Engineering – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 24 Sep 2020 18:47:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Engineering – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Lowe, The Citadel launch educational program for Civil and Construction Engineering cadets and students https://today.citadel.edu/lowe-the-citadel-launch-educational-program-for-civil-and-construction-engineering-cadets-and-students/ Sun, 27 Sep 2020 23:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18877 Citadel engineering cadets and students tour Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development companyCitadel engineering cadets and students tour Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development companyBeginning in spring 2021, Lowe’s internship program will be offered to juniors and seniors within The Citadel School of Engineering.]]> Citadel engineering cadets and students tour Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development companyCitadel engineering cadets and students tour Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development company

Photo above: Citadel engineering cadets and students tour The Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development company

On September 23, Lowe announced its partnership with The Citadel to launch a construction educational program, featuring an in-class lecture series with Lowe executives, on-site project tours and an internship program at Lowe’s Southeast regional office in Charleston for students enrolled in The Citadel School of Engineering. The program aims to provide cadets with real-world construction analysis and experiences to supplement classroom learning.

Beginning in spring 2021, Lowe’s internship program will be offered to juniors and seniors within the School of Engineering. The internship will provide participating cadets and students with real estate and construction management experiences. Interns will also work closely with Lowe senior project managers, attend construction team meetings and experience real-world construction activities with tours of active construction sites.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for these young adults to learn meaningful life skills and experience first-hand the many different components that are involved in successfully managing a multifaceted construction project,” said Mike Mansager, vice president of Lowe. Mansager adds that “through classroom lectures and in-field learning, Lowe will provide unmatched opportunities for students to learn about our local projects and take away real-world applications that will help them find great success in their careers after graduation.”

Mike Mansager, vice president of Lowe, instructing cadets and students during tour

In early September, Lowe hosted a group of Citadel cadets from professor Rebekah Burke’s Construction Engineering Materials and Methods class at the company’s construction site for The Cooper Hotel, downtown Charleston’s new full-service waterfront hotel, which broke ground in February 2020. The site tour was used to illustrate the construction process and discuss the challenges associated with building foundations for large waterfront developments.

“In talking with Mr. Mansager and the Lowe construction team, the cadets and students experienced firsthand the application and execution of technical engineering topics discussed in class,” said Burke. “As a result of this partnership between industry and academia, the students commonly described profound realizations about their career path in construction and engineering in their site visit reports and guest lecture reflections.”

Lowe is also currently hosting in-class lectures as part of a reoccurring, visiting lecture series at The Citadel School of Engineering. The most recent educational lecture, led by Mansager, focused on the topic of construction contracts. In his upcoming lectures, Mansager will discuss a variety of topics to assist cadets in better understanding how what they are learning in the classroom applies in real world applications for construction and development.

For more information about the Construction Engineering Program at The Citadel, please call (843) 953- 5083, or email sfye@citadel.edu.

Citadel engineering cadets and students tour Cooper Hotel construction site in Charleston courtesy of Lowe, a real estate development company

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Money magazine ranks Citadel #2 in SC, #87 nationally https://today.citadel.edu/money-magazine-ranks-citadel-2-in-sc-87-nationally/ Wed, 23 Sep 2020 17:26:30 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18778 Knobs from the Class of 2024 take part in morning drill during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Knobs from the Class of 2024 take part in morning drill during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)The Citadel comes in at #87, second in South Carolina to Clemson, which comes in at #67 nationally.]]> Knobs from the Class of 2024 take part in morning drill during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)Knobs from the Class of 2024 take part in morning drill during Challenge Week at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. (Photo by Cameron Pollack / The Citadel)

As seen on Money.com

Note: To see the Money rankings for South Carolina’s 4-year colleges, go to the Build Your Own Rankings section here. Money magazine published its most recent college rankings August 25, 2020. When looking at the complete, national list, The Citadel comes in at #87, second in South Carolina to Clemson, which comes in at #67 nationally.

The Best Colleges in America, Ranked by Value

Going to college shouldn’t mean a lifetime of debt. To find the schools that successfully combine quality and affordability, Money weighed more than 20,000 data points, including tuition fees, family borrowing, and career earnings. Explore our list, then build your own.

In addition, The Citadel is ranked at #29 out of 50 in America for the magazine’s sub-set of “Best Colleges Where More than Half of Applicants Get In.”

Money’s annual Best Colleges for Your Money ranking offers a practical analysis of more than 700 four-year colleges. We spent months evaluating data on quality, affordability, and student outcomes. Watch the video for a quick overview or read the full step-by-step breakdown here.

Citadel President General Glenn M. Walters ’79, USMC (Retired) speaks to upperclass cadets in McAlister Field House at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, August 20, 2020.

