Engineering – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Wed, 25 Sep 2019 17:47:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Engineering – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Engineering Education https://today.citadel.edu/engineering-education/ Thu, 26 Sep 2019 10:00:29 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=11024 The Citadel's 2016 intelligent vehicle, Pablobot, and its student creatorsThe Citadel's 2016 intelligent vehicle, Pablobot, and its student creatorsThe Citadel's engineering program boasts a plethora of disciplines. Newest among them is a computer engineering degree that launched in August.]]> The Citadel's 2016 intelligent vehicle, Pablobot, and its student creatorsThe Citadel's 2016 intelligent vehicle, Pablobot, and its student creators

As seen in the Charleston Regional Business Journal, by Barry Waldman

If the Lowcountry in 2019 could be encapsulated in one word, it would probably be “growth.” Economic and population growth particularly are creating new opportunities and challenges for the Charleston area that might have seemed far-fetched just a few decades ago.

For industry flooding into the area to capitalize on the Lowcountry’s pluses – a welcoming business environment, plentiful, low-cost land and infrastructure, and enviable quality of life – the No. 1 challenge is finding qualified talent.

The issue is particularly acute for the area’s burgeoning aerospace, automotive, advanced manufacturing, defense and supply chain sectors, and their increased dependence on new technologies like artificial intelligence.

The Charleston Regional Development Alliance says the first question relocating employers ask is about the availability of talent to match their needs.

“It’s absolutely a pain point,” said Suzie Rybicki, vice president of talent and training at PhishLabs, a global cyberse­curity and threat intelligence company based in Charleston.

A Talent Demand study conducted by the Charleston Metro Chamber in 2017 projected 35,000 new jobs for the region over the five years ending 2022 – in addition to unfilled vacancies. The report projects demand for engineers will leap by about 10%, software and IT jobs, 22%.

Providing a tech-heavy workforce is a challenge for communities nationwide and requires a three-legged stool of development, attraction and retention of STEM expertise.

Into that fray wade area institutions of higher learning, guided by local industry, to educate the next generation of com­puter experts and engineers.

The College of Charleston, for example, recently earned approval for a new systems engineering major in its computer science department to commence in fall 2020. It also attempted to develop a new electrical engineering program, though that was denied accreditation by the S.C. Commission on Higher Education.

The new systems engineering major was initiated because of conversations with area industry, said Sebastian van Delden, interim dean of the College of Charleston School of Sciences and Math­ematics. It was supported by 10 corporate powerhouses including Boeing, Bosch, Mercedes-Benz Vans and Volvo.

Based in the new, $55 million Rita Hollings Science Center on campus, the new major will prepare students to become the quarterbacks of workplace engineering teams. The major incorpo­rates elements of electrical, mechanical, industrial and computer engineering and provides students with opportunities to dive deeper into one of those disciplines.

Van Delden said the technical skills prepare students for the work but the soft skills prepare them for the workplace.

“Industry is really excited that our engineering students receive liberal arts training alongside STEM,” he said.

The Citadel’s history of producing engineers dates to 1842, and today the college boasts a plethora of disciplines. Newest among them is a computer engineering degree that launched in August.

Also the result of industry input, computer engineering is an amalgam of computer science and engineering that focuses on computing in all forms, from microprocessors to embedded computing devices and from laptop and desktop systems to supercomputers.

“We’re putting out the type of student who is going to solve the problems of the future, in energy, medicine, communication, computing and almost every other facet of life,” said Bob Barsanti, head of the department of electrical and computer engineering at The Citadel and a target tracking and signal processing expert.

Industry appreciates the leadership skills imbued in Citadel graduates that complement their technical skills.

“We have this whole leadership laboratory so the students that come out of here are not only technologically savvy but they’re also the type of people who are going to lead these industries into· the future,” Barsanti said.

Companies hiring people with computer and engineering know-how value those who can integrate multiple technologies across different disciplines.

“The application of these skills provides mission-critical information warfare solutions,” said John Guerry, lead systems engineer at Naval Information Warfare Center and an advisory board member for The Citadel’s engineering program.

Engineering undergrads at The Citadel recently finished in the top five in an international competition to build and operate autonomous vehicles that could negotiate a course with varied terrain and arrive at a destination.

Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering
Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering

The competition demanded the full range of engineering ingenuity, inclu­ing mechanical engineering to build the frame, software engineering to develop the algorithms and vision software that guided the shopping cart-sized robot.

“I had to learn several different program languages,” said Bill Quade, the student leader of the project who now works as an electrical engineer at NIWC. “Machine vision is such a new field and while I figured out some of it, I’m still learning how to do better.”

STEM skills are an engine of economic growth, in part because they’re in demand by employers and in part because they create wealth.

The average salary for a computer engineer in South Carolina is over $90,000, according to research by Computer Careers. Glassdoor estimates that the national average for systems engineers tops $80,000.

Business leaders and recruiters know that colleges can’t solve the mismatch between the Lowcountry’s extant tech skills and the industry needs alone.

“While higher educational institutions are diversifying their curricula, it’s still not scaling with the numbers businesses require to be successful,” said Claire Gibbons, director of global marketing and communications at the CRDA.

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Why is pluff mud smelly and can it be stabilized? Civil engineering undergrad researchers look for answers https://today.citadel.edu/why-is-pluff-mud-smelly-and-can-it-be-stabilized-civil-engineering-undergrad-researchers-look-for-answers/ Fri, 23 Aug 2019 14:33:58 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=10161 It's the "why" behind the scent of pluff mud, and the thought of making use of this vast natural resource, that's behind an on-going undergraduate research project in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at The Citadel.]]>

Photo above: pluff mud specimens after compacting. Photo credit: Marc Dolder, Citadel veteran student.

To some, it has a rich, earthy, salty smell that fondly reminds them they are home. To others, the percolating, popping mud that is ubiquitous with the sweeping tidal marshes and rivers of the South Carolina Lowcountry is just…stinky.

It’s the “why” behind the scent of pluff mud, and the thought of making use of this vast natural resource, that’s behind an on-going undergraduate research project in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at The Citadel.

The region’s pluff mud is well known for its pungent smell in southern coastal areas,” said Simon Ghanat, Ph.D., a Citadel professor recently named South Carolina Civil Engineer of the Year, “however, very little is known about the composition of the soil and its potential for practical uses in engineering.”

Pluff mud lining the coastal marshlands of the Lowcountry

According to Ghanat, the dark, soft soil is the product of decay, including sporobolus (formerly called spartina) grasses, oysters, crabs, shrimp and other marine life. “The rotten egg smells comes from anaerobic bacteria working on the pluff mud by releasing hydrogen sulfide,” he said. It is the detailed composition of the deeper layers of the soil that interests Ghanat and his students.

Civil engineering majors, Marc Dolder and Calvin Pitts, worked with Ghanat for several months, sampling, testing and analyzing the properties of pluff mud. Dolder is a veteran day student and Pitts is in the evening undergraduate studies program.

Citadel engineering undergraduate researchers Marc Dolden, left, and Calvin Pitts.

“My goal is to eventually find a way to stabilize pluff mud so builders don’t have to keep hauling it away. This would save money and be better for the environment,” Dolder said. 

The process involved compacting specimens of pluff mud into cylindrical molds.

“Specimens were compacted at numerous water content stages to establish a compaction curve. After compaction, each specimen was extruded from the mold and weighed to determine its total mass,” Dolder said.

The undergraduate researchers determined the natural water content, particle size distribution, liquid limit and lastic limit.

“The average water content of each specimen was determined by oven drying of samples,” Dolder continues. “Once the compaction tests were completed, the measured values of dry unit weight were plotted as a function of moisture content for each compaction test. Through this process we identified the optimum moisture content and the maximum dry unit weight of the pluff mud. “

In the end, the researchers determined that pluff mud can be stabilized. “With more research, we believe pluff mud could be could be made usable,” Dolder concluded.

The students work revealed important characteristics for future research, such as the fact that samples from different locations, even only a few miles apart, behaved very differently. They also investigated the effects of adding hydrated lime to the pluff mud samples. “The lime influenced the properties of the mud by increasing its optimum moisture content making it more stable,” Ghanat explained.

