Academics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Tue, 16 Mar 2021 22:31:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Academics – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 School of Engineering announces three finalists for Dean https://today.citadel.edu/school-of-engineering-announces-three-finalists-for-dean/ Tue, 16 Mar 2021 18:28:53 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22703 Three finalists for the position of Dean of The School of Engineering at The CitadelThree finalists for the position of Dean of The School of Engineering at The CitadelThe search for a new dean The Citadel School of Engineering is now focused on three finalists for the position.]]> Three finalists for the position of Dean of The School of Engineering at The CitadelThree finalists for the position of Dean of The School of Engineering at The Citadel

The search for a new dean The Citadel School of Engineering is now focused on three finalists for the position. The school was one of the first five engineering programs in the nation, and is consistently ranked in the top 25 in America by U.S. News & World Report. Graduates from the schools undergraduate programs have a near 99% job placement rate within the first 6-months of graduation.

The Citadel initiated the search in December, with the announcement of the impending retirement of the current Dean, Col. Ronald W. Welch, U.S. Army (Ret.), PH.D., P.E., FASCE, following the end of the 2021 academic year.

The finalists and their biographies are listed below.

Andrew Williams, Ph.D.

Andrew B. Williams, Ph.D., M.B.A., is an associate dean for the University of Kansas (KU) School of Engineering and the Charles E. and Mary Jane Spahr Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. In this role, he led the strategic planning, fundraising, and implementation efforts to catapult the KU IHAWKe (Indigenous, Hispanic, African American, Women, KU Engineering) Diversity & Women’s Programs to receive the highest inaugural Diversity Recognition Program Award with exemplary distinction given by the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) in 2019.

Williams’s career spans higher education and the private sector, including positions at Apple Inc., GE Medical Systems, and Allied Signal Aerospace Company. He was also a Boeing Welliver Faculty Fellow and GE Edison Engineer. Williams served as a department chair for Computer and Information Sciences at Spelman College in Atlanta, and as a research affiliate in the Human-Automation Systems Lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Williams was the John P. Raynor Distinguished Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Marquette University, where he founded and directed the Humanoid Engineering and Intelligent Robotics (HEIR) Lab.  His research and education work in artificial intelligence, autonomous robotics, and human-robot interaction has resulted in over 100 technical publications and presentations. His collaborative grant writing and fundraising efforts have resulted in approximately $29M in research and educational funding, corporate support, and private donations. He is the author of the book, “Out of the Box: Building Robots, Transforming Lives.” 

Williams serves on a National Academy of Engineering workshop committee for diversity, the ACM Education Advisory Committee, and the National GEM Consortium Alumni Advisory Board as treasurer. He received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from KU, his M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Marquette University, his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering with an emphasis in Artificial Intelligence from KU, and his Master of Business Administration from Rockhurst University.  He was born in Fort Riley, Kansas, the son of a WWII and Korean War veteran. He is married to Anitra Williams, his wife of 28 years, and together they have three adult children.

Craig Harvey, Ph.D., P.E.

Craig M. Harvey, Ph.D., P.E., is associate dean for Academic Affairs for the Louisiana State University (LSU) College of Engineering, a professor of Industrial Engineering, and holds the institution’s F.J. Haydel, Jr. Kaiser Aluminum Professorship. Prior to his current role at LSU, he was program director for Industrial Engineering.

Harvey teaches and conducts research in the area of Industrial and Human Factors Engineering. His research has ranged from investigations into engineering design process, medical product usability, health care productivity, construction safety, and control room management. Harvey’s work has been funded by the Keck Foundation, National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, Federal Aviation and Hospitals, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Louisiana Department of Economic Development, Louisiana Board of Regents, Baton Rouge Area Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.

Prior to joining the academic community, Harvey was a consultant of business process reengineering for KnowledgeWar, where he worked with Whirlpool and Ford Motor Company. Before that, he was manager of business process reengineering for the Student Loan Marketing Association (SallieMae) where he was responsible for the reengineering portion of the implementation of a $55 million document imaging system.

Harvey served un the U.S. Air Force in active duty for seven years and in the reserves for 13. During his time in the Air Force, he was an Air Force Civil Engineer. Harvey has more than 70 technical publications and is a senior member of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

Joseph Rencis, Ph.D., P.E.

Joseph Rencis, Ph.D., P.E., is a first-generation college graduate from a working-class family in a small town in rural Northwestern New Jersey. He received an Associate of Applied Science and a Bachelor of Science in Architectural and Building Construction Engineering technology from Milwaukee School of Engineering. Rencis earned a Master of Science from Northwestern University, and a Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University in Civil Engineering.

