Humanities & Social Sciences – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Fri, 18 Jan 2019 18:12:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.9 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Humanities & Social Sciences – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Waterford celebrates 265th anniversary of Washington’s visit https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-david-preston-waterford-washington-anniversary/ Thu, 27 Dec 2018 11:00:34 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=5299 Citadel historian and author, Prof. David PrestonCitadel historian and author, Prof. David PrestonCitadel historian David Preston has spent years researching and exploring how the British, French and Native American communities co-existed in the late 18th century.]]> Citadel historian and author, Prof. David PrestonCitadel historian and author, Prof. David Preston

As seen on GoErie.com by Ron Leonardi

‘Trail to a Nation’ activities commemorate George Washington’s 1753 Waterford visit.

On Dec. 15, 1753, 21-year-old George Washington was wrapping up a five-day diplomatic visit in Waterford following a dangerous, hazardous six-week journey from Williamsburg, Virginia.

Washington was sent to the French-occupied Fort LeBoeuf to deliver a message from Virginia Royal Lieutenant Governor Robert Dinwiddie informing the French they were trespassing on lands claimed by England and ordering them to evacuate the fort and their Ohio Valley presence.

The Fort LeBoeuf Historical Society on Saturday marked the 265th anniversary of Washington’s Waterford visit with a “Trail to a Nation” celebration, which included numerous exhibits and activities throughout town.

Historian David Preston, a professor at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, presented luncheon and dinner lectures titled “The Military Education of George Washington From Fort LeBoeuf to the Continental Army.”

Washington in Waterford

Preston, a Grove City native, presented both of his lectures at the Waterford American Legion post at 120 W. Fourth St. and participated in multiple book signings during his visit.

“It’s always meaningful as a historian to come to a site like Fort LeBoeuf and connect this rich history with audiences that appreciate it and are coming from multiple organizations and perspectives,” Preston, 46, said. “It’s a real treat.”

Preston has spent years researching and exploring how the British, French and Native American communities co-existed in the late 18th century.

Washington in Waterford

Washington departed Williamsburg on Oct. 31, 1753, for Waterford. After spending about five days in Waterford, Washington began his return journey to Williamsburg. He returned there in early January 1754.

“It’s a very formative moment for the young Washington in the sense he’s plunged right into the thick of international politics of imperial rivalry, Indian diplomacy, and the journey itself was an education unto itself,” Preston said.

“It gives him valuable perspectives on a number of levels — moving across the land, geography, the geopolitics of this area, and more immediately what the French were doing in 1753 and what they planned to do to anchor their control of the Ohio Valley in the next year.”

Preston addressed about 80 guests at Saturday’s luncheon and about 50 at the evening dinner.

“What I wanted to impart about his 1753 journey is how extraordinary his mission was,” Preston said. “The length of it, the conditions in which he travels, the depths of winter, and also the extraordinary literary achievement of George Washington’s journal, which is published after he returns.

“It is incredibly well detailed, filled with valuable military intelligence, geographical information, notes on diplomacy with native peoples, and it demonstrates that this 21-year-old man had incredible situational awareness to be able to note all of these details around him,” Preston said. “It’s really an amazing literary achievement.”

Saturday’s commemoration included exhibits and displays at the Waterford-based Fort LeBoeuf Historical Museum, the Judson House, and the Eagle Hotel.

Waterford resident Leon Sam Briggs, an enrolled Tonawanda Seneca of the Hawk clan, presented lectures at the American Legion luncheon and dinner outlining Washington’s diplomatic relationship with Native American tribes.

Erie resident Joan Mancuso designed medallions to commemorate the anniversary of Washington’s visit. The medallions, which were available for purchase, show Washington and a guide and their Washington’s Trail route to Fort LeBoeuf.

Pittsburgh artist John Buxton donated a framed print, which was raffled, depicting Washington’s Waterford visit. Titled “Domain of Three Nations,” the print depicts Washington delivering the message from British authorities to the French at Fort LeBoeuf.