Dolder and Pitts were paid during the months of they conducted their research through The Citadel Summer Undergraduate Research Experience.

“There are countless benefits from undergraduate research like this, not only for the students, but for the industries improved through this work.” Ghanat said. “Our plan is to continue the pluff mud work with additional undergraduate researchers next summer, to develop more data to assist Lowcountry engineers.”

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Project management plus community service equals great outcome for all https://today.citadel.edu/project-management-citadel-graduate-college/ Wed, 07 Aug 2019 12:00:07 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9839 Volunteers working in the James Island Outreach centerVolunteers working in the James Island Outreach centerThe Project Management program at The Citadel Graduate College hit the trifecta for me: convenient, affordable and well-respected, said graduate student Sara Massey.]]> Volunteers working in the James Island Outreach centerVolunteers working in the James Island Outreach center

Photo above: volunteers stocking shelves at James Island Outreach’s food bank

Sara Massey is a Project Management graduate student in The Citadel Graduate College. Fairly new to the Charleston, South Carolina area, the seasoned fundraiser and former CEO of a non-profit in Louisiana wanted a way to get involved in serving the community by using her developing project management skills on a real-world project.

“The discipline of formal project management in the engineering, defense, construction and IT industries has huge implications for the non-profit sector if it will be embraced,” Massey said. “Social entrepreneurs need these skills as much as those pursuing profit-motivated outcomes. I hope to demonstrate that in my work.”

Sara Massey, Project Management graduate student at The Citadel Graduate College
Sara Massey, Project Management graduate student at The Citadel Graduate College

Massey found where she was needed: James Island Outreach (JIO). JIO is a local non-profit devoted to providing emergency food, medicine, and utility assistance for financially struggling neighbors living on James Island and Folly Beach. Massey accepted the assignment of helping JIO restructure its annual fundraising event, Taste of James Island, to make it profitable rather than just a break-even venture.

“Using some of the project management techniques I was learning, such as identifying and characterizing stakeholders, and establishing and agreeing to the requirements of the event, were key to being able to pull this off successfully in just under 90 days,” Massey said.

Taste of James Island 2019. Photo courtesy of Lani Stringer.
Taste of James Island 2019. Photo courtesy of Lani Stringer.

“In prior years, JIO was not able to raise enough through Taste of James Island to be profitable. However, with Sara’s guidance, leadership, encouragement and skillful planning, we netted a profit of over $7,500 which is being used to purchase food to stock our pantry for our neighbors in need,” said Scott Graule, executive director, JIO.

In addition to gratification of helping her community, Massey was able to convert her work with JIO into a graded deliverable for one of her project management courses.

Massey and her husband Andy, a member of The Citadel Class of 1983 and a Citadel Graduate College ’85 alumnus, own Syn-Mass LLC, a consulting company focused on executive level projects and risk management. She says a master’s degree in Project Management is the perfect supplement to her career and goal of lifelong learning.

Andy Massey, Citadel Class of ’83, Citadel Graduate College Class of 1985, and Sarah Massey, Citadel Graduate College Class of 2020

“The Project Management program at The Citadel Graduate College hit the trifecta for me: convenient, affordable and well-respected,” Massey said.

Now she’s more inspired than ever to apply Project Management to non-profit work.

Non-profits rely on an ever-changing mix of staff and volunteers who each carry a portion of the institutional knowledge of how to carry out the mission of the organization.

The commitment to the “why” of the work is usually logical or emotional, but those who do the “what and the how” of the work deserve the benefit of sound project management to inform and fuel the efficiency of the work.

After graduation,  I’ll be looking for ways to add voice and evidence to this concept across a broad spectrum of social causes.

Sara Massey, Project Management student, The Citadel Graduate College

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Autonomous vehicles and AI: Citadel’s future engineers prepared to thrive in evolving technical landscape https://today.citadel.edu/autonomous-vehicles-and-ai-citadels-future-engineers-prepared-to-thrive-in-evolving-technical-landscape/ Thu, 18 Jul 2019 10:00:30 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9415 The availability of highly skilled engineers prepared to help lead the development of A.I. and its associated industries in the Charleston, South Carolina area is vital to the state's competitiveness and its economy. The Citadel School of Engineering, one of America's oldest engineering programs, is meeting that growing demand.]]>

Artificial intelligence is present in the daily lives of most people, even if few stop to consider the source. A.I. guides ride sharing apps, commercial airliners, and even mobile check deposits.