Rencis is currently a professor of Mechanical Engineering at Cal Poly Pomona, where he previously served as dean. Prior to joining Cal Poly, Rencis was a professor of Mechanical Engineering and director of Engineering Mechanics at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He served as department head for Mechanical Engineering, and as Twenty-First Century Leadership Chair at the University of Arkansas. Rencis was the dean of Engineering and Clay N. Hixson Chair for Engineering Leadership at Tennessee Tech University.

Rencis has published over 140 journal and conference articles in boundary elements, finite elements, molecular dynamics, and engineering education. He’s earned over $8 million in research funding.

Rencis is a fellow of the ASEE, ASME, and Wessex Institute of Great Britain. He served as ASEE President and was a director of the ASEE Engineering Deans Council Executive Board. Joe was elected to serve as the chair of the ASME Mechanical Engineering Department Heads Committee and was a member of the ASME Center for Education Board of Directors. Rencis has been an ABET program evaluator and has conducted reviews of new graduate programs. He is a recipient of ASEE awards for leadership, teaching, and service.

Presentations to campus

Each finalist will provide a presentation for the campus community. They will all be held in Bastin Hall 207, and on Zoom. In-person attendance will be limited due to COVID-19 precautions, thus Zoom attendance is recommended.

Zoom links will be send to faculty and staff on the morning prior to the presentation.

  • Dr. Andrew Williams: Monday, March 22 from 1:30-2:40 p.m.
  • Dr. Craig Harvey: Tues., March 30 from 1:30-2:40 p.m.
  • Dr. Joseph Rencis, Thurs., April 1, from 1:30-2:40 p.m.

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Engineering professor uses sabbatical to strengthen collaboration between The Citadel and Army Research Lab https://today.citadel.edu/engineering-professor-uses-sabbatical-to-strengthen-collaboration-between-the-citadel-and-army-research-lab/ Mon, 15 Mar 2021 15:21:17 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22686 Mazzaro has been working closely with Army researchers to develop a unique type of radar for detecting deadly hazards.]]>

Electrical engineering professor Gregory Mazzaro, Ph.D., splits time between labs at The Citadel and ARL’s headquarters in Adelphi, MD

Gregory Mazzaro, Ph.D., a professor in The Citadel’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, is using his sabbatical, awarded for 2020-21, to focus full-time on research that he’s been conducting with the Army. Since August, Mazzaro has been working closely with Army researchers in Adelphi, MD to develop a unique type of radar as part of a suite of sensors for detecting deadly hazards.

Since joining The Citadel in 2013, Mazzaro has worked part-time as a consultant for the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Army Research Laboratory (ARL) on several different technologies, including:

  • Harmonic radar — for detecting electronics such as those used to trigger explosives
  • Acoustic radar — for finding metallic objects such as landmines
  • Passive radar — for locating radio-frequency circuits such as those found in (2-way) communications gear and (1-way) scanner/listening devices

Mazzaro and his colleagues in the Sensors & Electron Devices Directorate at ARL have developed a variety of novel techniques for implementing these radars. This past spring, his team was awarded a pair of patents:

  • Method and Apparatus for Detecting Objects using a Combination of Radio and Acoustic Signals (US patent # 10,564,280)
  • Passive Non-Linear Synthetic Aperture Radar and Method Thereof (US patent # 10,649,080)

To date, Mazzaro is a named inventor on nine radar-related patents.

This year, Mazzaro and his team at ARL’s Adelphi Laboratory Center (ALC) designed, fabricated, programmed and tested a non-linear junction detector (“non-linear radar”) intended to be carried by a mobile platform (e.g. a drone) for detecting explosives. The initial design of the radar was conceived by Mazzaro; specifications were guided by experiments that he conducted on-site during prior summers at ALC. 

One of Mazzaro’s teammates, technician Khalid Salik of Ideal Innovations Inc., fabricated a prototype transceiver for transmitting very clean high-power probe signals while receiving very low-power radar-target responses. Another of Mazzaro’s teammates, Army electronics engineer Kyle Gallagher, programmed the software-defined-radio controller which generates and captures radar waves through that transceiver. In the fall, Mazzaro traveled to ALC to test the capability of this radar hardware to detect particular targets-of-interest, in different configurations:

  • At different distances away from the radar
  • Behind walls (i.e. inside nearby buildings)
  • Near ground (i.e. at different heights above a dry sandy surface)

Between his trips to ALC, Mazzaro processed the data he collected into actionable information which fed back into multiple redesigns of the radar. The latest incarnation of the radar was successfully tested in a desert environment as part of the Army’s Blood Hound Gang Program

This spring, Mazzaro is using his lab at The Citadel — an anechoic chamber located in the old coin-laundry building behind Letellier Hall — to evaluate his team’s radar against targets placed in different orientations (e.g. tilted, upside-down). Data that he gathers will further refine the radar’s design — widening its capabilities while reducing its size, weight, power and cost.