About a dozen re-enactors participated in Saturday’s activities.

“This is basically celebrating the heritage of Waterford,” said Patrick Jenks, vice president of the Fort LeBoeuf Historical Society. “We get a lot of people coming to the museum here and they know Washington came here but they don’t know the conditions that it was under. It was his first public mission, it’s his foray into diplomacy. He learned so much, but this really is a celebration of how far we’ve come.

“The town is basically created around the remnants of the French fort, then the British fort and then the American fort,” he said. “People don’t understand just how important this area was and why there was conflict between the French and the British.”

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When one of the most powerful people in the world comes to campus https://today.citadel.edu/when-one-of-the-most-powerful-people-in-the-world-comes-to-campus/ Fri, 21 Dec 2018 11:00:24 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=5399 The Honorable Dan Coats, Director of National Intelligence, meeting with cadets at The CitadelThe Honorable Dan Coats, Director of National Intelligence, meeting with cadets at The Citadel“So when you mention The Citadel, people immediately think 'solid people, strong foundation, and commitment to country.' Everything this institution is respected for you carry out of here, and I think that’s a great advantage whether in the military or in the intelligence community.” The honorable Dan Coats, DNI]]> The Honorable Dan Coats, Director of National Intelligence, meeting with cadets at The CitadelThe Honorable Dan Coats, Director of National Intelligence, meeting with cadets at The Citadel

Reflecting on a day spent with America’s Director of National Intelligence

By Cadet Rhaei Brown, with Kim Keelor

America’s Director of National Intelligence (DNI), Dan Coats is without dispute one of the most powerful people in the world. As DNI, he leads the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) and serves as the principal intelligence advisor to the President. What that means is that Director Coats oversees not just the FBI and the CIA, but 17 agencies that comprise the IC.

As Regimental Public Affairs NCO for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets and as the head of the cadet newspaper, The Brigadier, I was assigned to spend the day with the DNI when he came to The Citadel in September. He is undoubtedly one of the most high-level guests the college has had the honor of hosting.

Director Coats was here to be the keynote speaker for the 2018 Intelligence and Cyber Security Conference at The Citadel. In addition to speaking, he took the time to meet with cadets and students and some of the college’s leaders, at his request. He said he wanted to do more than arrive, speak, and leave− he wanted to meet as many people as he could, especially cadets considering careers in intelligence fields.

Dr. Mark Bebensee; Lt. Gen. John. B. Sams, USAF (Ret.); Director Dan Coats, DNI; Capt. Geno Paluso USN (Ret.) at The Citadel Sep.25, 2018
Dr. Mark Bebensee; Lt. Gen. John. B. Sams, USAF (Ret.); Director Dan Coats, DNI; Capt. Geno Paluso USN (Ret.) at The Citadel Sep.25, 2018

Discussion on intelligence and security studies

Director Coats’ visit began with a meeting with some of The Citadel’s administrative leaders and the Regimental Commander of the Corps. They talked about our college’s intelligence and cyber security programs, and about what Director Coats said was a continuously expanding need for highly trained intelligence professionals.

The group asked the DNI what his top piece of advice would be for students wanting to work in intelligence and he said, “Get off of Facebook!” which elicited laughter throughout the room. He elaborated by saying, “Be careful what you say and be careful what you do, because they’re going to go a long way back in your history as they consider what kind of person you are.”

Keynote address at Intelligence and Cyber Security Conference

Next, the Director’ delivered the keynote address to the several hundred people attending the conference. There were people from all areas of intelligence work there who were eagerly following his words.

The address centered on what Coats described as the looming threat that China poses to the nation, and what the IC is doing to counteract it. His list was extensive and involved all of the agencies.

“We are educating the private sector about Chinese activities and sharing information about cyber threats. We have warned universities about Chinese efforts to exploit our academic system. We are engaging with state and local officials about the threats they face from foreign influences and cyber intrusions,” Coats said. He continued by explaining that at the federal level, U.S. intelligence informs policy debates about the “nation’s response to China’s rise.”

