Education – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Wed, 09 Sep 2020 18:08:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Education – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 The Citadel plus Clemson equals more doctors of education in South Carolina https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-plus-clemson-equals-more-doctors-of-education-in-south-carolina/ Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18045 The Citadel's Zucker Family School of Education and Clemson University are working together to help students earn a Doctorate of Education.]]>

Photo: Clemson’s first Ed.D. cohort in Education Systems Improvement Studies; nine earned their Ed.S. at The Citadel (Courtesy: Clemson College of Education)

Citadel graduates lead the way while pursuing their doctorates

For some, teaching — and learning — is a lifelong pursuit. And it’s because of people like this that The Citadel’s Zucker Family School of Education partnered with Clemson University, in order to help more teachers earn a Doctorate of Education (Ed.D.).

The Citadel, along with Coastal Carolina University and Winthrop University, partnered with Clemson to establish an Ed.D. consortium partnership, and the program’s first group of students started class in summer 2018.

Lee Westberry, Ed.D.

“Earning a doctorate in education is the pinnacle of professional development for teachers,” said Lee Westberry, Ed.D., a professor and the program coordinator for Education Leadership at The Citadel. “In addition to personal growth, earning an Ed.D. creates many new and practical opportunities in a variety of educational career paths.”

Through the agreement, anyone admitted into Clemson’s Ed.D program — with an education specialist (Ed.S.) degree from one of the four institutions — has a pathway to earn their doctorate more quickly.

With The Citadel’s strong focus on leadership, it makes sense that Citadel graduates would make up the largest proportion of students seeking their Ed.D.

In each of the three years since the partnership was formed, Citadel graduates make up much, if not most, of the students in the group. In fact, more than half of the newest Ed.D. students are from The Citadel.

Kevin Smith

“I have found myself reflecting on how the Ed.S. program has flowed seamlessly into Clemson’s Ed.D. to continue my own growth as I pursue my goals,” said Kevin Smith, an Ed.S. graduate from The Citadel. “I highly recommend those who are interested in making an impact to invest their time with the committed faculty of The Citadel’s Ed.S. program. I believe it is the right choice for those who desire, like me, to be an educational leader of consequence.”

According to Westberry, an Ed.S. is required to work as a superintendent, the highest-ranking education official. But an Ed.D. is for something more.

The Citadel’s Ed.S. in Educational Leadership offers teachers an advanced graduate degree, between a master’s and a doctoral, that prepares them as candidates for certification at the superintendent level. Clemson’s Ed.D. program offers teachers the theoretical and practical knowledge and research skills that they need to be an educational leader.

To learn more about other programs offered by the Zucker Family School of Education, click here.

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New Citadel degree helps educators and professional development specialists teach in evolving educational environments https://today.citadel.edu/new-citadel-degree-helps-educators-and-professional-development-specialists-teach-in-evolving-educational-environments/ Thu, 13 Aug 2020 17:13:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17754 With a focus on alternative learning systems, the Zucker Family School of Education is now offering a new graduate degree to better serve educators.]]>

Photo: Bond Hall on The Citadel campus

Applications are now open for as early as Fall 2020

The COVID-19 environment is forcing educators, students and specialists who train working professionals to reevaluate their traditional methods of teaching.

In a time when many are focused on alternative learning systems, The Citadel’s Zucker Family School of Education is now offering a new graduate degree to help P-12 and higher education teachers — as well as professional development experts in military, healthcare, corporate and community settings — address this dynamic educational environment with a focus on student-centered education.

Graduates will be provided with theoretical and practical knowledge that’s essential to understanding instructional processes for varied learners in a range of settings.

The M.S. in Instructional Systems Design and Performance Improvement, which was proposed pre-pandemic, will also help educators long after the COVID-19 environment ends by providing practical experiences in the development of learning tools and environments.

Evan Ortlieb, Ph.D., dean of the Zucker Family School of Education

“The opportunity that this experience provides for educators — both in and out of schools — is really incalculable,” said Evan Ortlieb, Ph.D., dean of the Zucker Family School of Education. “In addition to the ways in which COVID has forced us to change how we think about education, rapidly-evolving technologies and research are offering new and improved ways to teach and learn. And that’s what this degree is really about — helping educators learn the best ways to harness new technology and information, mold it to fit specific needs, and then deliver extra benefits to students.”

