Engineering – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 07 Jul 2022 21:31:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.5 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Engineering – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Citadel School of Engineering recognizes current and future leaders in profession https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-school-of-engineering-recognizes-current-and-future-leaders-in-profession/ Fri, 08 Jul 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32600 By Melissa West, with The Citadel School of Engineering Five alumni — servant leaders in their field — are the newest members of The Citadel Academy of Engineers. At the]]>

By Melissa West, with The Citadel School of Engineering

Five alumni — servant leaders in their field — are the newest members of The Citadel Academy of Engineers.

At the 10th annual Academy of Engineers Induction and Dinner, held at the Holliday Alumni Center in April, the School of Engineering inducted the new members into the academy and also honored two Young Alumni of the Year as well as one Engineering Student of the Year.

“This year’s inductees are prime examples of the 180-year tradition of excellence and the core values of honor, duty and respect held by all graduates of this prestigious institution,” said Andrew B. Williams, Ph.D., dean of The Citadel School of Engineering. “It was an honor to celebrate their accomplishments and excellence in modeling what it means to be a principled leader. It was also a privilege to recognize two outstanding young alumni and their vast accomplishments over their brief careers thus far, as well as our Engineering Student of the Year who has shown commitment and dedication to both her studies and leading the more than 2,300 members of the Corp of Cadets.”

The Citadel School of Engineering Academy of Engineers honors engineering leaders from both the public and private sectors who have enjoyed substantial success in their professional lives and made significant contributions to their communities. All inductees have lived a life consistent with The Citadel School of Engineering’s mission to educate the next generation of innovative engineers that impact the world through principled leadership.

This year’s Academy of Engineers Inductees include:

Steven DiTullio, ’79

Steven DiTullio graduated from The Citadel in 1979 with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. After graduation, DiTullio was selected to attend the Naval Nuclear Power School where he then served on the USS George Bancroft SSBN 643. Following his active-duty military service, DiTullio joined Charles Stark Draper Laboratory serving in various technical and leadership positions during his 37-year tenure. In 2017 he was honored by the United States Navy with the Fleet Ballistic Missile Life Time Achievement Award. DiTullio retired from Draper in 2021 and is currently a consultant for the John Hopkins Physics Laboratory.

James “Buddy” Black, ’78

James “Buddy” Black graduated from The Citadel in 1978 and was awarded an Air Force ROTC scholarship during his time on campus. Black went on to receive his master’s degree from Clemson University in Electrical Engineering and served in the Air Force from 1980-1988. After, Black joined Science Applications International Corporation where he served for several years in various capacities before founding Nova Technologies, a company that develops simulators, where he remained for 19 years.

Larry Melton Jr, ’84

Larry Melton Jr graduated from The Citadel in 1984 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering. He also holds an MBA in Global Management. Melton is a decorated U.S. Marine Corps Officer who served in Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Currently serving as President and CEO of LMJ and Associates, Melton has over 37 years of experience in planning, implementing and executing large-scale engineering and construction projects in both the private and public sectors. Prior to his current role, he served as Principal Vice President with Bechtel Corporation for more than 22 years. Melton currently serves as Vice Chairman of The Citadel School of Engineering’s Executive Advisory Board.

Stephen Davis, ’85

Stephen Davis graduated from The Citadel in 1985 and is currently the president and chief executive officer at Davis & Floyd, Inc. As a son of the firm’s late founder, Emmett I. Davis Jr (Academy of Engineers 2014 Honoree), he has spent his entire career working with the company and participating in its growth. A pioneer in Traditional Neighborhood Development, Davis has managed private development projects involving award-winning, authentic communities, including Habersham in Beaufort, South Carolina. He serves as past chairman of The Citadel Foundation, board member for Countybank, former board member for the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources and session member for the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church.

Anthony “Tony” Parker, ’83

Anthony “Tony” Parker graduated from The Citadel in 1983 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering. Upon graduation, he accepted a commission in the U.S. Army Reserves as a 2nd lieutenant and went on to graduate from the Army’s Officer Engineering School in Ft. Belvoir, Virginia. Parker served eight years with the 718th Engineer Company before retiring in 1991. Following his active-duty service, Parker worked for the Florida Department of Transportation as a project engineer and then went on to consult with Hayes, James and Associates before joining Pond & Company in 1989. Over the next 32 years, his roles and responsibilities progressed from department head to president/chief operating officer and for seven years as chairman and chief executive officer, until his retirement in July 2021.

Young Alumni Award: Giancarlo Parrado, ’18, and Zachary Liollio, ’18

The event also recognized two Young Alumni Award recipients, Giancarlo Parrado and Zachary Liollio. Parrado, a graduate of The Citadel’s Mechanical Engineering program in 2018, is now working as a project engineer and project lead for NIWC Atlantic. Since graduating, he has also completed his Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering. Liollio graduated from The Citadel in 2018, earning his master’s degree in Project Management. Currently, he is a Project Manager in the Pavement Management Office of Charleston County Public Works.

Engineering Student of the Year: Cadet Kathryn Christmas, ’22

Engineering Student of the Year Cadet Kathryn Christmas graduated this spring with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. During her senior year, she served as Regimental Commander for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, the second woman to hold that rank. Having accepted a commission into the U.S. Air Force, Christmas will receive pilot training in Columbus, Mississippi.

For more information on The Citadel School or Engineering or the Academy of Engineers, click here.