Director Coats ended his speech by encouraging cadets and students to consider serving their country, recalling the old Uncle Sam recruiting poster that read, “We need YOU.” He said, “I’m fully aware of the sense of service that runs through the veins of those here at The Citadel. We need leaders with integrity, and professionalism, and a sense of duty. That is what you are learning here at the Citadel and we need you.”

Cadets and the DNI at lunch

Director f National Intelligence, Daniel Coats, speaking to members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets who study intelligence, Sept. 25, 2018
Director of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats, speaking to members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets who study intelligence, Sept. 25, 2018

Director Coats then spent time with a group of cadets and veteran students who are studying intelligence, sitting down to share lunch with them. This was arranged at his request, in advance of his visit.

He invited them to ask questions as many questions as they wanted, which they did. The questions ranged from asking about specific threats from Russia and China and how those are handled, to asking how the intelligence gathered by the agencies influences current events and national conversations.

Not just at lunch, but throughout the day, Director Coats answered dozens of questions from cadets including many about how to break into the intelligence field, find jobs within the agencies, and how to prepare now to make the best impression later for those pursing military, agency, or civilian intelligence service.

How The Citadel provides an advantage

DNI Dan Coats with intelligence and cyber security studies cadets at The Citadel
DNI Dan Coats with intelligence and cyber security studies cadets and Prof. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim at The Citadel; Rhaei Brown front row, second from left.

Before he departed, I asked Director Coats this question: “What qualities do think a Citadel cadet might have that could provide an advantage, or even set us apart, going into the intelligence community?” He said, “You already have the advantage. You have a great program in place. The Citadel is well respected with the type of people that come here, why they come here, the values they learn and reinforce while they’re here.”

Director Coats concluded by saying, “So when you mention The Citadel, people immediately think ‘solid people, strong foundation, and commitment to country.’ Everything this institution is respected for you carry out of here, and I think that’s a great advantage whether in the military or in the intelligence community.”

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Black American national security & foreign policy next generation leaders https://today.citadel.edu/black-america-national-security-foreign-policy-citadel-rahim/ Thu, 20 Dec 2018 11:00:33 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=5341 NewAmerica.org logoNewAmerica.org logoSince 9/11, there has been a growing number of Black Americans making a difference in the national security sector. Citadel professor Dr. Fraser-Rahim is one of them.]]> NewAmerica.org logoNewAmerica.org logo

As seen on NewAmerica.org

 

From Russia meddling in U.S. elections, to counterterrorism in Africa, to North Korean Nuclear Proliferation, our country continues to face new and evolving national security threats. On top of so much else, the November midterm elections have underscored Americans’ desire for change away from how Washington politics has long been run—and by whom.

Since 9/11, there has been a growing number of Black Americans making a difference in the national security sector. Many of them are former Obama Administration Appointees, lawyers, congressional staff, intelligence analysts, military veterans, diplomats, foreign aid practitioners, entrepreneurs, economists, and beyond – inspired by role models that have broken glass ceilings in national security such as Ambassador Andrew Young, General Colin Powell, Secretary Condoleezza Rice, Ambassador Patrick Gaspard, Ambassador Bonnie Jenkins, Ambassador Ruth Davis, and many others.

The Diversity in National Security Network and New America are pleased to honor the contributions of 35 Black American experts in U.S. national security and foreign policy. The list features experts currently serving in government, think tanks, academia, non-governmental organizations, and the media. Selection is based on excellence and leadership; their current work in national security or foreign policy; and their contributions to their issues of expertise through thought leadership.