Despite not teaching, Dr. Mazzaro enjoys staying in-touch with his fellow Electrical & Computer faculty and students. “I bump into my students in Grimsley Hall and they ask me, ‘Aren’t you on sabbatical?’ and I say ‘Yes, of course.’ Then I smile and wait for the inevitable, ‘Hold on, what is a sabbatical?’ to which I reply, ‘I’m excused from teaching, which means I have more time to do real engineering.’”

With three more papers he’s written, expected to be released in conference proceedings this April, Mazzaro will reach a personal milestone: 100 technical publications. “I need to share credit for that accomplishment with my Ph.D. advisor, Dr. Michael Steer of North Carolina State University. He emphasized equal importance for both sides of research: advance the state-of-the-art, and communicate your advances to the scientific community.”

Mazzaro looks forward to sharing the latest-and-greatest in radar technology with his students when he returns to teach ELEC 426 Antennas and Propagation in June.

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Remembering Col. Robert S. Adden, The Citadel Class of ’44 https://today.citadel.edu/remembering-col-robert-s-adden-the-citadel-class-of-44/ Sat, 13 Mar 2021 11:00:47 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22655 Col. Bob Adden, The CitadelCol. Bob Adden, The CitadelAs seen on Jhenrystuhr.tributes.com Robert S. Adden, 98, a long time resident of Charleston, passed away peacefully on March 6, 2021 after a brief hospitalization in Reston, Virginia. Born January 1, 1923]]> Col. Bob Adden, The CitadelCol. Bob Adden, The Citadel

As seen on Jhenrystuhr.tributes.com

Robert S. Adden, 98, a long time resident of Charleston, passed away peacefully on March 6, 2021 after a brief hospitalization in Reston, Virginia. Born January 1, 1923 in Orangeburg, South Carolina to the late Mary Elizabeth Heggie Adden and John Augustus Adden. His father died months before he was born and he was raised lovingly, along with his siblings “Toots” and Jack, by his mother during the difficult Depression era.

He attended The Citadel as a member of the Class of 1944, of which the entire class was called to active duty following their Junior Year. He served as a 2nd lieutenant in World War II with the 84th Infantry Division and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with Combat V, a Purple Heart and the Combat Infantry Badge. He was severely wounded in combat in November 1944 in Prummern, Germany, attributing his life being saved by God’s hand causing his dog tags to deflect a machine gun bullet that was directed towards his heart. He was discharged from the Army in 1946.

He graduated from The Citadel in 1947 as the first honor graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. Two days later he began his teaching career at The Citadel, leaving the college only for a short time to earn his Master of Business Administration from the Wharton School of Business and his Doctor of Philosophy in Economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While at Chapel Hill he met the love of his life, Norma Sue Sligh, and they married on December 27, 1953.

He enjoyed teaching accounting and taxation. He served as the Head of the Business Administration Department at The Citadel from 1962-1982, during which time he was instrumental in launching the Master of Business Administration and the evening undergraduate programs at what is now the School of Business Administration. He retired as Professor Emeritus in 1985. The Citadel recognized his service to the school awarding him the coveted Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award in 1984; an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Humane Letters in 2008; and the School of Business Alumnus of the Year Award in 2011. He and Sue were loyal supporters of Citadel athletics, rarely missing any home football, basketball or baseball game and listening on the radio to many of the away games.

He was a faithful Lutheran who proudly donated to the church. When his older brother Jack (USMC) gave him $100 that he had won playing poker in the South Pacific during WW II, he donated the money to the Orangeburg Lutheran Church. He taught an adult Sunday School Class for more than 50 years at St. John’s Lutheran Church, served on its Vestry and was a former President of the Vestry. He was also a lifetime member of the Salvation Army Advisory Board and a member of the Charleston Rotary Club.

Surviving are his wife of 67 years, Norma Sue Sligh Adden; daughter, Carolyn Elizabeth Rose and her husband Col. Michael G. Rose (USA, Ret) of Herndon, VA; son, Robert S. Adden, Jr. and his wife Kimetha Hunt Adden of Charlotte, NC; daughter, Virginia Sue Barrett and her husband Hazle Barrett of Camden, SC; four grandchildren, Robert Anthony Adden, Daniel Spencer Adden (Kayla), Caroline Jordan Christian (Jack) and Thomas Caldwell Jordan; four great-grandchildren, Mary Caroline Christian, Eleanor Christian, John Christian and Frances Christian and many loving nieces and nephews.

“He had such a calm sweet spirit & will be missed by many. “

Remembrance by family friend Mike Wiggins

“Col. Adden was a great accounting teacher during my years at the Citadel. He was kind and caring to the cadets. His quality as a man is undisputed. He supported the Citadel in many ways after his retirement. You could see him at basketball, baseball, and football games cheering on his team. God Bless his family and many friends.”

Roy DeHaven, ’81

Leave a remembrance about Col. Adden here.

