Engineering – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Wed, 13 Apr 2022 18:16:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.4 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Engineering – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Jared W. Perdue, P.E., The Citadel Class of 2003, appointed as Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation https://today.citadel.edu/jared-w-perdue-p-e-the-citadel-class-of-2003-appointed-as-secretary-of-the-florida-department-of-transportation/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 18:14:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31627 Secretary Jared Perdue The CitadelSecretary Jared Perdue The Citadel"To ascend to Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation 18-years after graduating from college is an amazing accomplishment."]]> Secretary Jared Perdue The CitadelSecretary Jared Perdue The Citadel

The Citadel School of Engineering alumnus selected after accomplishments leading large state projects

I’d like to congratulate Secretary Jared Perdue on his new appointment. To ascend to Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation 18-years after graduating from college is an amazing accomplishment, however, does not come as a surprise to me remembering Jared’s successful time here as a cadet and following his FDOT career since graduation in 2003. As a successful student-athlete and member of South Carolina Corps of Cadets, Jared always demonstrated great aptitude in civil engineering, especially in transportation courses. 

William J. Davis, PH.D., P.E.
Department Head and D. Graham Copeland Professor of Civil Engineering, The Citadel School of Engineering

As seen on flgov.com, April 7, 2022

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Today, Governor Ron DeSantis announced his appointment of Jared W. Perdue, P.E., as Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT).

Perdue has extensive experience with FDOT where he has served for nearly 18 years, and currently serves as District Five Secretary.   

“I am pleased to appoint Jared W. Perdue as Secretary of the Department of Transportation,” said Governor Ron DeSantis. “Secretary Perdue brings a wealth of knowledge and understands the unique aspects of Florida’s transportation industry. I am confident in his ability to lead FDOT and to continue to advance our transportation systems.”

“I am thankful for the opportunity to serve as Secretary of FDOT,” said FDOT Secretary Jared W. Perdue.“I look forward to building upon Governor DeSantis’ mission for the Department.”

Jared W. Perdue, P.E., Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation 

Jared W. Perdue has served at FDOT for 18 years, most recently as District Five Secretary where he was responsible for leading and developing a workforce of nearly 600 employees and managing an annual budget of nearly $1 billion

As District Five Secretary, Perdue led the completion of the I-4 Ultimate Project, FDOT’s largest project to date. He also oversaw the Wekiva Parkway project, a model transportation project for environmental conservation.

Prior to his time at District Five, he served in several leadership roles within the Department. 

In 2003, Perdue received his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from The Citadel: The Military College of South Carolina, in Charleston.

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The Charleston Engineers Joint Council selects Citadel professor Gafar Elamin as their 2022 Engineer of the Year https://today.citadel.edu/the-charleston-engineers-joint-council-selects-citadel-professor-gafar-elamin-as-their-2022-engineer-of-the-year/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 16:21:19 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=31212 Dr. Gafar Elamin, The Citadel School of EngineeringDr. Gafar Elamin, The Citadel School of Engineering"Whether, serving students as a caring advisor and extraordinary teacher... Dr. Elamin has demonstrated a lifetime of exceptional service to STEM education in his local community and beyond."]]> Dr. Gafar Elamin, The Citadel School of EngineeringDr. Gafar Elamin, The Citadel School of Engineering

Project Team of the Year goes to Naval Warfare Information Center – Atlantic

Charleston’s premier professional Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM)
organization, the Charleston Engineers Joint Council (CEJC) hosted its annual Engineers Week Banquet recently at The Citadel in honor of National Engineers Week.

Each year the CEJC selects an engineer, scientist, or technology professional in the Lowcountry that demonstrates exceptional career development and professionalism, along with local community leadership and outreach as its Engineer of the Year, in conjunction with National Engineers Week, which was Feb. 20-26 this year.

In a similar vein, the CEJC selects an outstanding project team that has exhibited the tenets of project management indicative of high performance in developing and implementing a technical project that has been superbly well-managed and delivered stakeholder value.

“The CEJC is proud to announce the 2022 winner of Engineer of the Year (EoY), Professor Gafar Elamin, Ph.D., of The Citadel School of Engineering’s Department of Mechanical Engineering,” said an announcement during the CEJC during the event.

Dr. Elamin, is an assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering at The Citadel, whose numerous educational and community accomplishments have served to distinguish him among his peers. Whether serving students as a caring advisor and extraordinary teacher, motivating youth as an insightful mentor, or cultivating his mechanical engineering talents to lead cutting edge research, Dr. Elamin has demonstrated a lifetime of exceptional service to STEM education in his local community and beyond.

It is the privilege of the CEJC to award Dr. Elamin our prestigious Engineer of the Year Award for 2022.

Press release from the Charleston Engineers Joint Council

The Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWSC) Atlantic was awarded the Project Team of the Year.

The announcement read: The Military Heath System (MHS) Video Connect Collaboration Team of the Naval Information Warfare Center Atlantic, a U.S. Navy engineering center headquartered in Charleston, South Carolina, earned our TPToY honor for their exceptional display of project management prowess in delivery of capabilities that enabled military healthcare providers to see more patients safely through the COVID-19 global pandemic, while protecting patient information and healthcare data in transit.