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Vertical flying vehicle airfield project earns cadets $10,000 award and skills for new roles as engineering professionals https://today.citadel.edu/vertical-flying-vehicle-airfield-project-earns-cadets-10000-award-and-skills-for-new-roles-as-engineering-professionals/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 21:25:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32613 A "vertiport," for electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) vehicles, could be inspired by designs developed by engineering cadets and students from The Citadel.]]>

Photo: An image from the eVTOL vertiport fly-through design video prepared by the winning team.

eVTOL engineering capstone designs successfully delivered to the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission

Someday, when electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) vehicles approach an airport needing to efficiently deliver cargo or passengers, the “vertiport” could be inspired by designs developed by engineering cadets and students from The Citadel.

Think of the movement of an eVTOL like a car-sized drone — lifting off straight up, rather than needing a runway for takeoff and landing. Lightweight, composite, battery-powered prototypes of passenger and cargo eVTOLS are being developed and tested around the world, and existing airports will need new infrastructure to accommodate this rapidly emerging Advance Air Mobility (AAM) travel mode.

Nine teams of senior cadets majoring in both Civil and Environmental Engineering, as well as Construction Engineering, were engaged in determining specific airfield and terminal infrastructure needs for the promising eVTOL aeronautical industry at Rock Hill-York County Airport, selected as an illustrative South Carolina case study location. Students began evaluating operational parameters and possible design solutions in the fall of 2021 and delivered final recommendations to the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission and an advisory panel of national experts in May 2022.

Cadets and students from the nine teams that worked on the Designing Advanced Air Mobility Infrastructure: Multidisciplinary Capstone Project, with Citadel faculty, industry experts and Representative Nancy Mace outside Grimsley Hall.

“Project designs developed by The Citadel students turned out far better than I could have ever imagined and have helped advance the professional dialog in our state on this coming aviation innovation,” said Gary Seigfried, PE, South Carolina Aeronautics Commission.

The Designing Advanced Air Mobility Infrastructure: Multidisciplinary Capstone Project is getting attention, earning a national Engineering Education Award with a $10,000 prize from the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES). U.S. Representative Nancy Mace, a 1999 Citadel graduate, visited campus to learn about eVTOL infrastructure during a student-led technical briefing in 2021. Some of the students competed in The Citadel’s Baker Business Bowl, earning second place, and others served as keynote speakers to an audience of 250 engineers and airport professionals at the 2022 South Carolina Aviation Association (SCAA) Annual Conference held in Myrtle Beach.

Representative Nancy Mace
Representative Nancy Mace attends a project presentation by senior civil engineering cadets on vertical takeoff infrastructure design concepts for Rock Hill-York County airport at The Citadel November 9, 2021.

Final designs prepared by student teams included:

  • Travel demand forecasting
  • Airfield operations and design
  • Ground transportation and traffic engineering
  • Environmental engineering
  • Airfield right-of-way, security and site restrictions
  • Terminal structural design
  • Terminal geotechnical and pavement design
  • Airfield storm water drainage design
  • Project value engineering
  • Construction impacts and site safety
  • Project phasing and scheduling
  • Project cost estimating

Numerous organizations supported this high-impact learning experience, including Heliplanners, Beta Technologies, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, South Carolina Aeronautics Commission, Rock Hill-York Co. Airport, Charleston International Airport Authority and Mead & Hunt Engineers, with representatives explaining complex engineering design procedures and serving on the project advisory panel.

“Students who completed this successful capstone project are now serving in the military, working as engineering professionals or headed to graduate degree programs,” said William J. Davis, Ph.D., PE, department head of Civil, Environmental and Construction Engineering at The Citadel. “Our graduates are exceptionally well prepared to contribute to planning, engineering and design of advanced air mobility infrastructure such as heliports, vertiports and high-density vertiplexes.”

The Aerospace Industries Association forecasts a $115 billion annual impact from the U.S. Advanced Air Mobility (AAM) sector by 2035, adding 280,000 new jobs and $20 billion in exports by 2033.

The Citadel’s Civil, Environmental and Construction Engineering class of 2022 stats:

  • 67 cadet and student graduates
  • 52 directly hired into professional engineering and construction industry positions
  • Nine serving as officers in U.S. Air Force, Army, Marines or Navy
  • Six entering graduate degree programs at: The Citadel, Clemson, Georgia Tech or Virginia Tech

Learn more about The Citadel School of Engineering here.

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Dr. Mary K. Watson named Civil Engineer Educator of the Year and Clemson Outstanding Young Alumni https://today.citadel.edu/dr-mary-k-watson-named-civil-engineer-educator-of-the-year-and-clemson-outstanding-young-alumni/ Thu, 19 May 2022 13:10:15 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=32255 Dr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The CitadelDr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The Citadel"Dr. Watson is performing at the very highest level of scholarly achievement and contributing immensely to the success of The Citadel."]]> Dr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The CitadelDr. Mary Katherine Watson teaching an engineering class at The Citadel

The Citadel School of Engineering professor continues leading in her field

A woman who began making her mark in the engineering industry almost as soon as she joined The Citadel in 2013, Mary K. Watson, Ph.D., is now the 2022 recipient of the Civil Engineer Educator of the Year Award. The award comes from the South Carolina Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). It will be presented June 10 at the S.C. Engineering and Trade Show.

Watson is an associate professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering with The Citadel School of Engineering. She was nominated for the award by the Jeff Davis, Ph.D., head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at The Citadel.

