Business – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu Thu, 11 Mar 2021 22:42:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://today.citadel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Citadel-Favion-new-150x150.png Business – The Citadel Today https://today.citadel.edu 32 32 144096890 Remembering Col. Robert S. Adden, The Citadel Class of ’44 https://today.citadel.edu/remembering-col-robert-s-adden-the-citadel-class-of-44/ Sat, 13 Mar 2021 11:00:47 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=22655 Col. Bob Adden, The CitadelCol. Bob Adden, The CitadelAs seen on Jhenrystuhr.tributes.com Robert S. Adden, 98, a long time resident of Charleston, passed away peacefully on March 6, 2021 after a brief hospitalization in Reston, Virginia. Born January 1, 1923]]> Col. Bob Adden, The CitadelCol. Bob Adden, The Citadel

As seen on Jhenrystuhr.tributes.com

Robert S. Adden, 98, a long time resident of Charleston, passed away peacefully on March 6, 2021 after a brief hospitalization in Reston, Virginia. Born January 1, 1923 in Orangeburg, South Carolina to the late Mary Elizabeth Heggie Adden and John Augustus Adden. His father died months before he was born and he was raised lovingly, along with his siblings “Toots” and Jack, by his mother during the difficult Depression era.

He attended The Citadel as a member of the Class of 1944, of which the entire class was called to active duty following their Junior Year. He served as a 2nd lieutenant in World War II with the 84th Infantry Division and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with Combat V, a Purple Heart and the Combat Infantry Badge. He was severely wounded in combat in November 1944 in Prummern, Germany, attributing his life being saved by God’s hand causing his dog tags to deflect a machine gun bullet that was directed towards his heart. He was discharged from the Army in 1946.

He graduated from The Citadel in 1947 as the first honor graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. Two days later he began his teaching career at The Citadel, leaving the college only for a short time to earn his Master of Business Administration from the Wharton School of Business and his Doctor of Philosophy in Economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While at Chapel Hill he met the love of his life, Norma Sue Sligh, and they married on December 27, 1953.

He enjoyed teaching accounting and taxation. He served as the Head of the Business Administration Department at The Citadel from 1962-1982, during which time he was instrumental in launching the Master of Business Administration and the evening undergraduate programs at what is now the School of Business Administration. He retired as Professor Emeritus in 1985. The Citadel recognized his service to the school awarding him the coveted Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award in 1984; an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Humane Letters in 2008; and the School of Business Alumnus of the Year Award in 2011. He and Sue were loyal supporters of Citadel athletics, rarely missing any home football, basketball or baseball game and listening on the radio to many of the away games.

He was a faithful Lutheran who proudly donated to the church. When his older brother Jack (USMC) gave him $100 that he had won playing poker in the South Pacific during WW II, he donated the money to the Orangeburg Lutheran Church. He taught an adult Sunday School Class for more than 50 years at St. John’s Lutheran Church, served on its Vestry and was a former President of the Vestry. He was also a lifetime member of the Salvation Army Advisory Board and a member of the Charleston Rotary Club.

Surviving are his wife of 67 years, Norma Sue Sligh Adden; daughter, Carolyn Elizabeth Rose and her husband Col. Michael G. Rose (USA, Ret) of Herndon, VA; son, Robert S. Adden, Jr. and his wife Kimetha Hunt Adden of Charlotte, NC; daughter, Virginia Sue Barrett and her husband Hazle Barrett of Camden, SC; four grandchildren, Robert Anthony Adden, Daniel Spencer Adden (Kayla), Caroline Jordan Christian (Jack) and Thomas Caldwell Jordan; four great-grandchildren, Mary Caroline Christian, Eleanor Christian, John Christian and Frances Christian and many loving nieces and nephews.

“He had such a calm sweet spirit & will be missed by many. “

Remembrance by family friend Mike Wiggins

“Col. Adden was a great accounting teacher during my years at the Citadel. He was kind and caring to the cadets. His quality as a man is undisputed. He supported the Citadel in many ways after his retirement. You could see him at basketball, baseball, and football games cheering on his team. God Bless his family and many friends.”

Roy DeHaven, ’81

Leave a remembrance about Col. Adden here.

J. Henry Stuhr, Inc. Downtown Chapel is serving the family. Due to Covid-19 restrictions, a memorial service will be held at St. John’s Lutheran Church at a date to be determined.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial donations be made to The Citadel Foundation Class of 1944 Scholarship Fund, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston, SC 29409 or to St. John’s Lutheran Church, 5 Clifford St., Charleston, SC 29401.

Read more about Col. Robert “Bob” Adden in this story by The Post and Courier

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Citadel alum calls in Chick-fil-A manager to help a drive-thru Covid-19 vaccination clinic https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-alum-calls-in-chick-fil-a-manager-to-help-a-drive-thru-covid-19-vaccination-clinic/ Sat, 13 Feb 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21836 When a drive-thru COVID vaccine clinic left people waiting for hours, the town mayor called in a professional for help: a Chick-fil-A manager.]]>

Note: Mayor Will Haynie (photo left), a member of The Citadel Class of 1983 who earned a Business Administration degree, was elected mayor of Mount Pleasant in 2017.

As seen on CNN, by Alaa Elassar

When a South Carolina drive-thru coronavirus vaccine clinic got backed up, leaving people waiting for hours, the town mayor decided to call in a professional for help: a Chick-fil-A manager.

