Citadel Graduate College – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 11 Mar 2021 17:38:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Citadel Graduate College – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Lu Parker, ’94: Citadel Graduate College alumna, journalist, former Miss USA, and kindness entrepreneur https://today.citadel.edu/lu-parker-94-citadel-graduate-college-alumna-journalist-former-miss-usa-and-kindness-entrepreneur/ Thu, 11 Mar 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22573 We strive to help all people better understand and embrace the power of kindness.]]>

“Never underestimate the power of a kind woman.” Lu Parker

Lu Parker doesn’t dawdle in the slow lane. She’s flying along numerous professional pathways, and while she’s navigating, she’s deliberate about conveying one key message: Be kind.

“The best is when someone sees my t-shirt or hoodie while I’m wearing it and stops me to say “I love your shirt!” or “What a great message!”  When that happens, it makes me realize that I am doing the right thing. It’s working,” Parker shared with The Citadel.

As a journalist with two decades of experience (including with WCSC-TV in Charleston, South Carolina) and multiple Emmy awards, Parker anchors four hours of news daily for KTLA in Los Angeles. Additionally, she is an inspirational speaker, an author, and the founder of Be Kind & Co. which recently launched a line of apparel.

Lu Parker in the studio at WCSC-TV, Live 5, in Charleston in the late 1990s.
Lu Parker in the studio at WCSC-TV, Live 5, in Charleston in the late 1990s.

Prior to her career in broadcasting, Parker was a ninth-grade English Literature teacher. In 1994, while she was a teacher, Parker captured both the Miss South Carolina USA, and Miss USA titles, going on to place fourth in the Miss Universe Pageant.

But, before all of that, Parker graduated from The Citadel Graduate College in 1993 with a Master of Arts in Education, after earning a BA in English Literature from the College of Charleston.

After seeing the launch of the Be Kind & Co. apparel line, The Citadel Graduate College reached out to Parker to ask her to share some reflections.

This is what she said.

An interview with Lu Parker, The Citadel Graduate College Class of 1994 and founder of Be Kind & Co.

What is your goal for Be Kind & Co.?

We strive to help all people better understand and embrace the power of kindness. My goal is to use Be Kind & Co. as a way to share content, experiences, and merchandise that inspires all of us to be a bit more kind each day. I truly believe that each kind act, even if small, helps to collectively heal the world.  

In 2021, we launched our BKC Apparel line and we are thrilled to be seeing so many people wearing our merchandise around the country, including in South Carolina. We like to say it’s “Merchandise with a Message.” We share small sayings like, “Be a Kind Human” – “Born Kind” – Be Kind Y’all – “Never Underestimate the Power of a Kind Woman.” 

 Why did you create Be Kind & Co.?

The original concept of Be Kind & Co. was created after I experienced an unfortunate situation where I was attempting to be kind to someone and it backfired on me. At the time, the experience made me seriously question kindness. I questioned my urge to help people and literally almost gave up on being kind ever again.  But eventually, I came to my senses and realized that kindness is a gift that I cherish. Be Kind & Co. was originally a blog but now it’s more of life-style media company that shares content, offers merchandise with messaging, and creates a space where people can share insights into the power of kindness.  

I am also in the early stages of writing a book about my experiences and how I handled it.  I am also looking forward to traveling again to speak around the country at conventions and venues on “How Kindness Creates Success.”

Lu Parker accepting her diploma for a Master of Arts in Education
from The Citadel Graduate College in 1993.

Why did you pursue a Masters of Education and why did you select The Citadel Graduate College?

I was already interested in English Literature and hoped to one day teach on a college level. My Mom suggested that I apply to The Citadel because I was living in Charleston at the time and she said the program had a great reputation. 

I have fond memories of attending the Citadel Graduate College.  My professors were helpful and the process was a smooth experience. I believe that anytime you set a goal in life, personally or professionally, you must complete each small task while staying focused on the future goal. Studying at The Citadel allowed me to further my education so I could eventually teach high school. I did teach high school at North Charleston High School after graduating from The Citadel. 

What do you miss most about Charleston?

Ahhhh, Charleston. The city has my heart in so many ways. I spent over two decades there growing up, going to college and graduate school. I also taught in the city, and eventually returned to work in tv news there at WCSC. I often say I have a memory on every corner of the city.  I love the beaches, the Southern accents, the people and the style. I even miss the heat, humidity and rain.   

What is your greatest achievement to date?

To answer your question about my greatest achievement to date, I would say I have been very fortunate in my life and had the opportunity to experience a lot of wonderful moments including attending college, winning Miss USA, winning Emmys, traveling the world, working in TV news, meeting celebrities, going to Hollywood events, and even writing a book….But I still don’t consider those accomplishments. They were all wonderful experiences. To answer you question about my greatest achievement to date, I would say it’s the fact that I have never given up on the belief that kindness can create huge change. Kindness can save a life.  Kindness can shift the world. Kindness is strength. It’s a daily practice that I hope I can continue to share through my writings, my company and my voice. 

What would you say to young women considering various careers about innovating their own pathways or even multiple careers?