The program, which will be held 100% online, will teach educators how to build educational experiences and products – both virtually and physically. Graduates will learn how to flexibly teach in new and dynamic ways, design courses, develop curriculums, create student guides, produce training materials and much more.

For more information about Instructional Systems Design and Performance Improvement, click here. To apply to the new program for any semester — even as early as Fall 2020 — click here.

The mission of the Zucker Family School of Education at The Citadel is to support the development and preparation of individuals who are knowledgeable about the learning process and learners who are effective, ethical, and reflective educators prepared to assume leadership roles in the profession and community. Further, with a focus toward learner-centered education, they are effective in educating a diverse learner population to high academic standards.

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The Citadel Provost, Dr. Sally Selden, featured as woman of influence https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-provost-dr-sally-selden-featured-as-woman-of-influence/ Mon, 10 Aug 2020 14:46:49 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17658 Citadel Provost Dr. Sally Selden being interviewed by Post and Courier reporter Jenna Schifrel for We the Women seriesCitadel Provost Dr. Sally Selden being interviewed by Post and Courier reporter Jenna Schifrel for We the Women seriesThe Citadel's highest ranking woman interviewed by reporter Jenna Schiferl for The Post & Courier's We the Women series.]]> Citadel Provost Dr. Sally Selden being interviewed by Post and Courier reporter Jenna Schifrel for We the Women seriesCitadel Provost Dr. Sally Selden being interviewed by Post and Courier reporter Jenna Schifrel for We the Women series

We the Women conversation series celebrates 100 years since women in America were given the right to vote

As seen on PostandCourier.com

It’s been 100 years since the 19th Amendment was ratified, giving women of the United States the right to vote.

In celebration, The Post and Courier reporters interviewed South Carolina women about the ways they’ve used their lives and their voices and their right to vote. This series, called “We the Women,” will roll out the first weeks of August, culminating on the anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which became part of the Constitution of the United States on Aug. 18, 1920.

Today, We the Women continues, featuring a conversation between Post and Courier reporter Jenna Schiferl and Brigadier General Sally Selden, Ph.D., Provost and Dean of The Citadel.

New videos will post online at postandcourier.com daily at 10:30 a.m. through Aug. 18.

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Killing COVID-19 germs on campus, step by step https://today.citadel.edu/killing-covid-19-germs-on-campus-step-by-step/ https://today.citadel.edu/killing-covid-19-germs-on-campus-step-by-step/#comments Wed, 05 Aug 2020 18:22:41 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17541 Knob Athletes report to campus at The Citadel in Charleston, SouthKnob Athletes report to campus at The Citadel in Charleston, SouthWe are taking a multi-layered and generously resourced approach that provides ongoing, carefully mapped out cleaning and disinfection to keep our campus as safe as possible.]]> Knob Athletes report to campus at The Citadel in Charleston, SouthKnob Athletes report to campus at The Citadel in Charleston, South

8 ways The Citadel’s facilities are being sanitized for Operation Fall Return 2020

Having cadets and students back, and campus back in action, means optimizing cleaning and disinfection services with the goal of killing COVID-19 germs and keeping all facilities as healthy as possible.

“We care deeply about the health of our campus community which is why we are taking a multi-layered and generously resourced approach that provides ongoing, carefully mapped out cleaning and disinfection,” said Cdr. Jeff Lamberson, USN (Ret.), vice president for The Citadel Facilities and Engineering Department. “For example, certified teams are disinfecting classrooms every evening after classes end.”

Cdr. Jeff Lamberson, USN (Ret.), vice president for The Citadel Facilities and Engineering Department, overseeing sanitation preparations in Murray Barrack.


The Citadel has hired The Budd Group, with almost 60 years of experience in disinfection services, to implement and oversee the ongoing campus sanitation operation.

Keeping clean, step by step

Budd Group expert sanitizing a cadet room at The Citadel
Contract manager for The Budd Group, demonstrates a backpack atomizer, which can clean an entire barracks in four hours, in Murray Barrack

1. Cadet rooms and barracks

All barracks and cadet rooms are thoroughly disinfected and sanitized using professional processes prior to move-in. Each barracks restroom will be equipped with hand-soap, hand sanitizer, touchless faucets and hand driers. Barracks restrooms will continue to be disinfected and sanitized daily.