Local hospitals in Mount Pleasant opened the clinic on January 22 for residents eligible to receive the first shots of Covid-19 vaccine. But shortly after the drive-thru opened, the computer system handling registrations went down, causing hundreds of people to wait in heavy traffic.

That’s when Jerry Walkowiak, the manager of a nearby Chick-fil-A, stepped in to save the day.

“When I heard about it, I called Jerry and asked if he would come help us out,” Mount Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie told CNN. “After he looked it over, he said, ‘There’s your problem right there. It’s backed up because you have one person checking people in.’ Then he showed us how to do it right.”

With the help of a few additional volunteers, Walkowiak transformed the messy traffic jam into a smooth operation, reducing the hours-long wait to just 15 minutes.

More than 1,000 people received the vaccine that day, Haynie said. When everyone returns for their second dose on February 12, Walkowiak will be back to help manage the drive-thru.

“At Chick-fil-A, we’re about being the most caring company in the world, and when Mayor Haynie asked us to come over, we took a look at what was their drive-thru system,” Walkowiak told news station WCBD.

“We saw a little hiccup in their drive-thru system, and we needed some more people, so we gathered some of the wonderful Rotary volunteers and went down there and just was able to expedite the registration part.”

More than 29 million doses of Covid-19 vaccines have been administered in the United States, according to data published Saturday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

While the US still has a long way to go before the pandemic is over, Haynie hopes his town’s experience will encourage others to get vaccinated and help with vaccine efforts.

“Jerry got a phone call and dropped everything because he knows getting this vaccine out is a game changer,” Haynie said. “This is what the light at the end of the long Covid tunnel looks like.”

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Citadel professor receives Army commission to restart new ‘Monuments Men’ mission https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-professor-receives-army-commission-to-restart-new-monuments-men-mission/ Mon, 01 Feb 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21750 James Bezjian has been accepted into the Army’s new project to revive a historic unit to safeguard cultural icons, artwork and artifacts.]]>

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Thomas Novelly

James Bezjian has always loved history. 

And as a former officer in the volunteer-only South Carolina State Guard, he’s always felt compelled to serve the community. 

So when Bezjian, a professor at The Citadel, was told he was accepted into the Army’s new project to revive a historic unit to safeguard cultural icons, artwork and artifacts, he felt like it was the answer to a lifelong calling. 

“It’s so vitally important to preserve as much of history as possible so that the narrative of history doesn’t get lost or twisted in the process,” Bezjian said. “Once this stuff is gone, it’s gone.”

The Pentagon unveiled the revival of the Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives program this fall during an announcement at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

It mirrors one of the most prolific World War II units — the team of history, art and culture experts dubbed the “Monuments Men” that saved European icons taken by Nazi Germany. 

The unit of more than 300 people was active for eight years during and after the war. They tracked down an estimated 4 million pieces of valuables, artwork and other trinkets that were taken or stashed by German soldiers. Two members of the group died during their mission.

The team became part of the 2014 big-screen hit “The Monuments Men” starring George Clooney, Matt Damon, John Goodman and Charleston resident Bill Murray. 

Bezjian, a business professor at the military college based in downtown Charleston, specializes in teaching students about entrepreneurship and cultural preservation.

He received word he would be commissioned in early March, before the global pandemic hit. He will become a captain in the Army Reserves along with more than 30 other academics and military officers. 

“They wanted to create this group of military government specialists, such as people trained in preservation, curation and protection techniques, to get them commissioned as the new monuments officers unit,” Bezjian said. 

James Bezjian Innovation Lab
Citadel assistant professor James Bezjian uses a 3D scanner to create a digital copy of a bird statue on Friday, January 12, 2018. Students in Bezjian’s class used the scanners to copy artifacts at the Charleston Museum and the Airborne & Special Operations Museum. (Courtesy: Brad Nettles, The Post and Courier)

The new group has a goal similar to the original unit and is composed of commissioned officers from the Army Reserve as well as civilians outside the armed forces with certain academic specializations. They’ll be based at the Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command at Fort Bragg, N.C. 

War doesn’t just claim lives, it can also turn historic sites to rubble in moments. 

Bombs can level ancient architecture, valuable military equipment from an important mission can be set aside as scrap, and priceless artwork can become worthless after a single firefight. 

The revamped Monuments Men will help war-torn nations preserve their cultural artifacts. Additionally, the new group will also aim to inform the Department of Defense and allies which significant sites should be spared from airstrikes and invasions. It also hopes to curb looting.

It’s an important mission for the Army and the Smithsonian. 

“In conflict, the destruction of monuments and the looting of art are not only about the loss of material things, but also about the erasure of history, knowledge and a people’s identity,” Richard Kurin, an anthropologist at the Smithsonian, said during the announcement that the unit was being renewed. 

The team will not be deployed full time, but will be assigned to tasks as they arise. It could include going to war zones. 

Bezjian has been working to inspire a love for history and preservation among the Corps of Cadets. 

In February, Bezjian traveled to Fort Bragg with two students to help preserve artifacts at the U.S. Army Airborne & Special Operations Museum. Using state-of-the-art 3D scanning technology, they created digital replicas of historic war artifacts. 

One piece The Citadel students preserved was an Army-issued M1 steel helmet worn by Walker Kirtland Hancock, one of the original Monuments Men team members. 

Bezjian will continue to keep his job at The Citadel while working with the Monuments Men unit, and hopes to inspire students into military careers that follow in his culture-protection footprints. 