The MHS Video Connect team is a highly skilled, diverse group of professionals that successfully implemented the design and integration of many complex new services required to support efficient healthcare delivery. The team demonstrated effective leadership, resourcefulness, internal and external communications, and technological acumen which enabled the team to overcome challenges and deliver a new capability extending the reach of healthcare to the 9.5 million eligible beneficiaries, including Active-Duty Service members, reservists, veterans, their families, and more than 200,000 healthcare professionals.

NIWIC Atlantic is a supporting partner of The Citadel, providing internships, competitions and mentoring opportunities for the college’s cadets and non-cadet graduate students studying fields including Cybersecurity, Computer Science and Intelligence and Security Studies.

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Ready for takeoff: Citadel cadets prepare for aviation careers https://today.citadel.edu/ready-for-takeoff-citadel-cadets-prepare-for-aviation-careers/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 21:28:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30967 After years of ROTC training at The Citadel, some cadets are getting ready to achieve their lifelong dreams and enter the military as aviators]]>

Photo: (left to right) Cadets Kathryn Christmas, Jason Beal, James Jeffcoat, Luke Eafano and Josiah Schainblatt

The Citadel has a long history of producing aviators for multiple branches of the armed services — and this year is no exception.

After four years of rigorous ROTC training at The Citadel, multiple cadets from different ROTC branches are getting ready to achieve their lifelong dreams and enter the military as aviators.

Though pilots serve in all branches of the military, it’s to be expected that the Air Force is where most can be found. The 25 senior cadets in the Air Force/Space Force ROTC program at The Citadel received their career assignments in November. Among them is Cadet Luke Eafano, a Physics major from Lawrenceville, Georgia, who earned a spot with the Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training (ENJJPT) program. ENJJPT is the world’s only multi-nationally manned and managed flying training program chartered to produce combat pilots for NATO.

The Citadel also contributes to future pilot careers through the cadet Flying Club, one of the college’s largest clubs that allows cadets to participate in flight training.

Cadet Samantha Walton, the 2021-22 Regimental Public Affairs Officer, spoke with a few of the cadets destined for the skies to learn more about how they’re getting ready for takeoff.

Ready the runway

Jason Beal

Cadet Jason Beall is a senior, majoring in Mechanical Engineering. Though he was born in Lexington Park, Maryland, he considers Fort Wayne, Indiana, to be home. At the end of this semester, he will graduate and accept a commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force.

Fly or fall 

I first visited The Citadel during Parents’ Weekend in 2015. Following my visit, I applied myself physically and academically to earn a ROTC scholarship, which has allowed me to pursue my dream to fly fighter jets one day. During my knob year, my older brother was a senior. Life was not easy having an older brother on campus, but it was my chance to prove myself to him as a Citadel cadet and as a man. After completing Recognition Day, my brother’s handshake made every hardship worth it. 

Ready, set, go

I was able to complete Field Training and log flight hours at local airports during the summer before my junior year. Field Training taught me the values of coordination, communication and taking charge during tough situations. I graduated Field Training with the Warrior Spirit Award for my flight, and I was able to pass the Test of Basic Aviation Skills during the first semester of my junior year.

Prepare for take off

On the surface, my cadet career looks like everything went according to plan, but I experienced plenty of hardships and failures. In my opinion, the ability to learn from setbacks is the most important lesson I have learned as a cadet. Following graduation, I will commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Air Force. In June I will marry my fiancé and, within a year of graduation, I will attend Pilot Training in Columbus, Mississippi.

To the clouds and beyond

Kathryn Christmas

Kathryn Christmas is the Regimental Commander for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, majoring in Mechanical Engineering. She has participated in multiple clubs ranging from rugby to Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society. Christmas was born in in Montgomery, Alabama, and raised in Easley, South Carolina. This May, she expects to accept a commission into the U.S. Air Force with a pilot slot.

Ready to soar

During high school, I was a part of the Civil Air Patrol and also witnessed the example of both of my parents, who were officers in the Air Force and who encouraged me to pursue my dream of flying. After visiting The Citadel during my senior year of high school, I knew that this was the place that would help me fulfill that dream. During my freshman year, I attended AFROTC class, leadership laboratory and immersed myself into extracurriculars such as rugby and the Flying Club.

Preflight checklist

My goal of becoming a pilot was further solidified after I got to meet Major General Jeannie Leavitt, the first female fighter pilot in the Air Force. Going to Field Training taught me how to be not only a leader, but also a follower; I ranked in the top 2% of class, graduated as a distinguished graduate and received the Warrior Spirit award from the flight. Being the Regimental Commander has taught me many things about myself and others, as well as the multiple aspects of leadership.

We’re flying 

As for my personal plan, my goal is to commission, along with the many friends I have gained over my four years here, into the United Stated Air Force with a pilot slot. I have yet to be given a date for training, but I will be receiving Pilot Training in Columbus, Mississippi, within a year after graduating. I hope to make my time in the Air Force a career to develop the future leaders of America and maintain the rights and freedoms of our country. Aim High!