The availability of highly skilled engineers prepared to help lead the development of A.I. and its associated industries in the Charleston, South Carolina area is vital to the state’s competitiveness and its economy. The Citadel School of Engineering, one of America’s oldest engineering programs, is meeting that growing demand.

Cadet in electrical engineering lab at The Citadel

It takes computer, electrical and mechanical engineering ingenuity to develop the A.I. supporting an autonomous vehicle, for example. Engineering students at The Citadel are already learning how to integrate those disciplines and have been for years.

“The students are called upon to bring together knowledge from a variety of undergraduate courses to design the autonomous vehicle,” said Bob Barsanti, Ph.D., electrical and computer engineering professor at The Citadel, and a target tracking and signal processing expert. “They must be able to integrate the electronic sensors, digital communications, motors, and computer controls to complete the challenge.”

The college’s Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) team developed a winning design for the 2019 competition. Their intelligent vehicle, Bender, finished fifth out in the design portion of the competition, just behind powerhouse universities including: 1. Georgia Institute of Technology, 2. Manipal Institute of Technology from India, 3. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and 4. Hosei University from Tokyo. As in years past, the college had a strong presence among the nearly 50 institutions at the annual competition at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan, a testament to the electric and autonomous vehicle skills developed within the The Citadel School of Engineering.

Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering
Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering

The Citadel was one of very few institutions offering only up to a Master’s degree to earn a place within any of the four portions of the competition.

“It is clear that our Citadel engineering team performed extremely well against some of the top schools around the world, and is a front runner in preparing engineers for the global industry surrounding electric and autonomous vehicles,” said Col. Ronald Welch, USA (Ret.),Ph.D., dean of The Citadel School of Engineering. “The Citadel School of Engineering is answering the call of local companies to produce the talent needed within a burgeoning electric and autonomous vehicle industry within the Lowcountry and South Carolina.  

The Citadel has been competing in the IGVC since 2011 when it secured rookie of the year honors, along with a ninth place finish in the Autonomous Navigation challenge. The Citadel’s other high finishes include a seventh place in the design competition in 2014, and a ninth place in the 2016 autonomous navigation challenge.

The Citadel’s Pablo Bot in 2016

The engineering faculty believe that competitions push students farther, and provide real world experience not found in the classroom. The faculty use a variety of competitions to engage students and promote the teaming skills desired by employers, one is the IGVC and another is the IEEE Regional Robotics Competition. The Citadel students are regularly in the top five within the regional robotics competition. 

Engineering at The Citadel has been producing engineers for the region, state, and nation since 1842. The Citadel School of Engineering meets regularly with regional industry leaders to ensure its graduates are meeting the companies’ present and future technical and professional requirements and will continue to partner with The Chamber of Commerce, the Charleston Regional Development Council, and the Charleston Corridor to ensure the greatest needs area being fulfilled with exceptionally skilled, locally developed engineers.

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Citadel Prof. Simon Ghanat named South Carolina Civil Engineer of the Year https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-prof-simon-ghanat-named-south-carolina-civil-engineer-of-the-year/ Thu, 27 Jun 2019 14:01:23 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=9208 Citadel civil engineering professor Dr. Simon Ghanat teaching in labCitadel civil engineering professor Dr. Simon Ghanat teaching in labThe state's Civil Engineer of the Year, as named by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) South Carolina Section, is Simon T. Ghanat, Ph.D., P.E., a professor in The Citadel School of Engineering.]]> Citadel civil engineering professor Dr. Simon Ghanat teaching in labCitadel civil engineering professor Dr. Simon Ghanat teaching in lab

(Photo above: Prof. Simon Ghanat teaching in civil and environmental engineering lab at The Citadel)

The state’s Civil Engineer of the Year, as named by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) South Carolina Section, is Simon T. Ghanat, Ph.D., P.E., a professor in The Citadel School of Engineering.