“My goal is to eventually create a training program at The Citadel where we can directly commission students into this unit,” Bezjian said. “I want to create a pipeline for students to these types of preservation jobs.”

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An inside look at The Citadel’s soon-to-be-completed new business school, Bastin Hall https://today.citadel.edu/an-inside-look-at-the-citadels-soon-to-be-completed-new-business-school-bastin-hall/ Sat, 30 Jan 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21717 The new Bastin Hall provides a glimpse into what a contemporary, 21st-century learning environment can look like.]]>

As seen in The Post and Courier

After more than two years of construction, a new home for The Citadel’s business school is ready to welcome students and professors.

Bastin Hall, which houses the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business, is the first new academic building constructed on the public military school’s campus in 30 years.

The 44,000-square-foot building was built with students in mind, said Michael Weeks, dean of the business school.

Everything from the fluid architectural design to the type of furniture used in classrooms was specially designed to build creative and collaborative spaces for students to work and study.

“It’s really, we think, going to be transformative for the educational experience for the students,” Weeks said.

Bastin Hall now hosts some of the college’s most popular degree programs. Of the 2,400 members in the Corps of Cadets, close to 600 are majoring in business. Another 375 Citadel students are pursuing a Master of Business Administration degree or are enrolled in a business administration degree completion program within the school.

While the finishing touches are still being put in place, the first round of classes was held inside the building Monday. It is expected to be completed in two weeks, with an opening ceremony to come in April.

The $25 million building sits near the intersection of Hagood Avenue and Congress Street, across the road from the school’s football stadium and alumni center.

It stands as one of the college’s most welcoming features on campus.

Once inside the main entrance, visitors are greeted with a large common area/collaborative workspace, complete with floor-to-ceiling windows and an abundance of natural light. A circular stock ticker hangs from the tall ceiling, a colorful array of numbers flashing across its surface.

The new Bastin Hall building is a modern upgrade from the previous business school home. Originally constructed in 1922, Bond Hall has housed business school classrooms since the 1970s. “There’s a lot of state-of-the-art space here that we just didn’t have in our old building,” Weeks said.

21st-century classrooms

The new Bastin Hall provides a glimpse into what a contemporary, 21st-century learning environment can look like.

Most of the new classrooms are equipped with dual laser projectors which have a much faster startup/shutoff time than their traditional counterparts, said Conyers Bull, the school’s multimedia services manager.

The rooms also include dual touch-screen computer monitors, Bull said, meaning that faculty don’t have to turn their back on students while teaching. If they want to write something on the board, they can use a stylus to write on the touch screen.

But one of the most highly anticipated pieces of technology is the building’s professional selling lab.

At first glance, this space might look like a traditional Bastin Hall classroom, with dozens of desks and corresponding portable whiteboards. Before the onset of the global coronavirus pandemic, these whiteboards would be stored beside students’ chairs but have since been converted into makeshift virus-blocking partitions.

Inside the sales lab there are several cameras mounted from the ceiling. Professors can use a special software to connect to cameras and microphones in nearby breakout rooms, where they can observe in real time mock sales pitches and role-playing exercises.

They can even provide feedback or advice over the speakers remotely from their position in the main lab.

This type of technology is a game changer in more ways than one, said Dr. Bob Riggle, who heads the marketing, supply chain management and economics department.

In addition to sales training, the lab can be used to teach interview skills or conflict-resolution training.

“It’s really state of the art,” Riggle said. “This is the best that you can get that’s on the market right now.”

Riggle taught his first course inside the new building on Monday.

“The feedback from the students was phenomenal. They were really excited,” he said. “This is the kind of thing that they need to kind of break through to the next level.”

A lasting legacy

Rick Bastin, a 1965 graduate of The Citadel, remembers what his business classes were like in Bond Hall.

“While I was there, we didn’t have air conditioning I don’t think. We had open windows,” he said.

While he reflects on his time there and his professors fondly, Bastin has been impressed to see how much the college has transformed in the time since he was on campus.

When he was a cadet, calculators were just in their infancy.

“We used to have to go to tables and books and figure all those things out and now it’s all at your fingertips,” he said.

Today, more than 50 years after Bastin was a student himself, the Florida resident is looking forward to eventually seeing the new business school building named in his honor.

The state-of-the-art facility was made possible because of a more than $6 million gift provided by Bastin and his wife, Mary Lee, through The Citadel Foundation.

Their family has supported the college for years, previously supplying funds to create the Bastin Financial Lab. The space has since been renamed the Mary Lee and Rick Bastin, ’65, Financial Trading Lab, and serves as one of the main focal points of the new business school building.

In addition to the Bastins, more than 50 other individuals, families, businesses and Citadel classes provided donations to help fund the new business school building. 

Bastin said he hopes the creation of a new building will help The Citadel attract highly skilled professors who might not have otherwise joined the faculty.

“I want to see them stay on the cutting edge of technology and bring in faculty that’s very attuned to that,” he said.

In addition to the sales and finance labs, the new building features an advising center and an entrepreneurship-innovation lab. The new building also includes a rooftop balcony that can be used for large gatherings and events.

“All of these labs and all of this technology ties together, and so they can take their ideas and put them into practice,” Weeks said.

Cadet Taurus Brown, who attends The Citadel on an Air Force contract and is the head drillmaster for the Corps, said he’s been blown away not just by the new building but how far the business school has come since he first enrolled as a freshman.

“I just think it’s going to be a great place to be in the next couple years,” Brown said. “I’m glad to see the building up, and I will be so happy to come back and really see how much it’s changed.”