2. Classrooms

L’Quante Hill demonstrates an electrostatic atomizer in a Capers Hall classroom at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina
L’Quante Hill demonstrates an electrostatic atomizer in a Capers Hall classroom at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina

Nightly, disinfecting teams will deploy into each classroom. These teams are using safe disinfectants on high touch-point areas, including desks and chairs. Additionally, classrooms are equipped with disinfectant wipes and hand sanitizer.

3. Look for the backpacks

Ray Cervantes, contract manager for The Budd Group, demonstrates a backpack atomizer, which can clean an entire barracks in four hours, in Daniel Library at The Citadel

Electrostatic disinfection teams are deployed across campus in high traffic areas. You’ll see them wearing backpacks with sprayers that send a deep cleaning, environmentally safe, mist into the air and across surfaces, penetrating hard to reach areas as well. After four minutes, the surfaces are fully disinfected. How does it work?

Electrostatic spray uses a specialized solution that is combined with air and atomized by an electrode inside the sprayer. Subsequently, the spray contains positively charged particles that are able to aggressively adhere to surfaces and objects. Because the particles in the spray are positively charged, they cling to and coat any surface they’re aimed at, enabling the sanitizing agent in the spray to then disinfect.

4. Proctors are following in your footsteps

Enhanced custodial services include disinfectant proctors assigned to busy locations such as the library, the mess hall and large shared spaces.

Karen Kennedy and Iris Hamilton Seabrooks clean chairs and tables in Daniel Library

“These proctors are responsible for disinfecting and sanitizing specific touch-points, such as cafeteria surfaces, water fountains, stairwells and handrails, door handles and push rails, trash cans, bathroom surfaces, and light switches,” Lambert explained. “They’ll also be attending to frequent gathering areas, such as conference rooms, break rooms, shared work spaces, media rooms, and waiting areas.”

5. Atomizers for use by all

Ryan Bilitski, a junior cadet in Charlie company and a facilities and engineering intern demonstrates an atomizer in Daniel Library offices at The Citadel

Feel like an area you are about to use needs a little extra attention? Disinfection atomizers are located in spaces across campus filled with a botanically-based solution that kills COVID-19 germs. The atomizers can safely be used by anyone wanting to sanitize an area before or after using it.

6. Sanitation stations

Self-help sanitation stations are located around campus in buildings and offices. These include large dispensers of disinfectant wipes and also hand-sanitizer.

Jeff Lamberson, vice president for Facilities and Engineering, demonstrates some of the procedures in place to keep cadets, faculty and staff safe during

7. Special service areas

Special service areas, such as the Treasurer’s Office, have protective plastic shields in place between staff and customers to block germ transmission and are regularly sanitized.

8. Offices

Faculty and staff offices were disinfected prior to reopening campus and are sanitized on a regular basis.

Lamberson says he wants The Citadel family to know that “we will continue to use our resources to ensure that our campus is a clean and a safe place to learn, lead, and achieve.”

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The Citadel’s commitment to elevating education throughout South Carolina continues https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadels-commitment-to-elevating-education-throughout-south-carolina-continues/ Thu, 30 Jul 2020 23:00:49 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=17394 Hundreds of K-12 teachers in South Carolina will be better prepared to educate students in the fall after learning new techniques through the STEM Center.]]>

Photo: South Carolina educators participating in a small session during Computer Science Professional Development Week

College’s STEM Center of Excellence prepares K-12 teachers for enhanced instruction 

When school resumes, hundreds of K-12 teachers in South Carolina will be better prepared to educate their students, whether it be face-to-face, virtually or a combination of the two.

Those teachers will integrate new techniques and concepts into their lessons, learned over the summer from The Citadel’s STEM Center of Excellence (SCE).

In addition to supporting Citadel cadets and students, the SCE serves as a community resource, holding numerous educational events for children annually and providing robust professional development programs for K-12 STEM teachers.

In July, more than 400 teachers participated in two, week-long workshops presented by the SCE. Both were originally planned to be held on campus, but were moved to a virtual format in response to the pandemic.