Dr. Watson is performing at the very highest level of scholarly achievement and contributing immensely to the success of the Department and School of Engineering. Furthermore, her work has far-reaching regional, national and international impact in advancing engineering educational practice and engineering student development.

Jeff Davis, Ph.D., P.E., The Citadel School of Engineering

Watson has earned more than $1 million in grant funding, supported by the National Science Foundation. She leads the college’s environmental and water resources curriculum and serves as the primary academic advisor for about 40 students in the School of Engineering College Transfer Program (CTP).

Dr. Watson, thank you profoundly for caring as you do for every student’s individual development, not just as an academic, but as an engineer, leader and person.

CTP Civil Engineering Class of 2020 graduate

Watson was also recently included in a new cohort of Outstanding Young Alumni, by Clemson University’s College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences. In addition to her new accolades, Watson has earned numerous others, some of which include:

  • Excellence in Research Award, The Citadel Provost, 2022
  • New Faculty Research Award, SE Section, American Society for Engineering Education, 2019
  • Outstanding Paper, 9th Conf. on Engineering Education for Sustainable Development, 2018
  • Best Paper Award, Multidisciplinary Division, Am. Society for Engineering Education, 2017
  • Seeley Award, Civil Engineering Division, American Society for Engineering Education, 2017
  • Best Instructional Paper, SE Section, American Society for Engineering Education, 2017, 2012
  • Young Civil Engineer of the Year, South Carolina Section, ASCE, 2016
  • New Faculty Excellence in Teaching Award, Committee on Faculty Development, ASCE, 2016
  • Outstanding New Teaching Award, SE Section, American Society for Engineering Education, 2015
  • Best Paper Award, New Engineering Educators Div., Am. Society for Engineering Education, 2015

As seen on Clemson.edu

Six honored by College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences

(From left) Craig Fallon, Rebecca Copenhaver DeLegge, Anand Gramopadhye, Robert Fjeld, Adam Kirn and Mary Katherine Watson pose for a photo at the gala celebrating the newest members of the Thomas Green Clemson Academy of Engineers and Scientists and Outstanding Young Alumni. Diana Chen, who is not pictured, was unable to attend. Photo courtesy of Clemson.edu.

Some of the most outstanding alumni and one faculty emeritus from Clemson University’s largest college gathered in downtown Greenville on Thursday to welcome three of their own into the Thomas Green Clemson Academy of Engineers and Scientists and to honor three others as Outstanding Young Alumni.

Induction to the academy is the highest honor bestowed by Clemson’s College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences. The honor recognizes alumni and special friends who have made major contributions to their professions and have brought significant distinction to the college and university.

The new members are Rebecca Copenhaver DeLegge, Craig Fallon and Robert Fjeld.

The newest crop of Outstanding Young Alumni are Diana Chen, Adam Kirn and Mary Katherine Watson. The award goes to graduates of the college who are 40 years old or younger and whose achievements have been significant to their profession or to the welfare of society.

Anand Gramopadhye, the college’s dean, thanked the night’s honorees and said each is leaving his or her unique mark on the world.

“We will always cherish the fact that your Clemson education may have had a small role to play in your success,” he said. “To paraphrase the Dalai Lama, we hope we have given you wings to fly, roots to come back and reasons to give.”

Mary Katherine Watson: Watson holds Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in biosystems engineering from Clemson. As an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at The Citadel, she has been recognized for her teaching excellence and her prowess as a researcher, developing scholarly contributions to the field of engineering education. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Watson is building regional and national programs for supporting advancement of diverse faculty and students in STEM fields.

Clemson.edu

Read the full announcement, WITH INFORMATION ON THE OTHER OUTSTANDING YOUNG ALUMNI, here.

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Jared W. Perdue, P.E., The Citadel Class of 2003, appointed as Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation https://today.citadel.edu/jared-w-perdue-p-e-the-citadel-class-of-2003-appointed-as-secretary-of-the-florida-department-of-transportation/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 18:14:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31627 Secretary Jared Perdue The CitadelSecretary Jared Perdue The Citadel"To ascend to Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation 18-years after graduating from college is an amazing accomplishment."]]> Secretary Jared Perdue The CitadelSecretary Jared Perdue The Citadel

The Citadel School of Engineering alumnus selected after accomplishments leading large state projects

I’d like to congratulate Secretary Jared Perdue on his new appointment. To ascend to Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation 18-years after graduating from college is an amazing accomplishment, however, does not come as a surprise to me remembering Jared’s successful time here as a cadet and following his FDOT career since graduation in 2003. As a successful student-athlete and member of South Carolina Corps of Cadets, Jared always demonstrated great aptitude in civil engineering, especially in transportation courses. 

William J. Davis, PH.D., P.E.
Department Head and D. Graham Copeland Professor of Civil Engineering, The Citadel School of Engineering

As seen on flgov.com, April 7, 2022

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Today, Governor Ron DeSantis announced his appointment of Jared W. Perdue, P.E., as Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT).

Perdue has extensive experience with FDOT where he has served for nearly 18 years, and currently serves as District Five Secretary.   

“I am pleased to appoint Jared W. Perdue as Secretary of the Department of Transportation,” said Governor Ron DeSantis. “Secretary Perdue brings a wealth of knowledge and understands the unique aspects of Florida’s transportation industry. I am confident in his ability to lead FDOT and to continue to advance our transportation systems.”