Bastin Hall’s design and construction was overseen by Liollio Architecture. THS Constructors served as the general contractor for the project. 

The Post and Courier: A tour of The Citadel’s new Baker School of Business building

Please visit The Post and Courier at this link to view the newspaper’s photo gallery of Bastin Hall.

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The Citadel unveils Bastin Hall, a new way to do business https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-unveils-bastin-hall-a-new-way-to-do-business/ https://today.citadel.edu/the-citadel-unveils-bastin-hall-a-new-way-to-do-business/#comments Wed, 27 Jan 2021 14:30:25 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21640 Exterior of Citadel's Bastin HallExterior of Citadel's Bastin HallBastin Hall, with its fluid architectural design, high-tech classrooms and fresh approach to conveying the college’s iconic architecture is a learning complex that now reflects the exemplary quality of the business education The Citadel provides.]]> Exterior of Citadel's Bastin HallExterior of Citadel's Bastin Hall

Bastin Hall is open for business.

That statement is even truer than it sounds. Bastin Hall, The Citadel’s first academic building to be constructed in three decades – is the gleaming new home for the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business (BSB).

With the finishing touches being put in place as the spring 2021 semester gets underway, Bastin Hall now houses some of the college’s most popular programs. Close to 600 cadets are majoring in business and approximately 375 Citadel Graduate College students are pursuing a Master of Business Administration or completing undergraduate degrees with the BSB.

Scenes from the first day of classes in Bastin Hall, the first new academic building on campus in three decades, at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, January 25, 2021.

“Bastin Hall, with its fluid architectural design, collaborative spaces, high-tech classrooms and fresh approach to conveying the college’s iconic architecture is a learning complex that now reflects the exemplary quality of the business education The Citadel provides,” said The Citadel President, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.). “Bastin Hall, thanks to the remarkable generosity of Rick and Mary Lee Bastin, will for generations serve the needs of future entrepreneurs and business leaders who specifically seek out The Citadel as the place to attain a business education.”

Located on Hagood Avenue and linking the main campus to the football stadium, Bastin Hall now stands as one of the college’s most welcoming features. The BSB faculty moved into Bastin Hall in January from Bond Hall, where The Citadel’s business school was located for many years.

Bastin Hall, at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, January 25, 2021

The building blocks of Bastin Hall

The state-of-the-art facility was made possible because of a more than $6 million gift provided by Rick Bastin, The Citadel Class of 1965, and his wife Mary Lee, through The Citadel Foundation (TCF). The Bastins have long supported The Citadel, previously supplying funds to create the Bastin Financial Lab in the BSB’s old location. Re-named The Mary Lee and Rick Bastin, ’65, Financial Trading Lab, the facility is now a focal point of the new building.

Mary Lee and Rick Bastin addressing guests at the groundbreaking for Bastin
Mary Lee and Rick Bastin addressing guests at the groundbreaking for Bastin Hall in 2017

“After several years in the works, it is exciting to see Bastin Hall become a reality this semester as the new home of the Baker School of Business,” said Rick Bastin, ’65, in a statement sent from his home in Florida. “State-of-the-art spaces such as the Financial Trading Lab and the Entrepreneur Lab will help the college recruit and retain a faculty of leading scholars and business professionals. It is my hope that future generations of Citadel cadets, evening undergraduates, and MBA students will benefit from this innovative space as they learn to become principled business leaders who achieve success in their field and give back to their communities.”

In addition to the Bastins, more than 50 other individuals, families, businesses and Citadel classes provided the substantial donations needed to fully realize the vision for the building through TCF. Plaques located throughout Bastin Hall will recognize the areas funded by their individual gifts, such as the Darby Family Lobby, in recognition of the Georgia and John Darby Family, ’85; the Jimmy Kerr, ’65, and Bunny Kerr Family Rooftop Terrace; and the Class of 1977 Great Lawn.

Scenes from the first day of classes in Bastin Hall, at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Monday, January 25, 2021.

Special features

Bastin Hall is approximately 44,000-square-feet. In addition to top-of-the-line technology-equipped classrooms, gathering spaces, breakout rooms, and academic offices, some of the building’s other notable features include the following:

  • Advising Center
  • Financial Services Center
  • Entrepreneurship-Innovation Lab
  • Professional Selling Lab
  • Large commons area
  • Balcony commons area
Cadet Taurus Brown, a senior majoring in Accounting, and the head Drillmaster for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, attending class for the first time in Bastin Hall, January 25, 2021.

“It’s amazing how much a new building can affect the feel of an entire academic program,” said Cadet Taurus Brown, an Accounting major, who attends The Citadel on a U.S. Air Force contract and is the head Drillmaster for the Corps. “We are all energized by being in Bastin Hall for our classes and labs, and to socialize and meet with like-minded students – which, despite the pandemic, we are able to do there. The new building’s large spaces enable us to get together safely, with social distancing to collaborate on class projects.”

Additionally, the building features a Student Success Suite with significant resources for all students including those pursing degrees through The Citadel Graduate College.

Dr. Michael Weeks, dean of the Baker School of Business, walks Bastin Hall checking on final touches being put into place on Monday, January 25, 2021.

“We are excited about the possibilities in this new building,” said Michael R. Weeks, Ph.D., USAF (Ret.), dean of the BSB. “In addition to a state-of-the-art finance lab, we also have a remarkable sales training lab in the building for our new Marketing and Business Development majors. Moreover, we are confident that the collaborative spaces in this building will transform the educational experience for our students.”