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My ring story: Humility over pride https://today.citadel.edu/my-ring-story-humility-over-pride/ Wed, 23 Sep 2020 13:20:31 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18757 "...an individual wearing The Citadel band of gold will not be someone who will give up easily."]]>

Meet Cadet Tromaine Cobbs, Reevesville, South Carolina, ’21

…the first and last thing that I will see is the big ring statue at the campus entrance symbolizing one point in my life where I chose not to turn and take the easy way out.

Tromaine Cobbs, Citadel Class of 2021

Who or what inspired you to attend The Citadel?

I chose to attend The Citadel because my grandmother always loved seeing me in my JROTC uniform and she told me to always continue to be great. I have also been working with two men who are brothers and who are both alumni of The Citadel at a W&B Enterprises. I have known them all my life.

Cades with Bruce Alexander marking in MLK Day Parade
Cadet Tromaine Cobbs seen on left holding banner during Charleston’s Martin Luther King Day parade

What was the most difficult obstacle you conquered that made you feel you earned the honor of wearing the ring?

The most difficult obstacle would be being more outgoing because I am naturally an introvert, but over these past years I began to talk more and made friendships with new brothers and sisters.

In what ways has this institution impacted your life?

This institution has continued to help me grow as a leader by introducing me into a whole new environment with countless opportunities to learn.

Why do you think it is important that cadets and/or people in general understand the symbolism and weight that the ring holds?

It is important for people to understand what the ring means because it represents much more than just an indication that I graduated from college. It stands for all the blood, sweat, and tears that have been shed before me. Additionally it shows that an individual wearing The Citadel band of gold will not be someone who will give up easily.

What is a song that describes your emotions leading up to Ring Day?

“Struggle No More” by Anthony Hamilton is a song that describes my emotions over these years, because the song takes about the hard times and how loved ones will help to lift you up and then being able to provide for your family without struggling through hard times.

What obligations do you feel you have in the future as a member of the Long Gray Line who wears the ring?

As a member of the Long Grey Line, I feel as though it will be my duty to not bring discredit to myself, family and the institution. I also feel that I should always continue to motivate others to be brave and to step out of their comfort zone in order for them to grow as a person.

What is inscribed on the inside of your ring and what is the significance?

A phrase that I have in my ring is “Humility over Pride.” To me, this means that a leader must be humble themselves in order to receive the loyalty of their followers and then everyone would be able to be prideful of what has been accomplished.

You are connected to thousands of alumni, not only through your Citadel experience but through the ring. How does that make you feel?

Having the chance to wear the ring will be a unique and unreal experience, because the first and last thing that I will see is the big ring statue at the campus entrance symbolizing one point in my life where I chose not to turn and take the easy way out.

Cobbs is a 2nd Lieutenant in the Corps, a Civil Engineering major, and enjoys being a member of The Citadel Gospel Choir.

Note: This is one in a series stories intended to show the different journeys members of The Citadel Class of 2021 have undertaken to earn their bands of gold. The Regimental Public Affairs team, Cadet Ruby Bolden, public affairs officer, and Cadet Samantha Walton, public affairs NCO sent a list of questions to participating cadets. These are the resulting stories.

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Two Citadel cadets earn Women in Defense scholarships https://today.citadel.edu/two-citadel-cadets-earn-women-in-defense-scholarships/ Fri, 28 Aug 2020 20:20:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18188 The Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter is pleased to announce Cadets Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther as the awardees of its 2020 STEM Scholarship.]]>

Note: The Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter awards two scholarships annually to women studying a STEM discipline; this year, Citadel cadets earned them both

From the Women in Defense Palmetto Chapter

The Women in Defense (WID) Palmetto Chapter is pleased to announce Lillian Layden and Catherine Guenther as the awardees of its 2020 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Scholarship.

Layden is a senior at The Citadel and a Computer Science and German double major with minors in Cybersecurity and Fine Arts. She is a member of the U.S. Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). Layden is contracted through the U. S. Air Force and will be commissioned upon graduation.

Guenther is a sophomore at The Citadel. She is pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering and is a member of the U.S. Air Force ROTC.

The WID Palmetto Chapter’s STEM Scholarship is an annual award for women attending South Carolina colleges or universities pursuing degrees in STEM fields. Two annual scholarships of up to $2,500 are available, one of which is reserved for a veteran/member of the military/ROTC participant. Scholarship awards are made according to financial need, academic achievement, faculty recommendation, recognition and honors, activities, and personal essay.

