students like me, coming out of the military into a familiar environment, but at the same time The Citadel is a transition for cadets who have chosen to go into the military. Overall, it’s a good place to transition from the military.

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My Ring Story: “Make an impact on the people around you” https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-make-an-impact-on-the-people-around-you/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 16:30:27 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=33447 Damirelys PerezDamirelys PerezDamirelys Perez is a Psychology major. She was born in Pennsylvania and has lived in Japan and Germany. She is captain for the women’s rifle team and has been named]]> Damirelys PerezDamirelys Perez

Damirelys Perez is a Psychology major. She was born in Pennsylvania and has lived in Japan and Germany. She is captain for the women’s rifle team and has been named to the Dean’s List and awarded Gold Stars multiple times throughout her cadet career. Additionally, she is the vice president of the Psychology Club and a member of Psi Chi, a national honors society in Psychology.

What makes the ring special to you?

It represents all the hard work and dedication I have put into this institution. I was doing all this to be a part of The Citadel and the alumni that have come before me. It also means that I am able to make my mark in the world and on the people around me. I am the first person in my family to go to college, so it is also a symbol of my journey as the first graduate. It is also a nice reminder of how much work and support my family have put into my success.

What do you hope your legacy will be when you graduate?

I want people to know me for my willingness to help and passion for connecting with others once I leave The Citadel. I want to be known for being a good person who others can trust and rely on, as well as always providing a helping hand. I think it is important for people to understand that, with or without rank in the Corps, you can make an impact on the people around you.

How has The Citadel impacted your character?

I have learned to take more initiative in taking on leadership roles I normally would back away from. Taking a jump to be in front of others and be comfortable making mistakes is a good skill The Citadel has taught me. I have learned not to view criticism in a negative way, but rather as a tool for self-improvement. I can now use criticism from others to make improvements on the skills I may not be the strongest in. 

Who has supported you and your journey while at The Citadel?

My mom and dad have been my main supporters over the years. Every time I was doubting my purpose and decision to come to The Citadel, they helped to reaffirm my choice and push me forward. Their encouragement to try new things and take chances has significantly helped my experience from knob year to now. I appreciate all their support and efforts to help me on this successful journey. 

What is one of the most unique moments that will stick with you once you leave The Citadel?

There are two moments that pop into my mind when thinking of unique moments.

The first was from my sophomore year during COVID, when the living assignments were rearranged to reduce infections. I had the opportunity to live in with other athletes in 1st Battalion and also socialize with my classmates. It was a challenge, but it made me get out of my comfort zone and put myself out there more.

The second is getting to be a co-author on one of my professors’ studies, which was an extremely rewarding experience. I will soon be able to present the findings from the study at the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Conference, where graduates and passionate psychologists gather each year. To have my work, alongside a classmate and professor, presented at this scale means a lot to me after all the years of work I have put into setting myself up for this moment.

About The Citadel Class of 2023’s ring stories

Members of The Citadel Class of 2023 received their rings on Friday, Oct. 7. Before actually getting their rings, some seniors spoke about the event’s significance with Cadet Eric Wilson, the Regimental Public Affairs Officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Wilson, who is from East Granby, Connecticut, is a Mechanical Engineering major. When he graduates, he will accept a commission to become an officer in the U.S. Air Force.

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What led a Citadel professor to the “Origins of The Wheel of Time” https://today.citadel.edu/what-led-a-citadel-professor-to-theorigins-of-the-wheel-of-time/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 12:34:15 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=33383 Michael Livingston with his book "Origins of The Wheel of Time"Michael Livingston with his book "Origins of The Wheel of Time"Citadel professor Michael Livingston, Ph.D., is set to release a companion book on the best-selling “Wheel of Time” series. His book, titled “Origins of The Wheel of Time: The Legends and Mythologies that Inspired Robert Jordan” will debut on Nov. 8. ]]> Michael Livingston with his book "Origins of The Wheel of Time"Michael Livingston with his book "Origins of The Wheel of Time"

Citadel professor Michael Livingston, Ph.D., is set to release a companion book on the internationally best-selling “Wheel of Time” series. His book, titled “Origins of The Wheel of Time: The Legends and Mythologies that Inspired Robert Jordan,” will debut on Nov. 8.