I am a huge believer that life is better when you love what you do. I always suggest to young women and men to find a career or a path to that career that lights a fire inside of you. I love my job as a tv news anchor because I am able to combine my love of writing, reading, and interacting with people.  It’s the same with my company Be Kind & Co. Creating a company takes a lot of behind the scenes work. It’s challenging and can be overwhelming, but when you feel good about what you are doing, then it’s worth it. I also totally believe that it’s never too late to change your profession or start a company, non-profit or passion project. It may require you to work after your “real” job, but again, when the passion is there, it won’t always feel like work. It’s a joy.  

As we celebrate Women’s History Month, I want to add that I 100% believe that when women support each other’s success, we all succeed.  There is so much success available out in the world, let’s help each other along the path and celebrate each other!  That’s true kindness!

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Closing the cyber workforce gap: the first Citadel Dept. of Defense Cyber Institute team at work https://today.citadel.edu/closing-the-cyber-workforce-gap-the-first-citadel-dept-of-defense-cyber-institute-team-at-work/ Wed, 10 Mar 2021 15:52:09 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22554 First cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber InstituteFirst cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute"I believe that through this program and the leaders who are sharing their knowledge with us, I will be more than equipped for the cybersecurity world when I graduate.]]> First cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber InstituteFirst cohort of students for The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute

The first group of cadets and students selected to study under the umbrella of The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute (CDCI) is hard at work, with the goal of being immediately ready to join America’s cybersecurity workforce after graduation. The cluster of future cyber warriors includes one active duty Marine student, one veteran student, and 19 cadets.

The CDCI mission is to ensure the delivery of principled leaders who are experts in cybersecurity and have the skillset and experience required to begin working for the U.S. Department of Defense as soon as they earn their degrees. The program will help expand America’s cyber capability by addressing the critical national security need for a larger cybersecurity workforce.

All of the CDCI participants are pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Cyber Operations, or a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, with a minor in Cybersecurity, or, a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with a minor in Data Science.

Among the students is Cadet Trey Stevens, a junior with a triple major in Computer Science, Cyber Operations and Intelligence and Security Studies. “I feel very fortunate that I’ve been selected to not only advance my own cyber education, but to be better prepared for the agency that I work with post-graduation so that I may perform my job as best as I can,” Stevens said. “This is a unique opportunity where professionals and experts are pouring in their knowledge in order to pave the path for future cybersecurity professionals. I’m planning on maximizing my engagement with this amazing program.”

The Citadel Department of Defense Cyber Institute (CDCI) cadets and students being led by Lt. Col Linda Riedel, SCARNG, and Dr. Shankar Banik, professor of computer science and cyber operations, and director of CDCI and numerous other programs at The Citadel.

The Citadel and the nation’s other five Senior Military Colleges (SMC) have each received approximately $1.5 million of federal money to establish a cybersecurity institute as pilot programs on their campus. The funds are part of a $10 million Department of Defense (DOD) appropriation to the National Security Agency (NSA) for these institutes, included in the 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act.

“It is an honor to be selected for such a program,” said Cadet Jalen Singleton, a junior Computer Science major with a minor in Cybersecurity. “I am included in an extremely talented cohort that has been given access to top cybersecurity knowledge and tools. I believe that through this program and the leaders who are sharing their knowledge with us, I will be more than equipped for the cybersecurity world when I graduate.”

The Department of Defense outlined three priorities for the SMC institutes: sustain a cyber-ready workforce, enhance the nation’s cyber talent and establish a top talent management program. The Citadel is helping achieve these goals.

“Being a part of CDCI is already an amazing experience,” said Cadet Hannah Collee. She is a sophomore double-majoring in Computer Science and Cyber Operations. “There is hands-on learning and countless opportunities for growth. This program helps students get in contact with numerous businesses and internships too. I can’t wait to continue with our team.” 

The 21 cadets and students selected to participate in the college’s first CDCI cohort include:

All, Jackson A.
Collee, Hannah E.
Deans, Conor W.
Freeman, Lydia S.
Hanulcik, Avery
Jensen, William M.
Johnson, Jared M.
Lilling, Eric R.
Lindenmeyer, Andrew R.
Ling, Nathanael C.
Race, Benjamin R
Reynolds, Aaron G.
Roser, Robert G.
Ruiz, Ashley
Singleton, Jalen A.
Skibicki, Ryan
Smiles, Shiloh O.
Stevens, Trey J.
Toomer, Timothy C.
Wells, Noah M.
Whitlock, Benjamin T.

Prospective cadets and students wanting more information should email dhoward2@citadel.edu or call (843) 953-1089.

The Citadel is a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education, as named by the United States Department of National Security Agency and Homeland Security.

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Citadel Graduate College Masters in Intelligence and Security #10 in U.S. by Best Value Schools https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-graduate-college-masters-in-intelligence-and-security-10-in-u-s-by-best-value-schools/ Tue, 09 Mar 2021 17:48:08 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22490 Photo above: Citadel Graduate College students meeting with the Director of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats, on campus in 2018 As seen on BestValueSchools.org It is easy for individuals that are]]>

Photo above: Citadel Graduate College students meeting with the Director of National Intelligence, Daniel Coats, on campus in 2018

As seen on BestValueSchools.org

It is easy for individuals that are not familiar with the complex nature of security professions to assume that a security education is part of criminal justice. The truth is that there are many types of security specialists. The growing need for security professionals leads to the need for those interested in security to receive a a high-quality education, such as a masters in security degree. 

Badge for Best-Masters-in-Security

What Can I Do with a Master’s in Security Degree? 