“I am thankful for the opportunity to serve as Secretary of FDOT,” said FDOT Secretary Jared W. Perdue.“I look forward to building upon Governor DeSantis’ mission for the Department.”

Jared W. Perdue, P.E., Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation 

Jared W. Perdue has served at FDOT for 18 years, most recently as District Five Secretary where he was responsible for leading and developing a workforce of nearly 600 employees and managing an annual budget of nearly $1 billion

As District Five Secretary, Perdue led the completion of the I-4 Ultimate Project, FDOT’s largest project to date. He also oversaw the Wekiva Parkway project, a model transportation project for environmental conservation.

Prior to his time at District Five, he served in several leadership roles within the Department. 

In 2003, Perdue received his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from The Citadel: The Military College of South Carolina, in Charleston.

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The Charleston Engineers Joint Council selects Citadel professor Gafar Elamin as their 2022 Engineer of the Year https://today.citadel.edu/the-charleston-engineers-joint-council-selects-citadel-professor-gafar-elamin-as-their-2022-engineer-of-the-year/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 16:21:19 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31212 Dr. Gafar Elamin, The Citadel School of EngineeringDr. Gafar Elamin, The Citadel School of Engineering"Whether, serving students as a caring advisor and extraordinary teacher... Dr. Elamin has demonstrated a lifetime of exceptional service to STEM education in his local community and beyond."]]> Dr. Gafar Elamin, The Citadel School of EngineeringDr. Gafar Elamin, The Citadel School of Engineering

Project Team of the Year goes to Naval Warfare Information Center – Atlantic

Charleston’s premier professional Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM)
organization, the Charleston Engineers Joint Council (CEJC) hosted its annual Engineers Week Banquet recently at The Citadel in honor of National Engineers Week.

Each year the CEJC selects an engineer, scientist, or technology professional in the Lowcountry that demonstrates exceptional career development and professionalism, along with local community leadership and outreach as its Engineer of the Year, in conjunction with National Engineers Week, which was Feb. 20-26 this year.

In a similar vein, the CEJC selects an outstanding project team that has exhibited the tenets of project management indicative of high performance in developing and implementing a technical project that has been superbly well-managed and delivered stakeholder value.

“The CEJC is proud to announce the 2022 winner of Engineer of the Year (EoY), Professor Gafar Elamin, Ph.D., of The Citadel School of Engineering’s Department of Mechanical Engineering,” said an announcement during the CEJC during the event.

Dr. Elamin, is an assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering at The Citadel, whose numerous educational and community accomplishments have served to distinguish him among his peers. Whether serving students as a caring advisor and extraordinary teacher, motivating youth as an insightful mentor, or cultivating his mechanical engineering talents to lead cutting edge research, Dr. Elamin has demonstrated a lifetime of exceptional service to STEM education in his local community and beyond.

It is the privilege of the CEJC to award Dr. Elamin our prestigious Engineer of the Year Award for 2022.

Press release from the Charleston Engineers Joint Council

The Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWSC) Atlantic was awarded the Project Team of the Year.

The announcement read: The Military Heath System (MHS) Video Connect Collaboration Team of the Naval Information Warfare Center Atlantic, a U.S. Navy engineering center headquartered in Charleston, South Carolina, earned our TPToY honor for their exceptional display of project management prowess in delivery of capabilities that enabled military healthcare providers to see more patients safely through the COVID-19 global pandemic, while protecting patient information and healthcare data in transit.

The MHS Video Connect team is a highly skilled, diverse group of professionals that successfully implemented the design and integration of many complex new services required to support efficient healthcare delivery. The team demonstrated effective leadership, resourcefulness, internal and external communications, and technological acumen which enabled the team to overcome challenges and deliver a new capability extending the reach of healthcare to the 9.5 million eligible beneficiaries, including Active-Duty Service members, reservists, veterans, their families, and more than 200,000 healthcare professionals.

NIWIC Atlantic is a supporting partner of The Citadel, providing internships, competitions and mentoring opportunities for the college’s cadets and non-cadet graduate students studying fields including Cybersecurity, Computer Science and Intelligence and Security Studies.

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Ready for takeoff: Citadel cadets prepare for aviation careers https://today.citadel.edu/ready-for-takeoff-citadel-cadets-prepare-for-aviation-careers/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 21:28:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30967 After years of ROTC training at The Citadel, some cadets are getting ready to achieve their lifelong dreams and enter the military as aviators]]>

Photo: (left to right) Cadets Kathryn Christmas, Jason Beal, James Jeffcoat, Luke Eafano and Josiah Schainblatt

The Citadel has a long history of producing aviators for multiple branches of the armed services — and this year is no exception.

After four years of rigorous ROTC training at The Citadel, multiple cadets from different ROTC branches are getting ready to achieve their lifelong dreams and enter the military as aviators.

Though pilots serve in all branches of the military, it’s to be expected that the Air Force is where most can be found. The 25 senior cadets in the Air Force/Space Force ROTC program at The Citadel received their career assignments in November. Among them is Cadet Luke Eafano, a Physics major from Lawrenceville, Georgia, who earned a spot with the Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training (ENJJPT) program. ENJJPT is the world’s only multi-nationally manned and managed flying training program chartered to produce combat pilots for NATO.

The Citadel also contributes to future pilot careers through the cadet Flying Club, one of the college’s largest clubs that allows cadets to participate in flight training.