Livingston’s love for the writing of Robert Jordan – or James Rigney Jr. as he was known when he graduated from The Citadel in 1974 – started 30 years ago. Now, Livingston has been able to see his own book, that builds upon the world Jordan created, come to life.

Livingston worked closely with Harriet McDougal Rigney — Rigney’s wife and editor — who provided a foreword in “Origins of The Wheel of Time.” McDougal was an integral part making ”Origins” a reality; she gave Livingston access to notes and early drafts from Jordan that had never been shared before. Livingston says he understands the world he and many other readers love would not have existed without her, and neither would his newest book, so he made sure she was part of this from the very beginning. In return, Livingston included a favor to McDougal on the front and back his book’s inside covers. There, readers will see the symbol of The Wheel of Time, the interwoven snake and wheel. In a 2013 interview, McDougal said she always wished she could have included that symbol in “The Wheel of Time” books.

“Origins” will be welcomed by Jordan’s fans all over the world, but the number one audience in my mind was Harriet,” said Livingston. “It was essential to me that I do justice to her husband’s legacy while acknowledging her vital role in its making — not just as his wife, but as his editor, as well.”

McDougal will also narrate parts of the “Origins” audiobook, along with Livingston and others. The audiobook will also feature an interview with Rosamund Pike, one of the actresses from Amazon’s TV adaptation of “The Wheel of Time” series.

Additionally, as part of the 2022 Charleston Conference, Livingston will speak during the Robert Jordan/Wheel of Time Special Collection Lecture and Tour at 12 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 3. For more information, click here.

A few days later, Livingston, McDougal and Maria Simons, Jordan’s editorial and research assistant, will be at Barnes & Noble Westwood at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 8 for the first “Origins” book signing. Livingston will provide deeper insight into this companion book, including further mention of Jordan’s connections to The Citadel.

“Being at The Citadel, in halls he walked…I don’t believe in ghosts, but I do think it made a difference to write this book in a world that he loved so dearly,” said Livingston.

Read more of Livingston’s recently published work

Livingston has also recently published “Crécy: Battle of Five Kings,” a groundbreaking new study of the Battle of Crécy in 1346, which is one of the most famous and widely studied military engagements in history. In addition, Livingston gave a virtual lecture on Oct. 17 the Hudson Library and Historical Society, and also recorded a podcast with The Sons of History discussing the Battle of Crécy. Click here to listen.

To keep up with his upcoming appearances and learn more about him, click here.

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My Ring Story: Navigating the uncomfortable https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-navigating-the-uncomfortable/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 15:26:11 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=33355 Mason HandMason HandMason Hand is a political science major from Greenville, South Carolina. He is a Dean’s List and Gold Stars recipient and is in the Honors Program. Hand is an editor for the Gold Star Journal, Vice Chairman of the Hollings Society and member of the Political Honors Society. He serves as the Regimental Adjutant for the 2022-23 school year. Hand is also a legacy cadet whose father, Michael Hand, ’90, served as First Battalion adjutant.]]> Mason HandMason Hand

Mason Hand is a political science major from Greenville, South Carolina. He is a Dean’s List and Gold Stars recipient and is in the Honors Program. Hand is an editor for the Gold Star Journal, Vice Chairman of the Hollings Society and member of the Political Honors Society. He serves as the Regimental Adjutant for the 2022-23 school year. Hand is also a legacy cadet whose father, Michael Hand, ’90, served as First Battalion adjutant.

What makes the ring special to you?

It is an outward symbol of a unique and personal journey every cadet, past and present, has been through. The bonds and relationships formed throughout this experience bring people from different backgrounds together in ways no other institution can. Being able to join the Long Gray Line of alumni has become a great honor in my life. Growing up watching my father put the ring on every morning makes it that much more special to wear it. 

What do you hope your legacy will be when you graduate?