There are a variety of master’s in security programs available to individuals that have an interest in providing security at national and international levels. Pursuing a masters in security in the field that a person wants to enter requires selecting the right program. This helps to determine what a person can do with a master’s degree in security.

Consider a master’s degree in security studies if you want a career that focuses on security leadership, crisis management, or security analysis. Individuals that want a career in cybersecurity or homeland security often find ideal master’s in security programs that fulfill the goals or requirements for working in these fields. Do you want to focus on the security of populations or on security efforts after a disaster? Earning a master’s in security that focuses on human security is an option that leads to a rewarding career.  

The pay and job growth in security is likely a reason that some people choose to earn a master’s degree in security. The 2019 median pay was $99,730 for information security analysts, with an anticipated job growth of 31 percent through 2029. The National Security Agency (NSA) lists the entry level pay for a mid-level investigator at more than $72,000, and the pay for an NSA Forensic Analyst starting at $93,822 a year. 

Some schools allow students to complete program requirements online to accommodate the busy schedules of working professionals. Other programs require on-campus coursework and other face-to-face meetings. Exploring the best master’s in security programs allows for determining the best school and program that meets your goals and interests.

About The Citadel Master of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies: an online program offering real-world skills

DNI Coats speaking during the 2018 Intelligence and Cyber Security Conference at The Citadel
Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats, speaking during the 2018 Intelligence and Cyber Security Conference at The Citadel

The Master of Arts (MA) degree program in Intelligence and Security Studies (ISS) prepares students to enhance national security through intelligence and homeland security leadership. Best practices for intelligence collection and analysis and national security combined with current theory, research, and experience give students the background necessary to cultivate critical thinking, concise writing, and effective briefing. By introducing applicable management principles and policy analysis, the program fosters the leadership skills to successfully address security and intelligence challenges facing the United States.

Unlike traditional graduate programs that take a theoretical and conceptual track in preparing students for further academic research, The Citadel’s ISS program combines theory and practice to provide the real-world skills necessary to enter and advance in the public and private intelligence arenas.

This program is entirely online to provide maximum flexibility for students, and at the same time allow the ISS program to attract instruction from intelligence professionals located around the world. Our program is taught by internationally recognized experts, with real-world experience at agencies like the FBI, CIA, DHS and at the White House.

Citadel.edu

Learn more and find information about how to apply to The Citadel Graduate College here.

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Citadel Graduate College’s Lt. Col. Brandon Pitcher, leading infantry battalion https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-graduate-colleges-lt-col-brandon-pitcher-leading-infantry-battalion/ Fri, 29 Jan 2021 14:48:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21572 The 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion, SC National Guard, honored U.S. Army Lt. Col. Joseph B. Bulwinkle, 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion outgoing commander, and welcomed U.S. Army Lt. Col. Brandon T. Pitcher, during the 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion change of command. U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kimberly D. Calkins, SC National GuardThe 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion, SC National Guard, honored U.S. Army Lt. Col. Joseph B. Bulwinkle, 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion outgoing commander, and welcomed U.S. Army Lt. Col. Brandon T. Pitcher, during the 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion change of command. U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kimberly D. Calkins, SC National GuardA College Park Middle teacher has climbed the ranks to now lead an infantry battalion in the National Guard in the upstate.]]> The 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion, SC National Guard, honored U.S. Army Lt. Col. Joseph B. Bulwinkle, 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion outgoing commander, and welcomed U.S. Army Lt. Col. Brandon T. Pitcher, during the 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion change of command. U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kimberly D. Calkins, SC National GuardThe 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion, SC National Guard, honored U.S. Army Lt. Col. Joseph B. Bulwinkle, 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion outgoing commander, and welcomed U.S. Army Lt. Col. Brandon T. Pitcher, during the 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion change of command. U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kimberly D. Calkins, SC National Guard

Photo above: The 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion, SC National Guard, honored U.S. Army Lt. Col. Joseph B. Bulwinkle, 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion outgoing commander, and welcomed U.S. Army Lt. Col. Brandon T. Pitcher, during the 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion change of command. U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kimberly D. Calkins, SC National Guard.

As seen in The Post and Courier

Note: Pitcher earned a Master’s degree in Educational Leadership from The Citadel Graduate College

A College Park Middle teacher has climbed the ranks to now lead an infantry battalion in the National Guard in the upstate.

On Jan. 9, the 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion, South Carolina National Guard, honored U.S. Army Lt. Col. Joseph B. Bulwinkle, 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion outgoing commander.

The battalion also welcomed U.S. Army Lt. Col. Brandon T. Pitcher, during the 4-118th Combined Arms Battalion change of command held at McCrady Training Center in Eastover.

Bulwinkle relinquished his command to Pitcher after nearly five-year post as commander.

Pitcher is a seventh and eighth-grade science teacher at College Park Middle. This is his first year at the school. He has served in the National Guard for 25 years.

Pitcher said this milestone achievement is “huge” and something he has been working toward during his career with the National Guard.

“This is a big deal for me,” he said, adding, “To be chosen is quite an honor.”

The Change of Command went into effect this month.

According to his bio, Pitcher is a graduate of the College of Charleston with a Bachelor of Science in Biology and holds a Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership from the Citadel College of Graduate Studies. Pitcher has served as a teacher and school administrator for more than 29 years in the Berkeley County School District and Dorchester School District Two; he retired as Oakbrook Middle’s principal last year and desired to head back to the classroom, and came to College Park Middle.