Liollio Architecture partnered with The Citadel to design and construct Bastin Hall. THS Constructors served as the general contractor for the project. Through a coincidence benefitting this bold new enterprise, the company connects The Citadel’s long-standing engineering and business legacies – the THS chairman and founder, Howard Suitt, graduated from The Citadel with a Civil Engineering degree in 1948, and company’s the senior vice president, Tom Suitt, earned a Business Administration degree from The Citadel in 1974.

About the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business

The Tommy & Victoria Baker School of Business develops innovative leaders of principle to serve a global community. The school is accredited by AACSB International and is a recognized leader in business education. 

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Citadel online MBA program ranked among top 100 nationally https://today.citadel.edu/citadel-online-mba-program-ranked-among-top-100-nationally/ Tue, 26 Jan 2021 22:33:39 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21678 According to U.S. News & World Report, The Citadel’s online Master of Business Administration program is one of the Top 100 in the nation.]]>

And Baker School of Business ranks in top 20 for Online Business Bachelor’s Program

Before the global pandemic made it a somewhat common part of life, the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business (BSB) knew that online learning is vital to increase and expand the business education of the state’s and nation’s workforce.

Now, according to U.S. News & World Report, The Citadel’s online Master of Business Administration (MBA) program is one of the Top 100 in the nation.

This continues the tradition of U.S. News & World Report ranking The Citadel’s online MBA as best in the state and as one of the best in the nation; last year, the MBA program was ranked at #102.

“We’re very excited to crack the Top 100 in U.S. News & World Report,” said Michael Weeks, Ph.D., dean of the BSB. “Most of those schools in the Top 100 are very large, research-focused institutions, so for a smaller, teaching-focused institution to be included in the Top 100 is something we’re very proud of.”

The convenience of distance learning allows working professionals and military service members, both in and outside of South Carolina, to earn an MBA without affecting their occupations.

The online benefits of the BSB are not limited to the graduate students. According to U.S. News, The Citadel also earned a place in the Top 20 for online Business Bachelor’s programs.

One of the key indicators that U.S. News & World Report uses to rank online programs is “Faculty Credentials and Training,” which measures how well an institution prepares instructors to teach remotely.

Out of 100 possible points, the BSB earned a 98 for the MBA program and a 99 for the bachelor’s program.

“This is the first year that the rankings have included a specific designation for online Business bachelor’s programs,” explained Jeremy Bennett, Ph.D., the director of BSB Graduate and College Transfer programs. “It was all made possible thanks to our outstanding faculty, staff and students – not to mention our partnering two-year schools.”

The BSB has agreements with dozens of two-year colleges – as far away as Colorado – which enable business students at those partner schools to seamlessly transfer their credits to The Citadel and earn a bachelor’s degree from a top-ranked institution, all from their own homes, without the need to move out of their communities.”

The rankings released in January are limited to non-cadet student programs, since cadets studying in the business school take their classes on campus, in-person. Almost 600 cadets are majoring in business, and approximately 375 students in The Citadel Graduate College are pursuing an MBA or completing an undergraduate degree with the BSB.

The Tommy & Victoria Baker School of Business develops innovative leaders of principle to serve a global community. The school is accredited by AACSB International and is a recognized leader in business education. 

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Remembering Air Florida Flight 90 hero, Arland Williams Jr., Citadel Class of 1957 https://today.citadel.edu/remembering-air-florida-flight-90-hero-arland-williams-jr-citadel-class-of-1957/ Tue, 12 Jan 2021 21:08:28 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=21265 Painted portrait of Arland D. Williams Jr. Citadel Class of 1957 on The Citadel campusPainted portrait of Arland D. Williams Jr. Citadel Class of 1957 on The Citadel campusFor months...we knew him only as the unknown hero. When the challenge came, Arland D. Williams Jr., Class of 1957, was ready.]]> Painted portrait of Arland D. Williams Jr. Citadel Class of 1957 on The Citadel campusPainted portrait of Arland D. Williams Jr. Citadel Class of 1957 on The Citadel campus

The story behind “the man who passed the rope” saving the lives of his fellow passengers 38 years ago

On January 13, 1982, Arland Dean Williams Jr. boarded Air Florida Flight 90 not knowing it would be his last flight, the last day of his life and that he would be declared a hero by the President of the United States.

Williams graduated from The Citadel in 1957, an Oscar Company sergeant and Business Administration major who loved intermural sports and was known by his high school nickname of “Chub.”

A native of Illinois, Williams served in the military for two years after graduating and went on to become a Federal Reserve Bank examiner.

But severe winter weather caused Air Florida Flight 90 to crash into the icy, 30-feet deep Potomac River as it was nearing Washington D.C. According to historic records, the impact killed 73 of the 79 passengers. Williams was one of six who initially survived, helping the other five escape the sinking wreckage.

What happened to “the man in the water” in the words of a witness

Photo: U.S. Parks Service photo of the Florida Flight 90 rescue effort on the Potomac River

A video just removed from YouTube this week included a description of how the rescue played out, told by chopper rescue crew member Gene Windsor. The narrator and Windsor describe how five of the survivors were pulled out the the water by rope, one at a time.

(Narrator) The helicopter team attempted one final rescue. The the sixth survivor, Arland D. Williams has been in the wreckage since the plane crashed. If you look closely you can see his hands in these dramatic pictures.