The award was formally announced at the South Carolina ASCE conference this month. The award letter states:

“As current President of the South Carolina Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers, I would like to extend my congratulations to you on behalf of the Section Board for being awarded the 2019 SC Civil Engineer of the Year for demonstrating outstanding contribution to the profession in South Carolina.” Shane Smith, P.E.

Ghanat received his Ph.D., M.S., and B.S. degrees in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Arizona State University. His research interests are in engineering education, seismic site response studies, engineering characteristics of strong ground motions, and probabilistic seismic hazard analyses. Among his research awards is a $765,887 grant he earned in conjunction with Citadel civil engineering colleague and co-principal investigator, Jeff Davis, Ph.D., P.E., to study coastal flood resiliency.

“My first passion lies with teaching and service to my students,” Ghanat said. “It was a special surprise and honor to receive this award and to be recognized by my fellow Civil Engineers in the state of South Carolina.”

The mission of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at The Citadel is to provide a nationally recognized student-centered learning environment for the development of principled leaders.

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Mazzaro continuing project at Army Research Lab to help soldiers detect hidden devices https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-army-lab-research-hidden-devices-radar-mazzaro/ Tue, 18 Jun 2019 19:03:58 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8969 Citadel engineering professor Greg Mazzaro with Army Research Lab project team lead, Kelly Sherbondy at the lab in Adelphi, MarylandCitadel engineering professor Greg Mazzaro with Army Research Lab project team lead, Kelly Sherbondy at the lab in Adelphi, MarylandDr. Gregory Mazzaro, a professor of electrical engineering at The Citadel, is spending the summer working on an ongoing project with the Army Research Lab in Adelphi, Maryland. He and his teammates continue to develop a unique, "nonlinear" radar designed to find hidden objects.]]> Citadel engineering professor Greg Mazzaro with Army Research Lab project team lead, Kelly Sherbondy at the lab in Adelphi, MarylandCitadel engineering professor Greg Mazzaro with Army Research Lab project team lead, Kelly Sherbondy at the lab in Adelphi, Maryland

Citadel engineering professor, Dr. Gregory Mazzaro and teammate hold three new patents for “non-linear” radar project

Dr. Gregory Mazzaro, a professor of electrical engineering at The Citadel, is spending the summer working on an ongoing project with the Army Research Lab in Adelphi, Maryland. He and his teammates continue to develop a unique, “nonlinear” radar designed to find hidden objects.

Traditional radar sends radio waves that bounce off of an object back to a receiver revealing it’s location. But that doesn’t work for things that are hidden or buried like phones, electrically triggered explosive devices or covert listening apparatus. That’s where Mazzaro’s non-linear radar can help.

“My teammates and I have been awarded another three patents,” Mazzaro said.

Army Research Lab in Adelphi, Maryland
Army Research Lab in Adelphi, Maryland

Mazzaro already holds several patents earned over the past five years for “harmonic radar” – radar that can pick up radio waves emitted from devices like cell phones.

His newest three patents with co-inventor Kelly Sherbondy include:

  • Automated Cancellation of Harmonics Using Feed-Forward Reflection for Radar Transmitter Linearization (US patent # 10,018,707)
  • Multitone Radar with Range Determination and Method of Use” (US patent # 10,203,405)
  • Methods and Systems for Locating Targets Using Non-Linear Radar with a Matched Filter Which Uses Exponential Value of the Transmit Signal (US patent # 10,234,543). 

“These patents protect ideas for maximizing the sensitivity of our radar receiver and for processing data collected by the radar into actionable information, such as the locations of the electronic devices that the radar is trying to detect,” Mazzaro explained. “At the Army Research Lab we are designing a slimmed-down version of our radar. We intend for the system to be light enough to be carried by an unmanned aerial vehicle, or drone.”

Mazzaro believes the radar will have far reaching impacts.

“Ultimately, we’d like to mount the radar on a drone so that a soldier might fly the portable radar in the vicinity of suspicious, and possibly harmful packages or other obscured objects, to determine if the area contains electronics. Thus the soldier could collect additional information about items in that environment well before physically entering the area,” Mazzaro said.

Citadel engineering professor Greg Mazzaro with Army Research Lab project team lead, Kelly Sherbondy at the Army’s radar lab in Adelphi, Maryland. Kelly is a full-time federal civilian employee at the Army Research Laboratory and a co-inventor on several of Mazzaro’s patents. 