Expertise: Sub-Saharan Africa

Dr. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Homeland Security
Dr. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Homeland Security

Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, Ph.D., Executive Director, Quilliam International and Assistant Professor, The Citadel

Dr. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim is the Executive Director, North America for Quilliam International, the world’s oldest counter-extremist organization with HQ’s in the United Kingdom and offices in Washington, DC where he overseas policy issues centering around rehabilitation, demobilization and deradicalization against violent extremism. In addition, he is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. He is an expert on violent extremism issues both domestically and overseas and a scholar on Africa and Islamic history. Follow his work here, and connect with him on LinkedIn and Twitter.

See the complete list of all 35 leaders and their biographies in the original article here.

Learn more about The Citadel’s intelligence and security studies and cyber defense programs here.

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Cadet Richard DeKold named Schwarzman Scholar https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-cadet-schwarzman-scholar/ Mon, 03 Dec 2018 17:32:47 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=5065 Cadet Chad Dekold stands in front of the Ashley RiverCadet Chad Dekold stands in front of the Ashley RiverCadet Richard "Chad" DeKold, a member of The Citadel Class of 2019, and 2nd Battalion Commander for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, is one of the students selected to receive a prestigious Schwarzman Scholarship.]]> Cadet Chad Dekold stands in front of the Ashley RiverCadet Chad Dekold stands in front of the Ashley River

Cadet Richard “Chad” DeKold, a member of The Citadel Class of 2019, and 2nd Battalion Commander for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, is one of the students selected to receive a prestigious Schwarzman Scholarship. DeKold, who attends The Citadel on a U.S. Army ROTC scholarship, is in the Honors Program and is pursing two majors: Intelligence and Security Studies, and Political Science with a focus on International Politics and Military Affairs. He is studying Chinese as his minor.

The Schwarzman Scholars program was started in 2016 with the goal of preparing the next generation of global leaders. The 147 college students selected for the Schwarzman Scholars Class of 2020 will pursue a Masters in Global Affairs with concentrations in public policy, economics and business, or international studies at Schwarzman College which is part of Tsinghua University in Beijing.

According to the program announcement, the selection process is designed to identify the most promising young leaders from around the world. The site’s description of DeKold is as follows:

“Richard DeKold reformed the leadership development program at The Citadel as one of its top Cadet Commanders and pioneered interfaith dialogues on LGBT inclusion. He has interned for the Institute for the Study of War’s Afghanistan Project in D.C. and analyzed the security of Chinese investments in Qatar for the Pudong Institute in Shanghai. As a Schwarzman Scholar, Richard plans to serve as an Infantry Officer and identify areas for Sino-American security cooperation. Richard is 21 years old and from the United States.”

DeKold was one of 400 semi-finalists who interviewed in one of four cities around the world before a panel of CEOs, former heads of state, university presidents and other global leaders. The final selection of scholars was announced Dec. 3.

“Our newest class includes a diverse group of future leaders from around the world. They join a global network of Scholars who have committed themselves to being a force for change, regardless of where their professional or personal passions take them. My hope is that a year in Beijing will inspire and challenge these students in ways they haven’t even imagined. I look forward to seeing how this new class will leave its mark,” said Stephen A. Schwarzman, Co-Founder, Chairman and CEO of Blackstone, and Chairman of Schwarzman Scholars.

Some of DeKold’s other accomplishments include completing the Army Ranger Challenge in 2015 and 2016. He prepared a Charleston Port security analysis for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, competed as a member of the The Citadel ethics bowl team, and studied abroad in Taiwan as part of the Department of Defense’s Global Officer Program. Additionally, DeKold managed a team of college and high school students for a candidate for U.S. Senate, is a member of the Cordell Airborne Ranger Society at The Citadel, and is an Eagle Scout.

Additionally, DeKold is featured in the college’s Our Mighty Citadel campaign for his work as a volunteer during Hurricane Florence. Watch his video here.