Pitcher attended the Palmetto Military Academy Officer Candidate School, Class 49 and commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in 1998. He is a graduate of the U.S. Army Infantry Officer Basic Course, the Infantry Captains Career Course, the Combined Arms Exercise course, the Human Resources Management Qualification Course, and is a graduate of the Command and General Staff College.

Pitcher’s previous military assignments include: Deputy Commander, 218th Regiment (Leadership); Executive Officer, 218th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade (MEB); S1, 218th MEB; S3, 1-118th Infantry Battalion; S1, S3 Air, 4-118th Infantry Battalion; Commander, Company A, 1-118th Infantry (Deployed); Executive Officer Detachment 1, HHC, 1-118th Infantry; Executive Officer, Company A, 1-118th Infantry; and Platoon Leader, Company B, 1-118th Infantry.

Pitcher’s military awards include: the Bronze Star Medal, Army Commendation Medal with three oak leaf clusters, Army Achievement Medal, Army Reserve Components Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, Armed Forces Reserve Medal with M device, NATO Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon, Army Reserve Components Overseas Training Ribbon, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Combat Infantry Badge, and Expert Infantry Badge.

He is a member of the National Guard Association of South Carolina, the National Guard Association of the United States, the National Infantry Association, Sumter Guards, Washington Light Infantry, and the Sigma Chi Fraternity.

Pitcher lives in Summerville with his wife, Susan, and their daughters, Brettan, and Graycen, and son, Colton.

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The Citadel unveils Bastin Hall, a new way to do business https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-unveils-bastin-hall-a-new-way-to-do-business/ https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-unveils-bastin-hall-a-new-way-to-do-business/#comments Wed, 27 Jan 2021 14:30:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21640 Exterior of Citadel's Bastin HallExterior of Citadel's Bastin HallBastin Hall, with its fluid architectural design, high-tech classrooms and fresh approach to conveying the college’s iconic architecture is a learning complex that now reflects the exemplary quality of the business education The Citadel provides.]]> Exterior of Citadel's Bastin HallExterior of Citadel's Bastin Hall

Bastin Hall is open for business.

That statement is even truer than it sounds. Bastin Hall, The Citadel’s first academic building to be constructed in three decades – is the gleaming new home for the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business (BSB).

With the finishing touches being put in place as the spring 2021 semester gets underway, Bastin Hall now houses some of the college’s most popular programs. Close to 600 cadets are majoring in business and approximately 375 Citadel Graduate College students are pursuing a Master of Business Administration or completing undergraduate degrees with the BSB.

Scenes from the first day of classes in Bastin Hall, the first new academic building on campus in three decades, at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, January 25, 2021.

“Bastin Hall, with its fluid architectural design, collaborative spaces, high-tech classrooms and fresh approach to conveying the college’s iconic architecture is a learning complex that now reflects the exemplary quality of the business education The Citadel provides,” said The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.). “Bastin Hall, thanks to the remarkable generosity of Rick and Mary Lee Bastin, will for generations serve the needs of future entrepreneurs and business leaders who specifically seek out The Citadel as the place to attain a business education.”

Located on Hagood Avenue and linking the main campus to the football stadium, Bastin Hall now stands as one of the college’s most welcoming features. The BSB faculty moved into Bastin Hall in January from Bond Hall, where The Citadel’s business school was located for many years.

Bastin Hall, at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, January 25, 2021

The building blocks of Bastin Hall

The state-of-the-art facility was made possible because of a more than $6 million gift provided by Rick Bastin, The Citadel Class of 1965, and his wife Mary Lee, through The Citadel Foundation (TCF). The Bastins have long supported The Citadel, previously supplying funds to create the Bastin Financial Lab in the BSB’s old location. Re-named The Mary Lee and Rick Bastin, ’65, Financial Trading Lab, the facility is now a focal point of the new building.

Mary Lee and Rick Bastin addressing guests at the groundbreaking for Bastin
Mary Lee and Rick Bastin addressing guests at the groundbreaking for Bastin Hall in 2017

“After several years in the works, it is exciting to see Bastin Hall become a reality this semester as the new home of the Baker School of Business,” said Rick Bastin, ’65, in a statement sent from his home in Florida. “State-of-the-art spaces such as the Financial Trading Lab and the Entrepreneur Lab will help the college recruit and retain a faculty of leading scholars and business professionals. It is my hope that future generations of Citadel cadets, evening undergraduates, and MBA students will benefit from this innovative space as they learn to become principled business leaders who achieve success in their field and give back to their communities.”

In addition to the Bastins, more than 50 other individuals, families, businesses and Citadel classes provided the substantial donations needed to fully realize the vision for the building through TCF. Plaques located throughout Bastin Hall will recognize the areas funded by their individual gifts, such as the Darby Family Lobby, in recognition of the Georgia and John Darby Family, ’85; the Jimmy Kerr, ’65, and Bunny Kerr Family Rooftop Terrace; and the Class of 1977 Great Lawn.

Scenes from the first day of classes in Bastin Hall, at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, January 25, 2021.