The goal of both workshops: help teachers inspire and prepare more South Carolina students to pursue STEM-related careers.

Addressing the shortage of computer science teachers

The first workshop involved the SCE’s ongoing work to increase the number of computer science teachers in South Carolina schools.

The SCE offered computer science professional development for nearly 250 teachers, with the goal of ensuring that every high school, and most middle schools, have at least one dedicated computer science teacher.

The South Carolina Department of Education selected the SCE to provide instruction in response to new, stricter guidelines about computer science requirements in South Carolina public high schools.

A teacher using the kits, provided by the STEM Center, to learn about computer science during the Computer Science Professional Development Week

“Now that a keyboarding class no longer counts as computer science credit, 436 high schools have to be able to teach in-depth computer science,” said Jennifer Albert, Ph.D., director of the The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence. “We’ve been working the last two summers with the Department of Education to make sure all of those teachers have the training and the certification needed to teach those classes.”

The experience was free for teachers, thanks to the funding from the state’s Department of Education, as well as a grant from the CS Teachers’ Association.

Infusing computing

The second workshop, held the last week of July, represented the final stage of a multi-million-dollar National Science Foundation grant awarded to the SCE, and project collaborators at North Carolina State University. The goal of the STEM+Computing project was aimed at helping teachers integrate computing and STEM curricula into their classes.

Nearly 200 teachers participated in the event, learning how to blend computational thinking — a problem-solving method that describes problems and their solutions in ways that a computer would understand — into their educational content.

Providing the workshop virtually didn’t faze the SCE director.

“We’ve had to restructure everything get the same, small-group, personal feel,” said Albert. “We had to almost triple the number of session facilitators that we hired this year, because we want them in small groups so they have the same amount of attention that they would have face-to-face.”

In fact, the SCE’s methods for adjusting to a virtual format, as well as more information on the workshop, is included on page 59 of a recent publication in the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education.

The SCE is a collaborative effort between The Citadel’s Zucker Family School of Education, the School of Engineering, and the Swain Family School of Science and Mathematics. It delivers outreach initiatives, like Storm The Citadel and more, to increase student interest, participation, and opportunities in the STEM disciplines.

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Remembering Myra Thompson, one of the Emanuel 9 and a double Citadel alumna https://today.citadel.edu/remembering-myra-thompson-one-of-the-emanuel-9-and-a-citadel-alumna/ Wed, 17 Jun 2020 09:23:15 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16804 In 2015, The Citadel Graduate College lost a double alumna who was dedicated to giving back and educatinng others -- Rev. Myra Thompson.]]>

On June 17, 2015, Charleston changed forever.

The tragedy of the Emanuel 9 massacre affected all of the Lowcountry, including The Citadel family. In addition to losing nine irreplaceable members of the community, The Citadel Graduate College lost a double alumna who was dedicated to giving back, Rev. Myra Thompson.

Thompson was leading the Bible study at Mother Emanuel AME for the first time, after being re-licensed to preach just hours before the tragedy.

“She was a wonderful mother and was very nurturing. She loved to learn. She would get so excited about learning new things. She was supportive of me and, at an early age, she recognized my talents and enrolled me in after school computer classes and encouraged me to learn everything I could. I did not realize it then, but now I see that my mom was way ahead of her time and somehow knew technology was going to be a major aspect in the world.”

Denise Quarles, daughter of Myra Thompson

During the 1980s and 90s, Thompson was a teacher at Brentwood Middle School — now called Meeting Street Elementary School at Brentwood, in North Charleston.

Her love of learning– and of teaching others — led Thompson to earn her Master of Education in Reading Education in 1994 through The Citadel Graduate College.

“I have wonderful memories of Myra Singleton (Thompson) and will always remember her as a very special graduate student,” said Dan T. Ouzts, Ph.D., professor emeritus in the Zucker Family School of Education. “I was her professor and advisor while she was pursuing the Master of Education in Reading and taught her several reading education courses. Myra was teaching at Brentwood Middle School and I often visited her classes during her internship. She was a very special teacher.”