I want the Class of 2023 to be remembered for the unique challenges we faced, like the COVID shutdown our knob year, and how we came together to overcome certain circumstances. Our class has become an exceptional group of men and women, all of whom I’m proud to know. I would like my legacy to be one of fairness, trust and work ethic – those are the three qualities I have tried to live by my senior year.

How has The Citadel impacted your character?

During my four years here, my classmates and I have been put in positions that are not necessarily comfortable, but that have prepared us for real life experiences. Some of those situations have been challenging to navigate, but before The Citadel I chose to not ask for help when I needed it. After coming here, I realized I need to rely on others around me and their individual skills to complete the mission in a manner that produces the best outcome possible. The honor code that is practiced every day here reinforced my personal concept of honor, duty and respect more than I imagined it would.

Who has supported you and your journey while at The Citadel?

I would not have been nearly as successful during my time here without the support of my parents and close family. A significant driving force was knowing that even when I felt I was failing and unsure of my future, they were proud of the man I was becoming. I knew I had their unconditional support. During my junior and senior year, Col. Hutson has also been a major mentor in my life, personally and professionally, helping me navigate uncomfortable situations and providing me with valuable advice.

What is the most important aspect of leadership that you learned at The Citadel?

Leadership is not about being liked. To paraphrase Col. Hutson, “If you’re going to lead soldiers into gunfire, they don’t care if you’re friendly. They want someone who will make the decisions, easy or hard, that will get them home alive.”
Being able to overcome the hurdle of being a good leader and being liked simultaneously was challenging. I can only hope that when people look back at who I was, they find a classmate, leader and teammate who was respectable, honorable and fair.

About The Citadel Class of 2023’s ring stories

Members of The Citadel Class of 2023 received their rings on Friday, Oct. 7. Before actually getting their rings, some seniors spoke about the event’s significance with Cadet Eric Wilson, the Regimental Public Affairs Officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Wilson, who is from East Granby, Connecticut, is a Mechanical Engineering major. When he graduates, he will accept a commission to become an officer in the U.S. Air Force.

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America’s Intelligence Community gains 85 new professionals from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets https://today.citadel.edu/americas-intelligence-community-gains-85-new-professionals-from-the-south-carolina-corps-of-cadets/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 17:58:01 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32410 Intelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelIntelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelThe Class of 2022 includes 85 cadets who studied Intelligence and Security Studies. Before graduation, some shared their career goals and advice for others considering The Citadel. ]]> Intelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The CitadelIntelligence and Security Studies professor Michael Brady conducting a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel

Photo: Intelligence and Security Studies professor Lt. Col. Michael Brady, USA (Ret.), ’90, former Director, Presidential Emergency Operations Center in the White House (2001 – 2002), leading a class for members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel in 2019.

The Citadel ignites careers for mission-driven, global problem solvers

As the number and types of positions within the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) continue to expand, those earning degrees from The Citadel are in high demand. For decades, The Citadel has been known by America’s IC leaders as a top producer of young professionals for intelligence roles.

In 2017, The Citadel formalized this career pathway, founding the first Department of Intelligence and Security Studies and corresponding undergraduate degree in South Carolina. Now it’s one of the most in-demand majors at The Citadel. There are 18 organizations in the IC, and Citadel alumni are serving in those agencies as intelligence analysists; inspection, investigation and compliance professionals; field agents and supervisors; cybersecurity officers; business and finance experts; facilities design; set up and logistic experts; or visual information specialists, to name just some of the many intelligence job functions.

The Class of 2022 includes 85 cadets who studied Intelligence and Security Studies. Below, some of them share thoughts about their career goals along with advice for younger students considering studying intelligence at The Citadel.

Joshua Babcock, South Carolina Highway Patrol Academy
Hometown: Johnson City, New York

Joshua Babcock, The Citadel Class of 2022

As a highway patrol officer, I will provide equitable service and protection, and uphold the laws of the constitutions of the United States and the state of South Carolina in order to promote a safe and secure environment for the public.

After gaining professional experience with the South Carolina Highway Patrol, I plan on using my degree to join an intelligence organization.