(Windsor) He said he couldn’t get out, that he was pinned, that his seatbelt had him or somethings was holding him there.

Photo: Windsor standing on rung of the rescue chopper, pulling a survivor from the water. U.S. Parks Service photo of the Florida Flight 90 rescue effort on the Potomac River

(Narrator) Williams was handed the rope, and three times he “unselfishly passed it on to someone else.

(Windsor) It took great courage to pass it off, and I wanted repay his courage.

(Narrator) Arland Williams had survived the crash, but drowned before he could be rescued.

(Winsdor) When the mission was over I called my wife and I said there was a sixth man. And I told her we couldn’t rescue him. And with that the tears flowed.

As seen in The Washington Post: Mystery Hero Of Air Crash Is Identified

By John Burgess and Washington Post Staff Writer David Hoffman

June 7, 1983

President Reagan announced yesterday that a 46-year-old bank examiner from Atlanta was the “mystery hero” of last year’s Air Florida crash — the man who passed a lifeline to others before drowning in the ice-covered Potomac River.

The president disclosed that a Coast Guard investigation determined that Arland D. Williams Jr., an employee of the Federal Reserve system, “was the hero who gave his life that others might live.

“You can live with tremendous pride. . . ,” Reagan told Williams’ parents and his two children as he posthumously awarded Williams the Coast Guard’s Gold Lifesaving Medal at a ceremony in the Oval Office.

Read the complete article here.

More on President Ronald Regan’s remembrance of Williams in 1993 in Charleston

Below is an excerpt of Reagan’s 60-minute commence address to the South Carolina Corps of Cadets’ Class of 1993. Then the 40th President of the United States, Mr. Reagan paid tribute to Williams by recognizing him as an example of courage others should follow.

But for me, there is one name that will always come to mind whenever I think of The Citadel and the Corps of Cadets. It is a name that appears in no military histories; its owner won no glory on the field of battle.

No, his moment of truth came not in combat, but on a snow-driven, peacetime day in the nation’s capital in January of 1982. That is the day that the civilian airliner, on which he was a passenger, crashed into a Washington bridge, then plunged into the rough waters of the icy Potomac.

… News cameramen, watching helplessly, recorded the scene as the man in the water repeatedly handed the rope to the others, refusing to save himself until the first one, then two, then three and four and finally five of his fellow passengers had been rescued. But when the helicopter returned for one final trip, the trip that would rescue the man who passed the rope, it was too late. He had slipped at last beneath the waves with the sinking wreckage –the only one of 79 fatalities in the disaster who lost his life after the accident itself.

For months thereafter, we knew him only as the “unknown hero.” And then an exhaustive Coast Guard investigation conclusively established his identity. Many of you here today know his name well, as I do, for his portrait now hangs with honor –as it indeed should –on this very campus: the campus where he once walked, as you have, through the Summerall Gate and along the Avenue of Remembrance. He was a young first classman with a crisp uniform and a confident stride on a bright spring morning, full of hopes and plans for the future. He never dreamed that his life’s supreme challenge would come in its final moments, some 25 years later, in the bone-chilling waters of an ice-strewn river and surrounded by others who desperately needed help.

But when the challenge came, he was ready.

His name was Arland D. Williams, Jr., The Citadel Class of 1957. He brought honor to his alma mater, and honor to his nation. I was never more proud as President than on that day in June 1983 when his parents and his children joined me in the Oval Office, for then I was able, on behalf of the nation, to pay posthumous honor to him.

I have spoken of Arland Williams today in part to honor him anew in your presence, here at this special institution that helped mold his character. It is the same institution that has now put its final imprint on you, the graduating seniors of its 150th year.

Ronald Wilson Reagan, 40th President of the United States of America

Read the full transcript of President Ronald Regan’s speech to the South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 1993 in The Citadel Digital Archives here, or watch the speech on C-SPAN.com here.

How The Citadel continues to honor Arland D. Williams Jr.

The Citadel continues to honor Williams in three ways.

His portrait is still displayed on campus, in the Department of Psychology office. In addition, every three years a professor in the department is selected for the Arland D. Williams Jr. Professorship in Heroism. The Class of 1957 endowed this professorship, which provides a stipend for research each of the three years a professor serves in Williams’s name. In 2021 it is Alexandra Macdonald, Ph.D.

And, the Arland D. Williams Jr. Society, formed in 2000, is managed by The Citadel Alumni Association to honor other Citadel alumni who perform acts of extreme heroism. The criteria states that nominees must have “made significant contributions while acting in the noblest, bravest and laudable manner while placing the well-being of others before themselves.” Examples of those inducted into the Society include David Goff, ’78, for saving the life of a man on a bridge while on duty for the Richland County Sheriff’s Department, and Tom Hall, ’89, for saving a person trapped in a car in rising flood waters in 2015 along with the help of his family.

More information about the Society can be obtained, or nominations sent, to info@citadelalumni.org.

The Arland D. Williams Jr. Bridge, Washington, D.C.

The Arland D. Williams Jr. Memorial Bridge on the Potomac River now houses an art project in it’s historic Light Tender’s House. Also known as the 14th Street Bridge, the former drawbridge once served as the entry gateway to Washington D.C.
Photo courtesy of WAMU.org.

Listen to, or read a story about the art project and the bridge’s history here.