Dreams can come true

James Jeffcoat

James Jeffcoat is the Deputy Regimental Operations Officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, a Mechanical Engineering major from Irmo, South Carolina and the Cadet Wing Commander for the Air Force ROTC Detachment. He is also the president of the Pistol Team and of the Society of American Military Engineers, as well as the vice president for the Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honors society. He expects to accept a commission into the United States Air Force as a 2nd Lieutenant.

It started with a dream

When I was a child, my father would take me to airshows in the area. These airshows struck me with an indescribable sense of awe. The performances of the Blue Angels, Thunderbirds and various other demonstration teams fueled my desire to become a pilot of the United States Air Force. I was hooked; the sky was where I was meant to be. What better place to make my dreams a reality than a military college?

Reality sets in

Years ago when asked, “What do you want to do when you grow up?” my answer was always, “I want to be a fighter pilot.” Reflecting on those interactions, I still feel childish telling people that I want to be a pilot; now, the only difference is that the dream I had as a child has since transformed into reality. On May 27, 2021, I received a call from Col. Matthew Morand, commander of The Citadel’s AFROTC program, telling me that I had been selected for a pilot slot.

Let’s fly

The next step in my journey is to commission into the United States Air Force as a 2nd Lieutenant on May 6th, 2022. After accepting my commission, graduating from The Citadel and the receiving my report date, I will report to Columbus Air Force Base to begin Undergraduate Pilot Training.

Eyes to the skies

Christopher Stuart

Christopher Stuart is a sophomore who serves as Cadet Corporal for Delta Company. Stuart, who was born in Raleigh, North Carolina and raised in Fairhope, Alabama, is a Marketing and Business Development major. He is president of the Sales Club, and expects to join the U.S. Marine Corps as an aviator upon graduation.

How it started 

It started with Deane Stuart, my father, a 1984 Delta Company grad. I knew for sure that I would be attending The Citadel to fulfil my father’s legacy. Early on, I knew I wanted to talk to someone about becoming a Marine Corps aviator. I was informed that a three-year sideload aviation scholarship was one of the most competitive. I would wake up with only one thing on my mind: achieving this scholarship.

So, the journey began…

After returning from winter furlough, I learned that I would be competing against 11 other cadets for the sideload scholarship. On April 26, after multiple tests and hurdles, Col. Giles Boyce, commander of The Citadel’s Navy/Marine Corps ROTC program, told me that I was awarded the aviation scholarship. It was the most rewarded experience to ever happen to me.

What’s next? 

I am the only cadet in the sophomore class who was awarded the scholarship. My tuition is now paid for by the United States Marine Corps. More importantly, I have a slot at Officer Candidate School for the summer after my junior year and one for The Basic School after graduation. Upon graduation from The Citadel, as well as the schools listed above, I plan to attend flight school at the Naval Air Station near my hometown in Pensacola, Florida. Semper-Fi!

(left to right) Josiah Schainblatt, Jason Beal, Kathryn Christmas, James Jeffcoat, Luke Eafano

Samantha Walton, who contributed to this article, is the 2021-22 Regimental Public Affairs Officer. She is from Macon, Georgia, and attends The Citadel on an U.S. Army scholarship. Walton is majoring in Political Science and will accept a commission to become an officer upon graduating.


For information about joining the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, click here.

To learn more about The Citadel’s ROTC programs, click here.

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Acquainting girl scouts with the fascination of engineering https://today.citadel.edu/acquainting-girl-scouts-with-the-fascination-of-engineering/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 21:27:50 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30865 Introduce a girl scout to engineering event at The Citadel led by The Citadel School of Engineering and women cadetsIntroduce a girl scout to engineering event at The Citadel led by The Citadel School of Engineering and women cadetsThe Citadel Society of Women Engineers chapter is on a mission to expand girls’ interest in engineering Within The Citadel School of Engineering there is a highly engaged chapter of]]> Introduce a girl scout to engineering event at The Citadel led by The Citadel School of Engineering and women cadetsIntroduce a girl scout to engineering event at The Citadel led by The Citadel School of Engineering and women cadets

The Citadel Society of Women Engineers chapter is on a mission to expand girls’ interest in engineering

Within The Citadel School of Engineering there is a highly engaged chapter of the national Society of Women Engineers.

“The reason I joined our SWE chapter is because I am in such a male-dominated career field and also attend a male-dominated college. I wanted to be able to connect with more women who are engineers and see what it is like for them in their career fields and be able to see all the amazing things that they have achieved and accomplished In their careers,” said Cadet Madison Locklear, a Mechanical Engineering major from Lugoff, South Carolina, who serves as the chapter’s treasurer.

The Citadel Society of Women Engineers’ Introduce a Girl Scout to Engineering event, in Buyer Auditorium on The Citadel campus on Sunday, Feb. 27, 2022.

According to The Citadel Office of Institutional Research, about 11% of women undergraduates attending the college are engineering majors. Of the total number of engineering undergraduates, about 6.6% are currently women.