I believe the best reason to attend The Citadel is that it will forge you into a better leader. It will make you more mature, confident, physically fit and will challenge you to become a better version of yourself that you may have never thought was possible.”

2nd Lt. Christian Blase, U.S. Army
Hometown: North Augusta, South Carolina

2nd Lt. Christian Blase, The Citadel Class of 2022

Preparing physically before you arrive at The Citadel for knob year is very important.

Come focused on wanting to learn and grow as a leader.

The structure you follow day to day as a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets will help if you choose to apply it to your daily life later.

2nd Lt. Gregory Chaves, U.S. Marine Corps, intelligence officer
Hometown: Los Angeles

The Citadel helped me focus on learning and thinking for myself. The friendships and experiences of cadet life help us all grow, preparing us to meet our goals.

Ensign Collin Gleco, U.S. Navy, submarine officer
Hometown: Shavertown, Pennsylvania

Collin Gleco, The Citadel Class of 2022

Double major: Spanish, Political Science, minor in Intelligence and Security Studies.

The Citadel provided the opportunity to build my leadership philosophy before being commissioned as an officer in the Navy. The ROTC programs are excellent.

In high school, I would never have believed that I would attend The Citadel, become a double major, first sergeant, company commander and an ensign in the Navy.

Jarett King, Department of Defense
Hometown: Sumter, South Carolina

When I was academically accepted to The Citadel, I was elated. I found out afterwards about the height/weight requirement for cadets and was worried that I would not be granted admission. During my senior year of high school, I reflected on what was important to me and why I wanted to attend The Citadel. That inspired me to lose 100 pounds before becoming a knob.

Attending The Citadel was probably one of the best decisions I’ve ever made in my life. The Citadel will teach you what type of follower you wish to be, what type of leader you wish to be. It will help you focus on your goals and aspirations and it will provide a sense of comradery that cannot be rivaled.

2nd Lt. Angelea Lance, U.S. Army, military intelligence officer
Hometown: Fort Worth, Texas

My goals are to stay in the Army past my scholarship obligation and fulfill my passion of serving others and my nation in the best way possible.

For those considering attending The Citadel, know that it creates a solid foundation for your future by challenging you to be the best you can be.

2nd. Lt. David McBain, U.S. Army Aviation Center, pilot
Hometown: Damascus, Maryland

The best reason to attend The Citadel is the structure of the Corps and the many requirements that teach time management, plus the focus on academics afforded to the cadets.

Phillip Quinn, Department of Defense
Hometown: Highland Park, Texas

Double major: Intelligence and Security Studies, Political Science, minor in Cybersecurity.

I selected The Citadel to push myself.

Those deciding to come here must arrive knowing knowing you need to just keep your head down and enjoy the grind. You can’t make it at The Citadel alone. That’s the whole point of being in the Corps. You must work together with your classmates — that’s what makes the difference.

2nd Lt. Steven Reisinger, U.S. Marine Corps cyber officer, Quantico, Virginia
Hometown: Millerton, Pennsylvania

The Citadel sets you apart from your future competition in life. The interpersonal skills and ethics you learn from your time here transform you into the kind of leader this country so desperately needs.

And — the many friends you make here will become family for life.

Learning Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel

There are numerous ways to learn Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. There is a South Carolina Corps of Cadets program and a non-cadet online undergraduate program which includes veteran and active duty students.

There are five areas of concentration for undergraduates to select when majoring in Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. They include:

  • Business Intelligence
  • Chinese Area Studies
  • Counterterrorism
  • General Intelligence
  • Military Intelligence

There is also an option for cadets and students to use their tuition from one semester to study in Washington, D.C., through The Citadel in DC program.

The Citadel Graduate College offers a (non-cadet) Master of Arts in intelligence and Security Studies. There are close to 60 students in that program, learning online, with the options of selecting concentrations in Cybersecurity or Leadership. The Class of 2022 included 17 master’s level graduates.

For more information about Intelligence and Security Studies programs at The Citadel and how to apply, visit this webpage, email intell@citdel.edu.