The WID Palmetto Chapter, based in Charleston, S.C., was founded March 13, 2009. Their goal is to provide networking and professional development opportunities to promote advancement and recognition of women in national defense and security, to support military service members, and to encourage partnerships between the local contractor community and Department of Defense agencies.

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The Lowcountry Graduate Center, co-founded by The Citadel, moves locations https://today.citadel.edu/the-lowcountry-graduate-center-co-founded-by-the-citadel-moves-locations/ Thu, 20 Aug 2020 23:00:07 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18020 The Lowcountry Graduate Center was founded by institutions including The Citadel, the College of Charleston and the Medical University of South Carolina.]]>

The Lowcountry Graduate Center (LGC) is a state-funded organization that was founded by top-rated institutions including The Citadel, the College of Charleston and the Medical University of South Carolina.

With plans to expand its utilization, The Citadel currently offers Project Management classes at the LGC, along with a few other Engineering courses.

“The Citadel’s graduate programs have been a presence in the Lowcountry Graduate Center since its inception,” said Kelly Brennan, Ph.D., The Citadel’s associate provost of enrollment management. “We are excited to continue to partner with the Lowcountry Graduate Center to bring educational opportunities to our community members in North Charleston. Building upon our online graduate programs, we are looking forward to expanding in-person course offerings that meet the needs of the community.”

LGC Moving to Trident Tech Thornley Campus

As the center of gravity – and employment in particular – moves north up the I-26 corridor in the Lowcountry, so does the Lowcountry Graduate Center (LGC). This summer, the LGC will move its operations to Trident Technical College’s Thornley Campus on Rivers Avenue in North Charleston.

Now more convenient than ever, and with extended hours for programs and services, the Lowcountry Graduate Center is even better positioned to provide graduate education. Working professionals throughout the Lowcountry can cultivate new skill sets and grow their careers at the LGC.

Joining the high school-through-graduate education pipeline at Trident Tech, the LGC will remain an independent organization. It will continue to provide in-person and hybrid graduate level programs of study and courses in fully digital classrooms with robust support services and free parking. Some will culminate in degrees while others generate an academic certificate with credits towards a future degree. Still others may simply represent a certificate of completion and accomplishment at a graduate level.

The new location in Building 920, the Center for Economic Development, allows the Lowcountry Graduate Center to extend its program and service hours to weekends, complementing the evening classes and services previously offered. Among the resources in that building are computer labs; high speed internet access; the College Center conference space; and Relish, the fine dining restaurant of Trident Tech’s Culinary Institute of Charleston. LGC students will have routine access to common shared areas such as to student break rooms, beyond the dedicated space for their classrooms in Building 920.

“As major manufacturing companies like Volvo and their suppliers locate at the northern edge of the Lowcountry, the need increases for a central location like Trident Tech, which sits between two I-26 exits and in proximity to Airport Road from Boeing,” said Dr. Nancy Muller, director of the Lowcountry Graduate Center. “Given the LGC’s longstanding involvement in the Metro Charleston Chamber’s Career Academies for the area’s high school students, I am delighted to be a new extension of Dr. Mary Thornley’s vision for education and career development in support of the Lowcountry’s growing and increasingly sophisticated workforce,” added Muller.

Added Trident Tech Vice President for Academic Affairs Cathy Almquist. “At Trident Tech, part of our mission is to enable members of our community to pursue higher education. We are delighted to host the Lowcountry Graduate Center as they help members of our community fulfill the goal of completing a graduate program.”

Recognizing that an educated populace is a key to economic growth and well-being, the LGC works with trusted advisors – business leaders, major employers, and academic institutions – throughout the Lowcountry to identify graduate studies, certificates, and degrees that will help meet workforce needs in the region.

About the Lowcountry Graduate Center

Funded annually by the State, the Lowcountry Graduate Center was created in 2001 as a consortium of the College of Charleston, The Citadel, and the Medical University of South Carolina. These founding institutions, along with the University of South Carolina and South Carolina State University, now offer a variety of graduate degrees and certificates at the Lowcountry Graduate Center. Conveniently located in North Charleston, the mission of the Lowcountry Graduate Center is to increase access to higher education by professionals in the workforce, support the region’s employers, and meet the economic, business development, and social needs of the Lowcountry. For more information, visit https://www.lowcountrygradcenter.org

About Trident Technical College

Trident Technical College is a public, two-year, multi-campus community college that provides quality education and promotes economic development in Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties. TTC is a member of the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education system that includes 16 technical colleges in South Carolina.