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Six generations of Workmans and a wakeup https://today.citadel.edu/six-generations-of-workmans-and-a-wakeup/ Sat, 26 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20940 Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)When Billy Workman matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina.]]> Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)Knob Billy Workman, a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, poses for a portrait at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Photo by Dashawn Costley / The Citadel)

By Cadet Merritt Reeves, The Citadel Class of 2022
Historic photos provided by The Citadel Archives and Museum

Photo above: Cadet-recruit William Douglas Workman V, The Citadel Class of 2024, a sixth generation Citadel cadet, poses for a portrait on campus on November 20, 2020.

When Billy Workman of Orangeburg matriculated in August of 2020, he was simply echoing the Workman family tradition. He was after all the sixth in a line of William Douglas Workmans to attend the Military College of South Carolina, a father-son tradition that dates all the way back to the late 19th century and his great-great-great-grandfather.

Billy’s full name: William Douglas Workman V.

In 1882, The Citadel resumed operations after closing its gates for 17 years after the Civil War. In that year, William Douglas Workman enrolled along with over a 100 other cadets. An 1886 graduate, he was the first of Billy’s ancestors to attend the college.

The second William Douglas Workman in the family line was William Douglas Workman Sr. who graduated from The Citadel in 1909 and was valedictorian of his class.

1909

William Workman Sr. was also the second, and the last, Workman to attend The Citadel before it moved from Marion Square campus to its current location on the Ashley River. Billy’s great-aunt, Dee Benedict, talked about her grandfather’s service during World War I.

 “If you look at my grandfather, he really was an absolute hero of the bunch,” said Benedict. “Back when South Carolina was in its own brigade, he led the charge and broke the back of the Germans.”

Dee Benedict, Billy Workman’s great aunt discussing William Douglas Workman Sr.

In 1935, William Douglas Workman Jr., Billy’s great-grandfather, graduated from The Citadel after holding the rank of battalion commander.

1935

In that year, the Corps numbered 89 cadets who were split into two battalions. William Workman Jr. was Benedict’s grandfather and, according to her, he served in North Africa during World War II. “After the war, he stayed in the reserves,” said Benedict, “He ran for the United States Senate against a newspaper man in Columbia and had 46% of the vote, which was amazing. There were a bunch of people who would get fired because they supported him which made it almost like a revival thing. Although he lost the race, that was the start of the Republican Party in South Carolina.”

Billy’s grandfather, William Douglas Workman III, graduated from The Citadel after serving as first sergeant in Tango Company. A 1961 graduate, he attended the college before it was integrated in 1966.

William Douglas Workman III, The Citadel Class of 1961

Billy’s father, Will (William Douglas Workman IV), who has a cotton ginning business in Orangeburg, was the last of the Workmans to attend The Citadel before the college turned co-ed. 

William Douglas Workman IV, '89
William Douglas Workman IV, ’89

He graduated in 1989 with the self-proclaimed title “centurion.” Known for his sense of humor, Will paid for this comedic streak throughout his years as a cadet with hundreds of tours. These punishments, however, hardly dimmed Will’s mischievous spirit.  According to Billy, he is still a jokester.  “He’s a pretty laid back guy,” said Billy, “but my going to The Citadel has loosened him up even more, and I can relate to him better.”

Doing what only felt natural, Billy is expected to graduate in 2024 with a Business Administration degree. After decades of forefathers who roamed the grounds of The Citadel, Billy finally joined the long line of Cadet Workmans. “Billy always had a choice on whether or not he would go to The Citadel,” said Will, “but when he decided he wanted to go for himself, it made me really proud. I was happy that the tradition wasn’t ending with me.”

William Douglas Workman V,
a sixth generation Citadel Cadet, who goes by Billy, posting for a portrait
at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina on November 20, 2020.

The Workman family has seen the college through time and progress. Like Billy’s Citadel COVID-19 on campus freshman year, each generation has had difference experiences, but one thing remains constant—the lasting bond between alumni and college. With five generations before him, Billy feels a familial expectation, but he waits in earnest to fulfill this role and dreams even of continuing the legacy one day with a seventh William Douglas Workman.

Cadet Merritt Reeves is an intern in the Office of Communications and Marketing. A junior majoring in English with a Spanish minor, she has earned Gold Stars for academic excellence. After graduation, she plans to return to her home town of Columbia, South Carolina and attend law school.

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Past and future meet in a plastic present https://today.citadel.edu/past-and-future-meet-in-a-plastic-present/ Fri, 18 Dec 2020 11:00:00 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20593 An interdisciplinary team from The Citadel, with the Gibbes Museum, is lifting the veil that separates the artistic from the technological.]]>

An interdisciplinary team from The Citadel, working with the Gibbes Museum of Art, is lifting the veil that separates the artistic from the technological.

The Veiled Lady — a masterful marble statue created by Pietro Rossi in 1882 — is one of the most well-known pieces of art in the Gibbes.

But the photo above is not of the Veiled Lady. Not the original one, at least.

Thanks to three departments on campus, and a 3D-printer company created by a former cadet called Evolve 3D, the priceless statue can now be recreated, anywhere, for less than a dollar.

Not only that, but the 3D-printed version of the statue can be touched, something that’s attractive to the museum’s everyday visitor and especially important for visually impaired guests.

“When I first saw the iconic Veiled Lady sculpture at the Gibbes Museum, I, like many, was drawn to the stunning textures of this intricately-carved marble,” said Tiffany Silverman, director of The Citadel Fine Arts program. “At the time, as a museum educator, I wished that everyone could have access to experience this artwork in a more tactile, immediate way. Fifteen years later, the perfect combination of talented colleagues and innovative technology has, at last, made this dream possible.” 