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Citadel professor co-organizing conference marking 50th anniversary of Watergate https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-professor-co-organizing-conference-marking-50th-anniversary-of-watergate/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 17:28:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32471 Registration is now open for the free, online conference that will allow Watergate experts to explore some of the scandal's lingering mysteries.]]>

Photo: The Watergate Hotel complex in 1985 (Courtesy: National Archives)

Registration now open for free, online conference

The 50th anniversary of the Watergate break in, one of the most well-known political scandals in American history, will be on Friday, June 17.

The week before that, Melissa Graves, Ph.D., from The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, and Shane O’Sullivan, Ph.D., from Kingston School of Art in London, will convene a free, two-day virtual conference to reflect on the lasting impact Watergate had on American politics and culture.

The conference will be held on Thursday, June 9, and Friday, June 10, beginning at 10 a.m. on both days.

Much of Graves’s research is focused on Watergate, including a book on the FBI’s response. In Feb. 2020, she organized a historic panel, which reunited the FBI’s lead investigators for Watergate for the first time since the scandal.

“Watergate is a great example showing the importance and expertise of the intelligence community,” said Graves. “Though many Americans — and people around the world, for that matter — know of Watergate, fewer know about the fascinating stories of the case’s investigators. Through this conference, we will bring together experts who will explain the myths, the investigation, the results and much more.”

Five decades after it happened, and despite the amount written about the scandal, many mysteries from the case remain. The conference, titled “The Watergate Break-in: 50 Years Later,” will allow experts to explore some of those questions.

The surviving investigators and prosecutors still can’t understand why the burglars entered DNC headquarters in the early morning hours of June 17, 1972; or how the experienced intelligence operatives in the break-in team made such elementary mistakes, resulting in their arrests and President Nixon’s resignation two years later.

from “The Watergate Break-in: 50 Years Later” conference website

Speakers at the conference will include historians, academics, as well as Watergate prosecutors and investigators. The full program can be found here.

The Citadel’s Department of Intelligence and Security Studies is one of the largest and fastest-growing on campus, offering degrees to cadet and non-cadet undergraduates, as well as graduate students.

The online conference is free to attend. Click here to register.

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Advancing careers: certificates in intelligence analysis https://today.citadel.edu/advancing-careers-certificates-in-intelligence-analysis/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 17:40:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31812 woman on computerwoman on computerStudents in the Intelligence and Security Studies online program come from all over the country with a variety of backgrounds.]]> woman on computerwoman on computer

Identifying threats to the U.S.

By Barry Waldman for The Lowcountry Graduate Center

A young woman with a bachelor’s degree in the social sciences decided early in her career that what she really wanted to do was work in intelligence analysis for the federal government.

Intelligence analysis is the process by which information is collected on a potential enemy and analyzed to understand current operations, predict their behavior and determine any threats they may pose.

Courses completely online

The Citadel graduate certificate program in Intelligence Analysis is a five-course, asynchronous online program that introduces students to intelligence analysis concepts, applicable management principles, policy analysis, critical thinking and enhanced critical leadership skills necessary to successfully address security and intelligence challenges facing the United States.

By its nature, it is conducive to working professionals and military service member to pursue a graduate certificate without interrupting their careers.

As the Military College of South Carolina, The Citadel is uniquely positioned to offer this program, which serves for most students as a stepping stone to the full master’s degree program in intelligence analysis. With a certificate, a master’s degree student is nearly halfway through the curriculum.

All certificate students take the three core courses – Introduction to Intelligence, Intelligence Research and Analysis, and Intelligence Theory Application. A long list of electives provide context for the analysis techniques learned, in courses like Topics in Homeland Security, European History, Evolution of Military Leadership Thought, International Political Theory, and Russian Active Measures, to name just a sampling.

Dipping toes into academia

Larry Valero, Ph.D., head of The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, says most students complete the certificate program in two or three semesters, but they have a couple of years to do so. Many students are working professionals in mid-career who haven’t attended college for years and need to dip their toes in academia before committing to a full master’s degree program. Once they have established their ability to juggle work, family and the rigors of graduate school coursework, most go on for the full master’s.