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The Citadel’s commitment to elevating education throughout South Carolina continues https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadels-commitment-to-elevating-education-throughout-south-carolina-continues/ Thu, 30 Jul 2020 23:00:49 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17394 Hundreds of K-12 teachers in South Carolina will be better prepared to educate students in the fall after learning new techniques through the STEM Center.]]>

Photo: South Carolina educators participating in a small session during Computer Science Professional Development Week

College’s STEM Center of Excellence prepares K-12 teachers for enhanced instruction 

When school resumes, hundreds of K-12 teachers in South Carolina will be better prepared to educate their students, whether it be face-to-face, virtually or a combination of the two.

Those teachers will integrate new techniques and concepts into their lessons, learned over the summer from The Citadel’s STEM Center of Excellence (SCE).

In addition to supporting Citadel cadets and students, the SCE serves as a community resource, holding numerous educational events for children annually and providing robust professional development programs for K-12 STEM teachers.

In July, more than 400 teachers participated in two, week-long workshops presented by the SCE. Both were originally planned to be held on campus, but were moved to a virtual format in response to the pandemic.

The goal of both workshops: help teachers inspire and prepare more South Carolina students to pursue STEM-related careers.

Addressing the shortage of computer science teachers

The first workshop involved the SCE’s ongoing work to increase the number of computer science teachers in South Carolina schools.

The SCE offered computer science professional development for nearly 250 teachers, with the goal of ensuring that every high school, and most middle schools, have at least one dedicated computer science teacher.

The South Carolina Department of Education selected the SCE to provide instruction in response to new, stricter guidelines about computer science requirements in South Carolina public high schools.

A teacher using the kits, provided by the STEM Center, to learn about computer science during the Computer Science Professional Development Week

“Now that a keyboarding class no longer counts as computer science credit, 436 high schools have to be able to teach in-depth computer science,” said Jennifer Albert, Ph.D., director of the The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence. “We’ve been working the last two summers with the Department of Education to make sure all of those teachers have the training and the certification needed to teach those classes.”

The experience was free for teachers, thanks to the funding from the state’s Department of Education, as well as a grant from the CS Teachers’ Association.

Infusing computing

The second workshop, held the last week of July, represented the final stage of a multi-million-dollar National Science Foundation grant awarded to the SCE, and project collaborators at North Carolina State University. The goal of the STEM+Computing project was aimed at helping teachers integrate computing and STEM curricula into their classes.

Nearly 200 teachers participated in the event, learning how to blend computational thinking — a problem-solving method that describes problems and their solutions in ways that a computer would understand — into their educational content.

Providing the workshop virtually didn’t faze the SCE director.

“We’ve had to restructure everything get the same, small-group, personal feel,” said Albert. “We had to almost triple the number of session facilitators that we hired this year, because we want them in small groups so they have the same amount of attention that they would have face-to-face.”

In fact, the SCE’s methods for adjusting to a virtual format, as well as more information on the workshop, is included on page 59 of a recent publication in the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education.

The SCE is a collaborative effort between The Citadel’s Zucker Family School of Education, the School of Engineering, and the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics. It delivers outreach initiatives, like Storm The Citadel and more, to increase student interest, participation, and opportunities in the STEM disciplines.

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Citadel Engineering faculty; alumnus leaders making news with top awards https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-engineering-faculty-leaders-making-news-with-top-awards/ Tue, 28 Jul 2020 23:00:54 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17391 Faculty and an alumnus from The Citadel School of Engineering are the proud recipients of awards from the 2020 American Society of Civil Engineers.]]>

Photo above: Award-winning Volvo interchange engineering project led by Citadel School of Engineering alumnus

The Citadel School of Engineering, consistently ranked as one of the top engineering schools in the country, could not achieve that status time and again without prominent industry faculty leading the way. The results of the 2020 American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) awards for the state of South Carolina underscore that point. 

Announced in July, the awardees include two faculty leaders, an alumnus, and a project that alumnus helped lead. 

Le Tellier Cup winner for outstanding lifetime achievement

Col. Ron Welch, USA (Ret.), Ph.D., PE, dean for The Citadel School of Engineering 

Dean of The Citadel School of Engineering, Dr. Ron Welch, accepting Edmund Friedman Professional Recognition Award in 2018

“Dr. Welch has accumulated a highly regarded national reputation for academic excellence continues to play an instrumental role in direction of ASCE’s Project ExCEEd (Excellence in Civil Engineering Education), and is a recognized leader in ASEE (American Society of Engineering Education) Civil Engineering Division.  He has served in academic appointments in higher education over 29 years including faculty and leadership positions at U.S. Military Academy, University of Texas at Tyler, and The Citadel.  His career includes 25 years of service as an Officer in U.S. Army rising to the rank of Colonel, prior to his retirement from the Corps of Engineers in 2007.   