Myra Thompson receiving her Master of Education in Reading degree (Courtesy: Denise Quarles)

One Master degree wasn’t enough for Thompson, however. In order to learn more and to be an even better educator, she returned a few years later to earn her Master of Education in Counselor Education in 1999.

“The Zucker Family School of Education is honored to have Myra Thompson as an alumna of our Reading Education and Counselor Education graduate programs,” said Renée Jefferson, Ph.D., interim dean of the Zucker Family School of Education. “Myra Thompson’s legacy as an English teacher and school counselor is one of commitment in educating and supporting all students. Her professional career epitomized the goals we have for our graduates, dedication to service as a principled educational leader.”

Thompson’s Citadel connections didn’t end with her degrees, however. One of her nephews, Anthony Sands, is currently a rising senior in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

At the time of her passing, Thompson left behind three children, 11 brothers, three sisters, a large extended family, and her loving husband — Rev. Anthony Thompson — who wrote “Called to Forgive: The Charleston Church Shooting, a Victim’s Husband, and the Path to Healing and Peace” in 2019.

Thompson’s passion for education didn’t stop in school or Bible study — it was a part of who she was, and who she raised her children to be.

“My mother grew up in the Civil Rights era and always took time to educate me on what African Americans had to endure — as far as not being treated equally and not having the same opportunities,” continued Quarles. “I still have books that she bought me as a child to teach me about what our ancestors had to endure. She used every opportunity she could to make sure I knew, even though things weren’t perfect, my generation was afforded opportunities hers did not have and that there was more work to be done. If she was still alive, I’m sure she would be dedicating her time working with organizations to help evoke change for how African Americans are treated.”

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Future teachers from the Zucker Family School of Education are good to go https://today.citadel.edu/future-teachers-from-the-zucker-family-school-of-education-are-good-to-go/ Fri, 05 Jun 2020 14:24:18 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16674 The exterior of Capers Hall is seen at The Citadel in Charleston,The exterior of Capers Hall is seen at The Citadel in Charleston,Photo: Capers Hall, where the Zucker Family School of Education is housed Meet members of the Class of 2020 who will use their educations to teach others The Zucker Family School of]]> The exterior of Capers Hall is seen at The Citadel in Charleston,The exterior of Capers Hall is seen at The Citadel in Charleston,

Photo: Capers Hall, where the Zucker Family School of Education is housed

Meet members of the Class of 2020 who will use their educations to teach others

The Zucker Family School of Education cultivates undergraduate and graduate students into principled educational leaders capable of, and committed to, transforming schools into learning communities where all children and youth succeed. With a focus toward learner-centered education, graduates from The Citadel’s education programs are effective in educating a diverse learner population to high academic standards.

The Citadel’s Master of Education is one of the most popular graduate programs offered. In fact, the second most popular degree for The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2020 was a Master of Education.

Meet some of the new Zucker Family School of Education graduates who will contribute to the futures of students around the Lowcountry and beyond.

Nicole Bossak

Degree: Master of Education in Educational Leadership
Hometown: Beaufort, South Carolina
Destination: Continue work as a school counselor for Beaufort County School District, and planning to seek a doctoral degree and further her career as a future administrator.

“The Beaufort Lead II Cohort was personalized and tailored to fit our needs as students. We had the best teachers guide ups to completion of our degrees!”

Maelda Chalk

Degree: Master of Education in Educational Leadership
Hometown: Hilton Head Island, South Carolina
Destination: Continue work at Beaufort County School District, with the goal of becoming the district’s first female Hispanic principal.

“The best reason is the quality of education and the consistency of rigorous instruction and discipline. My Citadel professors were highly trained in their field of study and provided me the highest standards of instruction. They cared about me, and supported and challenged me so that I could tap into my strength and achieve academic success.”

Collin Martin

Degree: Master of Arts in Teaching in Secondary Education
Hometown: Mount Pleasant, South Carolina
Destination: Pursuing a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Carnegie Mellon University

“I’ll be conducting research on RNA/Protein Synthesis and drug therapies. The Citadel has trememdous professors in the Zucker School of Education (thank you Dr. Dague, Dr. Graham, and Mrs. Wiseman), and a unique campus experience.”