 

 

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Earn a degree in Intelligence and Security in Charleston https://today.citadel.edu/earn-a-degree-in-intelligence-and-security-in-charleston/ Fri, 23 Nov 2018 11:00:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4848 Mike Switzer, program hostMike Switzer, program hostIntelligence, homeland and cyber security issues are constantly in the news – from the Russian elections interference to Facebook hacks to the recent rash of pipe bomb mailings.  Which is why our next guest’s Lowcountry university recently launched a degree program focused on intelligence and security. ]]> Mike Switzer, program hostMike Switzer, program host

As heard on South Carolina Public Radio, The South Carolina Business Review

Intelligence, homeland and cyber security issues are constantly in the news – from the Russian elections interference to Facebook hacks to the recent rash of pipe bomb mailings.  Which is why our next guest’s Lowcountry university recently launched a degree program focused on intelligence and security.

Mike Switzer interviews Carl Jensen, Ph.D., co-director of the Citadel Center for Cyber, Intelligence, and Security Studies at The Citadel in Charleston, SC.

Listen to the interview here.

Dr. Carl Jensen at SC Public Radio studios
Dr. Carl Jensen at SC Public Radio studios
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The Citadel in Cyprus – being thankful for new cultural experiences https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-in-cyprus-being-thankful-for-new-cultucadet-global-scholars-are-engrossed-in-learning-about-the-cypriot-culture-that-surrounds-them-including-the-architecture-economics-history-languag/ Thu, 22 Nov 2018 11:00:48 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4989 Citadel Cadet JoAnna Windborn visiting the Hala Sultan Tekke mosque in Larnaca, CyprusCitadel Cadet JoAnna Windborn visiting the Hala Sultan Tekke mosque in Larnaca, CyprusCitadel Cadets studying abroad in Cyprus, Greece are engrossed in learning about the Cypriot culture that surrounds them.]]> Citadel Cadet JoAnna Windborn visiting the Hala Sultan Tekke mosque in Larnaca, CyprusCitadel Cadet JoAnna Windborn visiting the Hala Sultan Tekke mosque in Larnaca, Cyprus
Citadel Cadet JoAnna Windborn visiting the Hala Sultan Tekke mosque in Larnaca, Cyprus

Cadet global scholars are engrossed in learning about the Cypriot culture that surrounds them, including the architecture, economics, history, language, religion and food.

Cadet Taurus Brown took part in a cooking lesson and demonstration as part of one of his courses this semester in Cyprus and sent these observations:

During the cooking demonstration, I learned that being a cook is no easy job. This conclusion may seem obvious, but one never truly understands this until you have three vegans give you three different limitations and send every plate prepared to their liking back to you for changes.

However, I can say there was one dish that was never sent back and that is the Tzatziki (yogurt dip). This dip became my favorite as soon as I realized how good it tastes with pita bread which is the most common pastry of Cyprus. I love it and eat it here every day.

Citadel Global Scholars in Cyprus learning how to cook Cypriot style

The Citadel Global Scholars travel to far away places for a semester at a time. These full-immersion programs provide time to explore and learn in those countries while only paying a little more than the regular semester’s tuition.

One of the most popular programs is the one that takes cadets like Brown, Cameron Ewer and JoAnne Winborn to Cyprus. Some of the things they’ve gotten to experience include the Hala Sultan Tekke mosque, the third holiest pilgrimage site in Islam. They’ve also explored ancient churches including the Church of Saint Lazarus.

Citadel cadets at the Lazarus Church in Larnaca, Cyprus
Citadel cadets at the Lazarus Church in Larnaca, Cyprus

They also scored some beach time at Famagusta Beach in the Turkish occupied zone of Cyprus.

Citadel cadets at Famagusta Beach
Citadel cadets at Famagusta Beach

The Global Scholars Program in Cyprus offers cadets enrolled in nearly every academic major at The Citadel the opportunity to spend a semester abroad, taking courses relevant to their majors, while paying only $500 more than the regular semester of study on campus at The Citadel.

The program is the product of a campus-wide effort among academic schools and administrative departments. Cadets travel to the Mediterranean island-nation for a rigorous semester of academic courses, cultural excursions, and unforgettable immersion in a foreign country.