His career includes 25 years of service as an Officer in U.S. Army rising to the rank of Colonel, prior to his retirement from the Corps of Engineers in 2007.  Since his arrival at The Citadel in 2011, Dean Welch has served as a forward-thinking leader of higher education in our state. As a testament to his vision, two new undergraduate degrees were added to The Citadel School of Engineering including Mechanical Engineering and Construction Engineering.  Additionally, he led creation of Master of Science degree programs in Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering.  Through Dean Welch’s strategic leadership, The Citadel’s School of Engineering enrollment has risen to 700 students, comprising approximately one-third of the college’s degree seeking students.”

William J. Davis, Ph.D., P.E., Dept. Head and D. Graham Copeland Professor of Civil Engineering, The Citadel 

In addition to leading the The Citadel School of Engineering, and continuing to teach Civil Engineering cadets and students, Welch has worked as a servant leader in numerous voluntary leadership positions throughout his career. Examples include serving a board member for Engineers Without Boarders and serving ASCE in leadership roles for more than 20 years, including as a program developer and mentor.  

Some of Welch’s other awards include: 

  • ASCE Edmund Friedman Professional Recognition Award, 2018 
  • Bliss Medal, Society of American Military Engineers (SAME), 2018 
  • Pillar of the College, College of Engineering, University of Texas at Tyler, 2017 
  • American Society of Civil Engineers, ASCE Fellow, 2016 
  • Engineer of The Year, Charleston Engineer’s Joint Council, 2015 
  • Society of American Military Engineers, SAME Fellow, 2015 
  • American Society of Engineering Education, ASEE Fellow, 2015 

Educator of the Year

Kweku Brown, Ph.D.

Dr. Kweku Brown teaching cadets out in the field during a Civil Engineering course in 2019

“Dr. Kweku Brown is an Assistant Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at The Citadel. His well-founded educational approaches and effective teaching methods are benefiting students, contributing to the quality of our Department’s learning environment, and embodying the highest ideals of The Citadel’s mission, as a teaching institution.  

His ability to create and support productive student-learning environments is phenomenal. Through his great work ethic and collaboration, he exemplifies how engineers can work together to strive for the highest standards of excellence. He passed his PE exam in 2020 and is in the process of submitting his application.” 

William J. Davis, Ph.D., P.E., Dept. Head and D. Graham Copeland Professor of Civil Engineering, The Citadel 

In 2019, Brown taught 12 sections of 8 Civil Engineering Courses, was selected as a national delegate for the Minority Faculty Development Workshop at Harvard University, and participated in 27 Citadel events and initiatives including Leadership Day and Student Excellence Day. In addition, Brown currently serves as a faculty Advisory for the student chapters of ASCE, the National Society of Black Engineers, and the Institute of Transportation Engineers.  

Brown’s most recent research appointments and recognition include: 

  • Member, Geographic Information Science and Applications, Standing Committee, Transportation Research Board, National Academies of Sciences, 2014-present
  • Member, Statewide Transportation Data and Information Systems, Standing Committee, Transportation Research Board, National Academies of Sciences, 2014-present
  • National Committee Member: American Association for State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Geographic Information systems for Transportation (GIS-T), Vice Chair of Student Paper Award Committee 

Brown received his Civil Engineering Bachelor’s degree from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Ghana. His Master’s degree and Doctoral degree were obtained from the University of Connecticut and Clemson University, respectively. Brown is a member of both the National and South Carolina Section of the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE). 

Engineer of the Year

Jim O’Connor, The Citadel Class of 1989, JMT engineering, Charleston

Project of the Year 

I-26/Volvo Car Interchange, Jim O’Connor, chief engineer 

Jim O’Connor

Charleston area JMT executive, and a JMT project, have been honored by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) South Carolina Section. Jim O’Connor, PE, CEng MIEI was named Civil Engineer of the Year, and JMT’s I-26/Volvo interchange design-build project was selected as Project of the Year. 

Jim O’Connor is a 1989 Citadel graduate and Vice President in JMT’s Charleston office who is both responsible for the firm’s South Carolina operations and actively participates in complex projects. He also holds an MS from Rutgers University and is a professional engineer in several states, including being a Chartered Engineer in the Republic of Ireland. As an active ASCE member, he serves as a Practitioner Adviser at The Citadel and is a member of the Civil Engineering Department’s Advisory Board. 

As an accomplished structural engineer, O’Connor contributed to the success of several key projects that are helping reshape the infrastructure in South Carolina’s Lowcountry including the award-winning I-26/Volvo interchange, the Port Access Road/I-26 interchange, the historic Low Battery reconstruction, and the Nexans Marine Terminal in the Goose Creek Bushy Park complex. 