J. Henry Stuhr, Inc. Downtown Chapel is serving the family. Due to Covid-19 restrictions, a memorial service will be held at St. John’s Lutheran Church at a date to be determined.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial donations be made to The Citadel Foundation Class of 1944 Scholarship Fund, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston, SC 29409 or to St. John’s Lutheran Church, 5 Clifford St., Charleston, SC 29401.

Read more about Col. Robert “Bob” Adden in this story by The Post and Courier

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An update on The Citadel Study Abroad, Global Scholars, and Study in D.C. programs https://today.citadel.edu/an-update-on-the-citadel-study-abroad-global-scholars-and-study-in-d-c-programs/ Fri, 12 Mar 2021 00:00:33 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22624 There are five planned, faculty-led summer study abroad programs for 2021.]]>

Photo above: Aberystwyth, Whales, one of The Citadel Global Scholars locations. Photo courtesy of VisitWhales.com.

As the spring 2021 semester and the coronavirus pandemic continue, The Citadel Office of Study Abroad is continually assessing summer and fall programs.

Here is an update from Zane Segle, Ph.D., director for The Citadel Study Abroad, International and Domestic Programs.

Summer 2021 Study Abroad

There are five planned, faculty-led summer study abroad programs for 2021. They include:

Estonia, led by Dr. Terry Mays, Ph.D.
France, led by Dr. Caroline Strobe, Ph.D.
Hungary, led by Dr. Sarah Imam, M.D.
Spain, Cadiz, led by Dr. Eloy Urroz, Ph.D.
Spain, Mallorca, led by Dr. Maria Jose Hellin-Garcia, Ph.D.

The programs are contingent upon Covid-19 travel restrictions which vary from country to country, as well as vaccinations for participants, and student interest.

Cap de Formentor, Mallorca, Spain. Photo by Livia Bühler.

Cadets and students interested in studying abroad through independent programs to Germany, Ireland, Italy, London or Japan are encouraged to contact The Citadel Office of Study Abroad at studyabroad@citadel.edu or for assistance with process navigation.

Fall 2021 study abroad with The Citadel Global Scholars Program

Thus far about 30 cadets are signed up for the college’s four Citadel Global Scholars Program locations, and more are welcome to participate.

The Citadel Global Scholars Program is an initiative to make semesters abroad feasible for all cadets. The program offers cadets enrolled in nearly every academic major at The Citadel to spend a semester abroad, taking courses relevant to their majors, while paying nearly the same amount for all study abroad costs as they would pay for a semester of study on campus.

The locations include:

  • Athens, Greece
  • Rome, Italy;
  • Nicosia, Cyprus
  • Aberystwyth, Wales.

In addition, two cadets will be participating in the annual UK Parliament program.

Those interested in signing up for fall 2021 should contact the office by emailing studyabroad@citadel.edu, by going by the office at 202 Richardson Ave. in person, or by calling (843) 469-7817.

The Citadel in D.C. fall 2021 semester

Muhammad Fraser-Rahim teaching The Citadel in DC students
Citadel professor Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, Ph.D. teaching The Citadel in D.C. students.

Approximately 12 cadets and students will take part in this program. The focus of the experience is Intelligence and Security Studies, though other academic disciplines are welcome. The program provides academic and internship credit.

Those interested in this program should contact Dr. Segle at seglez1@citadel.edu.

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Lu Parker, ’94: Citadel Graduate College alumna, journalist, former Miss USA, and kindness entrepreneur https://today.citadel.edu/lu-parker-94-citadel-graduate-college-alumna-journalist-former-miss-usa-and-kindness-entrepreneur/ Thu, 11 Mar 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22573 We strive to help all people better understand and embrace the power of kindness.]]>

“Never underestimate the power of a kind woman.” Lu Parker

Lu Parker doesn’t dawdle in the slow lane. She’s flying along numerous professional pathways, and while she’s navigating, she’s deliberate about conveying one key message: Be kind.

“The best is when someone sees my t-shirt or hoodie while I’m wearing it and stops me to say “I love your shirt!” or “What a great message!”  When that happens, it makes me realize that I am doing the right thing. It’s working,” Parker shared with The Citadel.

As a journalist with two decades of experience (including with WCSC-TV in Charleston, South Carolina) and multiple Emmy awards, Parker anchors four hours of news daily for KTLA in Los Angeles. Additionally, she is an inspirational speaker, an author, and the founder of Be Kind & Co. which recently launched a line of apparel.

Lu Parker in the studio at WCSC-TV, Live 5, in Charleston in the late 1990s.
Lu Parker in the studio at WCSC-TV, Live 5, in Charleston in the late 1990s.

Prior to her career in broadcasting, Parker was a ninth-grade English Literature teacher. In 1994, while she was a teacher, Parker captured both the Miss South Carolina USA, and Miss USA titles, going on to place fourth in the Miss Universe Pageant.