Whether studying Mechanical, Civil, Computer, Construction or Electrical Engineering, women cadets and students in the chapter make it their mission to introduce girls to a non-traditional career path that could change their lives.

One way they do this is by holding events, such as this one just prior to Women’s History Month, to serve as a resource to the community’s girl scouts who are beginning to consider careers.

This year’s Introduce a Girl Scout to Engineering event on February 27, brought 100 girl scouts to campus from troops around the Lowcountry.

“I want to some day be a designer for projects in sustainability for the power and energy industry,” added Locklear, something she shared with the girl scouts to provide an example of the many careers fields that exist for engineers.

The Citadel Society of Women Engineers’ Introduce a Girl Scout to Engineering event, in Buyer Auditorium on The Citadel campus on Sunday, Feb. 27, 2022.

“Our theme of space exploration was a hit, providing an incredible opportunity to see three generations of women and girls exploring creative ways to solve engineering problems, such as building a space elevator, a rover, and a moon communication system,” said Rebekah Burke, Ph.D., P.E., a professor of Construction Environmental Engineering at The Citadel, and the SWE chapter advisor.

Burke explained that “teams of girl scouts were partnered with a Citadel cadet or student, and an engineering professional or Citadel professor in a model of informal mentorship to encourage girls to pursue a career in a STEM career such as engineering.”

The Citadel Society of Women Engineers’ Introduce a Girl Scout to Engineering event, in Buyer Auditorium on The Citadel campus on Sunday, Feb. 27, 2022.

Cadet members who hold leadership positions with the SWE chapter on campus planned and directed the event. They include Locklear, Alicia Brewington, Elizabeth Lockridge and Rachel Short.

“I also want to thank the 15 engineering professionals from our community, and my colleagues in the School of Engineering, who gave their time on a Sunday to help support this important community event,” Burke added.

Cadet and student servant-leaders who volunteered at the event:

  • Thomas Aycock
  • Noah Axtell
  • Louise Bonnimond
  • Daniel Camp
  • Mark Clement
  • Campbell deHoll
  • William Dinsmore
  • Garrett Drew
  • Andrew Finkle
  • Jackson Fuller
  • Jordan Glowacki
  • Kevin Haddad
  • Charles Heaton
  • Carson Holroyd
  • Pei Hsuan Lu
  • Samuel LaFrage
  • Heidi-Camille R Johnson
  • Malupeaua Khine
  • Erik Liebal
  • Kincaid McCammon
  • Sullivan Newsome
  • Griffin O’Shields
  • Timothy Overend
  • Jacob Simonelli
  • Matthew Smith
  • Brandon Welch
  • Luke Wiggins
  • Donaven Wiliams
  • Sophia Woody
  • Jeremy Wilkes

Learn more about The Citadel School of Engineering

The Citadel School of Engineering is consistency ranked as one of the top 25 programs in America by U.S. News & World Report. In addition to cadet programs, there are offerings for non-cadet students in the evenings and online. Veteran and active duty military students also find programs convenient for balancing their busy schedules while earning undergraduate or graduate Engineering degrees. To learn more, go to this weblink.

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The winners of the Baker Business Bowl make a splash https://today.citadel.edu/the-winners-of-the-baker-business-bowl-make-a-splash/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 21:34:44 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30693 Members of the winning team are looking forward to representing The Citadel in the first ever SoCon Entrepreneurship Challenge next week.]]>

By Alaina Rink, CGC ’22

The $10,000 Baker Business Bowl VIII prize goes to team Trident Jet Nozzle. Their product is a jet nozzle attachment that improves water safety by increasing steering precision. Team Trident Jet Nozzle is an interdisciplinary team, with four Mechanical Engineering majors and one Finance major.

Additionally, they are looking forward to representing The Citadel in the first ever SoCon Entrepreneurship Challenge next week, when they have another chance to win an additional $10,000 prize.

Members include:

  • Will Bush
  • Luke Maynard
  • Lucas Robbins
  • Joseph Roland
  • Josiah Schainblatt
  • Corbet Warren
Members of Team Trident Jet Nozzle presenting during the final round of the Baker Business Bowl

Team ACE Aeronautical Engineering Consulting came in second place, earning $5,000. They intend for their company to plan, design and develop vertiports that accommodate multiple styles of electric vertical take-off and landing aircraft designs. ACE team members include:

  • Chandler Beale
  • Collier Summers

Cadets, evening undergraduate students, veteran students and graduate students who have the determination to turn their idea for a new product or service into a business are eligible to compete. “The Baker Business Bowl showcases our most creative students and is a way to put their learning into action,” said Michael Weeks, Ph.D., dean of the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business.

In the first round, the entrepreneurs submit a summary of the proposed business venture. There were 33 entries this year from multiple disciplines. 10 of these teams performed their elevator-pitches in the second round one month later, but only five teams could advance to the final round on Feb. 16.