Delivered to the South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) in 2019, the new I-26/Volvo Interchange provides critical access from a regional Charleston interstate highway to Camp Hall Commerce Park and the Volvo manufacturing facility. As the lead design firm on this project, JMT provided overall project management along with bridge and roadway design, and environmental services in support of the contractor, Conti Enterprises, Inc. The successful delivery of this project has added substantial value to the greater Charleston coastal community and the state of South Carolina. (Provided by JMT) 

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Engineering a creative way to hold “hands-on” labs — online https://today.citadel.edu/engineering-a-creative-way-to-hold-hands-on-labs-online/ Thu, 18 Jun 2020 14:16:07 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16898 This interactive, virtual lab is currently being offered to evening students currently enrolled in a summer session of a essential engineering course.]]>

Photo: Olga Zeller, the laboratory technician for The Citadel School of Engineering, works with Dr. Simon Ghanat’s students during a materials lab held via Zoom

There are perks — but also a lot of challenges — that come with virtual learning. There are even more challenges when it comes to finding a way to handle hands-on learning, when all the hands are made of pixels in a computer screen.

But that’s where Citadel engineering professor Simon Ghanat, Ph.D., and the School of Engineering got a chance to show off a creative ability to overcome challenges, and to bring virtual learning directly to the students.

Instead of pre-recording the lab experience, or attempting to hold hypothetical experiments, Ghanat and the school decided to hold an essential Engineering lab via Zoom, with one technician working alone in the lab, going through the experiments — live — for the students.

“Labs are vital to putting what cadets and students learn in their coursework into action, especially in engineering and science programs so they can see the applications of what they are studying,” said Ron Welch, Ph.D., P.E., dean of The Citadel School of Engineering. “With the leadership of Dr. Simon Ghanat and laboratory technician, Olga Zeller, we hope to develop a prototype, of sorts, for labs requiring specific equipment to still be available to those who need to learn remotely due to COVID-19, or other circumstances.”

This interactive, virtual lab is currently being offered to evening students currently enrolled in the summer session of the civil engineering course, “Mechanics of Materials.”

The course is essential to cadets and students studying mechanical, civil and construction engineering — operating as a foundation for the more advanced classes that come after. It introduces cadets and students to the practice of testing machines and equipment, as well as help them learn about the properties of engineering materials, as determined by results of tests in compression, tension, bending, torsion and more.

The unique idea first came to Dr. Ghanat during the emergency spring semester transition to online learning.

“I did demos and provided data for the students to analyze — but I noticed something was missing,” said Ghanat. “Students were not able to engage with each other, with a lab tech or me — which led me to the thought process of working with Olga, our lab tech, to perform experiments remotely in the summer course. By doing the labs in this format, students are able to share data and photos, and analyze data remotely — which was not possible in the Zoom-only format.”

It’s the kind of first-hand experience and learning that can’t be replicated without live demonstrations. And it’s clear how well the new methodology is working.

“It’s better than just seeing numbers,” said Olga Zeller, the lab technician with the School of Engineering. “Students can communicate between themselves, while also seeing the lab happening at the same time, with a professor talking in real time. It gives them a chance to see how it’s actually working, as well as a better memory and understanding of the material.”

Ghanat is currently using the new lab format for two groups, comprised of about 12 students each. Not only do the smaller class sizes give the students a more individualized, personal experience — it also shines a light on the educators’ dedication to teaching the next generation of engineers.

“Our faculty and staff’s passion for creating effective learning environments, coupled with students’ enthusiasm for their engineering education, works effectively through any medium,” said William J. Davis, Ph.D., P.E., head of the Civil & Environmental department.

For more information about The Citadel School of Engineering, please visit the School of Engineering webpage, or call (843) 953-6499.

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Citadel engineers in high demand around SC and the nation https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-engineers-in-high-demand-around-sc-and-the-nation/ Mon, 18 May 2020 20:56:53 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16465 There are distinct advantages for those graduating from one of the five oldest engineering programs in America, and one that is consistently ranked in the top 25 nationally. By graduation]]>

There are distinct advantages for those graduating from one of the five oldest engineering programs in America, and one that is consistently ranked in the top 25 nationally. By graduation each May, 85% of The Citadel School of Engineering students are employed, with 99 percent employed within two months of graduation.

“The combination of a highly relevant engineering curriculum combined with four years of required leadership training makes a Citadel educated engineer a highly desired addition to many teams,” said Col. Ron Welch, USA (Ret), Ph.D., PE. and dean for The Citadel School of Engineering. “The Class of 2020 is no exception and finished with outstanding results.”