But, before all of that, Parker graduated from The Citadel Graduate College in 1993 with a Master of Arts in Education, after earning a BA in English Literature from the College of Charleston.

After seeing the launch of the Be Kind & Co. apparel line, The Citadel Graduate College reached out to Parker to ask her to share some reflections.

This is what she said.

An interview with Lu Parker, The Citadel Graduate College Class of 1994 and founder of Be Kind & Co.

What is your goal for Be Kind & Co.?

We strive to help all people better understand and embrace the power of kindness. My goal is to use Be Kind & Co. as a way to share content, experiences, and merchandise that inspires all of us to be a bit more kind each day. I truly believe that each kind act, even if small, helps to collectively heal the world.  

In 2021, we launched our BKC Apparel line and we are thrilled to be seeing so many people wearing our merchandise around the country, including in South Carolina. We like to say it’s “Merchandise with a Message.” We share small sayings like, “Be a Kind Human” – “Born Kind” – Be Kind Y’all – “Never Underestimate the Power of a Kind Woman.” 

 Why did you create Be Kind & Co.?

The original concept of Be Kind & Co. was created after I experienced an unfortunate situation where I was attempting to be kind to someone and it backfired on me. At the time, the experience made me seriously question kindness. I questioned my urge to help people and literally almost gave up on being kind ever again.  But eventually, I came to my senses and realized that kindness is a gift that I cherish. Be Kind & Co. was originally a blog but now it’s more of life-style media company that shares content, offers merchandise with messaging, and creates a space where people can share insights into the power of kindness.  

I am also in the early stages of writing a book about my experiences and how I handled it.  I am also looking forward to traveling again to speak around the country at conventions and venues on “How Kindness Creates Success.”

Lu Parker accepting her diploma for a Master of Arts in Education
from The Citadel Graduate College in 1993.

Why did you pursue a Masters of Education and why did you select The Citadel Graduate College?

I was already interested in English Literature and hoped to one day teach on a college level. My Mom suggested that I apply to The Citadel because I was living in Charleston at the time and she said the program had a great reputation. 

I have fond memories of attending the Citadel Graduate College.  My professors were helpful and the process was a smooth experience. I believe that anytime you set a goal in life, personally or professionally, you must complete each small task while staying focused on the future goal. Studying at The Citadel allowed me to further my education so I could eventually teach high school. I did teach high school at North Charleston High School after graduating from The Citadel. 

What do you miss most about Charleston?

Ahhhh, Charleston. The city has my heart in so many ways. I spent over two decades there growing up, going to college and graduate school. I also taught in the city, and eventually returned to work in tv news there at WCSC. I often say I have a memory on every corner of the city.  I love the beaches, the Southern accents, the people and the style. I even miss the heat, humidity and rain.   

What is your greatest achievement to date?

To answer your question about my greatest achievement to date, I would say I have been very fortunate in my life and had the opportunity to experience a lot of wonderful moments including attending college, winning Miss USA, winning Emmys, traveling the world, working in TV news, meeting celebrities, going to Hollywood events, and even writing a book….But I still don’t consider those accomplishments. They were all wonderful experiences. To answer you question about my greatest achievement to date, I would say it’s the fact that I have never given up on the belief that kindness can create huge change. Kindness can save a life.  Kindness can shift the world. Kindness is strength. It’s a daily practice that I hope I can continue to share through my writings, my company and my voice. 

What would you say to young women considering various careers about innovating their own pathways or even multiple careers?

I am a huge believer that life is better when you love what you do. I always suggest to young women and men to find a career or a path to that career that lights a fire inside of you. I love my job as a tv news anchor because I am able to combine my love of writing, reading, and interacting with people.  It’s the same with my company Be Kind & Co. Creating a company takes a lot of behind the scenes work. It’s challenging and can be overwhelming, but when you feel good about what you are doing, then it’s worth it. I also totally believe that it’s never too late to change your profession or start a company, non-profit or passion project. It may require you to work after your “real” job, but again, when the passion is there, it won’t always feel like work. It’s a joy.  

As we celebrate Women’s History Month, I want to add that I 100% believe that when women support each other’s success, we all succeed.  There is so much success available out in the world, let’s help each other along the path and celebrate each other!  That’s true kindness!

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Closing the cyber workforce gap: the first Citadel Dept. of Defense Cyber Institute team at work https://today.citadel.edu/closing-the-cyber-workforce-gap-the-first-citadel-dept-of-defense-cyber-institute-team-at-work/ Wed, 10 Mar 2021 15:52:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22554 First cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber InstituteFirst cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute"I believe that through this program and the leaders who are sharing their knowledge with us, I will be more than equipped for the cybersecurity world when I graduate.]]> First cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber InstituteFirst cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute

The first group of cadets and students selected to study under the umbrella of The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute (CDCI) is hard at work, with the goal of being immediately ready to join America’s cybersecurity workforce after graduation. The cluster of future cyber warriors includes one active duty Marine student, one veteran student, and 19 cadets.