Members of Team ACE Aeronautical Engineering Consulting presenting during the final round of the Baker Business Bowl

Shawn Swartwood, a professor of entrepreneurship, has been involved with each round of this year’s competition. He was pleased to see alumni, and especially members of the Class of 1989, encouraging the teams in the final round. “It is great to see former students giving back to current students,” he said.

This year’s other finalists were The Auditory Assistant, Colonic Tattoo and Wound Closure. All the teams presented their fully developed business plans, which include marketing, budgeting and production strategies. They also answered questions from the judges.

This year’s BBB panel of judges included:

  • Joseph Conti
  • Faye Gooding
  • Deborah Kaufman
  • Mark Kohler
  • Antonio Linnen
  • David Saulnier

This annual event is possible thanks to the platinum sponsorship from The Citadel Class of 1989 and the gold sponsorship of Dan D. Nale, Ph.D., ’82. Nale said, “The ability to compete in a competition like the Baker Business Bowl says a lot about the students’ futures and The Citadel. There was a diversity of teams and products present tonight. It was a great event, very professional.”

For these teams, the final round of the Baker Business Bowl is just the first step.


Alaina Rink is a graduate assistant in the Office of Communications and Marketing while pursuing a master’s degree in English. She earned her undergraduate degree from the College of Charleston in secondary education English and taught in the Charleston area for four years.

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Certificates in Advanced Engineering Serve Workers and Employers https://today.citadel.edu/certificates-in-advanced-engineering-serve-workers-and-employers/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=30586 Photo of mechanical engineer at workPhoto of mechanical engineer at workAs seen on LowcountryGraduateCenter.com, by Barrry Waldman Lowcountry employers like Boeing, Mercedes Benz, Volvo, Bosch, NIWC, Cummins, Rotorion, Santee Cooper and many more seek engineers with advanced degrees in a]]> Photo of mechanical engineer at workPhoto of mechanical engineer at work

As seen on LowcountryGraduateCenter.com, by Barrry Waldman

Lowcountry employers like Boeing, Mercedes Benz, Volvo, Bosch, NIWC, Cummins, Rotorion, Santee Cooper and many more seek engineers with advanced degrees in a host of disciplines. Engines of growth in a region that has experienced triple the labor force growth of the nation, the manufacturing and high-tech fields are hungry for local expertise.

Enter the only local college with an engineering curriculum. The Citadel, which bestows engineering bachelor’s and master’s degrees, is helping fill the pipeline of critical staff at these businesses, keeping the jobs and employers in this region.

The alternative is for companies to import talent from outside the region, further straining schools, housing, roads and other infrastructure that are already near, or even past, full capacity. 

A Shorter Route to Engineering Expertise

For those seeking a shortcut to that expertise, who don’t have the time or resources to commit to a full graduate program, or who want to get their feet wet on an advanced degree before diving in, The Citadel offers certificates in advanced engineering that demonstrate proficiency without requiring the full master’s degree program.

Certificate programs in aeronautics, composite materials, manufacturing, mechatronics, and power and energy are aimed at working professionals and require just four master’s level courses over three years. Upon completion, students earn a certificate and are 40% of the way to a master’s degree.

“The certificate programs are offered in the evenings to allow working individuals with fulltime jobs or other obligations a systematic way to show increased tech proficiency,” said Lt. Col. Robert Rabb, a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and head of the mechanical engineering department. He says all the students who complete the certificate program have continued to a master’s degree.

Certificates Pave the Way to Further Study

Many of the students in the course are mid-level managers who need a graduate degree to move up the corporate ladder. Boeing, for example, requires an advanced degree to become a manager in the company.

Admission to the certificate program is somewhat less rigorous than for the full graduate level program. For some, it is a way to demonstrate the ability to do graduate work before applying for the full master’s.

Certificate students in aeronautics take these four courses: advanced fluid dynamics, applied aerodynamics, compressible flow, and computational methods in thermal sciences. Upon completion, these courses may be used as part of a master’s degree in aeronautical engineering or in any of the other four related engineering courses. 

In other words, students with a certificate in one discipline can apply those credits to a master’s in another.

In a time of labor shortages, particularly in high-skilled professions, plaguing businesses nationwide, the median salaries in many engineering management positions tops six figures. For 2019, the last year before Covid, roughly 300 new industrial engineers were hired in the three-county region, according to the Charleston Regional Development Alliance.

No Knob Year Rituals for Grad Students

The traditions around discipline for which The Citadel is renowned do not apply to graduate or certificate students. While first-year undergraduates at South Carolina’s military college must wear buzz cuts, endure verbal harassment from upperclassmen and walk in the street at right angles while on campus, those taking graduate level courses have a normal grad school experience. 

“The dress is business casual, and you can grow your hair long and talk bad about our country,” Rabb joked.

For more information, visit the website or call Dr. Rabb at (843) 953-0520.

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The Citadel School of Engineering still one of the top ranked programs in America, again ABET reaccredited https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-school-of-engineering-still-one-of-the-top-ranked-programs-in-america-again-abet-reaccredited/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 20:09:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29677 "This enhanced training provides students with a strong leadership foundation after graduation."]]>

Photo above: Mechanical Engineering major Cadet Peyton Campbell, ’20, working in a lab on The Citadel campus in 2019.