During the academic year, when Mazzaro is back on campus teaching electrical engineering at The Citadel, he will also be testing the prototype radar circuit boards, sending results and feedback to the team at the Army lab as the final radar design is being refined.

Mazzaro’s work was covered by The Post & Courier in 2017. Read that article here.

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Meet Bender, The Citadel School of Engineering’s self-driving vehicle https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-engineering-unmanned-self-driving-vehicle/ Thu, 06 Jun 2019 20:07:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8667 Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of EngineeringBender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering]]> Bender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of EngineeringBender, an intelligent ground vehicle developed by students in The Citadel School of Engineering

Post competition update:

The Citadel’s team came in 5th place (out of 45 entries) in the Design Competition:

1. Georgia Institute of Technology
2. Manipal Institute of Technology
3. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
4. Hosei University
5. The Citadel
6. IIT Madras

Congratulations Citadel team!

June 6, 2019

Bender is on the run. So are 45 other intelligent vehicles. They’re converging, with their student inventors, in Rochester, Michigan where they will face off to show off their swagger.

Five engineering students from The Citadel’s evening undergraduate program are with Bender, and their professor, Bob Barsanti, Ph.D., at the 27th Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition at Oakland University.

“This is an exciting opportunity for our students because it is a really fun way to experience being an engineer, learn about self-driving, unmanned vehicles, and to work with the technology of the future,” Barsanti explained. 

Two electrical engineering majors, Rutledge Detyens and William Quade, and three mechanical engineering students, Nicole Flexner, Justin Geisler and Michael Rudd comprise the team that created Bender. The team was formed last fall and has worked together on Bender ever since

“Building an intelligent ground vehicle requires students to design and construct an autonomous vehicle that can navigate a football field sized obstacle course  using a variety of modern sensors,” Barsanti said.

The three day competition includes four competition categories:

  • Auto-Nav Challenge – the full obstacle course requiring the vehicles to perform full autonomous operation throughout
  • Design Competition – students must document their vehicle development  in a design report, followed by an in-person presentation to judges
  • Inter-Operability Profile Challenge – students make their vehicles more interoperable, by requiring development of a Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems (JAUS) compliant vehicles, which is the architecture currently used for military robots
  • Self-Drive Challenge – demonstration of full road operations: lane keeping, lane switch, merging, avoiding crossing obstacles (simulated pedestrians/vehicles), taxi pickup of passengers, pothole detection, stop and crosswalk lines detection, right/left turn and intersection detection/logic, navigation to GPS waypoints and autonomous parking.

Barsanti’s teams have finished in the top ten several times, most recently finishing in ninth place in the navigation competition, but he says this trip really is about the journey, rather than the win.

The Citadel's 2016 intelligent vehicle, Pablobot, and its student creators
The Citadel’s 2016 intelligent vehicle, Pablobot, and its student creators

“The machine is built as part of a senior capstone design project here at The Citadel. It is the product of  ten months of student effort. It has a lot of advanced technology including GPS navigation, LIDAR detection, video capture, and computer imaging,” he explained. “All of the systems are integrated and controlled by a computer running specialized robot software and algorithms. This is cutting edge work for undergraduate students.”

The outcome of Bender’s performance will be shared here when the team returns from the competition.

 

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6 Reasons to earn a Master’s in Project Management from The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/6-reasons-to-earn-a-masters-in-project-management-from-the-citadel/ Tue, 04 Jun 2019 14:31:59 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8847 Gradutes of the Master's in Project Management program after Commencement CeremoniesGradutes of the Master's in Project Management program after Commencement Ceremonies]]> Gradutes of the Master's in Project Management program after Commencement CeremoniesGradutes of the Master's in Project Management program after Commencement Ceremonies

Whether you’re looking to switch jobs or become more valuable in your your current role, a Master of Science in Project Management may help you achieve your goals.  Project managers work to make ideas happen and are needed in every industry, from tech to healthcare and even finance.