Cadet Samantha Walton, the 2021-22 Regimental Public Affairs Officer, spoke with a few of the cadets destined for the skies to learn more about how they’re getting ready for takeoff.

Ready the runway

Jason Beal

Cadet Jason Beall is a senior, majoring in Mechanical Engineering. Though he was born in Lexington Park, Maryland, he considers Fort Wayne, Indiana, to be home. At the end of this semester, he will graduate and accept a commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force.

Fly or fall 

I first visited The Citadel during Parents’ Weekend in 2015. Following my visit, I applied myself physically and academically to earn a ROTC scholarship, which has allowed me to pursue my dream to fly fighter jets one day. During my knob year, my older brother was a senior. Life was not easy having an older brother on campus, but it was my chance to prove myself to him as a Citadel cadet and as a man. After completing Recognition Day, my brother’s handshake made every hardship worth it. 

Ready, set, go

I was able to complete Field Training and log flight hours at local airports during the summer before my junior year. Field Training taught me the values of coordination, communication and taking charge during tough situations. I graduated Field Training with the Warrior Spirit Award for my flight, and I was able to pass the Test of Basic Aviation Skills during the first semester of my junior year.

Prepare for take off

On the surface, my cadet career looks like everything went according to plan, but I experienced plenty of hardships and failures. In my opinion, the ability to learn from setbacks is the most important lesson I have learned as a cadet. Following graduation, I will commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Air Force. In June I will marry my fiancé and, within a year of graduation, I will attend Pilot Training in Columbus, Mississippi.

To the clouds and beyond

Kathryn Christmas

Kathryn Christmas is the Regimental Commander for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, majoring in Mechanical Engineering. She has participated in multiple clubs ranging from rugby to Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society. Christmas was born in in Montgomery, Alabama, and raised in Easley, South Carolina. This May, she expects to accept a commission into the U.S. Air Force with a pilot slot.

Ready to soar

During high school, I was a part of the Civil Air Patrol and also witnessed the example of both of my parents, who were officers in the Air Force and who encouraged me to pursue my dream of flying. After visiting The Citadel during my senior year of high school, I knew that this was the place that would help me fulfill that dream. During my freshman year, I attended AFROTC class, leadership laboratory and immersed myself into extracurriculars such as rugby and the Flying Club.

Preflight checklist

My goal of becoming a pilot was further solidified after I got to meet Major General Jeannie Leavitt, the first female fighter pilot in the Air Force. Going to Field Training taught me how to be not only a leader, but also a follower; I ranked in the top 2% of class, graduated as a distinguished graduate and received the Warrior Spirit award from the flight. Being the Regimental Commander has taught me many things about myself and others, as well as the multiple aspects of leadership.

We’re flying 

As for my personal plan, my goal is to commission, along with the many friends I have gained over my four years here, into the United Stated Air Force with a pilot slot. I have yet to be given a date for training, but I will be receiving Pilot Training in Columbus, Mississippi, within a year after graduating. I hope to make my time in the Air Force a career to develop the future leaders of America and maintain the rights and freedoms of our country. Aim High!

Dreams can come true

James Jeffcoat

James Jeffcoat is the Deputy Regimental Operations Officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, a Mechanical Engineering major from Irmo, South Carolina and the Cadet Wing Commander for the Air Force ROTC Detachment. He is also the president of the Pistol Team and of the Society of American Military Engineers, as well as the vice president for the Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honors society. He expects to accept a commission into the United States Air Force as a 2nd Lieutenant.

It started with a dream

When I was a child, my father would take me to airshows in the area. These airshows struck me with an indescribable sense of awe. The performances of the Blue Angels, Thunderbirds and various other demonstration teams fueled my desire to become a pilot of the United States Air Force. I was hooked; the sky was where I was meant to be. What better place to make my dreams a reality than a military college?

Reality sets in

Years ago when asked, “What do you want to do when you grow up?” my answer was always, “I want to be a fighter pilot.” Reflecting on those interactions, I still feel childish telling people that I want to be a pilot; now, the only difference is that the dream I had as a child has since transformed into reality. On May 27, 2021, I received a call from Col. Matthew Morand, commander of The Citadel’s AFROTC program, telling me that I had been selected for a pilot slot.

Let’s fly

The next step in my journey is to commission into the United States Air Force as a 2nd Lieutenant on May 6th, 2022. After accepting my commission, graduating from The Citadel and the receiving my report date, I will report to Columbus Air Force Base to begin Undergraduate Pilot Training.

Eyes to the skies

Christopher Stuart

Christopher Stuart is a sophomore who serves as Cadet Corporal for Delta Company. Stuart, who was born in Raleigh, North Carolina and raised in Fairhope, Alabama, is a Marketing and Business Development major. He is president of the Sales Club, and expects to join the U.S. Marine Corps as an aviator upon graduation.

How it started 

It started with Deane Stuart, my father, a 1984 Delta Company grad. I knew for sure that I would be attending The Citadel to fulfil my father’s legacy. Early on, I knew I wanted to talk to someone about becoming a Marine Corps aviator. I was informed that a three-year sideload aviation scholarship was one of the most competitive. I would wake up with only one thing on my mind: achieving this scholarship.

So, the journey began…

After returning from winter furlough, I learned that I would be competing against 11 other cadets for the sideload scholarship. On April 26, after multiple tests and hurdles, Col. Giles Boyce, commander of The Citadel’s Navy/Marine Corps ROTC program, told me that I was awarded the aviation scholarship. It was the most rewarded experience to ever happen to me.