Whether the goal is to become a civil, computer, construction, electrical or mechanical engineer, The Citadel School of Engineering continues to be one of the top programs in America when it comes to delivering successful outcomes for cadets and students. Close to 99% of engineering cadets and students have jobs within six months of graduation, according to the school’s department heads who track their graduates’ outcomes.

The Citadel School of Engineering, one of the oldest engineering programs in America, was recently reaccredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), and is ranked as the 16th “Best Undergraduate Engineering Program,” nationwide, by U.S. News & World Report.

The benefits and quality of the engineering degrees offered by The Citadel are judged not only by the success of the college’s graduates, but they are reviewed in detail by ABET’s evaluators every six years.

The Citadel School of Engineering offers five undergraduate and four graduate degrees. Additionally, the school offers 13 professional engineering certificates.

  • Civil and Environmental Engineering (repeatedly ranked in top 10 Civil Engineering programs in the nation by U.S. News & World Report)
  • Computer Engineering (the first students in this new program will graduate in May of 2023, with an ABET accreditation visit scheduled for the following fall)
  • Construction Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering (the largest program in the school)

ABET noted program strengths

The ABET assessments are focused on continuous improvement as the key to ensuring that the programs accredited are preparing students to graduate ready to enter the workforce. The process required the School of Engineering to provide an exhaustive, ongoing self-assessment, supported by onsite evaluations with each accreditation cycle.

Some of the comments from the ABET evaluation team are as follows:

Civil Engineering

Cadets in The Citadel School of Engineering take part in a Civil Engineering lab conducted by Dr. Timothy Wood in LeTellier Hall on campus in January of 2020.

“The program requires that all students take the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying Fundamentals of Engineering exam prior to graduation, a requirement that is not widely included in other civil engineering programs. Results from this exam are used as part of the assessment process. This examination requirement helps to reinforce an appreciation for the importance of licensure, while providing a head start on achieving.”

Construction Engineering

Cadets Keegan Sherman ‘21 and Rhett Garett ‘22 watch as the first stage of Capers Hall’s demolition takes place at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. Both men are working with the project.

“In their final semester, all seniors enroll in a practicum course involving a community-based project, currently connected to Habitat for Humanity. Inclusion of all program students in such an experience is rarely seen. This opportunity to participate in construction activities and to practice communications and project reporting on as real world situation strengthens students’ preparation for work after graduation.”

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering cadets participate in laboratory work in Grimsley Hall on The Citadel campus on March 4, 2020.

“The program has a rich curriculum that not only provides technical competence but emphasizes principled leadership as part of The Citadel Experience, where most students take on increasing responsibilities as they progress through the program. The majority of the program’s undergraduates, the South Carolina Corps of Cadets student cohort, is enrolled in the ROTC program and takes leadership courses as a part of the expanded curriculum, in addition to the 125 credit hours in the Electrical Engineering program. This enhanced training provides students with a strong leadership foundation after graduation.”

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineering cadets test a mechanical arm to aid in American Sign Language communication in Grimsley Hall at The Citadel in 2020.

“Small class sizes and the obvious collegiality between the faculty and the students, coupled with the faculty enjoyment of teaching and interaction with the students, strongly strengthen student learning in the program.”

Want to know more?

The Citadel Civil Engineering program earned its first accreditation in 1936. The reaccreditation for all of the schools engineering programs remains in effect until the fall of 2027.

To learn more about The Citadel’s engineering offerings, or to apply, please visit the website here.

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The Citadel School of Engineering earns ASEE diversity recognition https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-school-of-engineering-earns-asee-diversity-recognition/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 18:22:52 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=29489 "The Bronze level recognition means that your college is among the nation’s leaders in inclusive excellence."]]>

Photo above: The dean for The Citadel School of Engineering, Andrew Williams, Ph.D., leads an event on campus in the fall of 2021 focused on artificial intelligence and diversity in engineering, including industry leaders from the Charleston Lowcountry, as well as engineering cadets and students.

The American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Diversity Recognition program now recognizes The Citadel School of Engineering at the Bronze level. The Citadel received notification of the recognition December 21.

“The ASEE Bronze level recognition, the highest level that any institution currently holds, demonstrates that The Citadel is doing all we can strategically and in daily practice to make our School of Engineering the most welcoming and supportive learning environment possible,” said the dean for The Citadel School of Engineering, Andrew B. Williams, Ph.D. “This national recognition signals to any prospective engineering student — including underrepresented minorities, women, veterans and first generation college students — that that they will belong here and we will work diligently towards their success as future engineering professionals.”

The letter of recognition from the ASEE Diversity Recognition Committee read as follows:

Thank you for your application to the ASEE Diversity Recognition Program. I am pleased to inform you that you have been recognized at the Bronze Level based on your Fall 2021 application.