Special features

Bastin Hall is approximately 44,000-square-feet. In addition to top-of-the-line technology-equipped classrooms, gathering spaces, breakout rooms, and academic offices, some of the building’s other notable features include the following:

  • Advising Center
  • Financial Services Center
  • Entrepreneurship-Innovation Lab
  • Professional Selling Lab
  • Large commons area
  • Balcony commons area
Cadet Taurus Brown, a senior majoring in Accounting, and the head Drillmaster for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, attending class for the first time in Bastin Hall, January 25, 2021.

“It’s amazing how much a new building can affect the feel of an entire academic program,” said Cadet Taurus Brown, an Accounting major, who attends The Citadel on a U.S. Air Force contract and is the head Drillmaster for the Corps. “We are all energized by being in Bastin Hall for our classes and labs, and to socialize and meet with like-minded students – which, despite the pandemic, we are able to do there. The new building’s large spaces enable us to get together safely, with social distancing to collaborate on class projects.”

Additionally, the building features a Student Success Suite with significant resources for all students including those pursing degrees through The Citadel Graduate College.

Dr. Michael Weeks, dean of the Baker School of Business, walks Bastin Hall checking on final touches being put into place on Monday, January 25, 2021.

“We are excited about the possibilities in this new building,” said Michael R. Weeks, Ph.D., USAF (Ret.), dean of the BSB. “In addition to a state-of-the-art finance lab, we also have a remarkable sales training lab in the building for our new Marketing and Business Development majors. Moreover, we are confident that the collaborative spaces in this building will transform the educational experience for our students.”

Liollio Architecture partnered with The Citadel to design and construct Bastin Hall. THS Constructors served as the general contractor for the project. Through a coincidence benefitting this bold new enterprise, the company connects The Citadel’s long-standing engineering and business legacies – the THS chairman and founder, Howard Suitt, graduated from The Citadel with a Civil Engineering degree in 1948, and company’s the senior vice president, Tom Suitt, earned a Business Administration degree from The Citadel in 1974.

About the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

The Tommy & Victoria Baker School of Business develops innovative leaders of principle to serve a global community. The school is accredited by AACSB International and is a recognized leader in business education. 

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Citadel Class of 2021 Commencement information and speakers https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-class-of-2021-commencement-information-and-speakers/ Tue, 19 Jan 2021 21:17:38 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21513 South Carolina Corps of Cadets Graduation, Corps, CadetsSouth Carolina Corps of Cadets Graduation, Corps, CadetsThe college is laying the groundwork for in-person Commencement ceremonies for the Class of 2021 graduates.]]> South Carolina Corps of Cadets Graduation, Corps, CadetsSouth Carolina Corps of Cadets Graduation, Corps, Cadets

Photo above: The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2019 Commencement

Update on Feb. 15, 2021

Corps of Cadets and Veteran/Active Duty Students ceremonies:

  • Saturday, May 8 at 9 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.
  • Cadets will be assigned to a ceremony based on their company
  • Veteran students will attend the 9 a.m. ceremony with cadets

Citadel Graduate College ceremonies:

  • Sunday, May 9 at 9 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.
  • Graduates will be assigned to a ceremony according to their degree

Original article below

This May, approximately 1,000 cadets and Citadel Graduate College students will graduate from The Citadel. The college is laying the groundwork for in-person Commencement ceremonies for both groups. Additionally, the speakers for the ceremonies are prepared to address cadets, students and their guests in person. Each graduate will be provided with electronic tickets for a limited number of guests, as the college anticipates the need for continued social distancing.

“We surveyed last year’s graduates to ask what the two most important factors of Commencement were to them. Overwhelmingly the answers were to graduate alongside their classmates and to have their parents/family present,” said The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters. “This year, with more time to plan than we had last spring, we are thrilled to be able to make that happen.”

Current plans call for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets (SCCC) Class of 2021 to be divided into two groups for two separate, on-campus ceremonies that will be held on Saturday, May 8 in McAlister Field House.

The Citadel Graduate College students will also be divided into two segments for two ceremonies in McAlister Field House. Those events will take place on Sunday, May 9.

Only clear bags will be allowed inside the stadium; metal detection and scanning walk-through entrances will be in place.

The ceremonies will all be livestreamed for extended family members, as well as those unable to attend in person due to pandemic-related conditions or an inability to travel.

“We expect that about 60 days before graduation weekend we can provide finalized details based on the evolution of the pandemic. That is when we’ll know if other commencement-related activities, such as the Long Gray Line parade and awards ceremonies, can be held.” said Kevin Bower, Ph.D., associate provost for Academic Operations and Civil Engineering professor.

South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2021 commencement speaker

The Citadel Commandant of Cadets, Captain Eugene “Geno” Paluso, USN (Ret.), ’89, will address the SCCC Class of 2021. Paluso will retire from the position of commandant on June 30, 2021.

Paluso was born and raised in Washington, Pennsylvania. He attended college at The Citadel where he earned a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics in 1989. He began his military career in the Navy after being commissioned an ensign upon graduation and reported for duty as a student at Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) training in Coronado, California where he graduated with Class 164 in 1990. He went on to serve as a U.S. Navy SEAL officer for more than 25 years. He retired from the Navy in July 2014, joining his alma mater as Commandant of Cadets.

During his career, Paluso held leadership roles commanding special operations forces in the Balkans, Africa, Iraq and Afghanistan. He has led men and women in combat at all levels. Paluso has a Master’s of Military Science from the U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College as well as a Master’s of Science in National Security Strategy Resourcing from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. His service awards include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal (2), Joint Commendation Medal (2), Navy Commendation Medal (5), Joint Achievement Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, as well as numerous other service awards and commendations.