The Citadel Fine Arts Department, the Baker School of Business Innovation Lab, The Citadel Makerspace and Evolve 3D worked together to make the project possible — and to help make art more accessible outside of a museum.

Evolve 3D has its own interdisciplinary connections to The Citadel. The business (then called the Cambrian Project) was initially created as part of the annual Baker Business Bowl, a program aimed at helping budding entrepreneurs turn their ideas into income.

Though the team didn’t win the first or second place cash prizes, Ben Scott — the founder and CEO of Evolve 3D — says they earned something more valuable.

On the company’s website, he wrote:

“Countless hours of work, every night in the library, then the garage, studying business, writing/rewriting the business plan, working/reworking financial predictions, not going out on weekends, straining personal relationships for months, and still lost. I didn’t sleep for days following, but ironically, I think we still won. The lesson learned from that failure is worth a lot more than $10,000.”

Evolve 3D also loaned one of their beta printers, named Eve, to the museum which will use it to produce more 3D prints of art.

“This innovative and interdisciplinary partnership with The Citadel has proven to be an exciting way to engage our community with art and new technology,” said Sara Arnold, the director of cultural affairs at the Gibbes Museum of Art. “Our visitors are amazed to see the 3D printer in action at the Gibbes. Bridging art and technology opens a whole new world of creativity and accessibility and we are so grateful to Tiffany Silverman and The Citadel cadets who have shared their time and expertise with us.”

As part of the collaboration, James Bezjian, Ph.D, shared his groundbreaking use of a high-resolution 3D scanner that he uses to document artifacts. Dan Hawkins brought the technology of The Citadel’s Makerspace, including 3D printers. Scott — one of Bezjian’s students — started Evolve 3D along with Fine Arts minor — and one of Silverman’s students — Ethan Warner. The Gibbes Museum, current partner of The Citadel’s Fine Arts program, was looking for ways to increase access to their collection for both virtual and in-person audiences.

To that end, and thanks to the entire team involved, a 3D print of the Veiled Lady is also currently on display, waiting to greet visitors at the Charleston Area Convention and Visitors Bureau.

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Excellence in Leadership: Lt. Sarah Zorn https://today.citadel.edu/excellence-in-leadership-lt-sarah-zorn/ Tue, 08 Dec 2020 17:19:21 +0000 https://today.citadel.edu/?p=20611 Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Army leaders have strong intellect, physical presence, professional competence, high moral character, and serve as role models. Lt. Zorn has been recognized for her selfless care within the ‘Thunderbolt’ community.]]> Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)Photo By Capt. Ian Sandall | JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade)

As seen on DVIDSHub
Joint Base Lewis McChord, Washington
By Sgt. Casey Hustin, 17th Field Artillery Brigade

Photo above: Sarah Zorn is promoted to 1st. Lt. Dec. 3, 2020 at the ‘Black Knight’ Company Operations Facility. (US Army photo by Capt. Ian Sandall, 17th Field Artillery Brigade) 

JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Wash. — An Army Leader is anyone who by virtue of assumed role or assigned responsibility inspires and influences people to accomplish organizational goals— 1st. Lt. Sarah Zorn, who for the past six months has accomplished that and more within the 5th battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 17th Field Artillery Brigade, has her own idea of what makes a great Leader.

“You have to be competent; you have to be confident; you have to care—and a little common sense doesn’t hurt,” said 1st Lt. Sarah Zorn, an operations officer with Bravo Battery. “I feel like that philosophy kind of defines my leadership approach and who I want to be as a lieutenant.”

Zorn demonstrated her innate ability to pursue actions, focus thinking, and shape decisions for the greater good of the organization both in and outside the chain of command of the ‘Black Knight’ platoon.

“Lt. Zorn has filled the role as the headquarters platoon leader,” said Capt. Grayson Williams, Company Commander with B-Btry., 5th Bn., 3rd FAR. “She really just wants to see others succeed in her platoon. She just goes the extra mile to make sure that the platoon succeeds. Her ability to provide that insight and always the desire to learn has been instrumental in the success for the battery so far.”

From making history as the first female regimental commander at the Citadel for 2,300 cadets, to becoming a platoon leader of 20 soldiers, Lt. Zorn stays focused on doing the job at hand and doing it right.

“I think that transition from big picture to a little bit smaller picture really fundamentally is all the same,” said Zorn. “So—I come into work every day and I tell myself I’m just going to do the next right thing—whether it be the next right thing for soldiers, the next right thing for the battery—the next right thing for the team.”

Army leaders have strong intellect, physical presence, professional competence, high moral character, and serve as role models. Lt. Zorn has been recognized for her selfless care within the ‘Thunderbolt’ community.

“I’d like to highlight just how much genuine care she has for soldiers,” said Williams. “I know she has taken time out of her weekends to work on care packages for families with new babies in the battery. Lt. Zorn just wants to see the whole battery succeed, and really she shows this commitment as she volunteers her own time to really provide and deliver what the battery is asking for.”

Zorn said, “I would say to anyone who’s considering this or maybe anyone who is brand new and who is doubting themselves—this (the Army) is one of the most rewarding careers that you could ever have.”

The most successful Army Leaders, like Lt. Zorn, recognize that great organizations are built upon the mutual trust and confidence of our greatest assets—our people—who come together to accomplish peacetime and wartime missions—and so long as we continue to inspire leaders like Lt. Zorn to join us—we cannot fail.

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