Students in the program come from all over the country with a variety of backgrounds, Valero said. Some are serving members of the armed forces, first responders like police officers and firefighters, some work in Homeland Security. Others work in completely unrelated fields and have no intelligence background whatsoever but are interested in a career transition.

Putin and Intelligence Analysis

Events today involving Russia and its western neighbors, and the intelligence community’s need to understand Vladimir Putin’s motivations and incentives, are testament to the urgency of intelligence analysis. The future of Eastern Europe could be at stake.

“Our field is very interdisciplinary, running the gamut of politics, people, and technology,” Valero said. It is so topical and timely, there is no limit to what can be applied to the field. We offer that additional background that analysts may need to know now and in the future.”

For more information on studying Intelligence and Security Studies with The Citadel email intel@citadel.edu.

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The Citadel faculty serving as expert resources on Ukraine and many trending issues https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-faculty-serving-as-expert-resources-on-ukraine-and-many-trending-issues/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 21:17:17 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31308 Photo: Dr. Jeffrey Rogg, a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, during an interview with WCSC-TV on Wednesday, March 16. Faculty answers call to contribute from media,]]>

Photo: Dr. Jeffrey Rogg, a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies, during an interview with WCSC-TV on Wednesday, March 16.

Faculty answers call to contribute from media, community

Many of those working to fulfill the mission to educate and develop principled leaders at The Citadel, regularly demonstrate their own leadership by serving as contributing experts for media reports and community interests.

Members of the college’s five schools are often called upon for their insight expertise in a variety of fields. Jeffrey Rogg, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies within the School of Humanities and Social Science is just one of many examples of the relevant and insightful expertise found on campus.

As the third week of the Russian invasion of Ukraine came to a close, Rogg spoke with WCSC-TV, the local CBS affiliate, to help viewers in the Lowcountry understand more about the war and what it could mean for the United States.

When asked about the motives behind the invasion, Rogg answered: “From Vladimir Putin’s view, he believes that the greatest tragedy to befall modern Russia was the collapse of the Soviet Union. Because of that, he’s been intent on not just restoring the Soviet Union or even the Russian Empire, but also the pride and the power of Russia.”

To see more of the coverage from Rogg’s interview with Live 5 News, click here.

“One of the many strengths of an education at The Citadel is the access to experts who can put critical global events – such as Russia’s war in Ukraine – into a wider context,” said Brian Madison Jones, Ph.D., dean of The Citadel’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences. “As the Military College of South Carolina, we’re uniquely positioned to help our cadets, students and community understand what is currently happening and what it means.”

Throughout multiple newscasts, Rogg discussed the historical context for the invasion, what a no-fly zone would entail, how the war could affect the American economy and a range of other topics.

“Within the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, professors from the Departments of Intelligence and Security Studies, Political Science and History, including military history, are studying these events in real time for use in the classroom and offering expert insight and analysis to help the next generation of leaders understand and address the great challenges of today and tomorrow,” Jones said.

Other examples of The Citadel faculty in the news

Shankar Banik, Ph.D.
Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences – Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics

South Carolina National Guard attends Cyber Boot Camp at The Citadel
DVIDS

Conference series helps Army identify U.S. infrastructure risks
The Watch

Hee Yoon Kwon, Ph.D.
Department of Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Economics – Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

The continuing supply chain saga
South Carolina Public Radio

Side effects of pipeline shutdown linger in Lowcountry
WCIV – ABC News 4

David Preston, Ph.D.
Department of History – School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Citadel professor curates new perspectives on Revolutionary War
Moultrie News

When young George Washington started a war
Smithsonian Magazine

John Weinstein, Ph.D.
Department of Biology – Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics

Tires: The plastic polluter you never thought about
National Geographic

Citadel experiment will analyze how PPE degrades in coastal environments
The Post and Courier

John Zardus, Ph.D.
Department of Biology – Zucker Family School of Science and Mathematics

Some barnacles can more around to improve feeding position
The Scientist

For information about joining the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, click here.