The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2021 Commencement Speaker

Norman Seabrooks, The Citadel Class of 1973, will address The Citadel Graduate College’s graduates. Seabrooks returned to campus to speak to cadets in 2010 about how his Citadel experience shaped and motivated him to succeed in his career; now he will return once again to speak about The Citadel and his career experiences.

Seabrooks was the first African American to play football for the Bulldogs. He entered The Citadel at a tumultuous time in the nation’s history. The Vietnam War raged on in Southeast Asia while anti-war protests caused unrest at home, and the Civil Rights movement experienced some of its darkest moments with the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Throughout the South, the civil rights movement was marked by violence, unrest and the struggle for equal rights. At The Citadel, African American students also struggled at what was then an all-male and predominantly white military college in the South.

The first African American cadet, Charles Foster, graduated in 1970, — one year before Seabrooks enrolled. Amid the challenges of the times, Seabrooks distinguished himself on the gridiron. A three-year starter on the football team he earned first-team All-Southern Conference recognition in 1972 and he served as team co-captain while playing for coach Red Parker. He was inducted into The Citadel Athletics Hall of Fame in 1994. A Dean’s List history major who obtained the rank of cadet first lieutenant, Seabrooks graduated in 1973 and went on to a successful career in the health insurance industry with Aetna Inc., where he was Pacific Northwest Market President for the company. He retired as one of the top 100 employees at the Fortune 500 company with 35,000 employees.

Seabrooks grew up in Pahokee, Florida. He lives in Seattle. 

Personal graduation page for each member of The Class of 2021

A popular feature the college provided for graduates in 2020 will also be provided to the Class of 2021.

Just before graduation weekend, every graduate can log on to a commencement website to view their own graduation page, created just for them. The graduates can share their pages easily on social media platforms. Some of the features will include a photo, video and messaging center for loved ones to share their congratulations, plus a recording of the ceremony to watch at will. Details on how to upload videos and greetings will be shared at a future date.

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Citadel student finds rare plant for the first time in Charleston County https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-student-finds-rare-plant-for-the-first-time-in-charleston-county/ Mon, 04 Jan 2021 18:49:43 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21223 Carolina Birds-in-a-nest, rare flower population discovered by Citadel Graduate College biology studentCarolina Birds-in-a-nest, rare flower population discovered by Citadel Graduate College biology studentCitadel Graduate College Biology researcher Celie Dailey said in trips to the Black River site, she had to push through thickets of grass taller than she was.]]> Carolina Birds-in-a-nest, rare flower population discovered by Citadel Graduate College biology studentCarolina Birds-in-a-nest, rare flower population discovered by Citadel Graduate College biology student

As seen in The Post & Courier
By Chloe Johnson

McCLELLANVILLE — A Citadel student recently discovered new populations of Carolina birds-in-a-nest, a relative of the mint plant with a showy pink flower that had never before been recorded in Charleston County. 

The plant, which grows a few feet off the ground and can be hard to spot when it’s not in bloom, prefers a wet, sunny environment.

Celie Dailey, who is pursing a master’s degree in biology, stumbled on several thickets of the plant in bloom this summer at a conservation site on the Black River in southern Georgetown County. 

The rare wildflower lives in a limited range in the coastal plains from Georgia to North Carolina. The federal government considers it an “at-risk” plant, and will decide whether it should be listed as threatened or endangered in 2023. Dailey reported the sighting to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 

“They were really excited to find it,” Dailey said. “It turned out, it was kind of a monster population.”

But shortly after, Dailey spotted this rare plant again in an unexpected place — a roadside ditch in McClellanville. It was the first recorded population ever found in Charleston County. 

Celie and Macbridea
Celie Dailey in 2019 with a patch of Carolina birds-in-a-nest, or Macbridea caroliniana, which she has found in several new spots around Charleston and Georgetown County. April Punsalan/Provided

Joel Gramling, a Citadel professor and Dailey’s adviser, said the discoveries are important in part because the plant, with the Latin name Macbridea caroliniana, is hard to keep track of. A 2016 survey couldn’t find about 45 percent of the Macbridea population at previously discovered locations in South Carolina, Gramling said.

“We see this trend where we aren’t able to find these populations, and now, all of a sudden, here’s (Dailey) in several different counties, finding new populations,” he said.

It’s possible that the plant has been hard to detect because it blends in with other flora when it’s not blooming. If previously sunny areas become shaded by new trees or shrubs, it may also recede into simple green stems.

Thriving populations are found in “disturbed” areas, which may have been cleared of larger plants by natural causes, such as a forest fire, or man-made ones, such mowing in a drainage ditch. 

One of its main habitats — the edges of a swamp or inside a bog — can also be hard to access when the telltale blooms are out. Dailey said that in trips to the Black River site, she had to push through thickets of grass taller than she was, and was showered with ticks in the process. 

“Nobody wants to be in a swamp in July,” Dailey said. “It’s just nasty.”

But she said that the plant, though unassuming, is not just rare, it’s special to the state. South Carolina has the biggest population of the plant among the three states in which it’s been found. 

It’s just one of several overlooked plants that make up the state’s biodiversity, she said. 