Check out these six benefits of The Citadel’s graduate program in project management:

1. Industry demand for project managers

There is a huge demand in industry for project managers, and it’s expected to increase this year and in the years to come. According to the Project Management Institute, American industries will need 87.7 million project managers by 2027.

2. The skills are applicable to all industries

The beauty of project management is how versatile it is. Project managers demonstrate excellent leadership skills to guide teams to success in every field. Whether you’re flexing your finance skills through cost control, or using your best judgement in risk management, those same skills are essential to all industries. Even soft skills, such as motivation and team building, will be essential to any successful project team, no matter what industry you are working in.  

3. It’s a great way to make a career change (or boost your salary)

Project management is not only in high demand, it opens up opportunities for a pay hike or career change. Project management jobs often pay high salaries – in fact, the national average is $92,000.

4. It will prepare you for the PMP exam

This program will help you prepare for the PMP exam. In fact, The Citadel’s project management students have a 95% pass rate on the first try. The program is one of only 68 graduate programs in the United States accredited by the Project Management Institute’s Global Accreditation Center (GAC) –the same organization that facilitates the PMP.

5. It’s flexible

The Citadel Graduate College prides itself on offering flexible scheduling, because they know how busy you can be. The master’s program can be completed in as little as 1.5 years. Courses are offered in the evening, and some can be completed online. You can further customize your graduate studies by choosing between a Master’s degree and a graduate certificate in project management. Plus, admission is rolling, which means you can start in the fall, spring or summer.

Choose the plan that works best for you and complete the degree you want on your own schedule, without having to sacrifice your life or wait another year. Most of the students in the program are working professionals with families. Busy schedules and outside obligations do not hinder their success.

6. It has a great reputation

The Citadel has the only GAC-accredited graduate program in project management in South Carolina. The program is taught by The Citadel’s School of Engineering, named by U.S. News and World Report as one of top engineering colleges of 2019. For eight consecutive years The Citadel has been named the #1 Public College in the South for colleges offering up to a master’s degree. The Citadel is also named the #1 College for Veterans in the South. 


Learn more about the Master of Science in Project Management at citadel.edu/root/pmgt

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Citadel professor weighs in after Ben Sawyer bridge closes due to heat https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-professor-john-ryan-ben-sawyer-bridge-closes-due-to-heat/ Thu, 30 May 2019 12:05:45 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8489 John Ryan interviewJohn Ryan interviewCitadel professor John Ryan speaks with Channel 2's Sofia Arazoza about how extreme heat caused the Ben Sawyer Bridge to become stuck open.]]> John Ryan interviewJohn Ryan interview

As seen on WCBD – NBC Channel 2, by Sofia Arazoza

If you spent any time outdoors over the holiday weekend, you know it was hot. And the heat isn’t over.

But on Memorial day, the record-breaking temperatures caused major trouble for drivers coming in and out of Sullivan’s Island when the Ben Sawyer swing bride was shut down for hours, and officials say the temperature was to blame.

It was stand still traffic for hours, one driver describing it as a parking lot.

Sullivan’s island officials first confirmed the bridge was inoperable shortly before 3:30pm on Monday.

Engineers with the South Carolina Department of Transportation say the extreme heat caused materials to expand, impacting the opening and closing of the bridge.

Traffic teams re-routed drivers to the Isle of Palms connecter for five hours as SCDOT crews along with the Awendaw/Mclellenville fire department worked to cool down the bridge.

At 9:20pm, the bridge reopened to drivers, but it is still not open for boaters.

Since the cause was first reported, News 2 has gotten several questions about how heat can cause a bridge to malfunction and why it hasn’t happened before, since heat is no stranger to the Lowcountry.

We took those questions to a Civil Engineer professor at the Citadel. He explained heat can cause both steel and concrete to expand, which in this case, caused the materials to interfere, also known as fouling.

We do see hot temperatures often, but this time around we’ve seen continual highs, giving the bridge little time to cool off. Storm Team 2 has reported a record-breaking 100 degrees three days in a row.

SCDOT says maritime traffic will open Wednesday.