Mark Watson

Degree: Master of Education in Literacy Education
Hometown: Charleston, South Carolina
Destination: Continue teaching at Berkeley Middle School while considering more postgraduate education

“I endeavor to help students intrinsically love reading and become critical thinkers. I will accomplish this goal by improving my teaching methods and collaborating in our professional learning communities as much as possible, continuing to try out best practices. I hope to continue in education, wherever my destiny has me go to support the upcoming generations.”

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At 91, Citadel’s first woman graduate celebrates 50th commencement anniversary https://today.citadel.edu/at-91-citadels-first-woman-graduate-celebrates-50th-commencement-anniversary/ Fri, 29 May 2020 14:45:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=16580 Maxine Hudson speaking on phone and via zoom about being the first woman graduate at the citadel in 1970Maxine Hudson speaking on phone and via zoom about being the first woman graduate at the citadel in 1970The first woman to graduate from The Citadel walked the stage to accept her diploma for a master’s degree, 50 years ago, on May 29, 1970.]]> Maxine Hudson speaking on phone and via zoom about being the first woman graduate at the citadel in 1970Maxine Hudson speaking on phone and via zoom about being the first woman graduate at the citadel in 1970

Maxine Hudson among the first nine to graduate from The Citadel Graduate College in 1970

The first woman to graduate from The Citadel walked the stage to accept her diploma for a master’s degree, 50 years ago, on May 30, 1970.

At commencement they didn’t know what to do with this bunch of women. We were sort of like aliens.

Maxine Hudson, Citadel Graduate College Class of 1970, first woman to graduate from The Citadel

Maxine Hudson was with eight others who earned Master of Art in Teaching degrees in the first graduating class of what is now The Citadel Graduate College. Hudson was the “first” because she completed her course work in December 1969, and then participated with the others in the May commencement ceremony that included them and the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

Provided by The Citadel Archives

During the week of her 50th commencement anniversary, Hudson, now 91 years old, shared memories of her time on campus. She spoke with Tessa Updike, the director of The Citadel Archives, via Zoom and a mobile phone.

“Our president, Gen. Harris, was very warm. He was approachable and friendly. He really supported us,” Hudson said.

The Citadel President at the time, Gen. Hugh P. Harris, addressed the master’s degree candidates during commencement, awarding their diplomas just prior to the cadets’. The archive’s original copy of his speech reads:

“In September 1968, The Citadel started an accredited Master of Arts in Teaching Program. The program has been most successful in that we have more than 300 proceeding toward this degree. At this time, we have the first nine graduates…which will be conferred diplomas at this time.” 

Hudson, who taught history for years at North Charleston High School, first started taking undergraduate courses on The Citadel campus in the summers of the 1950s when cadets were not present. She says the University of South Carolina had an extension program for teachers at The Citadel. 

She met the man she would marry then, Dr. Herschel Hudson, a former cadet who volunteered to serve during World War II in the Marine Corps. He eventually earned his Ph.D. and returned to The Citadel as a professor.

Provided by The Citadel Archives

When the first evening master’s degree program started, The Citadel was an all-male college. It was during an era when women from outside, co-ed colleges, competed to be Miss Citadel for the all-male military college, back when the cadets’ yearbook had “centerfolds.”

Miss Citadel fold out in The South Carolina Corps of Cadets 1970 yearbook, The Spinx

Hudson was recruited by the college to attend the evening master’s program and was happy for women to be seen as scholars by the cadets who were on campus 24/7.

Maxine Hudson, first woman graduate of the Citadel speaking to the college's archivist via telephone and Zoom at 91 years old

“Everyone handled it with grace and dignity and in a manner that was acceptable. The way they handled it was beautiful. They did not make me feel like I was intruding or if I was breaking their tradition. Rather than making me feel like I was tearing something down, they made me feel like I was building it up. That certainty took a lot of acceptance. It made me feel proud.”

It was not until the 1970 commencement that women studying on campus became “news” with a small article in The News and Courier about The Citadel “going co-ed,” naming Hudson’s classmate, Suzanne Cross Butler, as the first woman to physically accept a diploma from The Citadel. It would not be until the 1990s when women would be admitted as undergraduate members of the Corps of Cadets.