The Global Scholars tuition and fees cover:

  • Round-trip airfare
  • Up to 18 credit-hours of courses
  • Lodging
  • Meal plan
  • Textbooks
  • Excursions

For more information on The Citadel Study Abroad programs and scholarship opportunities, please visit this web page or email studyabroad@citadel.edu.

See some of the Facebook posts from the cadets and students in Cyprus here.

 

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Plastic scraps from Charleston Harbor make for trashy art https://today.citadel.edu/plastic-scraps-from-charleston-harbor-make-for-trashy-art/ Mon, 05 Nov 2018 18:45:37 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4658 The Citadel Trash ArtThe Citadel Trash ArtA group of cadets from The Citadel have entered a diving pelican sculpture in the Port Royal Sound Foundation Recycled Art Contest, to be judged against other schools and groups for a potential $2,000 in prizes.]]> The Citadel Trash ArtThe Citadel Trash Art

As seen in The Post and Courier by Bo Petersen

Some 7 tons of plastic or rubber litter float in Charleston Harbor at any given time, everything from tire shreds to drink bottles.

This past weekend, pieces from five bags of harbor junk compete for cash prizes near Hilton Head Island.

A group of cadets from The Citadel have entered a diving pelican sculpture in the Port Royal Sound Foundation Recycled Art Contest, to be judged against other schools and groups for a potential $2,000 in prizes.

It’s an unusual extension of research by cadets under physiology professor John Weinstein. He estimated the tonnage of plastic pollution in the harbor and is studying its sources and consumption by marine creatures.

Cadets under Fine Arts professor Rick Sargent partnered with biology students on the art project.

They’ll be bringing their best to the contest. The pelican’s neck is fashioned from the skin of an orange traffic cone. Its head is a clump of plastic bags with bottle caps for eyes. Its wings are crushed beer cans. It appears to be diving to feed in water made from plastic.

Floating on the “water” are a plastic fast food tray, pairs of water shoes, an old whiskey bottle, a warped LP with a gold ball in its center hole and a section of car tire tread.

All of that came from bags of litter the cadets collected — within an hour — from the Ashley River marsh near campus.

Earlier in the week, a group of the 10 or so cadets who have had their hands in the artwork leaned over the table in their camouflage uniforms, putting the last pieces together. They looked like MASH surgeons.

The Citadel Tiffany Silverman Trash Art
The Citadel art department’s Tiffany Silverman helps Caroline Klauber, Skler Addy, and Rya Salter reposition a diving pelican the cadets were sculpting, made mostly from trash they collected from the edges of the Ashley River. Wade Spees/Staff

“I was surprised to see how well the materials came together to create the pelican. It’s actually turning out pretty good,” said cadet Skylar Cooper.

Sargent saw the project as a means to teach how art can have function as well as form, along with a conservation lesson. If they win a prize, the money will be used to provide art supplies for elementary and middle school students at an educational summer camp run by The Citadel.

The effort is both trendy and timely.

Recycled plastics have become a popular art form, pushed by anti-plastic pollution groups and adopted by a number of leading artists.

More commercial uses are being found for the material. South Carolina businesses are turning recycled plastic into a variety of products, including carpet, car parts, furniture stuffing and sprinkler heads.

Meanwhile, more municipalities are banning single-use plastic bags because of the amount of litter and dangers of its consumption by wildlife.

The city of Isle of Palms in 2015 became the first in the state to pass an ordinance banning businesses from offering the bags to customers. Folly Beach followed suit about a year later, adding foam containers to its ban. Other municipalities have now approved bans. Charleston City Council will vote Nov. 13 on a ban.

Some restaurants have begun doing away with plastic straws.

All that is taking place against a bill in the Statehouse waiting for the Senate’s session in January, a bill that would make the Legislature the only government body that can restrict the use of bags, or “auxiliary containers” in its language.