What’s next? 

I am the only cadet in the sophomore class who was awarded the scholarship. My tuition is now paid for by the United States Marine Corps. More importantly, I have a slot at Officer Candidate School for the summer after my junior year and one for The Basic School after graduation. Upon graduation from The Citadel, as well as the schools listed above, I plan to attend flight school at the Naval Air Station near my hometown in Pensacola, Florida. Semper-Fi!

(left to right) Josiah Schainblatt, Jason Beal, Kathryn Christmas, James Jeffcoat, Luke Eafano

Samantha Walton, who contributed to this article, is the 2021-22 Regimental Public Affairs Officer. She is from Macon, Georgia, and attends The Citadel on an U.S. Army scholarship. Walton is majoring in Political Science and will accept a commission to become an officer upon graduating.


For information about joining the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, click here.

To learn more about The Citadel’s ROTC programs, click here.

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Acquainting girl scouts with the fascination of engineering https://today.citadel.edu/acquainting-girl-scouts-with-the-fascination-of-engineering/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 21:27:50 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30865 Introduce a girl scout to engineering event at The Citadel led by The Citadel School of Engineering and women cadetsIntroduce a girl scout to engineering event at The Citadel led by The Citadel School of Engineering and women cadetsThe Citadel Society of Women Engineers chapter is on a mission to expand girls’ interest in engineering Within The Citadel School of Engineering there is a highly engaged chapter of]]> Introduce a girl scout to engineering event at The Citadel led by The Citadel School of Engineering and women cadetsIntroduce a girl scout to engineering event at The Citadel led by The Citadel School of Engineering and women cadets

The Citadel Society of Women Engineers chapter is on a mission to expand girls’ interest in engineering

Within The Citadel School of Engineering there is a highly engaged chapter of the national Society of Women Engineers.

“The reason I joined our SWE chapter is because I am in such a male-dominated career field and also attend a male-dominated college. I wanted to be able to connect with more women who are engineers and see what it is like for them in their career fields and be able to see all the amazing things that they have achieved and accomplished In their careers,” said Cadet Madison Locklear, a Mechanical Engineering major from Lugoff, South Carolina, who serves as the chapter’s treasurer.

The Citadel Society of Women Engineers’ Introduce a Girl Scout to Engineering event, in Buyer Auditorium on The Citadel campus on Sunday, Feb. 27, 2022.

According to The Citadel Office of Institutional Research, about 11% of women undergraduates attending the college are engineering majors. Of the total number of engineering undergraduates, about 6.6% are currently women.

Whether studying Mechanical, Civil, Computer, Construction or Electrical Engineering, women cadets and students in the chapter make it their mission to introduce girls to a non-traditional career path that could change their lives.

One way they do this is by holding events, such as this one just prior to Women’s History Month, to serve as a resource to the community’s girl scouts who are beginning to consider careers.

This year’s Introduce a Girl Scout to Engineering event on February 27, brought 100 girl scouts to campus from troops around the Lowcountry.

“I want to some day be a designer for projects in sustainability for the power and energy industry,” added Locklear, something she shared with the girl scouts to provide an example of the many careers fields that exist for engineers.

The Citadel Society of Women Engineers’ Introduce a Girl Scout to Engineering event, in Buyer Auditorium on The Citadel campus on Sunday, Feb. 27, 2022.

“Our theme of space exploration was a hit, providing an incredible opportunity to see three generations of women and girls exploring creative ways to solve engineering problems, such as building a space elevator, a rover, and a moon communication system,” said Rebekah Burke, Ph.D., P.E., a professor of Construction Environmental Engineering at The Citadel, and the SWE chapter advisor.

Burke explained that “teams of girl scouts were partnered with a Citadel cadet or student, and an engineering professional or Citadel professor in a model of informal mentorship to encourage girls to pursue a career in a STEM career such as engineering.”

The Citadel Society of Women Engineers’ Introduce a Girl Scout to Engineering event, in Buyer Auditorium on The Citadel campus on Sunday, Feb. 27, 2022.

Cadet members who hold leadership positions with the SWE chapter on campus planned and directed the event. They include Locklear, Alicia Brewington, Elizabeth Lockridge and Rachel Short.

“I also want to thank the 15 engineering professionals from our community, and my colleagues in the School of Engineering, who gave their time on a Sunday to help support this important community event,” Burke added.

Cadet and student servant-leaders who volunteered at the event:

  • Thomas Aycock
  • Noah Axtell
  • Louise Bonnimond
  • Daniel Camp
  • Mark Clement
  • Campbell deHoll
  • William Dinsmore
  • Garrett Drew
  • Andrew Finkle
  • Jackson Fuller
  • Jordan Glowacki
  • Kevin Haddad
  • Charles Heaton
  • Carson Holroyd
  • Pei Hsuan Lu
  • Samuel LaFrage
  • Heidi-Camille R Johnson
  • Malupeaua Khine
  • Erik Liebal
  • Kincaid McCammon
  • Sullivan Newsome
  • Griffin O’Shields
  • Timothy Overend
  • Jacob Simonelli
  • Matthew Smith
  • Brandon Welch
  • Luke Wiggins
  • Donaven Wiliams
  • Sophia Woody
  • Jeremy Wilkes

Learn more about The Citadel School of Engineering

The Citadel School of Engineering is consistency ranked as one of the top 25 programs in America by U.S. News & World Report. In addition to cadet programs, there are offerings for non-cadet students in the evenings and online. Veteran and active duty military students also find programs convenient for balancing their busy schedules while earning undergraduate or graduate Engineering degrees. To learn more, go to this weblink.