To learn more about non-cadet undergraduate and graduate programs offered by The Citadel, click here.

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Getting to know Sergeant First Class Kellin J. Varela, a Women’s History Month feature https://today.citadel.edu/getting-to-know-sergeant-first-class-kellin-j-varela-a-womens-history-month-feature/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 17:41:12 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31237 "As a first-generation Hispanic, I was blessed to receive my American citizenship through the United States Army."]]>

By Cadet Samantha Walton, Regimental Public Affairs Officer, Class of 2022

As a cadet attending The Citadel on contract with the U.S. Army, I spend a great deal of time with the Army ROTC Palmetto Battalion on campus and the active duty professionals there who lead us. I wanted to do an interview with someone in our detachment for Women’s History Month, and I selected Sergeant First Class Kellin J. Varela.

SFC Varela is a native of El Progreso Yoro, Honduras, but has spent much of her life living in the United States. She entered the Army in September 2005, attending Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, where she earned the distinct honor of being a Human Resource Specialist (42A).

SW: What made you want to join the military?

SFC Varela: The reason I joined the military was based on the opportunities for education. During my time in the military, I have received my Associate of Science in Criminal Justice, Bachelor of Science Interdisciplinary Studies and am three classes away from completing a Master of Arts Degree in Human Services Counseling in Criminal Justice.

As a first-generation Hispanic, I was blessed to receive my American citizenship through the United States Army. My number one choice was the United States Marine Corps, but I was impatient to leave home after high school graduation so I joined the United States Army instead as to not have to wait. Also, through the Army I’ve been blessed to travel the world, which was not an opportunity I have had before.

SW: What powerful female figure has inspired you?

SFC Varela: I believe she is retired from military service now, but Tonja Hill was First Sergeant Hill, she was my inspiration as a female role model. As a young soldier, she made me the leader that I am. 1SG Hill would always say, “pay it forward,” so I did. As a young soldier, I had terrible leadership skills, but she changed that. I adhered to the creed that “all soldiers are entitled to outstanding leadership; I will provide that leadership. I know my soldiers, and I will always place their needs above my own.” I take the Creed of the Non-commissioned Officer seriously.

SW: What advice would you give to young women following in your footsteps? Or looking to join the military?

SFC Varela: You can do anything that you put your mind to. Remember, you are your own worst enemy and you are stronger than you think. As women, we don’t give each other the credit we deserve. Never underestimate your potential. You are powerful beyond measure.

SW: What do you feel is the biggest challenge women in the military face today? What about in society at large?

SFC Varela: The biggest challenge women in the military face today is sexism, sexual harassment and sexual assault. As a woman and a minority, you will experience racism and injustice during all ranks. Serving as the Battalion Sexual Harassment/Assault and Response Prevention representative, I am passionate and a true advocate for our women.

While assigned to this position, I have assisted cadets with concerns or issues. Contributing to the embodiment of the Army Values, I am also Equal Opportunity Leader (EO) trained. As a trained EO representative, I ensure cadets and cadre alike practice the Army Values and treat all persons with dignity and respect. I am not afraid to correct an issue the minute I see it, recruiting other cadres to help teach cadets what appropriate conduct is.

SW: What is an obstacle you faced while growing up, or in the military? What did you learn from this?

SFC Varela: As a child in Honduras, I experienced traumatic events that have made me very resilient as a leader now. I’m a very compassionate, dedicated and passionate leader who always takes the time to help those in need. The one obstacle in the Army I have faced is that I don’t feel I get the same opportunities as some others, but I love being the underdog because the fight to move up and to serve with increasing levels of authority, such as where I am today, is a testament to other minority women that you can accomplish anything.

Regimental Public Affairs officer, Major Samantha Walton is from Macon, Georgia and attends The Citadel on an U.S. Army scholarship. She will accept a commission to become an officer upon graduating. Walton is majoring in Political Science.

The women of The Citadel Army ROTC department pose for a portrait in Jenkins Hall at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday, February 10 2021. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)
A 2021 photograph of women serving in The Citadel Army ROTC department, with SFC Kellin Verela seen second from right.
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