Provided by The Citadel Archives

The list of the first graduating class of The Citadel Graduate college is as follows:

  • Suzanne Cross Butler
  • Jonnie Garren Harvey
  • Elizabeth Shriver Hoffman
  • Maxine Taylor Hudson
  • James Bernard Machen
  • Mary Ann Parsons
  • John Carlisle Smiley, Jr.
  • Mary Edna Stocks
  • Sara Owens Vale

Click on the photo below to view the original 1970 commencement program.

Provided by The Citadel Archives

Hudson’s full interview will be available on The Citadel Archives website in the future.

The Citadel would like to thank Indigo Hall, an assisted living community in Charleston, South Carolina, and Kim Bonner, the director of nursing, for facilitating the Zoom interview and phone call with Maxine Hudson.

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Too much screen time? Maybe not, depending on what your child is doing, says incoming Citadel dean of education https://today.citadel.edu/too-much-screen-time-maybe-not-depending-on-what-your-child-is-doing-says-incoming-citadel-dean-of-education/ Sun, 26 Apr 2020 16:43:42 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=15893 Dr. Evan Ortlieb, Dean of The Zucker Family School of Educaiton at The Citadel 2Dr. Evan Ortlieb, Dean of The Zucker Family School of Educaiton at The Citadel 2"A lot of the research kind of gets thrown out at this point," said Evan Ortlieb, Ph.D., incoming dean of education at The Citadel.]]> Dr. Evan Ortlieb, Dean of The Zucker Family School of Educaiton at The Citadel 2Dr. Evan Ortlieb, Dean of The Zucker Family School of Educaiton at The Citadel 2

Note: Evan Ortlieb, Ph.D., will soon serve as the new dean for The Citadel’s Zucker Family School of Education

As seen on WABC 7, by Lauren Glassberg

If your kid is exceeding the recommended daily allowance of screen time, hear this:

“A lot of the research kind of gets thrown out at this point,” said Evan Ortlieb, Ph.D., a professor of literacy at St. John’s University.

Dr. Ortlieb says right now, don’t tabulate all the online classroom and school-based screen time. Instead, be cognizant of the rest of the day.

“What do we do with our spare time, our free time, and to what extent do we choose to use that on the computer in online settings,” Ortlieb said.

So say there is a child watching a video for a while.

No sweat, Dr. Ortlieb suggests giving a child a task, project, or assignment that goes along with that video.

“It’s basically whetting their appetite for what is to come afterward,” Dr. Ortlieb said. “It sort of creates a cognitive point to connect with as the story unfolds.”

Speaking of stories, there are so many literacy and book apps for kids.

“They can dictate the book, click unknown words and definitions with populate, there are a lot of features to help with accommodations for all learners,” he said.

That’s all great, but he says nothing replaces a regular book. While nothing replaces hanging out with friends, he says video chats are okay.

“Active participation is doing things with your hands, mind, mouth, with dexterity, it can be having conversations with FaceTime, Google Hangouts,” Dr. Ortlieb said.

So does FaceTime with grandparents count as screen time?

“Talking to grandparents for teenagers and young adults, rich history, and traditional knowledge we never inquire about, and this is the perfect time to do that,” he said.

Board games, puzzles, scavenger hunts, science experiments, cooking, and talking are all great, screen-free options for kids and adults.

“There should really be a break on a regular basis throughout the day from the computers the online and the digital stimuli,” Dr. Ortlieb said. “And can we cut ourselves some slack. We’re incredibly uptight about many things right now and this is the last thing we should worry about. Instead, we should just think, how can we utilize it for various purposes.”

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Citadel Graduate College alumnae becomes first African American woman ordained in SC Wesleyan Church https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-graduate-college-alumnae-becomes-first-african-american-woman-ordained-in-sc-wesleyan-church/ Sat, 11 Apr 2020 20:58:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=15690 Karen Lewis Crawford was in the final stages of her training to become an ordained minister in the Wesleyan Church when she received some surprising news: she would be the]]>

Karen Lewis Crawford was in the final stages of her training to become an ordained minister in the Wesleyan Church when she received some surprising news: she would be the first African American woman ordained in the history of the South Carolina district of the Christian church.