The Diversity Recognition Program was created by the American Society of Engineering Education to publicly recognize those engineering and engineering technology colleges that make significant, measurable progress in increasing diversity, inclusion, and degree attainment outcomes of their programs. Twelve applications were submitted in the Fall 2021 application cycle and reviewed to determine their acceptability for Bronze Level status, which at the moment is the highest level of recognition in the program. Each application was reviewed by 3 reviewers using a rubric drawn from the ADRP guidelines. An interactive panel discussion was also used to ensure that the reviewers were consistent in their recommendation on the acceptability of the application.

Based on the committees review your application was rated at the Bronze level. This is the highest level we issued this submission cycle. The Bronze level recognition means that your College/School is among the nation’s leaders in inclusive excellence. It demonstrates that the unit is committed to the following outcomes: 1) Establishing baseline support for groups underrepresented in engineering 2) Quantifiably analyzing and assessing unit composition, policies, culture, and climate related to all groups underrepresented in engineering. 3) Implementing programs and initiatives that strengthen the K-12 or community college pipeline thereby reducing significant barriers related to long-term growth. (4) Developing an action plan focused on continuous improvement.

I want to commend you for your progress and thank you very much for your support of this important ASEE EDC initiative.

Donald J. Leo, chair, ASEE Diversity Committee
Mechanical Engineering cadets and professor working with the Department of Mechanical Engineering’s autoclave.

One of the programs The Citadel School of engineering implemented to support diversity is a National Science Foundation funded Excellence in Civil Engineering Program featured in this article.

Institutions achieving Bronze-level status from ASEE in fall 2021 will be recognized at an industry meeting in February 2022.

Learn more about The Citadel School of Engineering

The Citadel School of Engineering is one of the oldest programs in American and is consistently ranked in the top 25 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

The School of Engineering offers five undergraduate programs that can be taken as a full-time as a cadet or as transfer student in a traditional college/civilian setting during the afternoon and evening.

Learn more about applying to a program in The Citadel School of Engineering here.

Learn more about Dean Andrew Williams here.

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Transforming airports for the future’s vertical flying vehicles https://today.citadel.edu/transforming-airports-for-the-futures-vertical-flying-vehicles/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 19:42:01 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=28514 DSCN0061-MediumDSCN0061-MediumThe cadets are designing the ground infrastructure, including vertical landing ports or vertiports, needed at regional airports.]]> DSCN0061-MediumDSCN0061-Medium

Engineering cadets present eVTOLS airport design project to Congresswoman Nancy Mace, panel of industry experts

Photo above: Cadet Dave Smith, ’22, presents information about potential infrastructure needed at airports to support the electric vertical take-off and landing vehicles.

As cadets explained to an audience recently in Grimsley Hall on The Citadel campus, there will be a time in the not-so-distant future when electric vertical take-off and landing vehicles (eVTOLS) will commonly deliver cargo, and even people, to airports around the region and the nation. But America’s airports must be modified to support eVTOLS.

Left to right: Cadets Aidan Puzzio and Matheson Wannamaker presenting information about their engineering capstone project on vertical take-off infrastructure improvements at Rock Hill-York County airport on Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2021

That’s where six seniors who are majoring in civil or construction engineering enter the picture. The cadets are designing the ground infrastructure, including vertical landing ports or vertiports, needed at regional airports to accommodate this rapidly developing industry.

“We are working on a design for the Rock Hill-York County Airport that we hope will serve as a case study that is transferable to other similarly sized airports, and beyond,” explained Cadet Davis Smith.

Congresswoman Nancy Mace attends a project presentation from senior engineering cadets on vertical takeoff infrastructure improvements at Rock Hill-York County airport in at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday, November 9, 2021.

The cadets on the capstone project include Kyle DiLiddo, Ben Kicklighter, Aidan Puzzio, David Smith, Noel Turner and Matheson Wannamaker. They presented details on the eVTOL market and projected impacts on the South Carolina economy to Congresswoman Nancy Mace, ’99, one of the college’s most well-known alumni who is a member of the Congressional Transportation Committee. In addition, industry experts and partners were in the audience.

Prof. Dan Nale, '82, discussing the engineering capstone project he is leading for cadets on vertical takeoff infrastructure improvements at Rock Hill-York County airport on November 9, 2021.
Prof. Dan Nale, ’82, at the podium discussing the engineering capstone project he is leading for cadets on vertical take-off infrastructure improvements at Rock Hill-York County airport on Nov. 9, 2021

Leading the cadets through this real-world project is a 1982 alumnus who graduated with a degree in Civil Engineering and worked for Gulfstream Aerospace for 35 years. Dan Nale, PE, the visiting Professor of Practice with The Citadel Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering believes this capstone project will give the seniors professional-level experience that can help catapult them ahead of other when they graduate.

Nale said it is estimated that “by the year 2035, the Advanced Air Mobility industry utilizing the EVTOLS is expected to have a $115 billion annual impact on the American economy.”

Mace, who congratulated the cadets on their work thus far after the presentation, asked how much the airport retrofitting program the cadets are creating would likely cost. Nale outlined details of an estimated of $2 million investment.

The cadets intend to have the Rock Hill – York County Airport eVTOLS modification plan complete by the time they graduate.