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The winners of the Baker Business Bowl make a splash https://today.citadel.edu/the-winners-of-the-baker-business-bowl-make-a-splash/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 21:34:44 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30693 Members of the winning team are looking forward to representing The Citadel in the first ever SoCon Entrepreneurship Challenge next week.]]>

By Alaina Rink, CGC ’22

The $10,000 Baker Business Bowl VIII prize goes to team Trident Jet Nozzle. Their product is a jet nozzle attachment that improves water safety by increasing steering precision. Team Trident Jet Nozzle is an interdisciplinary team, with four Mechanical Engineering majors and one Finance major.

Additionally, they are looking forward to representing The Citadel in the first ever SoCon Entrepreneurship Challenge next week, when they have another chance to win an additional $10,000 prize.

Members include:

  • Will Bush
  • Luke Maynard
  • Lucas Robbins
  • Joseph Roland
  • Josiah Schainblatt
  • Corbet Warren
Members of Team Trident Jet Nozzle presenting during the final round of the Baker Business Bowl

Team ACE Aeronautical Engineering Consulting came in second place, earning $5,000. They intend for their company to plan, design and develop vertiports that accommodate multiple styles of electric vertical take-off and landing aircraft designs. ACE team members include:

  • Chandler Beale
  • Collier Summers

Cadets, evening undergraduate students, veteran students and graduate students who have the determination to turn their idea for a new product or service into a business are eligible to compete. “The Baker Business Bowl showcases our most creative students and is a way to put their learning into action,” said Michael Weeks, Ph.D., dean of the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business.

In the first round, the entrepreneurs submit a summary of the proposed business venture. There were 33 entries this year from multiple disciplines. 10 of these teams performed their elevator-pitches in the second round one month later, but only five teams could advance to the final round on Feb. 16.

Members of Team ACE Aeronautical Engineering Consulting presenting during the final round of the Baker Business Bowl

Shawn Swartwood, a professor of entrepreneurship, has been involved with each round of this year’s competition. He was pleased to see alumni, and especially members of the Class of 1989, encouraging the teams in the final round. “It is great to see former students giving back to current students,” he said.

This year’s other finalists were The Auditory Assistant, Colonic Tattoo and Wound Closure. All the teams presented their fully developed business plans, which include marketing, budgeting and production strategies. They also answered questions from the judges.

This year’s BBB panel of judges included:

  • Joseph Conti
  • Faye Gooding
  • Deborah Kaufman
  • Mark Kohler
  • Antonio Linnen
  • David Saulnier

This annual event is possible thanks to the platinum sponsorship from The Citadel Class of 1989 and the gold sponsorship of Dan D. Nale, Ph.D., ’82. Nale said, “The ability to compete in a competition like the Baker Business Bowl says a lot about the students’ futures and The Citadel. There was a diversity of teams and products present tonight. It was a great event, very professional.”

For these teams, the final round of the Baker Business Bowl is just the first step.


Alaina Rink is a graduate assistant in the Office of Communications and Marketing while pursuing a master’s degree in English. She earned her undergraduate degree from the College of Charleston in secondary education English and taught in the Charleston area for four years.

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Certificates in Advanced Engineering Serve Workers and Employers https://today.citadel.edu/certificates-in-advanced-engineering-serve-workers-and-employers/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30586 Photo of mechanical engineer at workPhoto of mechanical engineer at workAs seen on LowcountryGraduateCenter.com, by Barrry Waldman Lowcountry employers like Boeing, Mercedes Benz, Volvo, Bosch, NIWC, Cummins, Rotorion, Santee Cooper and many more seek engineers with advanced degrees in a]]> Photo of mechanical engineer at workPhoto of mechanical engineer at work

As seen on LowcountryGraduateCenter.com, by Barrry Waldman

Lowcountry employers like Boeing, Mercedes Benz, Volvo, Bosch, NIWC, Cummins, Rotorion, Santee Cooper and many more seek engineers with advanced degrees in a host of disciplines. Engines of growth in a region that has experienced triple the labor force growth of the nation, the manufacturing and high-tech fields are hungry for local expertise.

Enter the only local college with an engineering curriculum. The Citadel, which bestows engineering bachelor’s and master’s degrees, is helping fill the pipeline of critical staff at these businesses, keeping the jobs and employers in this region.

The alternative is for companies to import talent from outside the region, further straining schools, housing, roads and other infrastructure that are already near, or even past, full capacity. 

A Shorter Route to Engineering Expertise

For those seeking a shortcut to that expertise, who don’t have the time or resources to commit to a full graduate program, or who want to get their feet wet on an advanced degree before diving in, The Citadel offers certificates in advanced engineering that demonstrate proficiency without requiring the full master’s degree program.

Certificate programs in aeronautics, composite materials, manufacturing, mechatronics, and power and energy are aimed at working professionals and require just four master’s level courses over three years. Upon completion, students earn a certificate and are 40% of the way to a master’s degree.

“The certificate programs are offered in the evenings to allow working individuals with fulltime jobs or other obligations a systematic way to show increased tech proficiency,” said Lt. Col. Robert Rabb, a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and head of the mechanical engineering department. He says all the students who complete the certificate program have continued to a master’s degree.