The breakout of 2020 graduates from the five Bachelor of Science degree programs and the four Master of Science programs is as follows:

South Carolina Corp of Cadets Bachelor of Science

  • Mechanical Engineering: 66
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering: 31
  • Electrical Engineering: 15
  • Construction Engineering: 9

Degree Transfer Undergraduate Programs (non-cadet)

  • Mechanical Engineering: 11
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering: 11
  • Electrical Engineering: 9

Master of Science Programs

  • Project Management: 20
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering: 2
  • Electrical Engineering: 2

Where are they working?

Here is a look at what some members of The Citadel School of Engineering Class of 2020 shared about their next steps and about their Citadel experience.

Christian Brackett

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Campobello, South Carolina
Destination: Lockheed Martin, Greenville, South Carolina

“The Citadel makes you become the kind of person everyone wants to be. You become reliable and honorable.”

John Croft

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Mount Pleasant, South Carolina
Destination: HITT Contracting for HITT Future’s Program as a project engineer based out of Falls Church, Virginia.

“The Citadel will mold you into the man or woman that you will want to become and set you up for your future. The value of the ring goes beyond that of any other college.”

Second Lt. Preston Dawes, USA

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Milton, Georgia
Destination: W.M. Jordan Company in Wilmington, North Carolina

“I got a 4-year Army ROTC scholarship my senior year of high school which solidified my choice to go to The Citadel to make myself the best leader possible.”

Second Lt. William Durnan

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Cheyenne, Wyoming
Destination: U.S. Army

“The Citadel provides a realistic experience of life. You learn to deal with difficult people and situations, the kind that you cannot back out of. It teaches you to remain humble always and understand the power of being a leader. For those that choose to pursue a leadership position in the Corps, you’ll know the challenge of juggling school, the duties of your position, physical exercise, extracurricular activities, and a social life. Ultimately you learn sacrifice, you can’t do everything or be everywhere and applying yourself in one place means you won’t be giving all your effort somewhere else. The Citadel will force you to prioritize and for many it will be a gut check but will likely make you a more mature person upon graduation.”

Ensign Ethan Eich

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Simpsonville, South Carolina
Destination: United States Navy

“The Citadel challenges every many and woman to be something more than just an individual.”

Second Lt. Jon-Scot Gilstrap, USAF

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: York, South Carolina
Destination: Working as an engineer in the U.S. Air Force, Join Base Charleston

“The Citadel’s attention to detail really develops you and teaches you how to prioritize time. Going forward, I hope to make a lasting impact on those around me, to do my job to the best of my ability and to make myself available to anyone who needs help. Also, I hope to keep the friendships which I made here at The Citadel for life.”

Nicholas Harington

Degree: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Hometown: Conway, South Carolina
Destination: Mead and Hunt working as an aviation civil engineer planning and designing airports

“I really liked the small size of The Citadel and the class sizes.”

Second Lt. Dennis McCann

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Long Island, New York
Destination: Civil engineer at Naval Information Warfare Center; U.S. Army Reserves

“The best reasons to attend The Citadel are the sense of community, the friendships and the connections.”

Thomas Murray

Degree: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Hometown: Mount Pleasant, South Carolina
Destination: Working as a civil designer for Dennis Corporation in Columbia, South Carolina

“At The Citadel you will make friends that will last a lifetime. Also, you will learn what it takes to develop yourself into a professional in your chosen occupation.”

Zacarias Neu

Degree: Construction Engineering
Hometown: Smyrna, Georgia
Destination: Project engineer with Whiting-Turner Contracting Company in the Charleston operation

“I will be working my way up to become a project manager on constructions sites. To me, the best reason to attend The Citadel is the lifelong family you gain.”

Gabriel Ramos

Degree: Electrical Engineering
Hometown: Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico
Destination: SAIC, Charleston

“The small class sizes give students access to a highly professional and knowledgeable staff. The professors’ backgrounds — which includes career military officers, industry executives, researchers, and academics — provided insight into my many options after graduation. As a bonus, The Citadel is in Charleston and you can’t beat that.”

Samuel Santiago

Degree: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Powell Butte, Oregon
Destination: United States Coast Guard

Dawn Wells, The Citadel Graduate College

Degree: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Hometown: Mount Pleasant, South Carolina
Destination: Mead and Hunt working as a transportation engineer with a focus on drainages design.

“I love The Citadel’s small class sizes, great professors, and the excellent, well-rounded curriculum.”