“I just love these wild places because they are just so diverse,” Dailey said. “Roadside places where you have so-called ‘weedy’ plants growing wild, people just want to cut these areas down … those types of areas are so cool to me, to see the abundance of life there.”

Residents who spot Carolina birds-in-a-nest can report it to the Fish and Wildlife Service office in Charleston at (843) 727-4707.

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Citadel Intelligence and Security Studies veteran student awarded Rangel Graduate Fellowship for foreign service https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-intelligence-and-security-studies-veteran-student-awarded-rangel-graduate-fellowship-for-foreign-service/ Thu, 17 Dec 2020 15:20:22 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20594 Ashley Towers served America for eight years in the Army National Guard’s military police force. Now she will serve the nation again, this time in foreign service through the U.S.]]>

Ashley Towers served America for eight years in the Army National Guard’s military police force. Now she will serve the nation again, this time in foreign service through the U.S. Department of State.

Towers is among a group of 45 individuals recently awarded a Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Graduate Fellowship through a highly competitive, nationwide process. The program prepares “outstanding young people for careers in the Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State in which they can help formulate, represent and implement U.S. foreign policy,” according to the Rangel website.

“As a veteran student and campus leader, Ashley Towers exemplifies the very best in Citadel academics and leadership and is truly deserving of a prestigious Rangel Graduate Fellowship,” said Larry Valero, Ph.D. head of the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies for The Citadel.

Ashley Towers, seen far right, photographed with some of the members of The Citadel Veteran Student Veteran Association in front of the Howitzer cannons on Summerall Field at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Thursday, November 5, 2020.

Towers currently serves as president for the The Citadel’s Student Veteran Association.

Towers and her class of Fellows will be supported through through two years of graduate study at universities of distinction, internships, mentoring, and professional development activities. The program awards the fellowships annually.

“When I first began looking at the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Graduate Fellowship, I was immediately drawn to the opportunity of such amazing funding for graduate school, and the excitement of a career with the U.S. Foreign Service that involves travel all over the world and learning new languages,” Towers said. “But when I dug deeper into what being a Foreign Service Officer entails, I realized that it would mean much more to me – it would mean serving a greater purpose in another, very different capacity than my time spent in the military, and finding camaraderie in sharing a very important mission. To represent and promote U.S. interests and policy abroad is a great responsibility, and I am honored and grateful for the opportunity.”

The Fellowship is administered by Howard University and provides each recipient with $42,000 annually for a two year period for tuition, room, board, books and mandatory fees for completion of two-year master’s degrees.

Additionally, Towers will have a personally assigned foreign service officer mentor. She will also participate in two summer internships including working on international issues for members of Congress in Washington, D.C. and working in a U.S. Embassy or Consulate assisted with up to $20,000 for internship related expenses.

Fellows who successfully complete the Rangel Program and Foreign Service entry requirements and all security screenings will receive appointments in the State Department Foreign Service. Each Rangel Fellow who obtains a master’s degree is committed to a minimum of five years of service. 

About The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Security Studies

Intelligence and Securities Studies is one of the most popular and fastest growing academic areas of interest at The Citadel. The Citadel has trained provided highly skilled intelligence and security military officers and civilian leaders for more than 100 years.

The Citadel offers Bachelor of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies, a non-cadet degree completion program, and a minor. Additionally, The Citadel Graduate College offers a Master of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies or a Graduate Certificate in Intelligence Analysis.

In the fall of 2020 there were approximately 375 undergraduate majors, 20 minors, and 85 graduate students.

For more information on the programs, please email intell@citadel.edu.

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Growing Acceptance of Mental Health Issues Generates Higher Demand in Clinical Counseling https://today.citadel.edu/growing-acceptance-of-mental-health-issues-generates-higher-demand-in-clinical-counseling/ Sat, 05 Dec 2020 17:57:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21287 Mental Health and Clinical CounselingMental Health and Clinical CounselingWith more acceptance of and interest in mental health, it’s no surprise that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 22% increase in the mental health workforce between now and 2030. Earn your Master of Arts in Clinical Counseling from The Citadel.]]> Mental Health and Clinical CounselingMental Health and Clinical Counseling

The importance of taking care of and talking about your mental health has stepped out of its once-taboo shadow and into the public eye. It’s evident with campaigns such as Cigna’s celebrity-studded initiative comprising Queen Latifah, Nick Jonas and Ted Danson, who address recognizing your mental health; social movements like IDONTMIND that inspire people to openly speak about mental health issues, and the multitude of e-counseling apps that have been created, for example Talkspace and BetterHelp.

With more acceptance of and interest in mental health, it’s no surprise that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 22% increase in the mental health workforce between now and 2030. This number doesn’t even include the demand for college counseling centers, hospitals and social service agencies that are all in need.  Growing demand presents an opportunity and job security for those who are interested in a clinical counseling career.

To best serve our community, we need individuals that have training based on evidence-based psychological principles that emphasize an approach to understanding client problems and developing intervention strategies that are successful.  

One such program that can deliver the education for those interested is to obtain a Master of Arts in Psychology: Clinical Counseling degree. The Citadel offers a curriculum that reflects current knowledge and perspectives concerning clinical mental health counseling and human development needs of a diverse society.              

Students looking to continue their path should choose a program that has a strong reputation in the community. Since 2016, 79% of graduates have obtained employment in the field before graduation and another 17% obtained employment within 3 months of graduation.