The CDCI mission is to ensure the delivery of principled leaders who are experts in cybersecurity and have the skillset and experience required to begin working for the U.S. Department of Defense as soon as they earn their degrees. The program will help expand America’s cyber capability by addressing the critical national security need for a larger cybersecurity workforce.

All of the CDCI participants are pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Cyber Operations, or a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, with a minor in Cybersecurity, or, a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with a minor in Data Science.

Among the students is Cadet Trey Stevens, a junior with a triple major in Computer Science, Cyber Operations and Intelligence and Security Studies. “I feel very fortunate that I’ve been selected to not only advance my own cyber education, but to be better prepared for the agency that I work with post-graduation so that I may perform my job as best as I can,” Stevens said. “This is a unique opportunity where professionals and experts are pouring in their knowledge in order to pave the path for future cybersecurity professionals. I’m planning on maximizing my engagement with this amazing program.”

The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute (CDCI) cadets and students being led by Lt. Col Linda Riedel, SCARNG, and Dr. Shankar Banik, professor of computer science and cyber operations, and director of CDCI and numerous other programs at The Citadel.

The Citadel and the nation’s other five Senior Military Colleges (SMC) have each received approximately $1.5 million of federal money to establish a cybersecurity institute as pilot programs on their campus. The funds are part of a $10 million Department of Defense (DOD) appropriation to the National Security Agency (NSA) for these institutes, included in the 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act.

“It is an honor to be selected for such a program,” said Cadet Jalen Singleton, a junior Computer Science major with a minor in Cybersecurity. “I am included in an extremely talented cohort that has been given access to top cybersecurity knowledge and tools. I believe that through this program and the leaders who are sharing their knowledge with us, I will be more than equipped for the cybersecurity world when I graduate.”

The Department of Defense outlined three priorities for the SMC institutes: sustain a cyber-ready workforce, enhance the nation’s cyber talent and establish a top talent management program. The Citadel is helping achieve these goals.

“Being a part of CDCI is already an amazing experience,” said Cadet Hannah Collee. She is a sophomore double-majoring in Computer Science and Cyber Operations. “There is hands-on learning and countless opportunities for growth. This program helps students get in contact with numerous businesses and internships too. I can’t wait to continue with our team.” 

The 21 cadets and students selected to participate in the college’s first CDCI cohort include:

All, Jackson A.
Collee, Hannah E.
Deans, Conor W.
Freeman, Lydia S.
Hanulcik, Avery
Jensen, William M.
Johnson, Jared M.
Lilling, Eric R.
Lindenmeyer, Andrew R.
Ling, Nathanael C.
Race, Benjamin R
Reynolds, Aaron G.
Roser, Robert G.
Ruiz, Ashley
Singleton, Jalen A.
Skibicki, Ryan
Smiles, Shiloh O.
Stevens, Trey J.
Toomer, Timothy C.
Wells, Noah M.
Whitlock, Benjamin T.

Prospective cadets and students wanting more information should email dhoward2@citadel.edu or call (843) 953-1089.

The Citadel is a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education, as named by the United States Department of National Security Agency and Homeland Security.

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Citadel Graduate College Masters in Intelligence and Security #10 in U.S. by Best Value Schools https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-graduate-college-masters-in-intelligence-and-security-10-in-u-s-by-best-value-schools/ Tue, 09 Mar 2021 17:48:08 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22490 Photo above: Citadel Graduate College students meeting with the Director of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats, on campus in 2018 As seen on BestValueSchools.org It is easy for individuals that are]]>

Photo above: Citadel Graduate College students meeting with the Director of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats, on campus in 2018

As seen on BestValueSchools.org

It is easy for individuals that are not familiar with the complex nature of security professions to assume that a security education is part of criminal justice. The truth is that there are many types of security specialists. The growing need for security professionals leads to the need for those interested in security to receive a a high-quality education, such as a masters in security degree. 

Badge for Best-Masters-in-Security

What Can I Do with a Master’s in Security Degree? 

There are a variety of master’s in security programs available to individuals that have an interest in providing security at national and international levels. Pursuing a masters in security in the field that a person wants to enter requires selecting the right program. This helps to determine what a person can do with a master’s degree in security.

Consider a master’s degree in security studies if you want a career that focuses on security leadership, crisis management, or security analysis. Individuals that want a career in cybersecurity or homeland security often find ideal master’s in security programs that fulfill the goals or requirements for working in these fields. Do you want to focus on the security of populations or on security efforts after a disaster? Earning a master’s in security that focuses on human security is an option that leads to a rewarding career.  