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Top jobs for School of Engineering graduates; what they say about The Citadel https://today.citadel.edu/top-jobs-for-school-of-engineering-graduates-what-they-say-about-the-citadel/ Fri, 10 May 2019 10:00:27 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=8145 Candace works at the Google Data Center in Monks Corner, South Carolina. "I decided to attend The Citadel Graduate College, because they're seen as the best in the Lowcountry for Project Management."]]>

The Citadel School of Engineering is one of the oldest programs in America and is consistently ranked among the top 25 programs in the nation. The School of Engineering offers four bachelor of science, four master of science, and 13 graduate certificate programs.

The majority of the cadets and students studying the fields of civil, construction, electrical and mechanical engineering, as well as project management, are employed before they graduate, with nearly 100 percent are employed within two months of graduation. Approximately 80 percent of those graduates stay in South Carolina for their careers.

Meet some of The Citadel Class of 2019 School of Engineering graduates:

Robert Alexander Perry, Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering

Robert Alexander Perry, The Citadel Class of 2019, Evening Undergraduate Program

Robert, who is originally from North Augusta, South Carolina, attended The Citadel through the Evening Undergraduate Program. He works for Santee Cooper as an electrical engineer.

The Citadel makes you a disciplined learner and provides you with an opportunity to learn from accomplished professionals in the various engineering fields. Robert Alexander

Caleb Carter, Bachelor of Science, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Caleb Carter, The Citadel Class of 2019
Caleb Carter, The Citadel Class of 2019

Caleb has a new job with Infrastructure Consulting and Engineering, PLLC. He’ll be involved in the execution of construction engineering and inspection duties on projects for the South Carolina Department of Transportation and for Charleston County government. As a cadet at The Citadel, he served as president of the student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

The Citadel is the greatest institution in the country to me. Here, we train individuals to be leaders. The same thing cannot be said about other schools. This journey helped me become the man I want to be by challenging me mentally, academically, and physically. Cadets are leaps and bounds more prepared to enter the real world after graduation than those from other schools, because of the training at The Citadel. Persevering when faced with obstacles becomes second nature. Caleb Carter

2nd Lt. Abigail Murn, U.S. Army, Bachelor of Science, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Abigail Murn, The Citadel Class of 2019

Abigail is a 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Army, accepting a commission just prior to graduating from The Citadel in May of 2019. While a cadet, Abigail served as captain of The Bulldogs’ volleyball team, and as president of The Citadel chapter of the Society of Women in Engineers, in addition to being active in the American Society of Civil Engineering. Just before graduation, Abigail was selected for The Citadel’s Community Ambassador Award for her service as “an outstanding mentor to female students at The Citadel majoring in engineering, helping host a Society of Women Engineers conference at The Citadel with 225 participants from across the state, and leading fellow engineering cadets and students in hosting two Introduce a Girl Scout to Engineering events.

Candace Pringle, Master of Science, Technical Project Management

Candace Pringle, The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2019, Project Management

Candace works at the Google Data Center in Monks Corner, South Carolina. “While in The Citadel’s project management program, I received a promotion from an entry level technician, to an entry level associate program manager (APM). Now, based on my performance as an APM, I’ve been encouraged by leadership to go apply for a promotion to the next level as well,” Pringle said. “I will not only apply my project management skill set to my full-time job, I will use what I’ve learned in all areas of my life and outside of employment expenditures.”

The Citadel Graduate College is a well respected school. I attended Clemson University as an undergraduate for Industrial Engineering, because they were the best in the state for that program. I decided to attend The Citadel Graduate College, because they’re seen as the best in the Lowcountry for Project Management. In addition, they have the graduate center in North Charleston which saved me from having to travel downtown; and they offer evening courses. I’ve learned so much from this program and I’m willing to share my experience with anyone who asks. Candace Pringle

Ensign Joseph Scerbo, U.S. Navy, Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering

Joseph Scerbo, The Citadel Class of 2019

Joseph’s hometown is Flemington, New Jersey. After graduating from The Citadel, his first assignment with the Navy is Nuclear Power School for submarine duty. Scerbo’s goal is to lead a division of sailors, and become qualified to operate and pilot submarines.

The best reason to attend The Citadel is to learn true life lessons at a place where you can mold yourself into a leader. Joseph Scerbo

Citadel ROTC Commissioning Ceremony, Joseph Scerbo third row from left on end

 

 

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