Master of Science in Project Management Graduates

Professional project managers work in almost every industry and work as leaders who plan and execute projects and are key contributors to the success of that venture. The Citadel’s Project Management Program, operated by the School of Engineering, is accredited by the world’s leading specialized accrediting body for project management programs, Global Accreditation Center for Project Management Education Programs.

Working professionals from many job sectors study project management.

“I will continue my work for the Naval Information Warfare Center as a security specialist, working my way up the ranks of leadership,” said Michael Popovich, The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2020. “My duties include deployment of a physical enclave into a cloud environment and maintaining management, operational, and technical security controls to protect critical medical health information for US service members.”

Popovich has a son who is a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, which is one of the reasons he considered The Citadel for his master’s degree.

“My hope is to build a meaningful family legacy rich in tradition. My younger brother graduated from the Corps of Cadets in 2008 and my oldest son is currently part of the 2022 class. I have two other boys and I intend for them to both attend The Citadel in the future. My dream is for the family table to be full of Citadel rings during future holidays.”

The full list of the college’s new Master of Science in Project Management 2020 graduates is as follows:

  • Christina Soyden Arnold
  • John Zachary Burchfield
  • Jay Baxter Caldwell III
  • Daniel Alexander Curlee
  • Stephen Pablo Fernandez de Bobadilla
  • Martin James Fosberry III
  • Kara Marie Klein
  • Mary Frances Mace
  • Jeremy Stephen Mackey
  • Patrick Dennis Magnum, Jr.
  • Sara Moeller Massey
  • Scott Owens
  • Matthew Kellard Paiva
  • Brian Benjamin Parker
  • Benjamin Franklin Parmenter II
  • Michael Jacob Popovich
  • Gabriel Omar Ramos
  • Thomas Adam Schaefer
  • John Lucas Semsar
  • Devon Lambert Wall

To learn more about The Citadel School of Engineering, please visit this website.

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Engineering cadets win $10,000 for ‘wall-climbing’ robot https://today.citadel.edu/engineering-cadets-win-10000-for/ https://today.citadel.edu/engineering-cadets-win-10000-for/#comments Sat, 25 Apr 2020 22:57:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=15899 Take a drone, a remote-controlled car, five senior mechanical engineering cadets — put them together — and what do you get?A $10-thousand-winning idea.]]>

Take a drone, a remote-controlled car, five senior mechanical engineering cadets — put them together — and what do you get?

A $10-thousand-winning idea.

Team “Wall Dynamic Inspection System” is the winner of the Baker Business Bowl VI (BBB). The team is working to construct a robot that allows bridge inspectors to do their jobs easier and without affecting traffic.

Prototype of Wall Dynamic Inspection System

“We wanted to solve a common problem we observed. We were frustrated with heavy traffic caused by bridge inspections, so we wanted to find a way to solve that problem,” said Cadet Rafael Gonzalez, one of the team’s presenters. “What we found was that the problem was worse than we imagined; there is a huge number of structurally deficient bridges across America that need inspection.”

That’s where Wall Dynamic Inspection System comes in. The robot drives up and down bridges, using drone-like fans to push itself against walls and defy gravity.

“We hope that by reducing the high cost, time, and skill level associated with bridge inspections, we can streamline the inspection process, improve public safety, and do something about inconvenient bridge traffic,” Gonzalez continued.

The team is currently working on the first prototype for the Wall Dynamic Inspection System.

“The team will pursue our second prototype to improve upon this original design,” said Cadet Jonathan Urbanic, project manager and presenter. “Once this is complete, the team will finalize this product and prepare to sell our Wall Dynamic Inspection System to contractors and DOT personnel so that bridge inspections and public safety may be improved.”

Cadet Jonathan Urbanic with the prototype Wall Dynamic Inspection System

This year the competition was held via Zoom, due to the campus closure.

Each of the five final teams had 30 minutes to present their business ideas, and to answer questions from the judges.

Team Wall Dynamic Inspection System includes:

  • Jonathan Urbanic
  • Zachary Crosby
  • Rafael Gonzalez
  • Trace Guy
  • Connor Munday

“We are very thankful to the Baker Bulldog Business Bowl and the judges that participated for this opportunity,” said Urbanic. “The team worked extreme hours for the last year to make this happen, and we are very proud to finish the year well.”

Team Rewind Filters came in second place, earning $5,000 for their business. The company’s goal is to create a machine that cleans and repurposes used water filters so that they can be reused.

The Baker Business Bowl is a program aimed at helping budding entrepreneurs who have an idea for a new product or service, and the desire to turn that idea into a business. It’s open to cadets, evening undergraduate students, and graduate students.

Contestants participate in teams and compete in three rounds. The final five teams are given the opportunity to attend a series of educational workshops on how to develop their full business plan.

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