Certificates Pave the Way to Further Study

Many of the students in the course are mid-level managers who need a graduate degree to move up the corporate ladder. Boeing, for example, requires an advanced degree to become a manager in the company.

Admission to the certificate program is somewhat less rigorous than for the full graduate level program. For some, it is a way to demonstrate the ability to do graduate work before applying for the full master’s.

Certificate students in aeronautics take these four courses: advanced fluid dynamics, applied aerodynamics, compressible flow, and computational methods in thermal sciences. Upon completion, these courses may be used as part of a master’s degree in aeronautical engineering or in any of the other four related engineering courses. 

In other words, students with a certificate in one discipline can apply those credits to a master’s in another.

In a time of labor shortages, particularly in high-skilled professions, plaguing businesses nationwide, the median salaries in many engineering management positions tops six figures. For 2019, the last year before Covid, roughly 300 new industrial engineers were hired in the three-county region, according to the Charleston Regional Development Alliance.

No Knob Year Rituals for Grad Students

The traditions around discipline for which The Citadel is renowned do not apply to graduate or certificate students. While first-year undergraduates at South Carolina’s military college must wear buzz cuts, endure verbal harassment from upperclassmen and walk in the street at right angles while on campus, those taking graduate level courses have a normal grad school experience. 

“The dress is business casual, and you can grow your hair long and talk bad about our country,” Rabb joked.

For more information, visit the website or call Dr. Rabb at (843) 953-0520.

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The Citadel School of Engineering still one of the top ranked programs in America, again ABET reaccredited https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-school-of-engineering-still-one-of-the-top-ranked-programs-in-america-again-abet-reaccredited/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 20:09:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29677 "This enhanced training provides students with a strong leadership foundation after graduation."]]>

Photo above: Mechanical Engineering major Cadet Peyton Campbell, ’20, working in a lab on The Citadel campus in 2019.

Whether the goal is to become a civil, computer, construction, electrical or mechanical engineer, The Citadel School of Engineering continues to be one of the top programs in America when it comes to delivering successful outcomes for cadets and students. Close to 99% of engineering cadets and students have jobs within six months of graduation, according to the school’s department heads who track their graduates’ outcomes.

The Citadel School of Engineering, one of the oldest engineering programs in America, was recently reaccredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), and is ranked as the 16th “Best Undergraduate Engineering Program,” nationwide, by U.S. News & World Report.

The benefits and quality of the engineering degrees offered by The Citadel are judged not only by the success of the college’s graduates, but they are reviewed in detail by ABET’s evaluators every six years.

The Citadel School of Engineering offers five undergraduate and four graduate degrees. Additionally, the school offers 13 professional engineering certificates.

  • Civil and Environmental Engineering (repeatedly ranked in top 10 Civil Engineering programs in the nation by U.S. News & World Report)
  • Computer Engineering (the first students in this new program will graduate in May of 2023, with an ABET accreditation visit scheduled for the following fall)
  • Construction Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering (the largest program in the school)

ABET noted program strengths

The ABET assessments are focused on continuous improvement as the key to ensuring that the programs accredited are preparing students to graduate ready to enter the workforce. The process required the School of Engineering to provide an exhaustive, ongoing self-assessment, supported by onsite evaluations with each accreditation cycle.

Some of the comments from the ABET evaluation team are as follows:

Civil Engineering

Cadets in The Citadel School of Engineering take part in a Civil Engineering lab conducted by Dr. Timothy Wood in LeTellier Hall on campus in January of 2020.

“The program requires that all students take the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying Fundamentals of Engineering exam prior to graduation, a requirement that is not widely included in other civil engineering programs. Results from this exam are used as part of the assessment process. This examination requirement helps to reinforce an appreciation for the importance of licensure, while providing a head start on achieving.”

Construction Engineering

Cadets Keegan Sherman ‘21 and Rhett Garett ‘22 watch as the first stage of Capers Hall’s demolition takes place at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. Both men are working with the project.

“In their final semester, all seniors enroll in a practicum course involving a community-based project, currently connected to Habitat for Humanity. Inclusion of all program students in such an experience is rarely seen. This opportunity to participate in construction activities and to practice communications and project reporting on as real world situation strengthens students’ preparation for work after graduation.”

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering cadets participate in laboratory work in Grimsley Hall on The Citadel campus on March 4, 2020.

“The program has a rich curriculum that not only provides technical competence but emphasizes principled leadership as part of The Citadel Experience, where most students take on increasing responsibilities as they progress through the program. The majority of the program’s undergraduates, the South Carolina Corps of Cadets student cohort, is enrolled in the ROTC program and takes leadership courses as a part of the expanded curriculum, in addition to the 125 credit hours in the Electrical Engineering program. This enhanced training provides students with a strong leadership foundation after graduation.”

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineering cadets test a mechanical arm to aid in American Sign Language communication in Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in 2020.

“Small class sizes and the obvious collegiality between the faculty and the students, coupled with the faculty enjoyment of teaching and interaction with the students, strongly strengthen student learning in the program.”

Want to know more?

The Citadel Civil Engineering program earned its first accreditation in 1936. The reaccreditation for all of the schools engineering programs remains in effect until the fall of 2027.

To learn more about The Citadel’s engineering offerings, or to apply, please visit the website here.

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