The Citadel Trash Art Shoe
This shoe was going to be attached to the base to support a diving pelican that Citadel cadets were sculpting, mostly from trash they collected from the edges of the Ashley River. Wade Spees/Staff

Supporters said any limitations would hurt the business sector and the bans do not get to the nub of the problem, which is litter. Opponents said the measure was an attempt to take away local government control over anti-pollution efforts, and that the plastics industry is seeking preferential treatment in the Statehouse.

The measure passed the House in the spring by a 3 to 2 margin.

Roughly 37,500 tons of plastics were recycled in the state in 2016-17. That’s up from about 24,000 tons five years earlier, according to the state’s environmental agency.

But that’s still a fraction of the tons trashed. About six billion plastic bottles end up in landfills annually across the two Carolinas.

Weinstein couldn’t help a wry smile as he watched the “fruits” of his research sculpted.

“It’s conserving by cleaning it up, but it’s also raising awareness of not only the global problem but our own backyard problem,” he said. “And it’s better than having it sit in the marsh.”

Seanna Adcox contributed to this report.

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VFW Scholarship Helps Veteran Continue His Studies at Military College https://today.citadel.edu/vfw-scholarship-helps-veteran-continue-his-studies-at-military-college/ Thu, 01 Nov 2018 21:37:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4710 VFW Scholarship RecipientVFW Scholarship RecipientJuan Campana wants to use his Intelligence and Security Studies major to return to work in the federal government after graduation.]]> VFW Scholarship RecipientVFW Scholarship Recipient

As seen in VFW

‘As an immigrant, serving the United States of America is the most honorable duty one can have’

Juan Campana was born in Ecuador and immigrated to the United States at a young age. Entering the United States Marine Corps after September 11, 2001, he spent four years as a Combat Engineer. He served two tours in Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom and at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, N.C.

Once Campana retired from the military, he continued to work in other capacities for the United States government. Campana then enrolled into The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina and wants to use his Intelligence and Security Studies major to return to work in the federal government after graduation.

As he was receiving a free haircut at Sport Clips on Veteran’s Day, Campana heard about the VFW’s “Sport Clips Help A Hero Scholarship” for the first time. When his GI Bill was exhausted two years later, he was recommended to apply by his campus chapter of Student Veterans Association. The scholarship has made all the difference to Campana’s future.

“I cannot be more grateful and honored to receive this award. I am able to continue my studies at The Citadel. Without this, I would not be able to graduate,” he said.

After experiencing the transition from military to civilian life, Campana has advice for other service members and veterans considering pursuing education. “Don’t be afraid to take a leap of faith in leaving the military. It may be a culture shock immersing yourself into a civilian role, but higher education is a nexus to veteran/civilian transition,” he advised.

“Remember, self-improvement is the key to success and education cannot be taken away from you,” Campana concluded.

Learn more about the VFW’s “Sport Clips Help A Hero Scholarship.”

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The Citadel’s Mark Clark Chair to provide lecture Oct. 30 https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadels-mark-clark-chair-to-provide-lecture-oct-30/ Thu, 25 Oct 2018 22:44:18 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4457 Lt. Col. Charles P. Neimeyer, USMC (ret.), The CitadelLt. Col. Charles P. Neimeyer, USMC (ret.), The CitadelOne of the U.S. Marine Corps' greatest historians, Lt. Col. Charles P. Neimeyer, UMSC (Ret.), Ph.D., is The Citadel's 2018 Mark Clark Chair. ]]> Lt. Col. Charles P. Neimeyer, USMC (ret.), The CitadelLt. Col. Charles P. Neimeyer, USMC (ret.), The Citadel

The Battle of Guadalcanal: Fighting and Winning a Single Naval Campaign

6:30 p.m.
October 30
Bond Hall 165
Free and open to the public

One of the U.S. Marine Corps’ greatest historians, Lt. Col. Charles P. Neimeyer, USMC (Ret.), Ph.D., is The Citadel’s 2018 Mark Clark Chair. Neimeyer will hold a public lecture on Oct. 30 that is open to the entire Lowcountry community about The Battle of Guadalcanal, one of the most discussed battles of World War II.