The pay and job growth in security is likely a reason that some people choose to earn a master’s degree in security. The 2019 median pay was $99,730 for information security analysts, with an anticipated job growth of 31 percent through 2029. The National Security Agency (NSA) lists the entry level pay for a mid-level investigator at more than $72,000, and the pay for an NSA Forensic Analyst starting at $93,822 a year. 

Some schools allow students to complete program requirements online to accommodate the busy schedules of working professionals. Other programs require on-campus coursework and other face-to-face meetings. Exploring the best master’s in security programs allows for determining the best school and program that meets your goals and interests.

About The Citadel Master of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies: an online program offering real-world skills

DNI Coats speaking during the 2018 Intelligence and Cyber Security Conference at The Citadel
Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats, speaking during the 2018 Intelligence and Cyber Security Conference at The Citadel

The Master of Arts (MA) degree program in Intelligence and Security Studies (ISS) prepares students to enhance national security through intelligence and homeland security leadership. Best practices for intelligence collection and analysis and national security combined with current theory, research, and experience give students the background necessary to cultivate critical thinking, concise writing, and effective briefing. By introducing applicable management principles and policy analysis, the program fosters the leadership skills to successfully address security and intelligence challenges facing the United States.

Unlike traditional graduate programs that take a theoretical and conceptual track in preparing students for further academic research, The Citadel’s ISS program combines theory and practice to provide the real-world skills necessary to enter and advance in the public and private intelligence arenas.

This program is entirely online to provide maximum flexibility for students, and at the same time allow the ISS program to attract instruction from intelligence professionals located around the world. Our program is taught by internationally recognized experts, with real-world experience at agencies like the FBI, CIA, DHS and at the White House.

Citadel.edu

Learn more and find information about how to apply to The Citadel Graduate College here.

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Most distinguished cadets named to fall 2020 President’s List https://today.citadel.edu/most-distinguished-cadets-named-to-fall-2020-presidents-list/ Thu, 25 Feb 2021 21:11:20 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22377 The President’s List, awarded for academic and military excellence, is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel.]]>

Photo: General Glenn Walters, UCMC (Ret.), Class of 1979, during the Gold Star and President’s List presentation on Feb. 25, 2021

The President’s List is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel. It indicates excellence in academics and military duties. The list is a combination of the Dean’s List and the Commandant’s Distinguished List and is composed of cadets who contribute the most to their companies while maintaining excellent military and academic records.

The following cadets have been recognized for their outstanding work during the fall 2020 semester:

First nameLast name
TrevorAtkins
MaryBallentine
JackBeehler
CarletonBeiliff
CharlotteBrailsford
TylerBurgess
PatrickCamatcho
BrentonCarnes
JackCasazza
AlbertCastro
JonahCharles
Yen RuChen
RyanCherrier
PatrickCherry
AlexanderClark
JoshuaCoats
HunterCongdon
GrantConner
WilliamConnor
CharlesCorte
JonathanCribb
AydenDevlin
MaximillianDonegan
JacksonDulay
DakotaDurham
MayaElassal
ChaseErvin
GraysonFree
NicholasFricchione
ZavierGebrayel
CharlesGeiger
JeremyGentle
CollinGleco
CarrettGraettinger
CodyGreen
CatherineGuenther
MitchellHamm
ThomasHammerstone
BuddyHerring
ElijahHolder
KienenHolmes
MichaelHooks
MalcolmJackson
IanJenkins
StephenKaiser-Parlette
JacobKnapp
RomanKokowsky
PatrickKrese
SamuelLittle
AveryLollis
StevenLynch
BrandonMacDonald
TriniMartinez
DavidMcBain
JakeMcPherson
JohnMichne
ZacharyMooney
JosephMurphy
GrantNorman
BrooksO'Brian
TizianaOrtega
TimothyOverend
IsaacPatterson
SamuelPoulin
RonaldPrince
MethRanaweera
WilliamRathke
StevenReisinger
KevinRevuelta
JackRose
IanSchultz
HadouSlimani
GrantSpeer
EthanStanley
JosephStilwell
BradleyStone
DanielStone
RichardStuckey
WilliamTempleton
CionnorThomas
BraxtonWeaver
JonathanWestmoreland
MadelynWojciehowski
JesseYoung
SamuelZuschlag
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Editorial: Celebrate our success on Mars. Another giant leap may be near. https://today.citadel.edu/editorial-celebrate-our-success-on-mars-another-giant-leap-may-be-near/ Thu, 25 Feb 2021 16:46:32 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22369 This image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechThis image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechWhat they’re doing on site with the X-rays, UV and Raman spectroscopy, they can get that information directly uplinked. ]]> This image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechThis image was taken by EDL_DDCAM onboard NASA's Mars rover Perseverance on Sol 1 34 NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Photo above: NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image during its descent to Mars, using its Descent Stage Down-Look Camera. This camera is mounted on the bottom of the descent stage and looks at the rover. This image was acquired on Feb. 22, 2021 (Sol 1) at the local mean solar time of 10:37:31. NASA/JPL-Caltech.