Also notable is that graduates of this program achieve substantially above average passing rates on required licensure exams. Since 2015, Citadel graduates have reported a first-time passage rate of 100% compared to an overall 72% passage rate on the National Counselor Examination (NCE) and 53% passage rate on the National Clinical Mental Health Counselor Examination (NCMHCE) in 2016 for all taking the exam in South Carolina.

The curriculum has been developed according to guidelines set forth by the Council of Applied Masters Programs in Psychology (CAMPP) and the program is accredited by the Masters in Psychology and Counseling Accreditation Council (MPCAC).

What’s even more convenient? Students may complete the program on a part-time or full-time basis. Advance your career on your own time; but you must act soon. The application deadline is March 1 for admission during the Summer or Fall terms.


To learn more about The Citadel’s Master of Arts in Psychology: Clinical Counseling program or to apply, click here.


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The Citadel ranks as best online college in the state https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-ranks-as-best-online-college-in-the-state/ Tue, 01 Sep 2020 14:32:12 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=18267 The Citadel is ranked number one for online colleges in South Carolina, coming in just ahead of Clemson University and the University of South Carolina]]>

Note: The Citadel is ranked #1 for online colleges in South Carolina, coming in just ahead of Clemson University and the University of South Carolina. To see the colleges’ scores, click here.

As seen on College Consensus

Online degrees in South Carolina provide an accessible education for residents at multiple levels of education at an affordable cost. From online technical colleges in South Carolina to advanced degrees, these distance learning programs provide a variety of careers to choose from. While anyone seeking higher education in the state can benefit from South Carolina online colleges, working adults, nontraditional students, and rural residents are a perfect fit for one of these programs. 

Many online programs are tailored to meet the schedules of working adults, understanding that traditional Monday-Friday class times just aren’t a fit with most full-time employment. Non-traditional students such as those pursuing a career change, or parents with young children at home can also benefit from these flexible schedules. Finally, rural residents are able to stay near friends and family while studying online. With few physical colleges in most small-town areas, online schools offer quality education without needing to move.

Ranking the Best Online Colleges in South Carolina

How does College Consensus decide the best online colleges in South Carolina? It starts with the Consensus Score, which combines reputable rankings and legitimate student reviews into a single score. We then research Consensus-ranked institutions to find those offering at least 3 online undergraduate programs. Only accredited institutions are considered. Schools are ranked below by their Consensus Score.

If you’re interested in traditional campus-based schools, check out our ranking of the Best Colleges in South Carolina.  You can also find out more about college financial aid with our list of the Top South Carolina Scholarships.

What Kinds of Degrees are Available Online?

Online degrees in South Carolina come in a wide variety from certificates to Associate’s and including South Carolina online Masters programs. The specific type of degree depends on the college offerings as well as the choice of study. Certificate programs may not count as a traditional degree, but many of these programs are short at only a few weeks or a few months and can have a significant return on investment. Associates programs are typically 2-year degrees, while Bachelor’s programs offer a 4-year degree. Master’s programs are most commonly 2-3 years schooling after a Bachelor’s, such as a South Carolina online MBA. A few Ph.D. programs are also available online, although this selection is more limited for your South Carolina online degree.

How Can I Save Money?

Online degree programs in South Carolina can provide a lower cost to students than regional public institutions or community colleges. It would be a poor description to say that the education quality is cheap, but the tuition and schooling costs definitely feel like cheap online colleges in South Carolina when it comes to your budget. Just think of some of the simple ways you save money — like not paying the cost of car and gas for commute, not including dorm living and food costs. Tuition for in-state college is only 40% of the cost of a 4-year degree and only 20% of the total cost of a 2-year degree for traditional attendance. That means online students have the opportunity to gain savings in 60-80% of the costs on-campus students must spend, while still gaining the benefit of online tuition in many places.

Online students are often also working students, hoping to not sacrifice income to further their education. Many jobs will also provide an employer reimbursement program for tuition expenses. This may be especially true if you are considering a program such as those offered at online technical colleges in South Carolina, where your degree may be directly applicable to your current career, for example as a dental assistant, transcriptionist, or electrical apprentice.

Are there Public Online Colleges?

You’ve probably heard about the dangers of for-profit colleges in the news. While it’s true that many for-profit universities offer online degrees with a bad reputation, fortunately, there are also many public online programs. Public programs are often part of not-for-profit school systems and have strong reputations. As technology has evolved, so too has most school offerings so that now many of the brick and mortar schools have additional online programs. U.S. News and World Report list many reputable online programs nationwide. The key is to look for accredited online colleges in South Carolina. Accreditation means that a school has met specific quality criteria including academic standards and adequate training in your field. This guarantee of quality is also a good indicator that employers will value your degree once completed.

Specifically, in South Carolina, there are some great online accredited schools. With many programs geared towards South Carolina tech work like Samsung, many of these online programs can yield a degree in a high-paying career such as software development. Check out programs at the University of South Carolina, where you might major in elementary education or get your online masters in information technology. Consider Charleston Southern University for a certification in supply chain management and enjoy online career counseling services via Skype. While there are many to choose from, another great choice for South Carolina locals in Limestone College. Get an associate’s degree in business administration and enjoy a vibrant online job board to help better position you for post-school success.

South Carolina offers a large number of affordable online degree programs for residents. Gain the benefits of your local community with a nationally accredited degree. Continue your career growth no matter what stage of life with one of these quality programs.

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