Crawford graduated from The Citadel Graduate College in 2004 with the Master of Arts in Education program. But she would not find her way to begin the journey to become an ordained minister for a decade after that. Finally, in 2019, Crawford was ordained with her husband Joel and three children Mikayla, Grace and Garrison looking on.

Karen Crawford with her Certificate of Ordination

Crawford currently serves as an assistant pastor of Spiritual Formation at Providence Wesleyan Church, in Summerville, South Carolina. She is pursuing a Master of Divinity at Wesley Seminary at Indiana Wesleyan University in Marion, Indiana. 

In honor of first Easter as an ordained minister, Crawford took the time to share these thoughts with The Citadel family.

Why did you become a minister? What was the first thing that led you in that direction? 

My family is very important to me. They keep me grounded and very happy. I believe that my relationship with Jesus Christ is also important. It is through Christ’s example of sacrifice, servitude and love that we learn how to treat our family, friends, and community — it’s the upward, inward, outward effect of one’s relationship with Christ.

My mother passed away in July 2014, and there were several profound spiritual moments that occurred after her passing. One of those moments was that my desire for God’s Word increased tremendously. I would read the Bible for hours on end. It was like a faucet I couldn’t cut off. My husband quickly saw that I was changing, not just in my desire for the Word of God, but in how I was living. My husband told me one Sunday after church, that the Holy Spirit told him that I was being called into ministry. I had thoughts about taking ministry classes but the support of my husband pretty much solidified things for me. I became a minister because I want others to grow in their walk with our Lord and accept Christ into their lives. For instance, baptisms are an important part of what I do as a pastor, and to witness a person being immersed in the water is a beautiful moment. It’s a wonderful experience. It is moments like that that bring a smile to my face.

What are your reflections on being the first African American woman ordained in the S.C. district? 

It’s interesting because it did not dawn on me until during my ordination meeting with the District Board of Ministerial Development that I was told by the Assistant District Superintendent that I was the first African American woman to be ordained. I asked my husband after the meeting, “Did I hear him correctly?” My husband said, “Yes, you’re the first.” It’s an honor. I don’t see myself as a trailblazer or anything. I just want to go out and preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and see lives transformed. That is what I feel that God has called me to do. I want to make disciples for Christ. I know that women in ministry face challenges, but I feel that when God commands any of us to do something then we are to be obedient. Romans 2:11 says that ‘God does not show favoritism.’ Just as a man is called so can a woman be called. Dietrich Bonhoeffer stated, ‘When Christ calls a man, he bids him come and die.’ I believe that statement applies to women because there is a sacrificial nature to be a pastor, and I believe sacrifice is gender neutral. I am blessed to be a part of a denomination that honors the gifts of women regarding teaching, preaching, and being spiritual leaders. 

Karen Crawford with Rev. Dr. Wayne Schmidt, General Superintendent of the Wesleyan Church

Tell us about your ordination ceremony. 

It felt like I was marrying the church–it was a beautiful moment. I believe that when I was asked a series of questions that it became real to me. But it was the act of ordination that pretty much was the powerful moment. These were the words: “Karen, as we lay our hands upon you, we ask the Lord to give the unusual outpouring of the Holy Spirit needed for your service as an ordained minister in the Church. May God’s anointing enable you to be a faithful exponent of His Word, and an instrument for his holy sacraments, in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.” It was at that moment I realized in the words of John Wesley, “I am no longer my own, but thine.”

How are you providing ministry to your church members currently?

Well, I am the Spiritual Formation pastor for my church and during this time, we have had to be creative in our thinking–which is to continue making disciples. COVID-19 interrupted our small group classes so…we do Bible study classes via Zoom. Zoom has been an incredible medium for pastors during this time. It’s been our answer to social distancing. Every Wednesday at 7:00 p.m., myself and the other pastors of my church, simultaneously teach our Bible Study classes to the members of our church or anyone else who wishes to be a part of it. People are nervous, scared and full of uncertainty during this time and I desire for them to know that we are still there for them. As for church service, I am still engaged with my congregation, so we do Facebook Live where we are still able to be engaged. Recently, I hosted a Facebook watch party and invited our friends to join us in watching the worship service. It was incredible! God is continuously at work in the universe and He has given us the technology we need to continue the work of the gospel during this pandemic.

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