As seen in The Post and Courier
By the Editorial Staff

After a year of grappling with a deadly pandemic, racial injustice and disturbing political turmoil, the landing of NASA’s most advanced rover on Mars sends an important and timely message of how the United States can still do great things.

Last week’s stunning, near-touchdown picture of Perseverance — NASA’s particularly fitting name for the rover — should instill in us a sense of wonder of our ever-expanding ability to explore new worlds.

The image already is being compared with NASA’s most iconic photos, including Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the moon and Saturn as seen by Voyager 1.

The spacecraft has 25 cameras and two microphones, many of which were turned on during Thursday’s descent, and still more pictures and even audio recordings were released this week. But its most tantalizing potential goes far beyond photos.

The $3 billion craft was guided to a site only a mile away from an ancient river delta, where it soon will look for signs of ancient life; if Mars ever harbored life, scientists’ best guess is that it occurred about 3 billion to 4 billion years ago, when water flowed on its surface.

The rover ultimately will be able to take rock and soil samples and jettison them back into space for retrieval to Earth by yet another spacecraft within the next decade. (NASA is working with the European Space Agency on that.)

“They’re not just looking at the surface but the subsurface. That turns out to be important too when you think about what was the history of this place,” he said. “What they’re doing on site with the X-rays, UV and Raman spectroscopy, they can get that information directly uplinked. Even if they can’t bring back soil samples, they can do a lot.”

The craft also has a miniature automated helicopter that can fly through the planet’s thin air to capture images the rover can’t. And it will try to convert a small amount of carbon dioxide into oxygen, which, if it works, would be crucial to providing breathable oxygen and fuel for future manned missions.

All signs show Perseverance stuck its landing, and it could start roving around by early March.

Admittedly, NASA has sent rovers to Mars before — this is our ninth spacecraft and fifth NASA rover to land on the planet — and China and the United Arab Emirates also have spacecraft in orbit there.

And of course, we shouldn’t put all our bets on Mars. Venus also deserves more exploration, particularly after last year’s controversial discovery in which powerful telescopes detected faint amounts of the molecule phosphine, which might exist only because something living emitted it.

But our six-wheeled, car-size rover is the most advanced ever and ultimately could provide the first proof of the existence of life outside our own planet. If it does, that would be yet another giant leap for mankind indeed.

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Citadel Physics Department makes virtual learning into a physical reality for high school students https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-physics-department-makes-virtual-learning-into-a-physical-reality-for-high-schoolers/ Wed, 24 Feb 2021 16:33:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22171 The Physics Department offers a virtual, but still hands-on, “class” for high school students about physics and its practical applications.]]>

Photo: Physics professor Kaelyn Leake, Ph.D., leading cadets and high school students through The Citadel Applied Physics Experience.

There’s a big difference between knowing the equations that explain gravitational forces and actually being hit in the head by an apple.

One is theoretical, and the other is a real-world effect of those theories.

Working to help high school students bridge the divide between physics equations and physical events: The Citadel’s Department of Physics.

Faculty and cadets in the department are working with high school students three times a year through The Citadel Applied Physics Experience. It’s a virtual, but still hands-on, “class” that teaches high school students about physics and expands their knowledge of the study’s practical applications.

“The goal of our Citadel Applied Physics Experience is to help high school students understand that physics is more than theory, through tactile experiences demonstrating real-world uses,” said Hank Yochum, Ph.D., head of the Department of Physics. “We don’t want to just tell students why physics is important — we want to demonstrate and discuss. It’s a chance to build something together, even via Zoom in the COVID environment, and to talk about how and why it works.”

Cadets help guide high school students in breakout sessions during The Citadel Applied Physics Experience

The department is currently accepting registrations for both the spring and summer sessions, after having kicked off the program in the fall semester. Faculty and cadets in the Department of Physics will continue to hold events like this three times a year — in both semesters and during the summer.

The experience is not limited to certain high schools. Physics faculty members will send a kit, for the hands-on portion, to registered students — so anyone who can receive mail can participate. Any student can participate regardless of STEM background.

Current Citadel cadets and faculty will help the high school students assemble a light-seeking, biology inspired robot that looks a lot like a bug.

The next Applied Physics Experience will be held on Saturday, April 3 from 1 to 5:30 p.m. A two-day summer session is planned for July 8-9.

The event is open to any high school sophomore, junior or senior who enjoys problem solving, science, math and hands-on projects.

The cost for all materials is $20. Space for each session is limited.

To register for the spring session, click here. The deadline for this session is March 12.

To register for the summer session, click here. The deadline for this session is June 15.

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