“In August 1942, the United States was presented with a rare strategic opportunity to go on the offensive in the Pacific war against Imperial Japan. The victory of the U.S. Navy at Midway just a few months before had opened this door. However, the U.S. Army and the Joint Staff war planners in Washington were rightfully focused on a ‘Europe First’ strategy since Nazi Germany presented a far greater threat to allied security than Japan at that moment.”

Neimeyer was honored by the United States Congress in 2017 after serving 11 years as the Director and Chief of Marine Corps History at the base in Quanitco, Virginia. During his 20-year active duty military career he served in all three Marine Corps Divisions, on the military staff at the White House for Presidents George H. W. Bush and William J. Clinton, and as an instructor at the U.S. Naval War College. Neimeyer retired from active service in 1996 at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for his performance as a professor of national security affairs. He went on to become a professor at University of Oklahoma, returned to the Naval War College as a full professor of national security affairs and dean, eventually accepting the position as the Director and Chief of Marine Corps History, Quantico.

A prolific author, Neimeyer has published articles in a variety of journals and magazines. He is the author of the following monographs: America Goes to War: A Social History of the Continental Army, 1775-1783, (NYU Press, 1996), The Revolutionary War, (Greenwood Press, 2007), and War Comes to the Chesapeake: The British Campaigns to Control the Bay, 1813-1814, (Naval Institute, 2015). For this last book, Neimeyer received the Simmons-Shaw award for best history by a federal historian from the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation in 2016.

Neimeyer’s presentation is sponsored by the Department of History in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at The Citadel.

This professorship is a Chair of Military History established in 1981 specifically to honor General Mark Clark and the general’s lifetime of service. Clark was still living at the time the decision to create The Citadel Department of History Mark Clark Chair was made and actively participated in the formation of the endowment.

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Ambassador of Georgia to the USA speaks at The Citadel Nov. 1 https://today.citadel.edu/ambassador-of-georgia-to-the-usa-speaks-at-the-citadel-nov-1/ Thu, 25 Oct 2018 14:03:41 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=4436 Ambassador Davit BakradzeAmbassador Davit BakradzeDavit Bakradze, the Ambassador of Georgia to the USA, will speak at The Citadel Nov. 1.]]> Ambassador Davit BakradzeAmbassador Davit Bakradze

The New Cold War: Democracy v. Authoritarianism in the Post-Soviet Era: A Discussion With Georgian Ambassador David Bakradze

How serious is the threat posed by resurgent authoritarianism across the globe? What must the world’s democracies do to compete successfully in the years ahead? Those questions will be addressed by Ambassador David Bakradze in an open discussion at The Citadel. The ambassador’s address takes place at 6:45 p.m. Nov. 1 in Bond Hall, room 165. It is free and open to the public.

Bakradze invites cadets, students, faculty, and staff of The Citadel, the College of Charleston, and members of the Charleston community to participate in the discussion.

“Ambassador David Bakradze’s visit affords a rare opportunity for the citizens of our community to gain a better understanding of the challenges, and opportunities, that lie ahead on this new frontier of American national interests and values,” added Bo Moore, Dean of the School of Humanities & Sciences.

A native of Tbilisi, Georgia, Bakradze earned advanced degrees in international economics and international law from Tbilisi State University. His many, prior positions of governmental leadership include service as Georgia’s Ambassador to Greece, Counselor of the Permanent Mission to the United Nations, and State Minister on European and Euro-Atlantic Integration.

“Georgia’s emergence as a representative democracy on the southern border of Russia at the crossroads of Asia and Europe is one of the most significant international developments of the post-Soviet era, “ said Jack Porter, Ph.D., Professor of International Politics & Military Affairs at The Citadel. “Georgia’s subsequent defense to support its independence from Russian encroachments provides a model for others to follow.”

The Ambassador’s presentation is sponsored by the International Politics and Military Affairs, and Intelligence and Security Studies programs of The Citadel’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

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