Supporting advisory panel and industry experts

The Citadel eVTOL Capstone Advisory Panel and supporting industry experts include:

  • Doug Barnes – District 5 South Carolina Aeronautics Commissioner,
  • Steve Bath – Engineering Division U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District,
  • Howard Chapman – Mt. Pleasant Town Council; Chair Mt. Pleasant Planning Commission,
  • Tim Fulford – Dean, Trident Technical College,
  • Steven Gould – Airport Director of Rock Hill – York County Airport,
  • Nick Harrington – Mead & Hunt Airport Design Engineer,
  • Amanda Heath – U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District,
  • Tracy Hendren – Engineering Division U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District,
  • Lt. Col. Andrew Johannes – District Commander U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District,
  • Hernan Pena – Executive Deputy Director & Chief Operating Officer Charleston County Aviation Authority,
  • Gary Siegfried – Program Manager of South Carolina Aeronautics Commission,
  • James Stephens – Executive Director of South Carolina Aeronautics Commission,
  • Nate Ward – Beta Aircraft Charging Station Program Manager,
  • Kathryn Wright – Vice President of Heliplanners,
  • Jeff Wright – President of Heliplanners

Watch an eVTOL test flight

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On his way to two degrees: Meet Air Force veteran student Kevin Bosshart https://today.citadel.edu/on-his-way-to-two-degrees-meet-air-force-veteran-student-kevin-bosshart/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 15:01:58 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=28522 Kevin BosshartKevin BosshartKevin Bosshart is a veteran day student pursuing a Mechanical Engineering degree; he earned a Bachelor of Science in Physics in 2019.]]> Kevin BosshartKevin Bosshart

In recognition of Veterans Day on Nov. 11, The Citadel is highlighting some of the college’s exceptional veteran students from different branches of the U.S. Armed Forces.

There are approximately 250 veterans currently studying at The Citadel, either as undergraduate or graduate students. They have the option of taking their classes as day students alongside the Corps of Cadets, as evening students with other non-cadet undergraduates or online. In addition, they are provided with multiple resources through the Veteran Student Success Center on campus.

Named #1 Best College for Veterans in the South for three years in a row, the Military College of South Carolina is honored to help our nation’s heroes advance their education.

Q&A with Kevin Bosshart, Class of 2019

Kevin Bosshart, USAF (Ret.), is a veteran day student pursuing his second bachelor’s degree at The Citadel. He earned a Bachelor of Science in Physics in 2019 and is currently enrolled in the Mechanical Engineering program. Bosshart plans to graduate with his second degree in 2023. After, he is hoping to find a job in Washington, his home state, to be near his family.

Q. What was your time in the military like?

A. I retired after 20 years with the rank of TSgt (E-6) from the Air Force in 2013. I will always value my time in the military. I got live in Alaska, Spain and the Carolinas (both North and South). I was able to travel to four continents, 20 something countries and to experience many different cultures.

Q. Did you come to The Citadel immediately after retiring, or do something else in between?

A. After I retired, I worked as a contractor at Boeing and Bosch. I had some health issues that forced me to leave the workforce and put me on disability. I decided then to go back to school. I was an aircraft mechanic in the military and around aircraft for quite a few years prior joining, so I was looking for a different kind of career since I couldn’t physically be a mechanic anymore.

Kevin Bosshart, USAF, sitting on an Iraqi tank

Q. How did you hear about The Citadel?

A. I looked into The Citadel because it had a good Computer Science program, and that is what I wanted to do. I started that program in 2015, but I found myself enjoying the homework from my physics class much more. After a year in Computer Science, I transferred to the Physics Department.

Q. What experiences from your military service helped shape who you are?

A. My experiences have given me new perspectives on different cultures and lifestyles. Being able to live overseas was an unforgettable experience and I would encourage anyone to do it. I spent just over four years living in Spain, unfortunately it didn’t help me in my Spanish classes very much. The Spanish locals loved practicing their English on us so we would fall into our own comfort zone and help them rather than work on our Spanish.

Kevin Bosshart and other servicemembers in Kuwait, on their way to Baghdad, in 2003

Q. What are your interactions with cadets like?

A. I really enjoy interacting with the cadets and I still have cadet friends from the first time I was here. When I first started here in 2015, it seemed like the cadets were afraid to interact with the veterans. I would be the first to the classroom and the cadets would file in and fill up all the seats furthest away from me. I talked to them after a while and asked why it seems they were so uncomfortable around veterans. A few of them said, “Because we don’t know you.” I told them that the majority of the veteran students I knew welcomed interaction and questions from cadets about their military service.

I’ve noticed since I started my second stint here at the school that the cadets seem a lot more comfortable around the veterans. I believe it stems from the growing number of veterans, both active duty and prior enlisted, at the school and having more opportunities for them to interact with us.

Q. What’s your favorite thing about The Citadel as a whole?

A. Coming from a military lifestyle, it helps to still be in a military environment. Meeting the cadets and getting to know them is very enjoyable.

Veterans interested in attending The Citadel can find information about programs and opportunities here. Additionally, information about benefits for veterans can be found here.

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